Page 1

scad atlanta’s student magazine

WINTER 2010 | VOL. 2, NO. 2

WINTER 2 010


gpb.org

WATCH.

LEARN.

LISTEN.

GPB

GEORGIA’S HOME

FOR GREAT PROGAMMING

CHANNEL

ATLANTA

S CAN MAGAZINE


contents ns sitio n a r t and

ition trad , t b alen er Clu s talk t sign e e r t d u t hic den e ffer Cul to o Tim er grap he onal stu s T e t o th inn 06 rnati as l orth r your ah d W Inte a o s f n ook eads , Ca iing s t k 10 Br fine r s h elig y to Fou n n D ckberr m a ow b r la alis of its s e r r d 11 U the B u min sign S e m d s o r d F Goe as a bol op! t form h into P n tio 12 el ar es pira Reb hap nel ins S s hic han arie sion 16 Cdents c i v dia e tic f In Stu o cas 's artis s w nta rie ho nta Atla uxu l l D 20 S D Atla a A A nds ltur SC SC Tre the cu hop s d l r o rom into ith f 26 Wlimpse m t r S 'A dam Ag ct d bje artist A O 28 tured Fea

WINTER 2 010

01


contributors

Nandhini Mehra World Trends

Maheq Wadhwani World Trends

Joshua Holcombe Model, Cover

Amy Troche-Walsh Artwork, Cover

Chelsea Elisha Model, Chic Shapes

Andrew Phillips Photography, Chic Shapes

Michelle Napier Hair, Chic Shapes

Olamma Oparah Makeup, Chic Shapes

Daniel Barnes Illustration, Chic Shapes

Jamie Liles Photography, Showcase

Thomas Gaddis Makeup, Cover

Richard Goodwin Illustration, The Culture Club

1:03 PM

Jst 4 U @ SCAD

Yr ClothS 4 Cash Fnd QL ClothS 4 Gr8 prices!

Bring in your gently-used brand name clothes and we’ll pay you cash on the spot, then browse our gently-used inventory for the latest fashions.

Take this coupon to Plato’s Closet & get

25% off!

Offer good Atlanta/Loehman’s Plaza or Sandy Springs only *Limit one coupon per person. Expires 3/31/10

www.platosclosetatl-itp.com 2480 Briarcliff Rd. @ Loehman’s Plaza or 6627 Roswell Rd. in Sandy Springs

02

S CAN MAGAZINE


about the cover Photography If you could change anything about Sean Wright yourself, what would it be? Would you Makeup opt for a smaller nose? Jolie lips? A chiseled chin?

Thomas Gaddis

Model In the era of Photoshop and plastic any change is possible. But Joshua Holcombe surgery, what fuels our desire to alter our Cover Concept image? What makes us go to such Maken Imcha drastic measures to attain the phantom Composition definition of true beauty?

John Nguyen

Amy

Somewhere in the illusions of perfection Artwork that flood the media, we have lost Troche-Walsh our identities. We have latched onto fantasies that have given skewed views of ourselves. For this issue’s cover, we experimented with image alteration, taking the idea of misrepresentation to the extreme.

WINTER 2 010

03


staff

From left to right

MAKEN IMCHA Editor-in-Chief

JOHN NGUYEN

RACHEL CHAIKOF Features Editor

MARIA AH

Art Director

SARIA CANADY

JANISHA WILSON

Public Relations Director

ALLYSSA LEWIS

Copy Editor

MARK ZIEMER

SEAN WRIGHT

SHANTAY ROBINSON

BRITTANY KRON

VANESSA ALLEYNE

Production Director

Photo Editor

Lifestyle Editor

04

Editorial Assistant Illustrations Editor

Advertising Sales Representative Web Director

S CAN MAGAZINE


About SCAN Magazine: SCAN is the quarterly student magazine of the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta. All editorial content is determined by student editors. Opinions expressed in SCAN are not necessarily those of the college. Š2010 SCAN Magazine. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. All rights reserved. Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this magazine or pass it along. Thanks. SCAN Magazine SCAD Atlanta 1600 Peachtree St. Atlanta, GA 30309 Office: (404) 253-2738 Fax: (404) 897-4888 scan.magazine@scadconnector.com www.scadconnector.com/scan

WINTER 2 010

05


THE CULTURE CLUB SCAD Atlanta's international students hail from nearly 30 countries. Here, six of them share their artwork, discuss cultural differences and tell what they love about Atlanta. COMPILED BY ALLYSSA LEWIS AND SARIA CANADY ILLUSTRATION BY RICHARD GOODWIN

