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SCAD AT L A N TA’ S ST UDE N T M AGAZ I N E SPRIN G 2012

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VO L . 4, NO . 2


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about the issue Art and sexuality are two things so deeply intertwined that it’s hard to tell them apart. Love and lust are so similar to the raw and intense moments that an artist experiences when they’re exploring their creative selfs. Both experiences can bring unimaginable ecstasy, supreme dissatisfaction and profound emotional growth. In this issue we explore how we perceive sexuality, love and relationships with artistic minds.

8

12

nazamin kazi

alexis blaudeu

Illustrator, Sex Sells

Writer, Bacon

ruth neharg

dylan moore

Illustrator, Adventures in Life Drawing

Illustrator, Debacles in Dating

jay bowman

erin mcmannes

Photographer, Voyeur or Exhibitionist?

Illustrator, Adventures in Life Drawing

Illustrator, Adventures in Life Drawing

4

UNMATCHED.COM

20

DEBACLES IN DATING

A frightening and fruitless adventure in online dating.

A tale of the depressing phenomenon known as SCAD dating.

8

SEX SELLS

24

ADVENTURES IN LIFE DRAWING

The truth about advertising and its hopeful future.

Censorship from three artist's perspectives.

12

VOYEUR OR EXHIBITIONIST?

28

STUDENT SHOWCASE

Photography: Accessing an intimate moment.

Featuring student work and their experiences with censorship.

18

BACON IS ALWAYS THE PASSWORD

32

BORN TO BE CLOTHES FREE

A personal account of an embarrassing moment in puberty.

Staff members reminisce on their naked days.

18

contributors

jonquel norwood

table of contents

24

20

28

about scan Office  » 404.253.2738

SCAN is the quarterly student magazine of the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta. All editorial content is determined by student editors. Opinions expressed in SCAN are not necessarily those of the college.

SCAN Magazine Spring House Computer Lab

©2012 SCAN Magazine. All rights reserved. This magazine may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher.

Meetings, Fridays at 10 a.m.

Fax » 404.897.4888

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» scan@scadconnector.com » scadconnector.com/scan

»

SC AN M AGAZIN E 1


4

about the issue Art and sexuality are two things so deeply intertwined that it’s hard to tell them apart. Love and lust are so similar to the raw and intense moments that an artist experiences when they’re exploring their creative selfs. Both experiences can bring unimaginable ecstasy, supreme dissatisfaction and profound emotional growth. In this issue we explore how we perceive sexuality, love and relationships with artistic minds.

8

12

nazamin kazi

alexis blaudeu

Illustrator, Sex Sells

Writer, Bacon

ruth neharg

dylan moore

Illustrator, Adventures in Life Drawing

Illustrator, Debacles in Dating

jay bowman

erin mcmannes

Photographer, Voyeur or Exhibitionist?

Illustrator, Adventures in Life Drawing

Illustrator, Adventures in Life Drawing

4

UNMATCHED.COM

20

DEBACLES IN DATING

A frightening and fruitless adventure in online dating.

A tale of the depressing phenomenon known as SCAD dating.

8

SEX SELLS

24

ADVENTURES IN LIFE DRAWING

The truth about advertising and its hopeful future.

Censorship from three artist's perspectives.

12

VOYEUR OR EXHIBITIONIST?

28

STUDENT SHOWCASE

Photography: Accessing an intimate moment.

Featuring student work and their experiences with censorship.

18

BACON IS ALWAYS THE PASSWORD

32

BORN TO BE CLOTHES FREE

A personal account of an embarrassing moment in puberty.

Staff members reminisce on their naked days.

18

contributors

jonquel norwood

table of contents

24

20

28

about scan Office  » 404.253.2738

SCAN is the quarterly student magazine of the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta. All editorial content is determined by student editors. Opinions expressed in SCAN are not necessarily those of the college.

SCAN Magazine Spring House Computer Lab

©2012 SCAN Magazine. All rights reserved. This magazine may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher.

Meetings, Fridays at 10 a.m.

Fax » 404.897.4888

SPRIN G 2 012

» scan@scadconnector.com » scadconnector.com/scan

»

SC AN M AGAZIN E 1


staaff st ff (left to right)

BARRY LEE illustrations editor Illustration, second-year

BRITANY PONVELLE asst. art director Graphic Design, second-year

DYLAN FAGAN photo editor Photography, third-year

BRITTANY KRON creative director Graphic Design, fourth-year

CARLOS MALDONABO asst. photo editor Photography, first-year

ERIC BEATTY web director Graphic Design, fourth-year

ERIN WHITE editor-in-chief Writing, fourth-year

CAROLINE HUFTALEN copy editor Writing, graduate

JACOB VANWINKLE art director Graphic Design, fourth-year

NYASHA MANDIVEYI news edittor Television Producing, third-year

ALANA ADAMS p.r. director Writing, fourth-year

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 3


staaff st ff (left to right)

BARRY LEE illustrations editor Illustration, second-year

BRITANY PONVELLE asst. art director Graphic Design, second-year

DYLAN FAGAN photo editor Photography, third-year

BRITTANY KRON creative director Graphic Design, fourth-year

CARLOS MALDONABO asst. photo editor Photography, first-year

ERIC BEATTY web director Graphic Design, fourth-year

ERIN WHITE editor-in-chief Writing, fourth-year

CAROLINE HUFTALEN copy editor Writing, graduate

JACOB VANWINKLE art director Graphic Design, fourth-year

NYASHA MANDIVEYI news edittor Television Producing, third-year

ALANA ADAMS p.r. director Writing, fourth-year

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» SCAD SPEAK

unmatched

DOT COM

writer Caroline Huftalen llustrator Barry Lee

When I told my friends that I was going to be writing about online dating and doing it from firsthand experience, they laughed, but then came to the romantic-comedy conclusion that I would find my soulmate through unusual and movie-quality experiences. That I would be very Kate Hudson-y and some poor lonely Matthew McConaughey-type would fall in love with me and I would have that moment where I said, “it was all for a story.” Then, naturally, it would get super dramatic and he would run off in a cab and I would chase after him. I’d fling the door open on a red light and say something quotable, which would lead to a great make out scene. The end. Knowing that the odds of my rom-com happy ending were slim and I would most likely meet a lot of duds, I did my best to keep

very long questionnaire. There were questions about the type of guy I was looking for, how important certain things were to me like

But I wasn’t the only one indulging in the details. One of my matches had a career listing of senior associate. Now this could

an open mind. I let go of all the prejudices and stereotypes that my brain automatically places on those with current profiles and signed myself up for two online dating sites: eHarmony.com and OKCupid.com.

looks and money, and more insightful questions like how selfish or emotional I am.

be impressive if it pertained to finance or business or some other lucrative job market that I will never be a part of. But instead, what he meant was retail sales associate. There is a difference there; salary and stability wise. And, how is it that out of all of my matches, which was more than 40 in the span of one month, did not a single one smoke? They all were cigarette free, wanted marriage and babies, and supposedly had great senses of humor. I beg to differ.

I wanted the real-deal experience, the sleek profile and scientifically produced matches. For this I turned to eHarmony.com. Which comes at a price. During non-promotional months it’s $60. Money aside, my advice for anyone sitting down and signing up for this site: give yourself a few hours, and maybe a panel of friends. I never knew how much I didn’t know about myself until answering the

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I cry really easily. When I’m mad, I cry. When I’m frustrated, I cry. When an ASPCA commercial comes on, I cry. Emotional, maybe. But I didn’t want eHarmony to think I was one of those girls. So naturally, I lied, and my emotional rating dropped down to a three on a scale from one to 10. When asked how important image was, I put seven, but then my shallowness set in, and I bumped it up to eight. The rest of the questions followed the same suit. Presenting myself in the best, though maybe not the most honest light.

If you think Facebook consumes your life, just wait till you enlist in a service that sends a bevy of men your way every day, and then

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» SCAD SPEAK

unmatched

DOT COM

writer Caroline Huftalen llustrator Barry Lee

When I told my friends that I was going to be writing about online dating and doing it from firsthand experience, they laughed, but then came to the romantic-comedy conclusion that I would find my soulmate through unusual and movie-quality experiences. That I would be very Kate Hudson-y and some poor lonely Matthew McConaughey-type would fall in love with me and I would have that moment where I said, “it was all for a story.” Then, naturally, it would get super dramatic and he would run off in a cab and I would chase after him. I’d fling the door open on a red light and say something quotable, which would lead to a great make out scene. The end. Knowing that the odds of my rom-com happy ending were slim and I would most likely meet a lot of duds, I did my best to keep

very long questionnaire. There were questions about the type of guy I was looking for, how important certain things were to me like

But I wasn’t the only one indulging in the details. One of my matches had a career listing of senior associate. Now this could

an open mind. I let go of all the prejudices and stereotypes that my brain automatically places on those with current profiles and signed myself up for two online dating sites: eHarmony.com and OKCupid.com.

looks and money, and more insightful questions like how selfish or emotional I am.

be impressive if it pertained to finance or business or some other lucrative job market that I will never be a part of. But instead, what he meant was retail sales associate. There is a difference there; salary and stability wise. And, how is it that out of all of my matches, which was more than 40 in the span of one month, did not a single one smoke? They all were cigarette free, wanted marriage and babies, and supposedly had great senses of humor. I beg to differ.

