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SCAD ATLANTA’S STUDENT MAGAZINE WINTER 2016 | VOL. 8 NO. 1


Interested in contributing to The Connector, SCAD Atlanta’s award-winning student news source? We’re always looking for photographers, illustrators, writers and more! The only requirement is that you’re a SCAD Atlanta student and ready to join a team of unique individuals collaborating to deliver news and information to the SCAD Atlanta community. For more information, email editor@scadconnector.com.

VISIT US ONLINE AT: scadconnector.com


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MEET THE STAFF

JEN SCHWARTZ editor-in-chief

LUANNE DEMEO creative director

VANIA HO art director

MATTHEW CORNWALL PR director

ASPEN EVANS style editor

ACQUILLE DUNKLEY photo editor

EMME RAUS copy editor

KRIS SEPPALA copy editor

SCOTT RUSSELL arts and entertainment editor

ANDERSON CARMAN comics editor

KATE BETTS

features editor

TONESA JONES opinions editor

photographed by LUANNE DEMEO

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS written by SHELLEY DANZY | illustrated by GABI MANCINI

“…to continue to grow into a happier, stronger person and create!” JISU JEAN PYO | BFA GRAPHIC DESIGN

When it comes to identifying characteristics, members of SCAD Atlanta’s student body all have some common denominators — as a whole we are artists, SCAD students and ATLiens, to name just a few. Though it would be easy to lop us all together based on those similarities, identity is so much more than simply what you do, where you study and where you live. People express their identity in a myriad of differing ways. Whether that be by their personal style choices or simply by watching a show that focuses on characters they relate to -- we’re exploring it all in this issue.

JEN SCHWARTZ editor-in-chief

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016

“…to overcome my fear of trying new things with my art.” MICHAEL MURENGEZI | BFA ANIMATION


“…to become a better producer/ songwriter, to have greater imagination and to become better spiritually, mentally and physically.” MATTHEW PETERS, JR. | BFA SEQUENTIAL ART

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STUDENT SHOWCASE

Love Runs Out (motion typography)

Didot vs. Fenice (typography book)

Legacy Edition Cigars (packaging)

iPet App (application)

IF SOMEONE ELSE REALLY KNOWS WHY AN IDEA WON’T WORK, THEN IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT TO LISTEN TO THEIR OPINION AND JUST LET IT GO AND FIND SOMETHING ELSE. SOMETIMES BY THROWING OUT IDEAS A BETTER ONE COMES ALONG. IT’S JUST A MATTER [OF] MOVING ONE QUICK UNTIL YOU FIND THE BEST IDEA AT THE END.

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


STUDENT SHOWCASE

JUAN DAVID GIRALDO HOYOS written by KAMILA MORELL photographed by DUC NGO

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PS-enabled shoes that vibrate to let you know when to when to turn or keep moving forward, the “takeover” of city maps throughout Atlanta, and the ultimate final event: a maze where only these special shoes let you navigate through. This was advertising graduate Juan David Giraldo Hoyos’ favorite project during his time as a graduate student at SCAD Atlanta. It was an amazing collaborative experience, even throughout the many challenges it faced and the several redesigns the campaign survived in order to reach the public. In many ways, it seems like Giraldo is equipped with his own navigation system, a personal drive that allows him to choose a path or create it. No big, flashy arrows and pinpoints in sight, Giraldo’s journey is more a series of internal nudges that lead him to move forward or pivot, much like those GPS shoes. Originally from Pereira, Colombia, Giraldo didn’t always know what he wanted to pursue upon entering college. He did, however, trust in his curiosity and artistic inclinations, saying about advertising that, “It always amazed me, watching cool commercials and everything, but I never thought I would end up doing it.” In many ways it seems like advertising was in the pursuit of finding him too. He pursued his undergraduate degree in

advertising at the Catholic University of Manizales. This college was conveniently close to home and he would go to class during the week and return for the weekends. A point he vividly remembers that changed his career outlook was a school visit to the major advertising agencies in Bogotá, the country’s capital, remembering; “…That blew my mind. Seeing how they worked, the things they came up with… I thought, ‘This is definitely what I want to do. This is perfect.’” After getting his bachelors from the Catholic University of Manizales, Giraldo went to work for the internationally renowned J. Walter Thompson agency in Bogotá, getting promoted internally for several years until reaching a steady state plateau. Watching as several of his peers left to pursue an advanced degree, Juan refused to be left behind. Combine that with his self-description as a “super competitive” person and you have one unstoppable SCAD student. It would be easy to assume that based on his former bachelors in advertising and the years of industry experience would make his pursuit of a Masters at SCAD a little more easygoing? Advantageous? Dare we think, easier? Nope.

