Page 1

UDENT MAGAZINE SCAD ATLANTA’S ST NO. 3 FALL 2015 | VOL. 7


Now you can download Atlanta’s most comprehensive arts and culture calendar.

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015

Atlanta Skyline Photo: Ryan Nabulsi, twinlensatl.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS

02 05 06 10 12 14 16

MEET THE STAFF LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

WHY I CAME TO SCAD

Current students explain what it was about SCAD that drew them in.

STUDENT SHOWCASE

Robin O’Neill and Marcel Wade.

WHAT’S YOUR LEARNING STYLE?

There’s more than one way to learn – take the quiz to find out which learning style you align with!

SPECIAL SNOWFLAKE SYNDROME When embracing individuality turns into a superiority complex.

DIFFERENT LOCATIONS: SCAD

A look at three of SCAD’s four locations from a student with personal experience.

19 22 24 28 30 32

WELCOME TO EAT-LANTA

A brief guide to some of Atlanta’s unique restaurants.

IN LIVING COLOR-BLIND

When it comes to not seeing color, are we embodying a post-racial society or are we just plain ignorant?

UNIVERSAL THREADS

Celebrating common threads through cultural diversity.

DIVERSITY AT SCAD

An infographic of our community.

COMICS CORNER

Four artists’ takes on the same pitch.

PORTFOLIO PREP / PEP TALK

Why getting your portfolio together should be a priority.

CULTURE IS NOT A TREND

Understanding cultural appropriation.

SCAN is the quarterly student magazine of the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta. All editorial content is determined by the student editors. Opinions expressed in SCAN are not necesssarily those of the college. ©2015 SCAN Magazine. All rights reserved. No parts of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher.

1


JEN SCHWARTZ editor-in-chief

LUANNE DEMEO creative director

VANIA HO art director

MATTHEW CORNWALL PR director

ASPEN EVANS style editor

ACQUILLE DUNKLEY photo editor

EMME RAUS copy editor

KRIS SEPPALA copy editor

SCOTT RUSSELL arts and entertinament editor

ANDERSON CARMAN comics editor

KATE BETTS features editor

TONESA JONES opinions editor

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


3


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

I

f you ask an outsider to characterize a SCAD student, you might get a description of the art school stereotype — something like Laney Boggs in “She’s All That” before the makeover montage, sporting paint splattered overalls and glasses that scream, “I’m an intellectual, take me seriously!” The truth of the matter is I’m sure you could find a few students here that fit that description, but as a whole SCAD Atlanta students are much more than some Hollywood archetype of what an artist should look like. Be it style, age, interests, race or major, there’s a wide variety of different people to meet at SCAD. Just about every facet of SCAD is diverse — the faculty, the artworks, the speakers and the students, to name a few — so in this issue of “SCAN” we decided to delve into the topic of diversity. One of the best parts of having such an assorted student body is the wide range of different artworks that are created. All of the content in “SCAN,” as well as in our online site “The Connector,” is created by the students for the students and we’re always looking for new and different types of artworks to feature of all kinds. Student media would love to see new contributions from you (yes, you!) in future publications so come get to know the staff and see what student media can offer you! There will be an interest meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 8 p.m. in the California room in addition to the vendors fair taking place on Wednesday, Sept. 23 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in the hallway right outside the Hub, as well as the Student Media open house on Friday, Sept. 18 from 1 - 3 p.m. in Spring House dorms and we’d love to see all of you there!

JEN SCHWARTZ editor-in-chief

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


WHY I CAME TO SCAD interviewed and photographed by ACQUILLE DUNKLEY

“I came to SCAD because I thought it would be

“As a high school student, I had been looking at

the best school for me to become more than

a lot of art schools but SCAD stood out because

just a good designer, but a versatile designer.

I was really looking into what career paths and

SCAD has the resources to make me become

graduate options there were. SCAD’s success

the creative professional I want to be.”

statistics and business connections made me really

JOASH BERKELEY

confident in my choice of study.”

2ND YEAR MOTION MEDIA

TORI HURLBURT

2ND YEAR INTERACTIVE DESIGN AND GAME DEVELOPMENT “I came to SCAD because I thrive in diverse environments, but even more because I love to draw and create. I knew that SCAD would give me all of these opportunities, and more.”

KELLY BECK

2ND YEAR FASHION DESIGN “I knew it was going to be the perfect place for my personal and professional development. Each quarter that passes, I know this is the right place to be. I’m here because SCAD has everything you need from professors to job opportunities to enhance your career and guarantee a successful future.”

ISABEL RODRIGUEZ

2ND YEAR FASHION MANAGEMENT

“After serving in the U.S. Air Force I decided to pursue my passion for art. SCAD Atlanta is the perfect location because it’s full of opportunities in the city. When I saw how passionate all of the students and faculty were, I knew it was the place for me.”