I wanted the real-deal experience, the sleek profile and scientifically produced matches. For this I turned to eHarmony.com. Which comes at a price. During non-promotional months it’s $60. Money aside, my advice for anyone sitting down and signing up for this site: give yourself a few hours, and maybe a panel of friends. I never knew how much I didn’t know about myself until answering the

4

S C A N MAGAZINE

» SPR ING

2 012

I cry really easily. When I’m mad, I cry. When I’m frustrated, I cry. When an ASPCA commercial comes on, I cry. Emotional, maybe. But I didn’t want eHarmony to think I was one of those girls. So naturally, I lied, and my emotional rating dropped down to a three on a scale from one to 10. When asked how important image was, I put seven, but then my shallowness set in, and I bumped it up to eight. The rest of the questions followed the same suit. Presenting myself in the best, though maybe not the most honest light.

If you think Facebook consumes your life, just wait till you enlist in a service that sends a bevy of men your way every day, and then

SPRIN G 2 012

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those men send you extra questions to answer. And they “nudge” you to answer them faster, or send you an “icebreaker.” And then you have to read through the profiles and find which ones actually interest you and message back and forth until you feel date ready. It’s a process. A very time-consuming, life-swallowing process. It made me feel completely incapable of having a relationship due to the time crunch. Beyond the fact that it makes you a social recluse, it all felt very set up. The moment my profile went live, I had men sending me messages and multiple choice questions like: What would you rather do on a first date? A) Have a picnic B) Watch a movie and eat popcorn C) A romantic candlelight dinner D) See a sports game. But then after my answers were given – D, of course, a date that involves beer, french fries and screaming your head off is perfection – silence would ring from the other end. And their pictures looked so professional, so retouched and, shall I say, fake. If their pictures seemed too good to be true, then their profiles were even worse. The answers all felt so feminine as if their mothers filled it out for them, or some, cough-cough, insider who merely wanted you to feel special and pretty for a day and think, hey people like me, they really like me. That way you pay the hefty fee to find “true love.” The two-party lies and outrageous amount of effort weren’t the only parts that troubled me. It all just felt so clinical. It took the romance out of love. All the important questions were already answered; the mystery was gone. The

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only thing left to find out was if you were attracted to one another. Which is hard, when it all seemed too planned, too forced and too much like buying a car. I also wanted to participate on a site that was more fitting for a student’s budget, a.k.a. free. There were a few options but I had heard some positive reviews about OKCupid.com. The reviews were wrong. Either that, or my friends are into some freaky stuff. This was one of the more frightening experiences. On the bright side, it made me feel good that I had standards and wouldn’t settle for the guy who messaged me who was in a polyamorous marriage and whose listed activities included child rearing. I wish I was kidding. But don’t worry, his wife had a profile as well. His even linked to it. The myriad of pictures of married men looking for “just sex” and nakedness made me thankful that I didn’t use my real name. If you are looking for a possible venereal disease, wanna-be Guidos and lots of moustaches, this is your site. From what I could gather before I erased my profile out of fear, there isn’t a whole lot of innocent, looking-for-potentiallove dating going on. It seemed like a lot of searching for mistresses and booty calls. It all felt very prostitution Craigslist-y. But, who am I to judge someone who lists sex as their hobby, interest and occupation. If I gained anything from this experience, it’s that yes, the stereotypical freaks are out there on these sites. But there are also quite a few normal people trying to find someone

to relate to. The people who have exhausted all other outlets for finding a companion and out of a last resort option have turned to the internet. They aren’t rejects or possible criminals, they are just busy and gosh-darn tired of trolling through the masses hoping someone has the guts to say, “I think you are intriguing, let’s explore this.” However, these people aren’t on OKCupid, so be prepared to pay for quality. More importantly though, I learned that I am not one of those people who wants to be a part of this new trend in finding love. I want the old-fashioned, eyes meeting from across the room, or more accurately me spilling my drink on you, and then seeing what happens from there. I want to learn about your obsession with your grandma a few weeks in on a rainy day when the smell of cookies is wafting through the air, not from a fact sheet. Either way, the odds are the same. Online dating may send them your way on a continuous assembly line, whereas conventional dating the pace is a little slower. But you still have to go through a whole lot of frogs. Oh – a few words to the wise, do not ever have someone pick you up. Looks and sentences can be deceiving. You too often hear the words, “but he looked so normal.” Never lend money to someone online who is claiming to love you. And, first dates should always be coffee. Alcohol clouds your judgement or could lead to a dinner situation. Quick getaways are necessary. You don’t want to wait to sober up, or for a check, to say goodbye to yet another Mr. Wrong.

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 7


those men send you extra questions to answer. And they “nudge” you to answer them faster, or send you an “icebreaker.” And then you have to read through the profiles and find which ones actually interest you and message back and forth until you feel date ready. It’s a process. A very time-consuming, life-swallowing process. It made me feel completely incapable of having a relationship due to the time crunch. Beyond the fact that it makes you a social recluse, it all felt very set up. The moment my profile went live, I had men sending me messages and multiple choice questions like: What would you rather do on a first date? A) Have a picnic B) Watch a movie and eat popcorn C) A romantic candlelight dinner D) See a sports game. But then after my answers were given – D, of course, a date that involves beer, french fries and screaming your head off is perfection – silence would ring from the other end. And their pictures looked so professional, so retouched and, shall I say, fake. If their pictures seemed too good to be true, then their profiles were even worse. The answers all felt so feminine as if their mothers filled it out for them, or some, cough-cough, insider who merely wanted you to feel special and pretty for a day and think, hey people like me, they really like me. That way you pay the hefty fee to find “true love.” The two-party lies and outrageous amount of effort weren’t the only parts that troubled me. It all just felt so clinical. It took the romance out of love. All the important questions were already answered; the mystery was gone. The

6

S C A N MAGAZINE

» SPR ING

2 012

only thing left to find out was if you were attracted to one another. Which is hard, when it all seemed too planned, too forced and too much like buying a car. I also wanted to participate on a site that was more fitting for a student’s budget, a.k.a. free. There were a few options but I had heard some positive reviews about OKCupid.com. The reviews were wrong. Either that, or my friends are into some freaky stuff. This was one of the more frightening experiences. On the bright side, it made me feel good that I had standards and wouldn’t settle for the guy who messaged me who was in a polyamorous marriage and whose listed activities included child rearing. I wish I was kidding. But don’t worry, his wife had a profile as well. His even linked to it. The myriad of pictures of married men looking for “just sex” and nakedness made me thankful that I didn’t use my real name. If you are looking for a possible venereal disease, wanna-be Guidos and lots of moustaches, this is your site. From what I could gather before I erased my profile out of fear, there isn’t a whole lot of innocent, looking-for-potentiallove dating going on. It seemed like a lot of searching for mistresses and booty calls. It all felt very prostitution Craigslist-y. But, who am I to judge someone who lists sex as their hobby, interest and occupation. If I gained anything from this experience, it’s that yes, the stereotypical freaks are out there on these sites. But there are also quite a few normal people trying to find someone

to relate to. The people who have exhausted all other outlets for finding a companion and out of a last resort option have turned to the internet. They aren’t rejects or possible criminals, they are just busy and gosh-darn tired of trolling through the masses hoping someone has the guts to say, “I think you are intriguing, let’s explore this.” However, these people aren’t on OKCupid, so be prepared to pay for quality. More importantly though, I learned that I am not one of those people who wants to be a part of this new trend in finding love. I want the old-fashioned, eyes meeting from across the room, or more accurately me spilling my drink on you, and then seeing what happens from there. I want to learn about your obsession with your grandma a few weeks in on a rainy day when the smell of cookies is wafting through the air, not from a fact sheet. Either way, the odds are the same. Online dating may send them your way on a continuous assembly line, whereas conventional dating the pace is a little slower. But you still have to go through a whole lot of frogs. Oh – a few words to the wise, do not ever have someone pick you up. Looks and sentences can be deceiving. You too often hear the words, “but he looked so normal.” Never lend money to someone online who is claiming to love you. And, first dates should always be coffee. Alcohol clouds your judgement or could lead to a dinner situation. Quick getaways are necessary. You don’t want to wait to sober up, or for a check, to say goodbye to yet another Mr. Wrong.