As he explains, “I wanted to challenge myself, more than anything else … and SCAD definitely challenged me a lot.” During his time at SCAD Atlanta from 2014 to 2015, Giraldo focused on the course projects, on building a strong portfolio, and learning other valuable life skills along the way. One of the most important he considers has to do with the relationship between product and creator, warning against the notion of holding ideas as “precious.” He says: “If someone else really knows why an idea won’t work, then it’s really important to listen to their opinion and just let it go and find something else. Sometimes by throwing out ideas a better one comes along. It’s just a matter [of] moving one quick until you find the best idea at the end.” Another piece of advice we hear a lot at SCAD but can sometimes overlook has to do with taking advantage of everything the school has to offer, holds special meaning to Giraldo since it’s responsible for getting him to his current job in the industry: Out to Launch. It was during this event where he met his future employers and describes it as an amazing experience. Transitioning to industry isn’t automatic, but from Juan’s experience just being at SCAD is “a huge door opener.”

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STUDENT SHOWCASE

Dirty Laundry (board game)

FoodBaby (website)

Pitfall (game)

Pitfall Game Atmosphere

THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN KIDS WHO LIKE PLAYING VIDEO GAMES AND KIDS WHO PLAY [THEM] TO FIGURE THEM OUT... AND I WAS PLAYING ALWAYS TO FIGURE IT OUT. [...] I WANT TO KNOW HOW THIS WAS MADE. I DON’T CARE WHAT’S GOING ON... I WANT TO KNOW HOW THE THOUGHT PROCESS WAS AND HOW IT WORKS.

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


STUDENT SHOWCASE

BHABNA HAQUE written by KAMILA MORELL photographed by DUC NGO

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ith her focused mind, tech savvy skills, and knack for planning, Bhabna Haque’s mind works like that of an engineer. She could have easily fit in with the likes of Georgia Tech or Georgia State taking a more traditional curriculum and degree, a path she always considered before learning about SCAD. But like most of us pursuing an arts and design degree, creativity is not optional for her: Haque knew she always wanted to be “in the creative side of technology.” Originally entering SCAD as a Game Design major and now a junior student pursuing the Interactive Design track, Haque’s focused career is a platform; spinning and gaining momentum ready to launch her forward with all speed into the realm of User Experience where she sees herself working with the likes of Google and NASA. But make no mistake, even though she may be focused, her sight is never narrow. She is interested in making a difference, of having some kind of impact, “Even if it’s just one person.” If you asked her when she was first starting her time at SCAD what her future as a college student looked like, she would have never been able

to imagine her reality, which not only includes amazing SCAD projects and assignments, some freelance work for local Atlanta businesses, an upcoming blog called Empty Nest, interning during the summer at Moxie Agency, and a summer job as SCAD counselor to high school students. Giving her direction is the personal responsibility she feels for doing the best she can and being an example especially for women, and women of color. She explains that merely having the option to come to SCAD for an arts degree and pursue a creative career is drive enough to succeed. Coming from nearby John’s Creek, Georgia, Haque was always tech savvy and described herself as the “kid that knew how to fix printers and computers.” Combine that with growing up playing a lot of video games, it’s a no brainer why she chose this particular major – or the major chose her. “There is a difference between kids who like playing video games and kids who play [them] to figure them out ... and I was playing always to figure it out. Like, I want to know how this was made. I don’t care what’s going on … I want to know how the thought process was and how it works.” Even