WHITNEY CHRISTINE CHILDERS 4TH YEAR ILLUSTRATION

5


visual effects:

ROBIN M O’NEILL written by EMME RAUS | photographed by RACHAEL HORST

ost people forget that an animation or live-action feature would be nothing without people like Robin O’Neill managing the visual effects. A visual effects artist is in charge of creating special effects and generating animation for live-action films. Now a third-year student, O’Neill has been toying with visual effects ever since she came to SCAD from Southmont, North Carolina. Originally, O’Neill wanted to be an animation major upon entering SCAD, but after talking to her academic advisor about all the technical aspects that interested her, she gravitated towards visual effects.“There is an element of creating a pretty picture that makes it more pleasing to viewers,” O’Neill said, “and I enjoy applying the nuts and bolts to come up with something that looks great.” O’Neill remembers her “a-ha” moment as being when she first watched the lantern scene from “Tangled” where Rapunzel and Flynn Ryder are in a boat with lanterns floating all around them. It was then that she thought to herself, “I want that career.” Some of O’Neill’s other influences include Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane” and Alice Guy-Blaché’s work in film. Guy-Blaché was one of the first female influences in French film and created works from the late 1800s to the early 1900s. O’Neill admires her directorial drive and ability to create compelling stories. However, O’Neill has no doubt that her “bread and butter is programming.” She is very interested in minor technical direction or learning how things are put together and function in an animated sequence. She believes that live-action and computer graphic visual effects, “Both offer their own outlets for creativity.” O’Neill competed in “Generate” this past year, an annual SCAD competition sponsored by companies where students have 24 hours to create a project related to their field. She worked with a team of students to design a simulation of a sailboat on water. O’Neill tinkered with the texturing and lighting and helped second-year students with credits while also assisting upperclassmen with lighting and rendering issues. The finished project was something to be proud of

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


STUDENT SHOWCASE

and O’Neill claimed working with others on a

for the Milledgeville Film Festival with two

composite project, “makes you realize how to

SCAD animation majors: undergraduate

manage time and divide up work — it was a

student Alexa Riley and graduate student

real eye-opener.”

Charles Quinniey.

O’Neill’s class projects are also something

“I believe in getting out there and networking

to marvel at, including a beautiful tea set

because that’s you how you get something,”

generated through code and a rendering of

she stated.

a snow globe created on Pixar’s RenderMan. When asked about her experiences creating

Like all of us, O’Neill has her moments of

the snow globe rendering, O’Neill beamed

self-doubt about her creations: “I stress a

and replied, “I like it because it uses global

lot about work, whether it’s good enough,

illumination and I learned a lot of different

whether the teacher is going to like it.” In

techniques.” Both works were inspired

moments of uncertainty, O’Neill turns to her

by the characters and design of Disney’s

family for a healthy confidence boost.“When

“Beauty and the Beast.”

I’m stressed I call my dad and he asks, ‘Did you put your all into it? If you did your best

However, O’Neill’s most complex SCAD assignment was her animation of the child’s game Jolly Penguin Race. Modeled,

then that’s all that matters and if it’s not good

“I BELIEVE IN GETTING OUT THERE AND NETWORKING BECAUSE THAT’S HOW YOU GET SOMETHING.”

enough, then make your best better.’” She is incredibly

textured and procedurally animated in

thankful for the love and attention her father

Houdini, the Jolly Penguin Race rendering

and family provide. “I want to work hard to

gives off a vibe similar to “Toy Story” but

be able to give back to him and my mom.

has a style completely unique to O’Neill. “A

They don’t understand what I do but they are

lot of majors make you question your work

very supportive.”

and this project assured me that I am good enough to do this,” she said.

Her dream job five years after graduation is to be involved in visual effects production

In addition to her studies, O’Neill is balancing

or research and development for a big film

three jobs right now. She works at the DMC

company like Disney, Pixar or Industrial Light

checkout counter, does SCADshow general

and Magic.

work and is a tutor for visual effects. Outside of school, O’Neill has done freelance work

Overall, O’Neill’s natural confidence and

by creating flyers for the international film

warm nature along with her range of

“Whitelock,” which won best international

accomplishments have already set her on

film at the Milledgeville Film Festival. She

her path for future success in the visual

also worked on a collaboration intro-banner

effects field.

7


television production:

MARCEL WA D E written by EMME RAUS | photographed by RACHAEL HORST

WITH ATLANTA BECOMING ONE OF THE HOTTEST FILMING HUBS IN THE COUNTRY, TELEVISION AND FILM HAD BETTER MAKE ROOM FOR SCAD THIRD-YEAR STUDENT MARCEL WADE.

B

orn and raised in San Diego, Wade is a television producing major with a minor in animation and a focus on cinematography. Wade’s niche in the film and TV industry is as the director of photography or as he described it, “the person who sets up the camera angles, shoots the scene and gets the director’s OK.” Wade recalled first getting involved in the arts in fifth grade when he got ahold of a Pokémon sketchbook and started drawing some of his favorite characters. In high school, Wade took AP Art and dabbled in drawing, painting and acting, but he first got hooked on filmmaking after watching some Academy-Award winning movies during his senior year. “Before I started SCAD I got really into films, especially ‘Inception,’ ‘Silver Linings Playbook,’ and ‘Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.’ After seeing how those films touched people I realized that’s what I wanted to do.” Wade said of Christopher Nolan, one of his biggest film heroes, “He has a way of deceiving his audience with ‘Inception,’ ‘Interstellar,’ even the ‘Dark Knight’ trilogy. You don’t know what he’s going to do until the very end.”