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writer Alana Adams illusrator Nazanin Kazi

If you haven’t realized by now advertising is a huge business that affects almost everyone. When advertising works well and reaches the right target audience it can make us buy things that we normally wouldn’t. Even when it doesn’t work well, it still seems to gain attention i.e. Snuggie, and the infamous Head-On amongst others. Regardless advertising is a way for big companies to send a large amount of people a single message. It is not always about buying. In some cases like PETA advertising is used to get people to live a certain way. For the most part advertising is used to get people to purchase new products. Why is advertising effective? We see advertising everyday. We see it while watching television, riding the train, listening to the radio, even when flipping through the menu at the Cheesecake Factory. Ads are a hard thing to miss, especially when watching television. Television is all about advertising. Companies work hard to make sure that you see their latest message, and that it resonates with you. ZenithOptimedia estimates that worldwide companies spend more than $400 billion dollars on advertising. Companies spend a lot of that money on commercials because they know that is an easy way to reach their audience while at home. As of late many people have stopped watching their favorite shows on their televisions and have resorted to watching them online to evade commecrcials. Even by trying to avoid commercials on television and watch shows online you will 8

S C A N MAGAZINE

» SPR ING

2 012

still run into them. Now YouTube and other sites are cluttered with 15 second, 30 seconds, and even longer commercials that you must watch in order to see your intended video. Advertising is becoming more and more effective each day. For a long time it was a one-way means of communication from company to consumer but that has changed. Most companies now are making use of social media, as it is a free way to help advertise. We are starting to see Twitter and Facebook accounts from companies where they are finally directly communicating with their consumers. When dealing with a small company it is an almost instantaneous way to

and Fitch ads. Abercrombie and Fitch is a perfect example of how sex sells. Walk into any one of their stores and within a couple seconds of entering, you realize it is not an average shopping experience. There are pictures of half naked, and completely naked men and women hanging on the wall. Their perfume is released through machines every couple of minutes, and house music is always blaring. During the summer of 2011 they actually had a song on their playlist that had a hook declaring, “I’m horny, horny, horny, horny.” If they aren’t a prime example of sex selling I don’t know what is. In February of 2011, The Wall Street Jour-

reach out to a company, for bigger companies you can still reach out to them but it might take a little more time for them to respond. This also works as a good way to show people how much they care about your satisfaction.

nal reported that Abercrombie and Fitch’s “net sales jumped 23 percent to $1.15 billion, following last year's 4.6 percent drop.” Even during the recession they seem to be making a significant amount of money.

When people see how they respond to certain situations, if done right it can earn them more credibility and trust. Social media is beneficial to both companies and consumers.

The famous retailer continuines to project an image of young, elite, sexy people. For the 2011 holiday season they were one of the stores to open at midnight; however they were among the very few, or only, to have men standing in their front room’s with their shirts off. I can say from personal accounts many young girls, and their mothers came into the store once they saw the men standing in the front sans the usual plaid.

Everyone has heard the saying that “sex sells.” You can see it everywhere, in commercials, on billboards and posters. Sometimes it's subliminal messages found in Coca-Cola ads and sometimes it is blatant in Abercrombie

SPRIN G 2 012

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 9


writer Alana Adams illusrator Nazanin Kazi

If you haven’t realized by now advertising is a huge business that affects almost everyone. When advertising works well and reaches the right target audience it can make us buy things that we normally wouldn’t. Even when it doesn’t work well, it still seems to gain attention i.e. Snuggie, and the infamous Head-On amongst others. Regardless advertising is a way for big companies to send a large amount of people a single message. It is not always about buying. In some cases like PETA advertising is used to get people to live a certain way. For the most part advertising is used to get people to purchase new products. Why is advertising effective? We see advertising everyday. We see it while watching television, riding the train, listening to the radio, even when flipping through the menu at the Cheesecake Factory. Ads are a hard thing to miss, especially when watching television. Television is all about advertising. Companies work hard to make sure that you see their latest message, and that it resonates with you. ZenithOptimedia estimates that worldwide companies spend more than $400 billion dollars on advertising. Companies spend a lot of that money on commercials because they know that is an easy way to reach their audience while at home. As of late many people have stopped watching their favorite shows on their televisions and have resorted to watching them online to evade commecrcials. Even by trying to avoid commercials on television and watch shows online you will 8

S C A N MAGAZINE

» SPR ING

2 012

still run into them. Now YouTube and other sites are cluttered with 15 second, 30 seconds, and even longer commercials that you must watch in order to see your intended video. Advertising is becoming more and more effective each day. For a long time it was a one-way means of communication from company to consumer but that has changed. Most companies now are making use of social media, as it is a free way to help advertise. We are starting to see Twitter and Facebook accounts from companies where they are finally directly communicating with their consumers. When dealing with a small company it is an almost instantaneous way to

and Fitch ads. Abercrombie and Fitch is a perfect example of how sex sells. Walk into any one of their stores and within a couple seconds of entering, you realize it is not an average shopping experience. There are pictures of half naked, and completely naked men and women hanging on the wall. Their perfume is released through machines every couple of minutes, and house music is always blaring. During the summer of 2011 they actually had a song on their playlist that had a hook declaring, “I’m horny, horny, horny, horny.” If they aren’t a prime example of sex selling I don’t know what is. In February of 2011, The Wall Street Jour-

reach out to a company, for bigger companies you can still reach out to them but it might take a little more time for them to respond. This also works as a good way to show people how much they care about your satisfaction.

nal reported that Abercrombie and Fitch’s “net sales jumped 23 percent to $1.15 billion, following last year's 4.6 percent drop.” Even during the recession they seem to be making a significant amount of money.

When people see how they respond to certain situations, if done right it can earn them more credibility and trust. Social media is beneficial to both companies and consumers.

The famous retailer continuines to project an image of young, elite, sexy people. For the 2011 holiday season they were one of the stores to open at midnight; however they were among the very few, or only, to have men standing in their front room’s with their shirts off. I can say from personal accounts many young girls, and their mothers came into the store once they saw the men standing in the front sans the usual plaid.

Everyone has heard the saying that “sex sells.” You can see it everywhere, in commercials, on billboards and posters. Sometimes it's subliminal messages found in Coca-Cola ads and sometimes it is blatant in Abercrombie

SPRIN G 2 012

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Abercrombie and Fitch isn’t the only company to use sexual elements in their advertising. European based menswear company Suitsupply ran a campaign in 2010 called Shameless. The main gist of their campaign seemed to be attractive men in nice looking suits with scantily clad women. All of the ads from the Shameless campaign infer that the naked women, or about to be naked women, was going to have sex with the man in the suit. As you can imagine this ads caused quite a stir. In this case, a good stir. The Wall Street Journal ranked it No. 1 in 2011. They had Salvatore Giardina and Salvatore Cesarani, both designers, rank Suitsupply’s suits along with Armani, J.Crew, H&M, Hart Schaffner Marx, and Target. They both came to the conclusion of Armani and Suitsupply tied for number one. Their Shameless campaign also caught they attention of Designers Couch, Jezebel, and the Huffington Post, who all wrote articles about the company following the release of the campaign. In my opinion using sex to help sell a product is a cop out. Almost everyone has sex, and almost everyone likes sex. Companies think that’s one thing their consumers all have in common. Of course people will be attracted to attractive and seductive imagery but that is not all we are about. Honestly, it's getting a little repetitive and tiring. How many times will I have to walk by a life size poster of a proportionally perfect women that represents maybe 20 percent of the women population 10

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posing next to a man with chiseled muscles in places I didn’t even know you can have them? Not all men can relate to David Beckham and his new underwear ads for H&M let alone will ever look like him. Not all women can relate to Adriana Lima as she struts down a hallway in Victoria’s Secret ad. What I would like to see is more of is creativity put into advertising. I want to see a company break the mold and create something I actually want to look at. It's not that I don’t enjoy seeing hot men every once in a while, but as an student attending I see other things differently. I see how important typography is and if used adequately it can really make an image pop. Right now the main emotions that advertising evoke for me are either boredom or frustration. If I had a dollar for every time I thought to myself, “What the hell were they thinking?,” I would probably be able to pay off my student loans with no problem when I graduate. Will this ever change? SCAD is filled with innovative thinkers in every major. A lot of us know how to think outside the box and execute that perfectly. There are examples of this as you walk down the hallways of our departments. If anyone can change the future of advertising I believe that they are sitting up on the third floor in the advertising department right now. They have probably been sitting in the same chair

for 12 hours running on fumes, and coffee. Usually they are getting ready to pull their hair out, but somehow they pull off some pretty impressive work regardless. I am by far not an expert on advertising but I believe I have a pretty good eye when it comes to distinguishing between a worthy campaign, and just something gone completely wrong. What sets us apart from others is that we are not looking to re-create something that has been done. We think of new ideas, and run with them. We know how to take risks.