during her pre-SCAD time, Haque showed signs of being not just a consumer of creativity, but also a creator. Haque’s path so far has been unique to her plans and interests. Mapping her way, building those connecting bridges, as we all strive to do through SCAD and beyond. She is an example of what may be the only universal trait SCAD students share: uniqueness. She is a testament that the world is ready to hear our voices and see our art. Whether inside a classroom with a professor, a meeting room with a client, or the videogames in our living rooms, Haque shows that we don’t create things that live outside of ourselves, but that have room in all our lives. She knows you don’t have to wait until finishing college to reach your potential. The opportunity is here. The opportunity is now. She says: “Be more open-minded. Meet other people. Give other majors a chance. Give yourself the time to grow. This is one of the biggest decisions [coming to SCAD] so don’t close yourself up.”

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UNIVERSAL TRUTHS WE’VE FORGOTTEN

UNIVERSAL TRUTHS WE’VE FORGOTTEN: a study in self-confidence written by EMME RAUS | illustrated by CLARA MEATH

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eople fail to realize that even though college is a major step up from the petty drama and insecurities of high school, students still have a hard time gaining confidence during this time of transition from scatter-brained teenager to level-headed adult. In an art school packed with neurotic perfectionists who have been told that networking is their best chance of landing a job, the pressure is on for SCAD students to make friends, face competitors and endure heartless criticisms on a daily basis. Not to worry though, I’m here to prepare you for those inevitable struggles with tactics grounded in therapy, physical health, style and art to help keep your cool. So smell some lavender candles, drink some tea and read on about this grab-bag of tricks guaranteed to keep you feeling confident during your time at SCAD.

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


UNIVERSAL TRUTHS WE’VE FORGOTTEN

PURSUE ONLY PROMISING GOALS. We know your artwork is your baby, but sometimes you need to pick your favorite children and disown the rest. While enrolled at a college on the tenweek quarter system where three five-hour-a-week classes are required to be considered a full-time student, it’s important to know your priorities. A healthy way to stay confident is to only juggle a few projects at once. Whether that’s a job, internship, gallery exhibition or just schoolwork, it’s important to know your limits and not to test them. Remember, you can always put aside projects and come back to them later.

SERVE YOUR WORST WORK ON A SILVER PLATTER. We procrastinate; it happens. Instead of pulling your hair out, just roll with what you’ve got so far. It might be nothing. It might be trash. But if you budget your time wisely and approach your deadend project in a positive direction, that confidence might be your saving grace in an impossible class. So dig out your surgical tools and sift around until you find something salvageable in that mess you call art. It might be garbage, but if you serve it on a silver platter, it might just fool your professor.

YOU ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR EVERYONE’S HAPPINESS. If you didn’t swallow this pill in high school, it’s time to take it seriously now. No matter where you are or who you’re with, there are going to be people who you enjoy your company and others who won’t. Don’t let it get to you. To combat criticism or frustration from your peers, professors, or anyone really, try going for a walk or run. Exercise plays a significant role in how your feel about yourself and your lifestyle. A trip to the gym might just release the endorphins you need to survive the week. After all, Andy Warhol wasn’t out to make paintings everyone liked, so why should you give yourself such an impossible standard?

DON’T BE ASHAMED OF A MENTAL HEALTH CONCERN. It’s normal to want to hide a diagnosed mental health problem from your friends or classmates, but keep in mind that there may be others in the same boat as you who feel the exact same way. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), one in four people between 18 and 24 have a diagnosed mental illness. NAMI calculated that over 25 percent of college students have been diagnosed or treated by a professional for a mental health condition in the last year. I know people in my own department who suffer from OCD, ADHD, bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety. As art school students, we are especially sensitive to these common mental health issues. However, it’s crucial to not let our demons define who we are or manipulate our self-confidence. Ask for help when you need it and remember, SCAD Atlanta Counseling and Support Services offer round-the-clock psychiatrist visits as well as personal, group and creative counseling services for all SCAD students.

GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK. Nothing is more important for gaining confidence in public then taking care of yourself in private. Whether you are introverted, extroverted or somewhere in the middle, make sure to set aside time to decompress and recharge your energy and confidence levels. Read a book, bake some cake-pops, or work on an art piece that’s just for your eyes. Fur therapy is also proven to de-stress the animal and the person; so go pet a fluffy dog, cat, ferret, whatever! During these mini-breaks, it’s also best to stay away from technology and do something organic and hands-on. The best thing to do with free time is often to catch up on sleep.

Confidence is an exercise in endurance that we must constantly work towards. In addition to these tips, everyone also needs a supportive community to fall back on when they feel like they can’t take care of themselves. Family, friends, club members, co-workers, professors, counselors – in order to rely on these people; make sure you’re a friend to them first. Most importantly, remember that we’re all human and we’re all on the same playing field. Confidence is best reaped and sown in a community willing to acknowledge and dismiss the faults of everyone in it.

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you’ve ever binge-watched a show, you might be familiar with the concept of temporarily adopting aspects of a character’s personality. Perhaps you’ve picked up their lingo or other verbal mannerisms. Maybe you’ve found yourself acting more assertive and heroic. The truth is, your personality is a strange, malleable thing. In fact, many of your defining characteristics are most likely a result of your environment; fiction included. We as human beings have an evolutionary trait to relied less on stereotypes while interpreting the project our own emotions, thoughts and motives subject. “The more you’re reminded of your own onto other people or things. A study at Ohio State personal identity, the less likely you’ll be able to University tested different take on a character’s idenEXPERIENCE-TAKING IS A variables that affected “extity,” said Geoff Kaufman, PHENOMENON WHERE A READER the leader of the study, perience-taking” in readers. Experience-taking is a FEELS A FICTIONAL CHARACTER’S “You have to be able to take phenomenon where a reader EXPERIENCES AS THEIR OWN. yourself out of the picture, feels a fictional character’s and really lose yourself in the experiences as their own. book in order to have this authentic experience of taking on a character’s identity.” The university had 70 heterosexual students read one of three versions of a narrative about the life of Higher levels of experience-taking are also coupled another student. One version identified the subject with our natural tendency for empathy. Human as gay early in the reading, one did so later on and brains are hardwired to feel this, likely due to a the other identified the subject as heterosexual. primitive need for community in order to survive. The students who discovered the character was We spend time with our loved ones, sharing ideas gay later in the narrative not only had an easier and experiences, to the point that the exchanges time experience-taking, they statistically had more result in their identities becoming a part of our favorable attitudes towards homosexuals and own. Our self-identity ends up developing accord-

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016

ing to who we know and who we empathize with. According to psychology professor James Coan, “It’s essentially a breakdown of self and other.” On social media, it’s common to see varying sorts of images and texts captioned with “it me” or “same tbh.” It’s an interesting sort of meme. Where the phrase once might have been used alongside selfies or depictions of one’s self, it has grown to be used to capture abstract yet relatable concepts. Once again, empathy and self-identification are at work to provide us with different ways of viewing ourselves, whether it’s finding a connection with 404 pages or dogs in sleeping bags. If we can indicate our current physical or mental state through such random imagery, it’s not a stretch to find similarities in fictional heroes. A relatively common way to express a closeness with a character is through costume. This can manifest in


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graphic tees depicting the character or adopting a fashion style that might mimic their look. The “Star Wars,” “Harry Potter” and even “Twilight” fans have a tendency to dress up as their favorite characters when attending the latest premieres of their movies. Conventions such as Atlanta’s Dragon Con are home to many cosplayers who dress and act like their favorite characters for a weekend. There can be quite a few requirements to meet for “other” to become “self.” First, the other must be something that is able to act with agency. This means that it seems to act of its own volition in a way that isn’t predictable to us. We are then more likely to do things like cheer for and care for the other. Consider a slow loading bar on YouTube. When a Wi-FI signal is sporadic, the buffering part seems to move of its own will and we end up talking to it, begging it to move faster, as if that would actually assist it. Recognizability is another small factor we should consider. A great example would be popping a balloon with a smiley face drawn on it. The thought of this object having a face automatically makes us more likely to empathize with its sudden, needle-y demise. This is a piece of rubber and air we’re talking about. If we can feel for its life so easily, imagine the possibility of emotion we feel for characters as their innermost thoughts and emotions are being displayed for us in print and on the screen. Growing up can be hard in our society. Maybe it’s a good thing that we have this unique ability to become a sum of our environmental influences. We constantly reiterate the importance of role models in hopes that we end up as the best version of ourselves. Fictional characters end up playing an important role in our development, as well. It just goes to show: you are what you watch.