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


STUDENT SHOWCASE

During his first year at SCAD Atlanta, set of two upcoming television series step and every breath. It took a sit-in of Wade wrote and shot his first short for Discovery Oxygen that his mother 48 hours to complete. I still call it my film, a romantic comedy titled “The and aunt created together. Wade worked most hard-worked project yet.” Blind Date,” with a team of 12 students with producer and director Inda Reid In his free time, Wade works as a during his freshman year and director Tim Burley, who freelance photographer shooting music “MY FAMILY PUSHES in one of his film classes. is known for directing “The videos and business montages. He shot ME AND IT’S GOOD TO Real Housewives of Atlanta.” a montage video for Kelsey Kawamoto KNOW I HAVE THEIR “My confidence was low for her senior fashion collection that UNCONDITIONAL LOVE because I didn’t know Wade has nothing but played at the SCAD 2015 Atlanta AND SUPPORT.” what I was doing but I respect for Burley and spoke Fashion Show. had help from friends and classmates.” with enthusiasm about his experiences working with him. “He coached me “I want to take acting classes too,” Wade is fortunate to come from a through what I was doing, gave me Wade explained. “Being behind the successful performing arts family. His tips on how to handle the camera and scenes is incredible but I want to be the mother and aunt, Maria and Michelle showed me what goes on behind a entertainer sometimes too.” Acero, were one set of identical twins in reality show. It was amazing.” the R&B singing group “Elusion” during After graduating SCAD, Wade wants to the 1990s and routinely opened for Although working on two reality TV enroll in the NYU graduate film program TLC. Also, Marcel’s father was a regular programs was exciting for him, Wade and then he sees himself as a director, extra on “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air.” claimed that he is more interested actor and producer for film, television, Now his mother and aunt are television in film rather than music videos and more. “I BELIEVE WITH PEACE, show entrepreneurs. television, because he LOVE, AND PROSPERITY wants the freedom to “I believe with peace, love THE WORLD WILL MOVE IN and prosperity the world will “I have a very mixed family: black, travel to exotic locations. A BETTER DIRECTION.” move in a better direction. Filipino, Irish, Spanish and Native American,” Wade said. “My family Wade also revealed that he dabbles in So, I want to show my ideals in my work pushes me and it’s good to know I have sound design: “I actually did the sound while also be entertaining,” Wade stated. their unconditional love and support.” for the ‘Assassin’s Creed Revelations’ Two summers ago he shadowed on the trailer. I made every sword swish, every

9


? e l y t S g n i n r a e L r u o Y What’s written by KATE BETTS | illustrated by AMBER BELLERJEAU

Ever wondered why your brain works the way it does? Take this 10 question quiz and find out you’re a visual, auditory or kinesthetic learner.

1. Oh, no. You just remembered that you have an art history exam tomorrow that you completely forgot about. How do you cram?

4. When you watch a movie, what are you doing?

A. Make flash cards, look over them

B. Focusing on the dialogue.

A. Focusing on the images and body language of the actors. C. Paying attention but fidgeting.

frantically and review any pictures and charts you find in your textbook.

5. You’re in class. What distracts you?

B. Read your class notes aloud to yourself and make your roommate quiz you.

A. Landscaping going on outside.

C. Grab your notebook and study your

B. People chatting as they pass by.

notes while pacing back and forth.

C. The room being too hot or too cold.

2. Your color theory professor is demonstrating a painting technique for a project. What are you doing?

6. Someone asks you to spell “trompe-l’oeil”. What do you do?

A. Watching everything they do very

A. Ask for a piece of paper and a pen.

closely. B. Listening carefully and filing it away in your mind. C. Mimicking the professor’s motions and wishing you could paint along with them.

3. When you’re bored, you tend to do which of the following? A. Doodle. B. Hum, sing or talk to yourself. C. Go for a walk.

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015

You’ve got to write it down. B. Sound it out letter by letter. C. Stare off into space and write it with your finger on the table.

7. Someone asks you how to get to The Hub. How do you help them? A. Picture each turn, hallway, and piece of art you’d pass. B. Tell them each turn they will need to take in detail. C. Offer to walk them there.


FEATURES

If you answered mostly A’s, you are a visual learner. Visual learners have a good eye for body language and very good memories. They tend to learn most in lectures by watching the speaker, and their preferred method for studying is to use pictures, graphs, charts

8. What does your notebook from class look like?

or color coding. Visual learners like to have written instruction rather than verbal instruction because they tend to remember

A. Color-coded and neatly organized.

things that they can see in writing.

B. A mish-mash of notes from lectures.

If you answered mostly B’s, you are an auditory learner.