(ALANA) SEX SELLS/ADVE

Yes, sex does sell, but it isn’t the only thing that does. Bold, beautiful, new images can sell a product even better. Art students today are the people who are creating tomorrow., and tomorrow is looking bright. That the world of advertising will soon change as our students are working hard to make sure of that. Each one of us wants to be better than the next. This friendly competition could possibly be the drive we need to set new trends. There are a lot of exciting projects in the works that have captured my eye more than campaigns currently running. I encourage you to take a walk through the school and really take the time to look at what students next to you are creating and have already created. It is inspiring and impressive. Advertising is the focal point of consumerism, and we are all consumers, so why not make it new and exciting. We’ll leave it up to Advertising majors to do that. SPRIN G 2 012

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 11


Abercrombie and Fitch isn’t the only company to use sexual elements in their advertising. European based menswear company Suitsupply ran a campaign in 2010 called Shameless. The main gist of their campaign seemed to be attractive men in nice looking suits with scantily clad women. All of the ads from the Shameless campaign infer that the naked women, or about to be naked women, was going to have sex with the man in the suit. As you can imagine this ads caused quite a stir. In this case, a good stir. The Wall Street Journal ranked it No. 1 in 2011. They had Salvatore Giardina and Salvatore Cesarani, both designers, rank Suitsupply’s suits along with Armani, J.Crew, H&M, Hart Schaffner Marx, and Target. They both came to the conclusion of Armani and Suitsupply tied for number one. Their Shameless campaign also caught they attention of Designers Couch, Jezebel, and the Huffington Post, who all wrote articles about the company following the release of the campaign. In my opinion using sex to help sell a product is a cop out. Almost everyone has sex, and almost everyone likes sex. Companies think that’s one thing their consumers all have in common. Of course people will be attracted to attractive and seductive imagery but that is not all we are about. Honestly, it's getting a little repetitive and tiring. How many times will I have to walk by a life size poster of a proportionally perfect women that represents maybe 20 percent of the women population 10

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posing next to a man with chiseled muscles in places I didn’t even know you can have them? Not all men can relate to David Beckham and his new underwear ads for H&M let alone will ever look like him. Not all women can relate to Adriana Lima as she struts down a hallway in Victoria’s Secret ad. What I would like to see is more of is creativity put into advertising. I want to see a company break the mold and create something I actually want to look at. It's not that I don’t enjoy seeing hot men every once in a while, but as an student attending I see other things differently. I see how important typography is and if used adequately it can really make an image pop. Right now the main emotions that advertising evoke for me are either boredom or frustration. If I had a dollar for every time I thought to myself, “What the hell were they thinking?,” I would probably be able to pay off my student loans with no problem when I graduate. Will this ever change? SCAD is filled with innovative thinkers in every major. A lot of us know how to think outside the box and execute that perfectly. There are examples of this as you walk down the hallways of our departments. If anyone can change the future of advertising I believe that they are sitting up on the third floor in the advertising department right now. They have probably been sitting in the same chair

for 12 hours running on fumes, and coffee. Usually they are getting ready to pull their hair out, but somehow they pull off some pretty impressive work regardless. I am by far not an expert on advertising but I believe I have a pretty good eye when it comes to distinguishing between a worthy campaign, and just something gone completely wrong. What sets us apart from others is that we are not looking to re-create something that has been done. We think of new ideas, and run with them. We know how to take risks.

(ALANA) SEX SELLS/ADVE

Yes, sex does sell, but it isn’t the only thing that does. Bold, beautiful, new images can sell a product even better. Art students today are the people who are creating tomorrow., and tomorrow is looking bright. That the world of advertising will soon change as our students are working hard to make sure of that. Each one of us wants to be better than the next. This friendly competition could possibly be the drive we need to set new trends. There are a lot of exciting projects in the works that have captured my eye more than campaigns currently running. I encourage you to take a walk through the school and really take the time to look at what students next to you are creating and have already created. It is inspiring and impressive. Advertising is the focal point of consumerism, and we are all consumers, so why not make it new and exciting. We’ll leave it up to Advertising majors to do that. SPRIN G 2 012

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 11


voyeur or exhibitionist? Photography allow us to be voyeurs accessing a seemingly unwitting subject. Yet some of those subjects are exhibitionists, aren't they? They willingly open up for our eyes, excited by exposing themselves and shocking us. The following might be calculated voyeurism. Or maybe just random acts of exhibitionism. Decide for yourself (and we certainly won't judge you for being one or the other).

photographer Jay Bowman 12

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voyeur or exhibitionist? Photography allow us to be voyeurs accessing a seemingly unwitting subject. Yet some of those subjects are exhibitionists, aren't they? They willingly open up for our eyes, excited by exposing themselves and shocking us. The following might be calculated voyeurism. Or maybe just random acts of exhibitionism. Decide for yourself (and we certainly won't judge you for being one or the other).

photographer Jay Bowman 12

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is always the password writer Alexis Blaudeau

I felt the cold of the floor through my pant bottoms, thorougly chilling my ass and as cold as I remember it; it was in no way able to subdue the allover red color that was being invoked by my sobbing. They had left me alone for the past fifteen minutes. I had been crying from both the humiliation and the possibility that not one of my siblings cared enough to investigate my whereabouts. “It’s not fair.” I was always the butt of the joke, “I bet when I grow up they won’t do me like this anymore,” or so I thought. I remained on the floor until satisfied, my back was pressed agaisnt the corner where the wall met the frame of the door. I felt sorry for myself, and I knew my mother would give them hell when she found out. “Where was she?” I sat there wondering, but the herding of every person who was involved in my torment soon interrupted that thought. “I hate you”, I said. They had made their way to

18

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where I sat just on the other side of the door; someone must have noticed my absence or heard my cries while passing through the corridor. I mean, after all, my sobbing had to serve some purpose. Plus, I had to make it look good for my mom, “maybe I’ll throw up, that’ll show them.” I was justified, I had gauged the event, and in comparison to all the other times my siblings had embarrassed or harassed me; by far this was the worst yet. This, in combination with anger, fueled the uncontrollable heaving and frog like sounds erupting from my twelve-year-old body. They are all much older than me, and it has always been an issue. Natalie, the closest of my siblings—and the one responsible for my ass being cold and my face being red—was ten years older than me. My mother had had my sisters back-to-back and during those ten years before my birth, Natalie was the baby. Perhaps some ill content had manifested

itself that night and Natalie was seeking revenge for the attention I had stolen from her as a child. No matter the reason, what she had done was unwarranted. It was more hurtful than usual for Natalie. Usually she would make me memorize vocabulary words, that if I didn’t recite the definitions correctly, I would be punished with some form of physical abuse (subsequently because of this torture, I’m quite skilled in memorization— thank you, Natalie). This particular weekend we had all found ourselves at my family’s farm in Macon, Mississippi, including one guest, my oldest sister’s boyfriend Jeremy, to my later dismay. They had dated for as long as I could remember. Being only twelve-years-old at the time did not inhibit me from seeing how handsome he was. He had dark brown hair, blue eyes, with lips and a smile reminiscent of Elvis Presley. Needless to say, I had

a crush on him. They were in college and had decided to spend the weekend with the family. He was studying photography and brought a book of nude portraits that they were looking through in the guest bedroom. This was the first time in memory I was allowed to be where they were. I sat on the bed admiring the beautiful shapes of the women illustrated in the antique photographs all the while reminding myself not to say anything that could reflect my inferior age. They were laughing at the women’s pubic hair, and maybe Natalie took this opportunity to ensure that I would never enjoy the privilege of their company again because before I had realized what was happening she had said… “Alexis’ pubic hair is shaped just like this woman’s, isn’t that right Alexis?” I looked up in blank terror. She continued, “You know, your bacon strip?” I was mortified. Everyone was laughing at me. I thought

everyone shaped their pubic hair in that fashion…right? I mean, my sister’s landing strips were only slightly thinner than mine. Worst of all, I knew everyone was picturing me naked. More importantly, Jeremy was picturing me naked. I was exposed, and I couldn’t breathe. I ran to the bathroom and I stayed there all night. The fifteen minutes had passed and they were all there on the other side of the door. My oldest sister, Nicole, passed notes to me through the gap between the green painted cement and the frame. I read something along the lines, “Natalie’s really sorry”, “she didn’t mean it”, and “come on, we can go for a ride.” I was unresponsive. I couldn’t interpret the words over the voices of Natalie and my brother, who were chanting the word “bacon” over and over again. In that moment, I changed; from that day on I wore nothing on my sleeve, I didn’t share my emotions

with anyone, and I began shaving everything. To this day whenever my family is together they often block me physically from entering a room demanding I provide “the password”, which is and will always be bacon—a memento from the event that affected the amount of exposure I permitted to be seen by my family and everyone else. I had made the mistake of feeling comfortable naked around my sisters, and I vowed from that day onward to become a “never-nude”, which proved to be too difficult. So instead I increased my awareness of the leverage someone had on me and eliminated any signs of weakness. I have continued this discipline and today I appear to be a confident yet distant young woman, as if my pubic hair embodied the character of that twelveyear-old girl and by going “bald” I symbolically removed the evidence of my sibling motivated insecurities.