6

S CAN MAGAZINE


WINTER 2 010

07


JEFFREY KORDOVA

NICOLE GOUWS

TURKEY MOTION MEDIA DESIGN

SOUTH AFRICA GRAPHIC DESIGN

I love the vast amount of nature that is a part of this beautiful city. Everything is green! I love how Atlanta looks, especially the suburban-life, which you can’t find in Turkey. Also, I love how everyone in the United States can express themselves without any difficulties, and how self-confident the people are. It is obvious that this is a free country and the people are open-minded. That is why I love being here at SCAD Atlanta.

The thing I like the most about Atlanta [and] the United States is the diverse culture. You can find people from across the globe in Atlanta and with them they bring their amazing cultures. I find Atlanta is a great place to meet new people.

Culture vs. Nature Blue ink, coffee and marble grounds, 24" x 24"

08

Save the Eleven Acrylic on canvas 23" x 17"

JOHN-MICHAEL KIRKONNEL CAYMAN ISLANDS ANIMATION I like the abundance of opportunities here in the United States. Whether it’s jobs or just leisure activities, there is just so much going on. Although it is constantly growing, there are a very finite number of things you can do back home. Don’t get me wrong, the kinds of things you can do on a tropical paradise are great, but there are even greater limitations. Photo courtesy of John-Michael Kirkonnel

S CAN MAGAZINE


SAFA ASHRAF

YOHEI HORISHITA

MONISHA ASHOK

In Pakistan, a housewife is the ideal beauty, because they take care of everything. Their respect for their family, honesty and simple and sacrificial nature make them priceless. In the U.S., models get more appreciation; it is all about outer beauty. But in Pakistan, beauty is all about one's inner image.

The main difference between the United States and Japan is the diversity of human races, religions and cultures. In Japan, the dominant ethnic group and culture is obviously Japanese. However, there are many people from different places trying to achieve their own dreams in the United States. I feel that living here is such a wonderful opportunity to enrich my personal perspective.

I feel the United States has established a better mind set for their art platform. In Malaysia, there are good art schools, but coming to the United States has opened up my mind to many different techniques and ways to perform my art. The art industry in Malaysia is still growing, but in America, there are better materials to work with.

PAKISTAN MOTION MEDIA DESIGN

Photo courtesy of Safa Ashraf

JAPAN ILLUSTRATION

MALAYSIA FASHION

Photo courtesy of Monisha Ashok

The Secret Life from Life Source Series Watercolor on Arches paper 22" x 34"

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN WRIGHT

WINTER 2 010

09


B O O K S W O R T H T H E T I M E Books written on the subject of design are becoming so prolific that some of them have lost their identity among similar titles. Although minor flaws in layout can be overlooked in other genres, to have an unoriginal or poorly designed book about design is a cardinal sin. Following are a few books that stand out.

Fingerprint: The Art of Using Handmade Elements in Graphic Design By Chen Design Associates

Taking inspiration from printmaking, illustration and collage, this book demonstrates how to merge manually rendered pieces with digital designs. It is a unique resource of endless ideas to suit any design project.

BY BRITTANY KRON

10

How To Be A Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul Design Disasters: Great Designers, Fabulous Failure & Lessons Learned By Steven Heller

Sometimes the most important things in life have to be learned the hard way. This anthology of essays and anecdotes from top designers details the ups and downs of an ever-changing medium and reinforces the idea of treating failure as a necessary step to success.

By Adrian Shaughnessy

The practical, the glossed-over, the nitty-gritty. From deciding what to charge for your services to how to handle thorny clients, it’s all answered here in this nononsense and pragmatic guide. It is a must-have.

Lettering & Type: Creating Letters and Designing Typefaces By Nolen Strals and Bruce Willen

Although this book covers the fundamentals of typeface design, its true value lies in the bounty of examples and exercises that serve as inspiration and as a bridge to more exploratory typographic ideas.