C. Doodles. Lots of doodles, but mixed with notes from class.

9. Someone waves to you from across the room. How do you remember them?

Auditory learners do best when they can learn by hearing. They have good memories for things that were told to them and prefer

A. By their face.

verbal instruction to written instruction. They

B. By the music playing in The Hub when

are sensitive to tone of voice and are often

you first met.

described as chatty, but great listeners.

C. By how you introduced yourself.

Auditory learners like to have music in the background while studying and tend to hum, sing or talk quietly to themselves.

10. Your professor tells you the date of an exam. What do you do?

If you answered mostly C’s, you are a kinesthetic/tactile learner.

A. Immediately write it down. B. File it away in your memory — you’ll remember

Kinesthetic learners prefer to learn through

hearing the professor saying the date. C. Arrange a study session with some of your friends.

action. They would rather show another how to do something rather than explain a concept to them. Kinesthetic learners typically benefit more from doing group work than from studying individually. To enhance learning, kinesthetic learners can study while doing something active such as walking, standing up or chewing gum. For more information, please visit educationplanner.org or the Bepko Learning Center at http://blc.uc.iupui.edu.

11


Special

F L A W O K N S Syndrome E written by TONESA JONES | illustrated by SHANNON CONNELLY

W

hen we were children, an important part of our development was encouraging individuality. Unfortunately, around puberty the celebration of diversity became a race to find the most esoteric band or hobby that branded us as “special.”One entry on urban.dictionary.com describes “special snowflake syndrome” as “a disease in which [subjects] believe that because they occupy a subculture mildly different from the mainstream, they are inherently better.”

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


SNOWFLAKE

This is most evident in the comment section

In “The Negro Artist and the Racial

message for women then becomes that

of YouTube under any popular mainstream

Mountain,” Langston Hughes describes

the only way to truly be unique is to have

artist. People suffering from “special

this anxiety of an associated identity and

nothing in common with any woman

snowflake syndrome” are likely to leave a

individuality: “this urge within the race

and to not care about your body while

comment criticizing a mainstream artist and

towards whiteness, the desire to pour racial

simultaneously maintaining a figure that

their fans with a variety of colorful adjectives

individuality into the mold of American

fits Western standards of beauty. Special

before plugging their favorite artist or band

standardization, and to be as little Negro and

snowflake syndrome in women manifests

boasting the quality and authenticity of the

as much American as possible.”

as celebrations of hobbies and interests

music based on the limited amount of people who are aware that the band or artist even exists. The delusion of special snowflakes is that exclusivity

associated with men that should not be

“THE DELUSION OF SPECIAL SNOWFLAKES IS THAT EXCLUSIVITY EQUALS ELITISM AND THAT BY PARTICIPATING OR LIKING SOMETHING THAT FEW PEOPLE DO MAKES THEM UNIQUE.”

While Hughes was

gender specific.

speaking in the context of African-American

It is human nature to categorize, and

artists disassociating

some people are so resistant to fit in these

themselves with the

categories that they go to extremes to mark

legacy of slavery and art

themselves as an elite. While some special

inspired by the black

snowflakes are trying to avoid harmful

equals elitism and that by participating or

experience in pre-civil rights America, his

racial and gender stereotypes, others are

liking something that few people do makes

point about individuality being “poured

clinging to an adolescent understanding of

them unique. They hate the idea of being in

into a mold” is how some people contend

what is means to be unique. Uniqueness,

a group and will go to the end of the earth

with racial stereotypes. Rather than with

however, is not a product of being a member

to find the most obscure group to like and

American standards,

belong to. Some people are possessive of

some people are

their interest. It becomes a mark of their

molding themselves

intelligence to belong to a select group like

within subcultures

being a member of an exclusive social club

they believes are far

at Harvard. The fewer people who say they

removed from the

belong to a particular social group, the more

culture their skin color

likely a special snowflake will attach to it.

associates them with.

Not all special snowflakes are shallow.

Special snowflake syndrome also infects

something exterior to distinguish ourselves

Sometimes snowflakes involve themselves in

gender representation, particularly for

from the mainstream, we should derive our

subcultures as a form of self-protection from

women. This is most evident in the

uniqueness on what we endeavor to do and

racial and gender stereotypes. When I was

representation of women in film and

how we contribute to our culture.

in grade school, I disliked rap and hip hop,

television. Female characters are only

not based on the aesthetic of the music, but

considered interesting and unique when

because I feared that liking anything that

they reject any stereotypically feminine

was stereotypically associated with being

characteristics. While it is great to get a

African-American would bring me closer to

character who isn’t a damsel in distress,

that stereotype.

these characters are usually no more

IT IS HUMAN NATURE TO CATEGORIZE, AND SOME PEOPLE ARE SO RESISTANT TO FIT IN THESE CATEGORIES THAT THEY GO TO EXTREMES TO MARK THEMSELVES AS ELITE.

of an exclusive club or being one of 30 people listening to a Turkish gothic metal band. What makes us unique are our experiences, both shared and individual, that

expand our understanding of the world and how we interact in it. So rather than finding

than the female version of a “bro.” The

13


written by MEGAN HUXLEY | photographed by JOYA CHAPMAN, SHELSEA DORAN and SHAYE GARIGAN

F

rom the moment I was accepted to SCAD, I couldn’t decide which campus I wanted to attend. Atlanta was my first choice until my mother convinced me to visit Savannah. That visit ended in my campus choice changing before the trip was over, and I stayed in Savannah for my first year. I’ve now spent four years at SCAD, and I’ve gone to three campuses and moved between them six times.