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 19


is always the password writer Alexis Blaudeau

I felt the cold of the floor through my pant bottoms, thorougly chilling my ass and as cold as I remember it; it was in no way able to subdue the allover red color that was being invoked by my sobbing. They had left me alone for the past fifteen minutes. I had been crying from both the humiliation and the possibility that not one of my siblings cared enough to investigate my whereabouts. “It’s not fair.” I was always the butt of the joke, “I bet when I grow up they won’t do me like this anymore,” or so I thought. I remained on the floor until satisfied, my back was pressed agaisnt the corner where the wall met the frame of the door. I felt sorry for myself, and I knew my mother would give them hell when she found out. “Where was she?” I sat there wondering, but the herding of every person who was involved in my torment soon interrupted that thought. “I hate you”, I said. They had made their way to

18

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where I sat just on the other side of the door; someone must have noticed my absence or heard my cries while passing through the corridor. I mean, after all, my sobbing had to serve some purpose. Plus, I had to make it look good for my mom, “maybe I’ll throw up, that’ll show them.” I was justified, I had gauged the event, and in comparison to all the other times my siblings had embarrassed or harassed me; by far this was the worst yet. This, in combination with anger, fueled the uncontrollable heaving and frog like sounds erupting from my twelve-year-old body. They are all much older than me, and it has always been an issue. Natalie, the closest of my siblings—and the one responsible for my ass being cold and my face being red—was ten years older than me. My mother had had my sisters back-to-back and during those ten years before my birth, Natalie was the baby. Perhaps some ill content had manifested

itself that night and Natalie was seeking revenge for the attention I had stolen from her as a child. No matter the reason, what she had done was unwarranted. It was more hurtful than usual for Natalie. Usually she would make me memorize vocabulary words, that if I didn’t recite the definitions correctly, I would be punished with some form of physical abuse (subsequently because of this torture, I’m quite skilled in memorization— thank you, Natalie). This particular weekend we had all found ourselves at my family’s farm in Macon, Mississippi, including one guest, my oldest sister’s boyfriend Jeremy, to my later dismay. They had dated for as long as I could remember. Being only twelve-years-old at the time did not inhibit me from seeing how handsome he was. He had dark brown hair, blue eyes, with lips and a smile reminiscent of Elvis Presley. Needless to say, I had

a crush on him. They were in college and had decided to spend the weekend with the family. He was studying photography and brought a book of nude portraits that they were looking through in the guest bedroom. This was the first time in memory I was allowed to be where they were. I sat on the bed admiring the beautiful shapes of the women illustrated in the antique photographs all the while reminding myself not to say anything that could reflect my inferior age. They were laughing at the women’s pubic hair, and maybe Natalie took this opportunity to ensure that I would never enjoy the privilege of their company again because before I had realized what was happening she had said… “Alexis’ pubic hair is shaped just like this woman’s, isn’t that right Alexis?” I looked up in blank terror. She continued, “You know, your bacon strip?” I was mortified. Everyone was laughing at me. I thought

everyone shaped their pubic hair in that fashion…right? I mean, my sister’s landing strips were only slightly thinner than mine. Worst of all, I knew everyone was picturing me naked. More importantly, Jeremy was picturing me naked. I was exposed, and I couldn’t breathe. I ran to the bathroom and I stayed there all night. The fifteen minutes had passed and they were all there on the other side of the door. My oldest sister, Nicole, passed notes to me through the gap between the green painted cement and the frame. I read something along the lines, “Natalie’s really sorry”, “she didn’t mean it”, and “come on, we can go for a ride.” I was unresponsive. I couldn’t interpret the words over the voices of Natalie and my brother, who were chanting the word “bacon” over and over again. In that moment, I changed; from that day on I wore nothing on my sleeve, I didn’t share my emotions

with anyone, and I began shaving everything. To this day whenever my family is together they often block me physically from entering a room demanding I provide “the password”, which is and will always be bacon—a memento from the event that affected the amount of exposure I permitted to be seen by my family and everyone else. I had made the mistake of feeling comfortable naked around my sisters, and I vowed from that day onward to become a “never-nude”, which proved to be too difficult. So instead I increased my awareness of the leverage someone had on me and eliminated any signs of weakness. I have continued this discipline and today I appear to be a confident yet distant young woman, as if my pubic hair embodied the character of that twelveyear-old girl and by going “bald” I symbolically removed the evidence of my sibling motivated insecurities.

SPRIN G 2 012

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 19


Debacles writer Erin White illusrator Dylan Moore

There are rules for dating at art school. There is protocol. One does not simply date at SCAD. One plays the often fruitless, sudden death round of trying to lasso a dame or lad into some type of romantic situation. The dating paradigm at art school is unbalanced, unfair and completely depressing for a few reasons. These reasons are kind of like rules. Rule number one: every guy is assumed gay until proven straight. If you’re a straight person seeking a straight partner and your target has passed this test, head to rule two. Is your potential beau single? At SCAD, chances are they’re not. In my experience the most eligible males, the ones with decent social and conversational skills ranging beyond World of War craft, are typically already taken. At a school that is roughly 60 percent women and 40 percent men, there just aren’t a lot of options. For every six girls there are four men. Lets then assume that one out of four are gay. Then assume one out of three are taken. That’s really only two men for every six women. These numbers minus the socially 20

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in Dating

awkward factor and shrinks the dating pool to ridiculously pathetic odds. As something of an experiment, I have dated two guys from art school. Both of them passed rule number one and neither of them are destined for a relationship. Guy number one is a SCAD Alum and is working at a sushi restaurant rolling raw fish with his $120,000 degree. He is sweet, laid back and he is also a nerd. His bedroom is covered in framed comic books and Marvel superhero posters. On the floor, piles of dirty clothes, food wrappers and an impressive sneaker collection. I notice he bed has no sheets. This is probably because he gives all his money to Marvel. His room smells vaguely of dog and sweat. I am almost certain he wouldn’t know what to do with a girl if he had a manual. Guy number two doesn’t need a manual; he needs a slow-down button. While he is neither nerdy, nor gay, he falls into the tragic category of the unwilling to commit. This strain of SCAD men is usually distracted by the buffet of single, attractive and often desperate SCAD girls on the prowl. He could fit in at a traditional school, but his creative na-

ture makes him uniquely fit for SCAD. Sometimes he buys for me dinner, but more often he’s trying to undress me at ACA House. Per usual I’m being smooshed into the cold, blank dorm room wall and a twin mattress. The lighting is harsh and unflattering; I try to conceal my love handles. My hair is matted against a pillow that I’m sure has never been washed. I can hear his roommate laughing to the “Cool Whip” episode of Family Guy and the guy next door coughing up wads of phlegm. I’m trying to protect myself for both his tentacle-like hands and from falling off the bed. I am reminded of why I’ve never been into college guys. To be fair, I’m not the perfect dating candidate either. As an artist, which means I am completely crazy. I’m neurotic about ridiculous things like being extremely early everyone where I go. I ration my food before I eat it, for Christ’s sake. I’m extremely argumentative and have an unabashed air of smugness. I also always feel entitled to the last cookie in the box. It’s not that I’m prejudice of my fellow undergraduate degree-seeking peers; it’s the fact that guys my own age tend to be SPRIN G 2 012

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 21


Debacles writer Erin White illusrator Dylan Moore

There are rules for dating at art school. There is protocol. One does not simply date at SCAD. One plays the often fruitless, sudden death round of trying to lasso a dame or lad into some type of romantic situation. The dating paradigm at art school is unbalanced, unfair and completely depressing for a few reasons. These reasons are kind of like rules. Rule number one: every guy is assumed gay until proven straight. If you’re a straight person seeking a straight partner and your target has passed this test, head to rule two. Is your potential beau single? At SCAD, chances are they’re not. In my experience the most eligible males, the ones with decent social and conversational skills ranging beyond World of War craft, are typically already taken. At a school that is roughly 60 percent women and 40 percent men, there just aren’t a lot of options. For every six girls there are four men. Lets then assume that one out of four are gay. Then assume one out of three are taken. That’s really only two men for every six women. These numbers minus the socially 20