S CAN MAGAZINE


URBAN DELIGHTS

BY RACHEL CHAIKOF

Clothes, skiing, poles and gadgets. Things you may not have known about our northern neighbor. Roots This iconic fashion brand is known for selling a wide selection of sweatsuits, outerwear and authentic leather products to keep Canadians warm and toasty in the country's blistery winter weather. First established in 1973, Roots has grown to more than 120 retail locations throughout North America. Skiing Because Canada is so close to the North Pole, most areas of the country receive an average of 11 inches to several feet of snowfall per year. This makes for great skiing at world-class resorts. Vancouver is also the proud host of the 2010 Winter Olympic Games, which will include skiing competitions WINTER 2 010

in Whistler, a resort town located about 78 miles north of Vancouver. The site boasts more than two million visitors per year. Totem Poles Totem poles, large monumental carvings sculpted from trees, can be found sprinkled around the northwest region of Canada. Usually carved by Native Americans, these totem poles are beautiful artistic presentations that hold spiritual meanings and tell stories of various clan lineages and notable events. Blackberry The Canada-based company Research in Motion invented this highly used technology. When the Blackberry first appeared on the scene in 1999, it was a two-way pager. Then in the year 2002, Research in Motion released the smartphone model that millions of people around the world now use to talk, text, e-mail and surf the Net.

11


GOES SURREALISM BY MARIA AH

I

magine yourself walking through the halls of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, surrounded by the works of Leonardo Di Vinci, Raphael, Giovanni Bellini and Johannes Vermeer. You admire fine art. Suddenly, something seems out of place. You ask yourself, “Why is this here?” You can’t help but to stand in front of this odd painting longer than any other piece you've seen in the museum. What could possibly be more awing than Raphael’s Madonna in the Meadow or even Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring? How about a painting of an extraterrestrial in a pink turban, emerging from a cloud of smoke like a genie from his lamp? The bubble surrounding your conceptions of fine art just went “Pop!” The painting of the extraterrestrial is not a figment of the imagination. It is one real example of the many paintings that have surfaced from the underground visual art movement known as pop surrealism, or lowbrow art. The movement’s Los Angeles roots date back to the late 1970s. “It isn’t an emerging trend as much as it is a trend that has been around for some time,” said Michael V. Brown, a fine arts professor at SCAD Atlanta. “And [it] is getting greater recognition and acceptance by people outside of California.

12

“It is influenced by the movie industry, cartoons, illustrations, tattoos, graffiti, car and surf/skate culture,” Brown said. “Robert William’s Juxtapoz Magazine was started as a way to showcase the talents that are now defined as ‘pop surrealist’ to thumb the nose towards the stuffy, pretentious fine art world found in New York. “His magazine has really brought the aesthetic of pop surrealism to a much greater audience.” The movement is catching on fast with a growing number of artists incorporating pop surrealist elements into their work. Much like hip-hop’s effect on music, pop surrealism is slowly changing what people consider to be fine art. “Lots of people said my work is very West Coast or lowbrow, [a style] which I do enjoy,” said Yi-Hsin Tzeng, who recently earned her MFA in painting at SCAD. “It’s hard to put my work into some specific categories because I use different media to achieve my intention  ...  to play with the boundary between high and low art, which you can see in my recent works.”

TOP TO BOTTOM

Pop surrealist art often carries a humorous, sometimes impish tone. It is an expression of individualism and rebellion. Once on display in small alternative galleries such as Psychedelic Solutions Gallery in New York’s Greenwich Village and 01 Gallery in Hollywood, pop surrealist works can now be found in popular fine art galleries.

Ann-Marie Manker You whispered you were mine You vowed we'd never part Couples only Watercolor, pencil, gouache on paper, 11" x 14"

But there is still a debate on whether the style, originated by underground cartoonists like Robert Williams and Gary Panter can be considered as fine art. S CAN MAGAZINE


A number of artists who started their careers by exhibiting their work in lowbrow galleries have gone on to showings in mainstream fine art galleries. So why the debate? One of the main arguments against the merits of pop surrealism is that many pop surrealists began their careers in fields not traditionally considered fine art, such as animation, comic books, and tattooing. Many of them are also self-taught, which opens pop surrealists to criticism of their validity, figurative focus and lack of formal training. Technical skills have always been held in high regard in art schools, which further estranges pop surrealism from the fine art world. “Although the terms ‘pop surrealism’ and ‘lowbrow’ are used interchangeably, the term pop surrealism came out of a reaction of artists who did not want to be labeled as lowbrow,“ said Ann-Marie Manker, a fine arts professor at SCAD. “The difference seems to lie between being self-taught versus educated; or strong craftsmanship skills and one style being grittier than the other. Lowbrow has a more punk attitude whereas pop surrealism is easier for academia to digest.” WINTER 2 010