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Creativity Community Connected 13


LABEL ME

N A M U H EW CORNWALL TZ | illustrated by MATTH written by JEN SCHWAR

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


SEXUALITY IS FLUID

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here used to be a time when a person’s sexuality was placed into one of two categories: gay or straight. Nowadays, things aren’t so simple — there are bisexuals, demisexuals, pansexuals, asexuals and God only knows what else. As a staunch liberal and avid supporter of the LGBTQ community I try my best to keep myself updated on related issues and terminology, but at times even I get confused. While I’m glad society’s view on sexual identity isn’t as black-and-white as it once was, I fear people are getting a bit too hung up on labels.

homosexual, many stigmas about bisexuality 2.4x9 emerged. Many people claim that bisexuality 4C is just a phase — either a heterosexual’s way of experimenting or a homosexual’s period of transition. There is a large sense of society assuming that bisexuals will eventually ‘pick a side’ and once they end up with a partner of either sex, their attraction to the opposing sex is considered null and void. A handful of heterosexual-identifying individuals are hesitant to date bisexuals, claiming that their attraction to both genders makes them less likely to remain faithful. Though it may be assumed that this narrow view on bisexuality would stem only from heterosexuals, biphobia is a very real problem in the LGBTQ community, as well — a number of homosexuals jokingly refer to bisexuals as “greedy” and refuse to date bisexuals out of fear that the relationship will only amount to sexual experimentation for their bisexual would-be partners.

Though it would be more convenient to loop people into groups that disclose exactly whom they’re sexually attracted to, the truth of the matter is that most people fall somewhere on a spectrum. In 1948 the Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale, commonly referred to as the “Kinsey Though stigmas surrounding bisexuality Scale,” was established by Alfred Kinsey, Wardell certainly haven’t disappeared altogether, just as Pomeroy and Clyde Martin as homophobia still persists, a way to measure sexuality THOUGH IT WOULD BE MORE society’s recent shift towards on a spectrum. The Kinsey CONVENIENT TO LOOP PEOPLE hyper-sensitivity, political Scale, which ranges from INTO GROUPS THAT DISCLOSE correctness and social justice zero to six, zero being have played a significant EXACTLY WHOM THEY’RE “exclusively heterosexual with no homosexual SEXUALLY ATTRACTED TO, THE role in diminishing these [tendencies]” and six being TRUTH OF THE MATTER IS THAT ideas. At least partially (if not more so) thanks to “exclusively homosexual MOST PEOPLE FALL SOMEWHERE Tumblr, modern ideas on [with no heterosexual ON A SPECTRUM. sexuality have become tendencies],” came inclusive and more accepting than ever before. about after the trio’s research reflected that While bisexuality used to be considered somewhat people’s sexual identities and preferences did peculiar in terms of sexual identities, nowadays not adhere to being solely straight or gay. it’s far closer to the norm than other specific ones; this new P.C. culture of ours has brought According to online magazine “Bustle,” the in a flurry of new terms for identifying sexual creation of the Kinsey Scale is what first garnered identity: asexuals, who don’t experience sexual society’s acknowledgement of bisexuality and the attraction, demisexuals, who only experience first mainstream step towards the general public sexual attraction after a deep emotional bond acknowledging sexual fluidity. In spite of Kinsey has been formed, heteroflexibles, who are mostly and his associates’ findings that not everyone attracted to members of the opposite sex but identifies as exclusively heterosexual or exclusively occasionally experience sexual attraction towards