S C A N MAGAZINE

» SPR ING

2 012

in Dating

awkward factor and shrinks the dating pool to ridiculously pathetic odds. As something of an experiment, I have dated two guys from art school. Both of them passed rule number one and neither of them are destined for a relationship. Guy number one is a SCAD Alum and is working at a sushi restaurant rolling raw fish with his $120,000 degree. He is sweet, laid back and he is also a nerd. His bedroom is covered in framed comic books and Marvel superhero posters. On the floor, piles of dirty clothes, food wrappers and an impressive sneaker collection. I notice he bed has no sheets. This is probably because he gives all his money to Marvel. His room smells vaguely of dog and sweat. I am almost certain he wouldn’t know what to do with a girl if he had a manual. Guy number two doesn’t need a manual; he needs a slow-down button. While he is neither nerdy, nor gay, he falls into the tragic category of the unwilling to commit. This strain of SCAD men is usually distracted by the buffet of single, attractive and often desperate SCAD girls on the prowl. He could fit in at a traditional school, but his creative na-

ture makes him uniquely fit for SCAD. Sometimes he buys for me dinner, but more often he’s trying to undress me at ACA House. Per usual I’m being smooshed into the cold, blank dorm room wall and a twin mattress. The lighting is harsh and unflattering; I try to conceal my love handles. My hair is matted against a pillow that I’m sure has never been washed. I can hear his roommate laughing to the “Cool Whip” episode of Family Guy and the guy next door coughing up wads of phlegm. I’m trying to protect myself for both his tentacle-like hands and from falling off the bed. I am reminded of why I’ve never been into college guys. To be fair, I’m not the perfect dating candidate either. As an artist, which means I am completely crazy. I’m neurotic about ridiculous things like being extremely early everyone where I go. I ration my food before I eat it, for Christ’s sake. I’m extremely argumentative and have an unabashed air of smugness. I also always feel entitled to the last cookie in the box. It’s not that I’m prejudice of my fellow undergraduate degree-seeking peers; it’s the fact that guys my own age tend to be SPRIN G 2 012

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 21


Guy number two is just like this. Having had one relationship of significant weight he is now a professional at remaining emotionally unavailable. He reminds me of the Pirates of the Caribbean version of Davey Jones. He keeps his heart detached and locked far, far away for no one to find. The Hub at SCAD Atlanta is a central multipurpose room. It’s a watering hole, a home-

One of the newest additions to the eligible student crowd includes a handsome, bearded brunette guy some girls have been referring to as “The Lumberjack”. The ladies refer to him as such due to his rugged appearance consisting of flannel shirts and dirty boots. He’s decently tall, fairly muscular and he appears to be straight. He’s a straight hottie, so naturally he’s already on the radar. In the event that an actual relationship does bloom, there's a special connection only kids at an art school would experience. At SCAD, students are often pushed to their limits as

artists and as students. Over a ten week period we jump through typographical hurdles, rendering hoops of fire, and swing through the endless cave of color theory and learning to measure 3/15ths of an inch. Our experience at an institution that judges us on our innovation is different from those who experience college in a more traditional sense. Instead of spending hours hunched over a textbook of meaningless facts, we are building five-feet tall lighting installations for Martha Whittington’s 3D Design class. We spend dozens of painstaking hours slicing and mutilating Color Aid with an Xact-o knife, shaping it into nonverbal confessions of our deepest emotions. We spend what feels like hours being critiqued and criticized for what we once considered a masterpiece in front of our peers. We struggle to get sleep. We struggle to stay motivated. We struggle to be strong, professional artists. The metamorphous that we embark on during our journey is a beautiful, powerful time in our lives and it’s really cool to share on a

deeper level in a relationship. These things are something that only a fellow artist and student would really understand. The beauty of dating at art school is that you’re with someone who is also going through the same gauntlet that’s currently kicking your ass. You share in the pain, success and growth you experience in college. You have the opportunity to watch them grow and blossom as an artist, and in return you give them the same. I must say I long for that connection, but for now I’ll just settle of a guy that’s straight.

ROSWELL

1165 WOODSTOCK RD. (NEAR SUPER TARGET) 770-993-0240 CODE #07510

Younger guys also have a limited scope on the lady front. They don’t have the type of experience that makes one mature in love. They probably had one serious girlfriend in or after high school which ended tragically and now care for quantity than quality.

work den and mating ground. Students dress in everything from six inch heels to bunny rabbit slippers to travel through the common area. Like peacocks the students strut across the hardwood, chests puffed out, hair bouncing in a subconscious attempt to attract someone worth attracting. Everyone checks each other out here. Especially if you’re a new student. New students are subject to the burning gaze of the hungry, wolf pack of old students preying on new blood for the hopes of new romantic prospects.

CODE #07511

too underdeveloped. Sexually, they tend to be selfish lovers who only imitate what they see on the internet. While I’m not seeking a “baller-shot-caller” type, I find myself being most attracted to guys who have at least dipped their toe in a career field. These guys tend to be more goal oriented and actively ambitious. They handle their business. Their mothers don’t pay for their meal plan.

40% PRINT % 20 ORDER ENTIRE FRAMING off PACKAGE

off

VALID 4/4/12 TO 4/18/12

*Offer good only towards purchase of complete custom framing package which must include mounting and fitting of artwork; and/or complete printing order. Offer not valid towards purchase of individual frame mouldings not part of a complete custom framing package. Offer not valid towards ready-made frames. Coupon must be surrendered at time of purchase; no copies will be honored. Limit one coupon per visit. Not valid with any other discounts or previously placed orders. Limit 3 complete framing packages.

20%

ENTIRE PURCHASE OF NON-SALE, off IN STOCK ITEMS

VALID 4/4/12 TO 4/18/12

Blick Art Materials, Retail Inc., coupon must be surrendered at time of purchase; no copies will be honored. Limit one coupon per visit. Valid only on non-sale, in-stock items. Not valid with any other discounts or promotion, phone/mail/internet orders, furniture and purchases of gift cards.

*Ao07509* 22

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 23


Guy number two is just like this. Having had one relationship of significant weight he is now a professional at remaining emotionally unavailable. He reminds me of the Pirates of the Caribbean version of Davey Jones. He keeps his heart detached and locked far, far away for no one to find. The Hub at SCAD Atlanta is a central multipurpose room. It’s a watering hole, a home-

One of the newest additions to the eligible student crowd includes a handsome, bearded brunette guy some girls have been referring to as “The Lumberjack”. The ladies refer to him as such due to his rugged appearance consisting of flannel shirts and dirty boots. He’s decently tall, fairly muscular and he appears to be straight. He’s a straight hottie, so naturally he’s already on the radar. In the event that an actual relationship does bloom, there's a special connection only kids at an art school would experience. At SCAD, students are often pushed to their limits as

artists and as students. Over a ten week period we jump through typographical hurdles, rendering hoops of fire, and swing through the endless cave of color theory and learning to measure 3/15ths of an inch. Our experience at an institution that judges us on our innovation is different from those who experience college in a more traditional sense. Instead of spending hours hunched over a textbook of meaningless facts, we are building five-feet tall lighting installations for Martha Whittington’s 3D Design class. We spend dozens of painstaking hours slicing and mutilating Color Aid with an Xact-o knife, shaping it into nonverbal confessions of our deepest emotions. We spend what feels like hours being critiqued and criticized for what we once considered a masterpiece in front of our peers. We struggle to get sleep. We struggle to stay motivated. We struggle to be strong, professional artists. The metamorphous that we embark on during our journey is a beautiful, powerful time in our lives and it’s really cool to share on a

deeper level in a relationship. These things are something that only a fellow artist and student would really understand. The beauty of dating at art school is that you’re with someone who is also going through the same gauntlet that’s currently kicking your ass. You share in the pain, success and growth you experience in college. You have the opportunity to watch them grow and blossom as an artist, and in return you give them the same. I must say I long for that connection, but for now I’ll just settle of a guy that’s straight.

ROSWELL

1165 WOODSTOCK RD. (NEAR SUPER TARGET) 770-993-0240 CODE #07510

Younger guys also have a limited scope on the lady front. They don’t have the type of experience that makes one mature in love. They probably had one serious girlfriend in or after high school which ended tragically and now care for quantity than quality.

work den and mating ground. Students dress in everything from six inch heels to bunny rabbit slippers to travel through the common area. Like peacocks the students strut across the hardwood, chests puffed out, hair bouncing in a subconscious attempt to attract someone worth attracting. Everyone checks each other out here. Especially if you’re a new student. New students are subject to the burning gaze of the hungry, wolf pack of old students preying on new blood for the hopes of new romantic prospects.