SAVANNAH Art kids take over the city and available places to rent. Studying art may be questioned in the outside world from time to time, but never in Savannah. It’s not difficult to find someone that shares your artistic interests if you make the effort. Looking back, I think this was the ideal place to spend my first year. Savannah doesn’t have a campus like a “normal” university, but it feels like a college environment more than any other college town. I

The general feeling of being a SCAD student is similar no matter

met a majority of my college friends at Turner House, which is one

which campus you attend. Classes are intimate, and the students are

of the first year dorms in Savannah, during the first week of classes.

kind with varying degrees of eccentricity. The interior design program

Everything felt set up for the college experience in Savannah, but

and classroom setting is remarkably similar at each campus.

Savannah began to feel too small after a while.

It’s obvious that each campus offers a different experience because

It is a great place to focus on education, but it’s not the best place to

of location, but it’s more than that. Studying in Lacoste, Savannah

balance an internship and school. There aren’t as many opportunities

and Atlanta provides unique learning experiences because of the

that don’t require traveling. Outside of school, Savannah doesn’t lose

individual learning environments and what can be taken advantage of

it’s charm, but it can get boring. Everything closes early, unless it’s a

at each location.

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


TRAVEL

bar or club. Tourist attractions aren’t so appealing when you’re no longer a tourist.

LACOSTE Go to Lacoste if you can and don’t look back. Unfortunately,

Savannah is the best campus if you want to have as close to the

it’s not possible to stay in Lacoste for the full school year —

normal college experience as possible at SCAD. It’s the worst

believe me I’ve tried. I’ve been twice and would go again if I

campus if you’re lookingfor excitement and change.

could fit it into my curriculum.

ATLANTA

Every aspect of being in school is intensified. The quarter is shortened to eight weeks, and nearly a week of that is spent in

Atlanta is my hometown so it felt like moving on, but never really

Paris. The workload becomes overwhelming towards the end,

going anywhere. My initial decision to come to Atlanta was inspired

but it’s for a good reason. SCAD puts on an exhibition at the

by three main ideas.

end of the quarter. Students have the opportunity to show and sell their work.

First, there isn’t a building specifically for writing majors, such as myself, in Savannah. Writing majors are put into Arnold Hall with

Relationships were formed much more quickly than in Atlanta

all the other liberal arts classes. In Atlanta, Ivy Hall is exclusive to

and Savannah, and also became much deeper. You may live

writing majors. Another big advantage is that far more writers come

at the residence halls at other campuses, but you’re around

through Atlanta to give readings and lectures than in Savannah.

fellow students 24/7 in Lacoste. This can lead to some tension, but I found some of my closest friends through my Lacoste

Second, there are plenty of internship opportunities in Atlanta.

experience. Relationships with professors differ, too. You’re

I think it’s a great time to be an artist in Atlanta because the art

around your professors almost as much as you’re around other

community is growing rapidly. Internships aren’t exclusive to

students. Hanging out with them at the bar isn’t allowed, but

summer or winter break. I’ll admit it’s not easy to balance an

you do eat nearly every meal next to them for eight weeks.

internship and class, but it is possible. Third, there are still places to go after 9 p.m. that aren’t bars or clubs. There are always plenty

Most people loved Lacoste, but there were some that disliked

of things to do: visit art museums and galleries, see performances,

living there. It’s a medieval village with only two cafés that

or check out Piedmont Park.

aren’t open year round and a convenience store. Getting outside of the village mostly happens on weekends. Some find

A disadvantage to being a SCAD student in Atlanta is that it doesn’t

it claustrophobic, but many enjoy the exquisite surroundings

quite feel like being in college sometimes. A majority of classes are

enough to never get bored.

held in the main building, so if your major is located in the DMC or Ivy Hall, it may be harder to meet students from other majors.

I would bounce around the campuses every quarter if I could.

Another disadvantage to living in Atlanta is that it’s not an easy city

The diversity of experience makes it difficult to remain in one

to live in without a car.

place, but my parents may refuse to help if I threaten to move again. Still, graduation is in less than a year, and the desire to make it to Hong Kong is hard to resist.