“I use dif ferent “I use mediadif to ferent achieve my media intention, andto The absence of this internal analysis and achieve I intend to my recognition of pop surrealism seems to be a direct result of the movement’s origins  —  the play with intention, the underground, self-taught and artistic expressions of an array of subcultures. boundar yintend and I On the other hand, many artists who have between High adopted or have been influenced by pop surto play with realism argue that the lack of scholarly cri- and Low ar t.” tiques, technical skills and figurative focus Another question that arises is whether pop surrealism is a legitimate art movement. There have been few scholarly writings regarding pop surrealism, and art movements are usually legitimized by the critical writings about them. Critics expand on the initial findings, writing their own critiques.

is what stimulates true creativity and artistic expression. Isn’t creativity and unique expression the true purpose of art, whether fine or aspirant? “I am inspired by the way lowbrow artists are able to take something like an icon from popular culture and depict it in their own humorous or disturbing way,” said Sean Abrahams (BFA, painting, 2009). “I think lowbrow artwork will always be taking new forms and be labeled in different ways.”

the boundar y between High and Low ar t.”

YI-HSIN TZENG

TOP Yi-Hsin Tzeng, You cannot see my desire Acrylic on canvas, 48" x 24"

13


20% to 50% off* the items you need now PIEDMONT PEACHTREE CROSSING 3330 Piedmont Road Suite 18 MON-FRI 9-8 SAT 10-7 SUN 11-6

404.237.6331 www.bindersart.com Shop with us and support the BINDERS Art Supply Scholarship Fund, which is awarded to a SCAD student.

*DISCOUNTS ARE OFF MSRP AND RANGE FROM 10% TO 50% OFF.

Bring Juki’s Industrial Strength Sewing to Your Workroom. TL-98QE MSRP: $1,499

MO-623 MSRP: $837

High speed overlock with auto rolled hemming

Portable high speed lockstitch

228 Ottley Drive Atlanta, GA 30324 (800) 426-2246 (404) 261-4240 sales@sewingmachine.com

Both machines for $999! Special offer available while supplies last.

Please visit our Atlanta showroom for all of your sewing, embroidery, sublimation and direct to garment printing equipment and supplies.

Bis

S hop

tN

W

17th St NW

SCAD Peachtree

Northside Dr

Howell Mill Rd NW

Sam Flax

Deering Rd NW

1460 Northside Dr Atlanta, GA 30318 404.352.7200

axso samfl

u t h .c

om

voted best art store 6 years in a row students receive a 10% discount

16th St NW 14th St NW

14

S CAN MAGAZINE


WINTER BACK TO SCHOOL 2010

Although Abrahams doesn’t actually consider his work as a part of any movement, his mixture of strong craftsmanship and lowfi construction in his works demonstrate his pop surrealism influence. “My paintings and drawings often contain imagery that is cartoonish, cluttered and made up of flat and modeled forms, Abrahams said. “I am constantly inspired by what other artists are doing, whether it is in music or painting, and I borrow what I like and make it my own.” Some artists believe that pop surrealism is another movement to stimulate change and exploration. Exploration of new styles is what influences art movements, including most recently the thinkism movement, which is considered to the first art movement of the 21st century.

Inspired by artists Camille Rose Garcia and Mark Ryden, Manker’s work has been associated with lowbrow and pop surrealism. “I think it has to do with my line work that sometimes looks illustrative and [its] narrative subject matter,” Manker said. “My drawing style is dictated by my aesthetics, and my work is psychologically charged and emotive. I design imagery and compositions in a way to subvert emotion through metaphor or narrative.”

“I feel like my work is a bridge between the two, with both influences being recognized. I paint in a way that is most appropriate to the idea I am trying to convey at the time.” WINTER 2 010

1165 WOODSTOCK ) (NEAR SUPER TARGET 770-993-0240

No matter what you call it — low brow art or pop surrealism — the movement is making waves and influencing artists everywhere.

Brown’s work demonstrates constant exploration of new, personal and unique styles. But in an interview on the art blog Erratic Phenomena, Brown questioned whether he is a pop surrealist. “I find it interesting to think that other people could define my work. I don’t see my work as being pop surrealist, but I also don't see it as the highbrow work that has influenced my work and ideas so thoroughly,” Brown is quoted by Erratic Phenomena.

ROSWELL RD.