CODE #07511

too underdeveloped. Sexually, they tend to be selfish lovers who only imitate what they see on the internet. While I’m not seeking a “baller-shot-caller” type, I find myself being most attracted to guys who have at least dipped their toe in a career field. These guys tend to be more goal oriented and actively ambitious. They handle their business. Their mothers don’t pay for their meal plan.

40% PRINT % 20 ORDER ENTIRE FRAMING off PACKAGE

off

VALID 4/4/12 TO 4/18/12

*Offer good only towards purchase of complete custom framing package which must include mounting and fitting of artwork; and/or complete printing order. Offer not valid towards purchase of individual frame mouldings not part of a complete custom framing package. Offer not valid towards ready-made frames. Coupon must be surrendered at time of purchase; no copies will be honored. Limit one coupon per visit. Not valid with any other discounts or previously placed orders. Limit 3 complete framing packages.

20%

ENTIRE PURCHASE OF NON-SALE, off IN STOCK ITEMS

VALID 4/4/12 TO 4/18/12

Blick Art Materials, Retail Inc., coupon must be surrendered at time of purchase; no copies will be honored. Limit one coupon per visit. Valid only on non-sale, in-stock items. Not valid with any other discounts or promotion, phone/mail/internet orders, furniture and purchases of gift cards.

*Ao07509* 22

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Adventures in Life Drawing

(ILLU[BARRY]) LIFE DRAWING

Censorship in art has been an issue for years, especially when it comes to the nude body. In these pieces three different illustrators, they take censorship in a surrealist approach to the various forces censorsing their subjects.

illustrator Ruth Meharg 24

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Adventures in Life Drawing

(ILLU[BARRY]) LIFE DRAWING

Censorship in art has been an issue for years, especially when it comes to the nude body. In these pieces three different illustrators, they take censorship in a surrealist approach to the various forces censorsing their subjects.

illustrator Ruth Meharg 24

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(ILLU[BARRY]) LIFE DRAWING

(ILLU[BARRY]) LIFE DRAWING

illustrator Erin McManness

Jonquel Norwood

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(ILLU[BARRY]) LIFE DRAWING

(ILLU[BARRY]) LIFE DRAWING

illustrator Erin McManness

Jonquel Norwood

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student showcase

» TELE

Tanya Tucker Tanya Tucker is a television production major and senior at SCAD who has recently begun working full time at TNT, after interning there since last June. Her official job title is Production Assistant/Librarian. Where do you hope this job we’ll lead? What’s your dream position? I’m a very ambitious person. I want to continue growing within the department in this first year. My long-term goal is to be in my Vice President’s position. I love TNT, so if I’m still working there I’ll be happy. If I keep

Television Production is a newer major, and we didn’t have a club, so I said, "Why can’t it have a club?" And really getting to show the rest of the school what we are doing, which a lot of people don’t understand, because we’re not fine arts. Also, I’ve gotten to bring a lot of my outside experiences, from working at TNT, in to help the other students — with panels and workshops with TNT people. Students I don’t even know will ask me for advice. I love that. I definitely want to remain involved at SCAD after I leave and be a resource for the students. I believe I have a lot

work, what would my bosses go for and their bosses go for, and so forth? But I definitely see that the industry’s changing. It’s nice that you start to see certain networks in television that they really want to push the boundary with it, and I like it. If you want to push that envelope, if you want to go there and, you know, do some risque things, do it in an artistic manner, that’s what you have to do in order to make it more acceptable. That’s how I would do it, and how I naturally do it in my own work. It needs to have a point behind it; I think that’s the important part is having a

going in the direction I’ve been going, I think I can get there.

of knowledge to share. I have great people as mentors and I hope to do that.

purpose behind it, not just because you can.

How does your artistic background affect your work? I really appreciate the education I’ve gotten at SCAD. I work with a lot of people who didn’t come from arts school backgrounds — they’re from communication backgrounds and things like that. I really feel like the creative foundations SCAD has given me have helped me stand out.

Have you had any experience with censorship in your major? Has SCAD influenced your ideas on this manner in any way? These questions of censorship are an issue. I think that, overall, the industry is definitely opening up to it more. I am one, I would like to be able to just do what I want to, but I’m just the kind of person that I just naturally go, would this fly? Would it be okay? But naturally I think I just have to think about that, because I know in the professional world that’s an issue, and you have to consider what would be socially acceptable, and, my case at

What has been your favorite experience as a television production major at SCAD? Showrunners — the whole creation of it. 28

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What advice do you have for younger television production majors? Network. Networking is how I got to where I am now. Be curious. Ask questions. Don’t be okay with mediocre and being average. Make sure people notice you, in good ways, of course. And one of my big things was always using the resources at this school. So every time there was a speaker that came in related to my major, I went. Don’t forget those contacts. Informational interviews are probably the most important thing I could say.

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student showcase

» TELE

Tanya Tucker Tanya Tucker is a television production major and senior at SCAD who has recently begun working full time at TNT, after interning there since last June. Her official job title is Production Assistant/Librarian. Where do you hope this job we’ll lead? What’s your dream position? I’m a very ambitious person. I want to continue growing within the department in this first year. My long-term goal is to be in my Vice President’s position. I love TNT, so if I’m still working there I’ll be happy. If I keep

Television Production is a newer major, and we didn’t have a club, so I said, "Why can’t it have a club?" And really getting to show the rest of the school what we are doing, which a lot of people don’t understand, because we’re not fine arts. Also, I’ve gotten to bring a lot of my outside experiences, from working at TNT, in to help the other students — with panels and workshops with TNT people. Students I don’t even know will ask me for advice. I love that. I definitely want to remain involved at SCAD after I leave and be a resource for the students. I believe I have a lot

work, what would my bosses go for and their bosses go for, and so forth? But I definitely see that the industry’s changing. It’s nice that you start to see certain networks in television that they really want to push the boundary with it, and I like it. If you want to push that envelope, if you want to go there and, you know, do some risque things, do it in an artistic manner, that’s what you have to do in order to make it more acceptable. That’s how I would do it, and how I naturally do it in my own work. It needs to have a point behind it; I think that’s the important part is having a

going in the direction I’ve been going, I think I can get there.

of knowledge to share. I have great people as mentors and I hope to do that.

purpose behind it, not just because you can.

How does your artistic background affect your work? I really appreciate the education I’ve gotten at SCAD. I work with a lot of people who didn’t come from arts school backgrounds — they’re from communication backgrounds and things like that. I really feel like the creative foundations SCAD has given me have helped me stand out.

Have you had any experience with censorship in your major? Has SCAD influenced your ideas on this manner in any way? These questions of censorship are an issue. I think that, overall, the industry is definitely opening up to it more. I am one, I would like to be able to just do what I want to, but I’m just the kind of person that I just naturally go, would this fly? Would it be okay? But naturally I think I just have to think about that, because I know in the professional world that’s an issue, and you have to consider what would be socially acceptable, and, my case at

What has been your favorite experience as a television production major at SCAD? Showrunners — the whole creation of it. 28

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What advice do you have for younger television production majors? Network. Networking is how I got to where I am now. Be curious. Ask questions. Don’t be okay with mediocre and being average. Make sure people notice you, in good ways, of course. And one of my big things was always using the resources at this school. So every time there was a speaker that came in related to my major, I went. Don’t forget those contacts. Informational interviews are probably the most important thing I could say.

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student showcase

» ANIM

Evan Curtis Evan Curtis is a graduate student majoring in animation. He is finishing his thesis, entitled “The Dream of Ore Magi,” which is based on a dream he had in undergrad. The short film recently won the Sir Edmund Hillary award for Best Animation at the Mountain Film Awards in California. Describe your dream job. My dream job would be to work for myself. To find a producer to, you know, trust me and say, “Go do what you want and here’s my money.” Right now I have written a feature-length script. I’ve done a lot of stop-motion short films and I would like to make a feature. And that’s what I’m planning right now. I would also like to get back into doing outdoor leadership maybe as a kayak guide. Before coming to SCAD, I worked for the Montana Conservation Core. It was just amazing to be in Montana. So, for me, my dream job isn’t necessarily working in the animation field. I think it’s more inspiring to do something outside of your field because that’s where you’ll get inspiration. I’ve done internships in animation studios and they were not very inspiring at all.

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How does your artistic background affect your work? Growing up in the mountains, I love being outside and doing activities, which is why I’m drawn to stop motion because it’s very physical and you’re not sitting in front of a computer. So instead of spending all day in a windowless studio, I occasionally like to take my puppets and toys out on physical locations and shoot them. My environment and my landscape has definitely shaped who I am and I want to feature that in my movies.