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SEXUALITY IS FLUID

Though their existence is well-meaning, all these new terminologies can make it easy to get confused. Though one’s sexuality is nobody’s business but their own and most people steer clear of asking invasive questions regarding it, Another issue with society’s obsession with the topic is broached much more frequently and knowing someone’s label is that it contributes casually in queer spaces (queer being an umbrella to heteronormativity. As the name suggests, term for anyone who doesn’t identify as solely heteronormativity is the idea that heterosexuality in heterosexual).. I’ve had my humans is the norm while other sexual orientations IT IS GENERALLY ASSUMED THAT fair share of experiences of are some sort of oddity. It SOMEONE IS HETEROSEXUAL my sexuality being questioned at gay bars/clubs, and the is generally assumed that UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED OR askers rarely ask if you’re someone is heterosexual DISPLAYED – WHETHER THAT BE interested in them or what kind unless otherwise stated or displayed — whether THEIR WARDROBE, VOICE, OR of people you’re attracted to; that be their wardrobe, BODY LANGUAGE – CALLING THAT it’s almost always “So, what voice, or body language ASSUMPTION INTO QUESTION. are you?” I can’t speak for everyone, but I personally don’t — calling that assumption appreciate people demanding me to stuff myself into question. So when someone asks “what under a label just for someone else’s knowledge. are you?” (or something to that effect), it’s not members of the same sex, and pansexuals, whose sexual attraction has no dependence on gender, assigned gender or gender identity.

only a question about sexual orientation but also a statement of the way society expects people to act, perpetuating stereotypes. If you don’t believe heteronormativity is a problem, ask yourself this: How many instances have you heard of someone “coming out” to society as being straight? Heteronormativity poses a huge problem with queer representation in the media. Majority of characters portrayed on television and in the movies are straight, depriving young queer children of romantic storylines they can relate to. Even worse, the astonishingly unbalanced ratio of straight characters to gay or queer ones could plant the idea in a child’s head that their nonheterosexual feelings are abnormal. Though there has been an increase of queer representation in the media over the past few years with shows like “Orange is the New Black”, “Glee” and “Pretty Little Liars” featuring non-straight characters and romantic plots, these shows are aimed at a more mature audience, still leaving younger queer children without examples of romance they can relate to.

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016

Now don’t get me wrong, I do understand the purpose and advantages of labels having a specific term for your sexuality can make people feel like their sexual identity is valid and recognized as well as help them specify other people they can relate to. People should be able to date who they want and call it what they want but not everyone’s sexuality fits into a preset definition, and that’s okay too. If placing your sexuality into a preset label feels right to you, go for it! But for me, the next time someone inquires about my sexuaI leanings, I think I’ll stick with the Kinsey Scale and just give them a number.


SEXUALITY IS FLUID

E Y S S N I C K A L E E H T 0

Exclusively heterosexual

1

Predominantly heterosexual only incidentally homosexual

2

Predominantly heterosexual, but more than incidentally homosexual

3

Equally heterosexual and homosexual

4

Predominantly homosexual, but more than incidentally heterosexual

5

Predominantly homosexual, but only incidentally heterosexual

6

Exclusively homosexual 17


WHAT MOVIE TROPE ARE YOU? written by KRIS SEPPALA | illustrated by ANDERSON CARMAN

Do you consider yourself evil?

Yes.

I’m not evil, but I’m bad.

No.

Do you like wearing tight leather?

THE DIABOLICAL VILLAIN

Do you like saving people?

No.

Yes.

Do you prefer to wear a cape or use a gun and badge?

Cape.

THE SUPERHERO

No.

Yes.

Do I have to?

Why not?

Is there anything that would persuade you to help others?

THE FEMME FATALE

Gun and badge.

People are the disease of this world.

Well ... can I at least have fun if I say maybe?

It depends.

No.

THE BADASS ACTION HERO

THE SELF-RIGHTEOUS VILLAIN

THE COMIC RELIEF

THE ANTI- HERO

THE BUZZKILL

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


WHAT MOVIE TROPE ARE YOU?

SEE YOUR RESULTS HERE

THE DIABOLICAL VILLAIN Perhaps you like sitting in swivel chairs while petting furry white cats. You see the world as yours for the taking. At times you may find yourself laughing “MWAHAHAHA” uncontrollably. All in all, you want to watch the world burn.