15


SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


APPROPRIATION

C

u t l re u is not a

TREND written by ASPEN EVANS | illustrated by NATHAN PINNEY

W

ith today’s society reflecting such a complex integration of aspects from different cultures in the forms of food, music, clothing and entertainment, the line between appreciating a culture versus appropriating it is constantly blurred. American society is always finding new and easy ways to enjoy other cultures at a surface level. Take for instance the average stereotype of a music festival attendee. You will catch them clad in a headdress, like a walking Lana Del Rey music video, their forehead dotted with a bindi and henna tattoos snaking up their

participants get to to run a 5K while colored powder is thrown at them for each mile achieved. The race is directly taken from the traditional Indian “Holi Festival,” also known as the “Festival of Colors.” Although it does include the use of colored powder, the festival is a religious experience for the Hindu religion, signifying the triumph of good over evil as well as the end of winter and the arrival of spring. Overall, by subtracting the religious aspect of this ceremony and using it as an excuse to throw powder at each other without making any reference to its origin is disrespectful to the Indian culture.

arms as they listen to their favorite bands.

Cultural appropriation is the action of taking aspects of another culture and using them for personal gain while not belonging to said culture. Check out fun activities such as the Color Run, where

The monetization of urban black culture is currently a hard-hitting issue in American society today. With the dilution of rap and hip-hop music, white newcomer artists such as Macklemore and Iggy Azalea are being crowned

“CULTURAL APPROPRIATION IS THE ACTION OF TAKING ASPECTS OF ANOTHER CULTURE AND USING THEM FOR PERSONAL GAIN WHILE NOT BELONGING TO SAID CULTURE.”

17


APPROPRIATION

the “king and queen” of hip-hop while shunning more fitting, longer-standing black artists for accolades and press. The issue is not that they are white in a predominately black music genre; it is that they have come into a genre, made a hit or two and not paid homage to past and current icons in the industry to earn their space.

On the other hand, cultural appreciation is the action of embracing another culture without offending said culture or taking aspects of it for oneself. There is not much information out there to direct someone in the way of appreciating a culture and not crossing that fine line. I believe that to truly appreciate someone’s culture, you must take it upon yourself to understand the history and significance of the culture before you do, say or wear something. An example would be if you were invited to a traditional wedding with full on traditional garb. Attending this wedding wearing the garb would be acceptable because you understand that this is a cultural aspect and should be highly respected versus wearing that same outfit for Halloween the next month.

In addition, the popularization of primarily black physical features on non-black bodies is rampant throughout the media. Internet sensations such as the #KylieJennerChallenge led teens and adults to incur bruising and swelling of their lips by placing them in shot glasses, bottles and anything with suction to “WITH AMERICA BEING A create teen-reality personality Kylie MELTING POT OF DIFFERENT Jenner’s plumped-up lips. Celebrities With America being a melting pot of different CULTURES, WE OFTEN FORGET are increasingly being seen on red cultures, we often forget that everything we see THAT EVERYTHING WE SEE OR carpets with fuller lips and bigger butts. or experience is not ours to participate in just EXPERIENCE IS NOT OURS TO These traits, which can be found on because it’s aesthetically pleasing or piques our PARTICIPATE IN JUST BECAUSE most anyone, are more commonly IT’S AESTHETICALLY PLEASING OR interest. Swiftly embracing other cultures and found on black bodies and were once their differences is what makes America great. PIQUES OUR INTEREST.” the cause of ridicule until non-black At the end of the day, let’s make sure that we celebrities popularized them through plastic surgery. honor and respect each other’s differences in the same swift manner we embrace them. Let’s not forget our favorite holiday Halloween as our playground for dressing up for cheap thrills and that chance to be a geisha, Native American chief or a sombrero-wearing member of a Mexican mariachi band. Halloween is the most talked about holiday as far as appropriation where people are called into question for their offensive caricaturing of other cultures. Chances are, if you have to ask yourself if something is offensive, then you probably shouldn’t do or wear said thing.

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


o t e om c l e w

A T N A L T A E written by SCOTT RUSSELL | photographed by ACQUILLE DUNKLEY

A

tlanta is the melting pot of the South in more ways than one, especially where diverse cuisine is concerned. There are so many unique and excellent restaurants in this city that it feels wrong to eat at the same place twice. No matter what meal you’re hungry for, Atlanta’s eateries never fail to satisfy. Here are a select few of our city’s most noteworthy dining destinations.

19


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

LEE’S BAKERY

HANKOOK TAQUERIA

ANTICO PIZZA NAPOLETANA

4005 Buford Highway NE

1341 Collier Road NW

1093 Hemphill Ave. NW

There’s nowhere in town quite like the

Over on the Westside is a hidden gem

Just around the corner from SCAD Atlanta

Buford Highway corridor when it comes to

called Hankook Taqueria, a must-try spot

is what many have called Atlanta’s best

exotic cuisine. The area’s authentic Asian

for anyone who loves tacos, which is to say

pizza place: Antico Pizza Napoletana. This

restaurants bring many Eastern flavors to the

everyone. This award-winning restaurant

fast casual restaurant is overwhelmingly

table, but arguably, none are so outstanding

offers a unique fusion of Korean and

authentic: they list prices in Euros and

as Lee’s Bakery.