Have you had any experience with censorship in your major? Has SCAD influenced your ideas on this manner in any way? I did my undergrad at SUNY Purchase, and they did not care at all. They did not censor at all. My peers were making films with nudity, penetration, cursing, everything. At SCAD, I don’t think that would ever go. I feel like maybe, because the Atlanta campus is a little more intimate and you get to know your professors more, if I wanted to propose a story that would have something in it like that, they would let me make it, but it wouldn’t

What has been your favorite experience as an animator at SCAD? My film “Chief Serenbe” was definitely reflective of my experience in Atlanta and my feelings of being in grad school and that desire to get out. That film has played at the more festivals than any of my films. It’s gotten into South by Southwest, which is the biggest festival I’ve ever gotten into. Being able to go to that and experience it was really great. Because of that, other festivals have contacted me and wanted my film without me having to pay the submission fees. I definitely feel that making that film was a great experience. It’s on my website, along with all my other films.

get shown on campus. So I think it would get censored, definitely, which is strange, and I was not expecting that. Just the idea that there is this limitation, this unspoken censorship, it definitely affects the students. What advice do you have for younger major? As the Roman poet Ovid once said, “When Death comes let it find me at my work.” Look everywhere outside your major for inspiration and take risks. Lastly, you're not a filmmaker unless you make films, so quit dilly-dallying and get to work.

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SC AN M AGAZIN E 31


student showcase

» ANIM

Evan Curtis Evan Curtis is a graduate student majoring in animation. He is finishing his thesis, entitled “The Dream of Ore Magi,” which is based on a dream he had in undergrad. The short film recently won the Sir Edmund Hillary award for Best Animation at the Mountain Film Awards in California. Describe your dream job. My dream job would be to work for myself. To find a producer to, you know, trust me and say, “Go do what you want and here’s my money.” Right now I have written a feature-length script. I’ve done a lot of stop-motion short films and I would like to make a feature. And that’s what I’m planning right now. I would also like to get back into doing outdoor leadership maybe as a kayak guide. Before coming to SCAD, I worked for the Montana Conservation Core. It was just amazing to be in Montana. So, for me, my dream job isn’t necessarily working in the animation field. I think it’s more inspiring to do something outside of your field because that’s where you’ll get inspiration. I’ve done internships in animation studios and they were not very inspiring at all.

30

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How does your artistic background affect your work? Growing up in the mountains, I love being outside and doing activities, which is why I’m drawn to stop motion because it’s very physical and you’re not sitting in front of a computer. So instead of spending all day in a windowless studio, I occasionally like to take my puppets and toys out on physical locations and shoot them. My environment and my landscape has definitely shaped who I am and I want to feature that in my movies.

Have you had any experience with censorship in your major? Has SCAD influenced your ideas on this manner in any way? I did my undergrad at SUNY Purchase, and they did not care at all. They did not censor at all. My peers were making films with nudity, penetration, cursing, everything. At SCAD, I don’t think that would ever go. I feel like maybe, because the Atlanta campus is a little more intimate and you get to know your professors more, if I wanted to propose a story that would have something in it like that, they would let me make it, but it wouldn’t

What has been your favorite experience as an animator at SCAD? My film “Chief Serenbe” was definitely reflective of my experience in Atlanta and my feelings of being in grad school and that desire to get out. That film has played at the more festivals than any of my films. It’s gotten into South by Southwest, which is the biggest festival I’ve ever gotten into. Being able to go to that and experience it was really great. Because of that, other festivals have contacted me and wanted my film without me having to pay the submission fees. I definitely feel that making that film was a great experience. It’s on my website, along with all my other films.

get shown on campus. So I think it would get censored, definitely, which is strange, and I was not expecting that. Just the idea that there is this limitation, this unspoken censorship, it definitely affects the students. What advice do you have for younger major? As the Roman poet Ovid once said, “When Death comes let it find me at my work.” Look everywhere outside your major for inspiration and take risks. Lastly, you're not a filmmaker unless you make films, so quit dilly-dallying and get to work.

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born to be

clothes- free

Artists are notoriously a bit eccentric. We're not afraid to stand out in a crowd. Whether it is wearing sequins, 7-inch heels or nothing at all, art students are constantly pushing the limits, testing boundaries and throwing caution to the wind artistically, professionally and socially. And it seems we have been doing so since birth. We may not have realized that our aversion to the standardized Geranimalswear meant we were destined for right-side brain greatness, but we definitely knew that we didn’t want to blend in with the rest of the future-suit-wearing OshKoshB’Gosh kids.

My parents always feared that I was going to become a stripper. Just as soon as my mother would put clothes on me, I would be taking them off. I would shed them throughout the house – a sock here, a pair of pants there – until I was completely naked. Except for my pink cowgirl boots. All I ever needed was a good heel and I was happy.

–– Caroline Huftalen

I’ve enjoyed walking around my house naked for as long as I can remember. It’s not that I’m a nudist, I just don’t like to wear clothes. Why wouldn’t you want to be naked? Being naked is the most natural state you could physically be in. You’re no longer restricted by garments and are instead free of all binding. It’s liberation.

––Erin White It was really hard to get me to take a bath when I was little. Why would I want to be clean? I was just going to go outside afterwards and get dirty anyway. Once at my grandparents, I covered myself in an impressive amount of mud. My grandmother told me I had to have a bath, but I was not interested. She coaxed me into the bathroom, but I bolted at the sight of the running water. “Nude dude coming through!” I repeated as I ran through the house. –– Dylan Fagan

problem with wearing them in Miami is the damn heat. Inevitably, halfway through any family party, I'd be running around half-naked and drinking the coldest thing I could get my hands on. This is one aptitude that never really left me.

My parents also harbored concerns about my prospective future career as a kid; they figured I’d either end up an exotic dancer (since I loved running around sans clothes) or a lawyer (since I loved arguing about why I should be allowed to do so). No matter how many salient points I made, the one case I could never win was that it just wasn’t fair how — even at age five — boys didn’t have to wear shirts, but girls did. At least I have something to fall back on in case art school doesn’t pan out.

–– Jacob VanWinkle

–– Brittany Kron

Growing up in Miami, I used to love wearing suits. The 80's-style Miami Vice suits were my favorite, but the only

NS, MEA E H T VE U HA O Y F I IC. MUS E H T AVE WE H

SCADATLANTARADIO.ORG

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born to be

clothes- free

Artists are notoriously a bit eccentric. We're not afraid to stand out in a crowd. Whether it is wearing sequins, 7-inch heels or nothing at all, art students are constantly pushing the limits, testing boundaries and throwing caution to the wind artistically, professionally and socially. And it seems we have been doing so since birth. We may not have realized that our aversion to the standardized Geranimalswear meant we were destined for right-side brain greatness, but we definitely knew that we didn’t want to blend in with the rest of the future-suit-wearing OshKoshB’Gosh kids.

My parents always feared that I was going to become a stripper. Just as soon as my mother would put clothes on me, I would be taking them off. I would shed them throughout the house – a sock here, a pair of pants there – until I was completely naked. Except for my pink cowgirl boots. All I ever needed was a good heel and I was happy.

–– Caroline Huftalen

I’ve enjoyed walking around my house naked for as long as I can remember. It’s not that I’m a nudist, I just don’t like to wear clothes. Why wouldn’t you want to be naked? Being naked is the most natural state you could physically be in. You’re no longer restricted by garments and are instead free of all binding. It’s liberation.

––Erin White It was really hard to get me to take a bath when I was little. Why would I want to be clean? I was just going to go outside afterwards and get dirty anyway. Once at my grandparents, I covered myself in an impressive amount of mud. My grandmother told me I had to have a bath, but I was not interested. She coaxed me into the bathroom, but I bolted at the sight of the running water. “Nude dude coming through!” I repeated as I ran through the house. –– Dylan Fagan

problem with wearing them in Miami is the damn heat. Inevitably, halfway through any family party, I'd be running around half-naked and drinking the coldest thing I could get my hands on. This is one aptitude that never really left me.

My parents also harbored concerns about my prospective future career as a kid; they figured I’d either end up an exotic dancer (since I loved running around sans clothes) or a lawyer (since I loved arguing about why I should be allowed to do so). No matter how many salient points I made, the one case I could never win was that it just wasn’t fair how — even at age five — boys didn’t have to wear shirts, but girls did. At least I have something to fall back on in case art school doesn’t pan out.

–– Jacob VanWinkle

–– Brittany Kron

Growing up in Miami, I used to love wearing suits. The 80's-style Miami Vice suits were my favorite, but the only

NS, MEA E H T VE U HA O Y F I IC. MUS E H T AVE WE H

SCADATLANTARADIO.ORG

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Scan Spring 2012 Issue  

SCAD Atlanta's student produced magazine. This Spring 2012 issue is about relationships

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