30% OFF

ENTIRE PURCHASE OF NON-SALE, IN-STOCK ITEMS

VALID

TOP LEFT TO RIGHT Michael V. Brown, Jeebus Fink Acrylic on canvas, 48" x 36" Sean Abrahams, Untitled Acrylic on canvas, 24" x 30"

2/14/10

2/28/10

Blick Art Materials, Retail Inc., coupon must be surrendered at time of purchase; no copies will be honored. Limit one coupon per visit. Valid only on non-sale, in-stock items. Not valid with any other discounts or promotion, phone/mail/internet orders and purchases of gift cards.

*Ao02973*


C I H C APES SH

esign d f o s e rincipl p e h t ying d o b m E

This photo feature was a collaboration between undergraduates, graduates and alumni of SCAD Atlanta.

Photography Andrew Phillips Illustration Daniel Barnes Makeup Olamma Oparah Hair Michelle Napier Model Chelsea Elisha Styling Janisha Wilson Concept Maken Imcha

16


S

17


18

S CAN MAGAZINE


WINTER 2 010

19


SHOWCASE

JENNIFER KIM FOURTH-YEAR | GRAPHIC DESIGN

Looking back, even as a child, my mind would conjure up random images full of enigmatic shapes and designs. My passion is to change ordinary into extraordinary. Famed French Romantic artist Eugene Delacroix once said, "What moves men of genius, or rather what inspires their work, is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough." Although my eyes are tightly shut, my eyelids are frantically flickering. My thoughts are wandering, curious and wild, clawing for inspiration. I then drift off, dreaming of the day

20

that my creation will bring forth people standing wide-eyed and studying the expressions of my concept, my masterpiece. A freshly sharpened pencil in one hand and a blank notepad before me, I sit alone burning the midnight oil with Felix Mendelssohn and Antonio Rossetti playing softly in the background. As an artist, my biggest struggle is obtaining inspiration, to stir up whatever has been settled at the bottom of the cup. I aspire to achieve greatness. I have the hunger for art and design, I hope that one day my dreams will turn into a living and breathing reality.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMIE LILES

CHAVVI The rich and dynamic culture of India inspired me to come up with the warm and vibrant colors of a gold and pink backdrop. I wanted to create a rustic and natural look, so I used real wood as my book cover and created my logo/prints with a wood burner for a pastel finish.

I N D I A N

ANNE GEDDES For Anne Geddes collectible doll series, I used a clear box to show all angles of the doll, as well as exhibit the doll in a red clay pot. I wanted the theme of the display to be consistent with nature so I added the white picket fence along the brightly hued flowers onto the box.

LOGOS Bottom left to right: Chavvi Indian Foods Mikou Design CreamOla Bake Shop

F O O D S

Mario

d

C H AVV I

e

s

i

g

n

CreamOla Bake Shop

21


22

S CAN MAGAZINE


SHOWCASE

What keeps me drawing is the moment when a figure or creature comes to life out of a doodle. With just a few marks, some basic shapes and two tiny dots for eyes, a small living thing appears on the paper. One simple line can change the mood or expression of a character­ — much easier than in the real world.

ALUMNA | ILLUSTRATION MA, Illustration, 2009

It was while studying graphic design in Kiel, Germany, that I fell in love with illustration. Drawing classes became my favorite. I started scribbling and have not stopped since then. I became more interested in the design process, the initial rough pencil stages that happened outside of the computer, than the finished design. The pencil is still my favorite tool to bring ideas from my head to life. I love the imperfect line that it creates and the sound that it makes against paper. My work, though finished digitally, is made up of tactile layers of old papers, patterns and other textures that I find in decaying books, antique maps, etc. I also sew, glue and cut to create the things belonging to my illustration world. All of my typography is also done in this same, handmade way. I can sit down for hours drawing ABCs. I am inspired and influenced by everyday life and the people around me­ — sometimes their faces appear on my paper sometimes not. I have a direct relationship to my characters. While drawing them, there is this moment when they start talking to me somehow. It always surprises me when they talk to other people in a similar way and it makes me happy when one of my drawings makes someone smile­ — if not, I would be happy to just take the pencil and draw a smile on their face.

WINTER 2 010

23


SHOWCASE

Sil v i n a G u e r re i ro FOURTH-YEAR | ADVERTISING The power of persuasion starts with inspiration, and mine began when I was first introduced to vintage advertising. Leonetto Cappiello, also known as the “Father of Advertising,” made it possible for advertisements to simultaneously be beautiful bodies of art. His idea of art in advertising is exactly why I am so passionate about what I do. There are many things to consider when I begin a project. Not only is there a ton of research, briefing and brainstorming involved, but the idea has to also eventually take form with the perfect balance of body copy and art direction. Advertising is all about a big idea and how it can effectively communicate to a target audience. For me, it’s also about bringing art back into the world of advertising and I hope that my work speaks that message as well.