Mexican cuisine, and their off-the-wall tacos

wood-fire their supremely popular pies in

are as affordable as they are satisfying. No

handmade ovens shipped from Naples.

Lee’s is a family-run Vietnamese restaurant

one would know that better than “Iron Shirt

Atmosphere is just as important a part of

nestled in a nondescript strip mall near

Robyn,” Hankook’s current taco-eating

the Antico experience; the restaurant uses a

Brookhaven, and while the establishment’s

record-holder with an astounding 20 tacos

communal seating style, with diners sharing

appearance is nothing fancy, their food is as

eaten in one sitting.

long, low picnic tables. Even if you’re not

special as it gets.

thrilled by the idea of rubbing elbows with I ordered from the specials menu, selecting

strangers, you won’t mind a bit once you bite

Lee’s is known for its twist on the classic

the excellent Tong Dak Taco, which features

into an Antico slice.

soup and sandwich combo. Their banh mi

crispy chicken tenders covered with a tangy

sandwich is hailed as one of the nation’s

chipotle aioli, sesame soy salad and jack

Antico’s pizzas are all slightly charred and

best, and it’s easy to see why. The celebrated

cheese. Next was the filling and flavorful Fire

well done, and there are no substitutions

handheld, served on fresh, house-baked

Dog, a spicy, all-beef hotdog topped with

or half-and-half topping choices allowed —

bread, overflows with distinctive flavors —

green cabbage kimchee. An order of sesame

these folks are serious about the integrity

tender grilled pork, plus pickled carrots,

fries proved to be a show-stealing side —

of their pies. I ordered the San Gennaro

radishes, jalapeno and cilantro — none of

Hankook’s take on French fries, tossed

pizza with juicy salsiccia sausage, sweet

which drown each other out. Lee’s pho is

in sesame oil and red pepper flakes, was

red peppers, cipolline onions and buffalo

also excellent with savory meat, fresh veggies

delicious to the point of being addictive.

mozzarella cheese on a deliciously crispy,

and rice noodles, all in a rich beef broth.

bubbly crust. “There is no better pizza in Atlanta,” I overheard another diner exclaim. I would be hard-pressed to argue with him.

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

1269371_15803 2.4x9 4C

VORTEX BAR AND GRILL

SUBLIME DONUTS

We can help you ace your finances

878 Peachtree St. NE and 438 Moreland Ave. NE

535 10th St. NW

Even when it comes to classic American fare,

No meal is complete without dessert, and

Atlanta is crazy diverse in terms of what’s

what better way to end our exploration

out there, with an emphasis on “crazy.” No

of Atlanta’s diverse cuisine than with the

restaurant epitomizes the glorious excess

sweetness of Sublime Doughnuts? Just

of American cuisine quite like the infamous

across the street from Georgia Tech, this

Vortex Bar & Grill, known for both its

gourmet donut shop, owned by chef Kamal

iconic skull entryway and its inventive and

Grant, has two other locations in Bangkok,

decadent burgers. Keep in mind that this

Thailand. Every donut on their extensive

edgy establishment is 21-and-up.

menu is simply sublime.

Atlantic Station/ATM 171 17th Street N.W. 404-214-6120

I opted for one of Vortex’s infamous Coronary

I couldn’t pass up the so-called Strawberry

Bypass Burgers, the Double, which is

Ice Cream Burger, with its fresh, juicy

Woodruff Arts Center ATM Only 1280 Peachtree St. N.E.

essentially breakfast, lunch and dinner

strawberry slices embedded in ice cream

jammed into one. The massive handheld

and sandwiched between an airy powdered

features a pair of half-pound sirloin patties,

donut “bun.” I also savored the Orange

two fried eggs, six slices of American cheese

Dream Star, a star-shaped donut with a tart,

and eight slices of bacon, all in between

tasty citrus glaze and a rich vanilla cream

two grilled cheese sandwich buns. If that’s

cheese filling. Sublime’s award-winning

not the meal of an American hero, I don’t

donuts have earned them a wall’s worth of

know what is. The restaurant also offers an

glowing write-ups.

Reaching any goal is easier when you have a good plan. And a strong financial plan is built on solid financial decisions. With our customized tools and services, we can help you create your own road map to financial security.

One Atlantic/ATM 1201 W. Peachtree St. 404-865-4990

wellsfargo.com

insane slate of signature burgers beyond the Bypasses. Experience Vortex, but bring an

So next time you’re out around town and wondering

appetite and a half.

where to eat, consider stepping outside your comfort zone and trying something new. Take a big bite of out Atlanta’s diverse culinary culture — you have nothing to lose and the world to gain. © 2015 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC (1269371_15803)

1269371_15803 2.4x9 4C.indd 1

21

8/14/15 11:11 AM


written by MATTHEW CORNWALL photo illustration by ACQUILLE DUNKLEY

W

elcome to a post-racial American society. There have been two terms of a half-black president, there’s usually at least one token minority on every TV show and it’s a popular belief that Martin Luther King Jr. “died for the freedom of black people.”