THE SELF-RIGHTEOUS VILLAIN No one sees the world the way you do. Sacrificing total populaces for the “greater good” brings you no concern. You think you know what needs to be done but no one else agrees with you. You don’t care if people think you’re evil, you’ll do whatever you think you have to do — even if it kills people.

THE FEMME FATALE You like being dangerous and look good doing it. Some may think of you as simple eye candy but you know how to get what you want and take your opponents by surprise. Sometimes you’re out to help the hero and other times you don’t want to play nice. You’re good at being bad and that’s just how you like it.

THE COMIC RELIEF No one takes you seriously but you’re having too much of a good time to care. Usually you’re the sidekick to the main hero. Typically you’re the character who’s guaranteed to not die, because that wouldn’t be very funny. You don’t take too much responsibility but you’ll help save the day and have fun while doing it.

THE SUPERHERO Defending the innocent comes naturally to you. You have powers and/or abilities no one else has and you choose to use them to help others. You’re not like most folks in that you’re willing to give it your all to defeat evil. You’re the all-around good guy standing for truth and justice.

THE ANTI-HERO Where some see the world as black and white, you see it in varying shades of gray. There’s little you hold close to your heart. You fin it hard to trust people knowing that anyone is capable of betrayal. You look out for yourself and help others only if it’s in your best interests.

THE BADASS ACTION HERO Chances are you like to work out and if you’re bald you’re in good company. You’re rough around the edges but you’re their best chance they got. You might end up with some cuts and bruises while leaving wreckage in your path, but in the end you get results. You don’t care what it takes to get the job done and save the day.

THE BUZZKILL Try again.

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THE NEW POWER SUIT

THE NEW POWER SUIT

culture is helpful as well.” While personal style is welcomed, Haugabrook also believes there is a line: “You don’t want to overwhelm [a potential employer] with your style. It is not only about the clothing you wear, but your whole self.” For some employers, it is establishing that line that has caused conflict in the workplace with written by TONESA JONES | photographed by LUANNE DEMEO business-casual dress code policies. In 2013, Newsweek received quite a bit of attention for their internal dress code policy. This policy, though not believes personality in professional attire goes chard Feloni of “Business Insider” very different from other companies, was criticized further than wearing something appropriate for the reported that after Mary Barra for being too handholding with employees because office. “Your outfit speaks about you, speaks to became the CEO of GM, “The smallest it listed clothing items that were inappropriate the image you want to portray to others,” Cabezas biggest change she made at GM involved for the office. Dana Magaciagli of “The Business explained, “But in a professional environment, changing the dress code.” Barra changed Journals” noted in her article “Why Newsweek’s your outfit becomes as important as your resume, a lengthy 10-page policy into two words, new dress code is right on the mark”, that these your cover letter, or your portfolio.” “Dress appropriately.” GM is not the only restrictions reflected generational differences in place with a changing workplace dress the workplace: “Within each generation there is Besides making a first impression on potential code policy. Michael Cohn of “Accounting a wide continuum of conservative employers, clothes have Today” reported that 71 percent of WHILE OLDER GENERATIONS to liberal attitudes and as many a psychological effect CPA firms in New York have a businessHAVE A CLEAR DEFINITION interpretations of the type of dress on the person wearing casual dress code with only six percent that is appropriate enough or them. Joe Pinkser of OF PROFESSIONAL ATTIRE, still requiring suits. Seeing changes in “The Atlantic” reported dress code policy in one of the most MILLENNIALS ARE PUSHING THE professional enough.” While older generations have a clear definition on a study that linked conservative industries shows how much BOUNDARIES ON THE CASUAL of professional attire, millennials work performance with has changed about professional attire END OF BUSINESS WEAR. are pushing the boundaries on the clothes. This study since the 1980’s. SCAD Atlanta career casual end of business wear. found that participants who wore a white coat that advisor Jasmine Haugabrook says that

Ri

business clothes look a lot different for millennials than it did for previous generations. “Wearing a blazer with a skirt or pants suit, in my opinion, is obsolete – even beyond creative fields.”