24

S CAN MAGAZINE


CITY OF DREAMS

For the City of Dreams project, I had to come up with a print campaign for Asia’s first oceanic casino and resort. Because the experience of the entertainment resort is nothing short of magical, the tagline is simply “Immerse in Wonder.” This tagline also inspired the art direction of these pieces, which is consistently carried throughout the campaign.

WINTER 2 010

25


THE PINK CITY } Jaipur, also known as the Pink City, is a beautiful architectural treat and is the capital of Rajasthan. Most of the city is made from pink mud and is built using intricate “Jali” work. Jaipur is a popular tourist destination, attracting foreigners with its colors, forts and monuments. The late princess Gayatri Devi was a well-known Indian princess who came from Jaipur.

TARUN TAHILIANI } Tarun Tahiliani’s unique combination of historical opulence and contemporary chic lends his fashion wear to couture. The history of Indian fashion entails the embellishment of textile and the masterful way these endless, dreamy lengths of cloth were draped, tied, twisted and pulled over the body. As a trend, this endured for centuries, shaping with the times and evolving slowly through cultural invasion. Men and women displayed the richness of textiles, from turbans, to saris, to dhotis or widebodied skirts, draped or fastened by a single

26

piece of string. No detail or labor of love was too painstaking: years of handwork would be kneaded into a single, lavish piece of cloth, and this tradition was passed from one generation to the next. And yet, it was not until recently that Indian fashion began to mature in terms of cut and proportion. The combination of these elements, along with India’s enduring and passionate affair with color, is the basis of Tahiliani’s work. It is the exuberant and richly detailed, structured drape that represents Tahiliani’s modern Indian woman.

RAJASTHAN PUPPETS } These puppets are a typical symbol of Rajasthan. They are often used in puppet shows for tourists and can also be bought on roadsides. They are made from wood and fabric and are ornately painted in traditional makeup and clothing.

S CAN MAGAZINE


WORLD TRENDS: INDIA

Discover the country's architecture, religion and traditions RAJASTHAN } The Lake Palace, owned by the Taj group, is a unique hotel located in Udaipur, Rajasthan. It is surrounded by water, and requires a motorboat to access it. It is a high- end luxury hotel and has been occupied by the likes of Jackie Kennedy and Vivien Leigh. The James Bond film “Octopussy” as well as “The Fall” were filmed at the Lake Palace. In Rajasthan, women dress with nose rings and bangles going up their arms. The bright colors contrast with India's sandy desert. As one of the most colorful states in India, Rajasthan is a showcase of the country's beauty and tradition. FAKIRS } A Fakir is a religious disciple of God, who has renounced all materialistic assets and lifestyle. He relies on the goodwill of people to provide him with food. This is beneficial for him and to the people.

TEXT BY NANDHINI MEHRA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MAHEQ WADHWANI

WINTER 2 010

27


Are they siblings, lovers, enemies? Are they siblings, lovers, enemies? Are they siblings, lovers, Are they enemies? Are siblings, lovers, theyenemies? siblings, Make your own lovers, up enemies? storAre y for the two they young people siblings, living lovers, in this enemies? fashionableAre theybangle siblings, bracelet by ar tist Adam lovers, Smith. enemies? Plastic, Are they faux gold leaf, siblings, lovers, archival prints, enemies? Are lacquer. they siblings, lovers, enemies? Are they siblings, lovers, enemies? Are they siblings, lovers, enemies? Are they siblings, lovers, enemies?

SCAN loves this bracelet's vintage charm

One Degree of Separation $42, Available at shopSCAD Atlanta www.shopscadonline.com

28

ADAM SMITH

( B FA , m e t a l s a n d j e w e l r y, 2005)

S CAN MAGAZINE


Savor a moment between classes at The Hub’s

ESPRESSO BAR

NOW FEATURING

NEW HOURS

Italian and French sodas

Monday - Thursday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Flavored coffees SCADpuccino

Friday and Saturday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Fresh-baked cookies

Closed Sunday

Pastries WINTER 2 010

3


4

S CAN MAGAZINE

SCAN Magazine Winter 2010  

SCAN Magazine is a new quarterly magazine launched by the Connector. Bringing to you the best student art and insight into SCAD Atlanta.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you