they believed to be a doctor’s performed better on a test than their counterparts who didn’t. Clothes not only make a difference to how employers view your potential at their company, but also changes how you perform in a work environment. When advising students go on job interviews, Haugabrook tells students to do one thing first: These changes have prompted WHILE MANY PEOPLE DEBATE “Research the company and a number of diverging their culture. Even if it is a opinions on what is considered WHETHER OR NOT JEANS laid-back environment, you professional attire. While many SHOULD BE ALLOWED [...], ONE do not want to go in wearing people debate whether or THING IS CERTAIN: THERE IS jeans nor necessarily a threenot jeans should be allowed ROOM FOR PERSONALITY IN piece suit.” Cabezas agrees: under the business-casual “This will determine how you WORKPLACE ATTIRE. umbrella, one thing is certain: have to dress for work there or while attending there is room for personality in workplace attire. an interview. If you cannot find this information Ana Cabezas, a luxury fashion management major, anywhere, tak[ing] a look at similar companies’

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016

As many writers for business magazines and blogs have noted over the years, professional attire has been at times problematic for women. When entering into positions in the corporate office in the 1970’s and 1980’s, women adopted masculine fashion to exert an image of authority and confidence. Haugabrooks believes that the shoulder-padded power suit of the 1970’s and 1980’s is no longer necessary for women to feel powerful in the workplace “It is all about feeling confident. It is not just the clothes you put on; you have to be able to wear them.” Haugabrooks notes that in place of the pants suit, there is the “power pump,” a high -heeled shoe that allows women to be feminine and feel authoritative at the same time. Haugabrook also notes that changes


THE NEW POWER SUIT

in the power suit also applies to men: “Guys can be a little more adventurous with different colored oxfords, slacks and a button down. [They can wear] a jacket without a tie.” In spite of these changes, formal wear for executives is still a necessity in the workplace. A recent study reported on by Joe Pinkser of “The Atlantic” indicated that formal clothes change the way people think of themselves. Haugabrooks has observed this with SCAD executives, “It depends on your role because some people, regardless, feel more comfortable in a suit.” Even with more business-casual attire in the workplace, attitudes towards piercings, hair color and tattoos still remain conservative in the office. Haugabrook said that when interviewing for her current position she left her nose ring, a piercing she has had since she was sixteen, at home: “Even if it shouldn’t offend or change how someone perceives you, sometimes it does. Err on the side of caution when you are interviewing.” While attitudes differ on what is considered to be professional attire, some choices still block potential job applicants from landing a position. For those not sure how to show their personality in professional wear for the career fair on Feb. 16, Haugabrook asserts three things to keep in mind: 1. Express yourself with accessories and shoes. 2. Keep it simple with a pair of slacks and a button-down shirt. 3. Make sure you are comfortable in the clothes you are wearing: fit is key. With the career fair fast approaching, consider your personal style when dressing to impress potential employers. Personalizing your professional attire will not only make you stand out, but also be your unique power suit.

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016

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1080 W. Peachtree Street NW | 404.480.8222 mycreativeapproach.com @creative_ATL #creative_ATL /CreativeApproachATL


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photographed by NANCY JUAREZ | first assistant / light design: AUSTIN ROBINSON | creative director: MARIO LOPEZ | second assistant: JESSE PRATT | third assistant: GABRIEL CAMPOY | model: SKYE LIN | stylist: MY NGUYEN | stylist assistant: HAN-YU LU | makeup: LAUREN ANDERSON | hair: HOUSTON MCCANN | nail tech: HYEONJEONG WOO

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SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


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SECTION HEADER STYLE

SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2016


COMICS CORNER

SCAD students have the unique opportunity to share their identity through self portraiture.

SHANNON CONNELLY

JAMEL JONES

CLARA MEATH

KIKI HILL

GABI MANCINI

AMBER BELLERJEAU

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Now you can download Atlanta’s most comprehensive arts and culture calendar.

Atlanta Skyline Photo: Ryan Nabulsi, twinlensatl.com


our identity through the years illustrated by VANIA HO

2005 – 2007

2009 – 2011

2007 – 2014

2011 – 2013

2014 – 2014

2013 – present

2014 – present

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SCAN Winter 2016  
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