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015

These events, along with others, have led

Phrases like “I don’t see color” and “race

people to believe that racism is over in

doesn’t affect me” are used by people

modern society. Not only is this far from

who want to sound politically correct when

the truth, but the cherry on the ignorance-

in actuality, these are cop-out answers

flavored cake is when people claim that

used to refrain from sounding racist. Race

they “don’t see color.” Color-blindness is a

isn’t something invisible. It’s a beautiful

dangerous result of growing up in an era

spectrum that we use to identify ourselves

that supposedly has resolved racism. If we

and each other. Such removal of race from

remove this blinder, perhaps we can make

anyone’s identity is racist. It’s a refusal to

post-racial society a reality.

see someone as they actually are by denying


COLORBLIND

their differences and experiences. It implies

they engage in social situations based in a

hashtag movement created by black people

an over-generalization where everyone is

predominantly white society. Lack of ebonics

for black people.

homogeneously identical which implies that

and other stereotypical characteristics are

differences in race are a bad thing that we

usually grounds to erase these children’s

Overall, denying someone their race is

should ignore or cover up.

identities as if these were the requirements

denying them their identity. We don’t go

to be able to identify with this race. They’re

around pretending that women aren’t women

The generic dictionary definition of racism

not. What it means

states “the belief that your race is better than

to be black and what

someone else’s.” However, the dictionary

it means to be white

isn’t able to capture the nuances, evolution

are human-created

and complex aspects of language used by

concepts that are regulated by complex

have our own backgrounds, differences and

people of multiple backgrounds. A more

and varying definitions. Race should never

struggles. You may mean well, but there’s a

accurate definition of racism would be “a

be limited to the following qualifiers, yet

difference between claiming not to see these

combination of a feeling of disdain towards

it consists of skin color, physical features,

identities and treating people fairly in spite of

a certain group, committing actions against

culture, origin of country and ancestry. To tell

whatever differences they may have. Society

that group and/ or a society that oppresses a certain group.” Prejudice + discrimination + institutionalized =

“AMERICAN SOCIETY IS AT THE POINT WHERE THE DEFAULT RACE IS WHITE. THIS IS REFLECTED IN THE MEDIA WHERE THE OVERSATURATION OF WHITE CHARACTERS RESTRICTS FAIR REPRESENTATION OF PEOPLE OF COLOR.”

“CLAIMING TO NOT SEE RACE ONLY ENABLES THESE INJUSTICES TO OCCUR.”

or that disabled people aren’t disabled. Why would we do the same for a person of color? We all

anyone that they

still targets people with non-Anglo-Saxon

aren’t a race that

names by denying them jobs and welfare.

they identify with

Claiming to not see race only enables these

disrespects all of

injustices to occur.

these aspects of who they are.

When you say “I don’t see color”, what you mean to say is: “I don’t discriminate anyone

racism. The fact is, being a minority is often

#BlackLivesMatter is a movement focused

based on race” which allows for other people

seen as a negative trait in American society

on making sure that black people’s lives

to retain their racial identity. The fight for

and claims of racial “color-blindness” align

are treated the same as any other race. It’s

equality doesn’t end at the abolishment of

with that mindset.

meant to be empowering and uplifting to a

slavery, racial profiling or equal pay. There’s

race that’s historically been degraded and

still a long way to go for every minority to be

American society is at the point where

oppressed. In attempt of what seems to be

treated fairly.

the default race is white. This is reflected

“equality,” there are many individuals who

in the media where the oversaturation of

try to use the hashtag #AllLivesMatter. The

white characters restricts fair representation

change to #AllLivesMatter is an excellent

of people of color (POC). This results in

example of color-blindness. While it’s still

minorities creating their own programs

a true statement, the fact that black lives

and stations, such as Telemundo and BET.

are treated like they don’t matter on a

Communities center around race due to the

wide scale is the reason why the hashtag

need for people to have these identities and

got started. Yes, it’s possible for people

their differences acknowledged.

to feel excluded when #BlackLivesMatter

“YOU MAY MEAN WELL, BUT THERE’S A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CLAIMING NOT TO SEE THESE IDENTITIES AND TREATING PEOPLE FAIRLY IN SPITE OF WHATEVER DIFFERENCES THEY MAY HAVE.”

gets used but consider the exclusion that Kids of color are often hounded by their

brought it up in the first place.The use of

classmates that they don’t “act black” when

#AllLivesMatter erases and overwrites this

23


photographed by LUANNE DEMEO | assisted by ACQUILLE DUNKLEY and ASPEN EVANS styled by LOGAN FORD | make-up by KIANNA MCCALLA | hair by AMANDA RISING

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


STYLE

PRIYANKA PATIL INDIA The beautiful floor length ‘anarkali’ is a peculiar costume from the northern part of India. Typically, it is a combination of a long frock-style top called a “kameez” and slim-fitted bottom (legging-style) called “churidaar”. Depending on the occasion, the fabric of the Anarkali varies from chiffon to silk to cotton. Women usually wear more heavily embroidered Anarkali suits for weddings and festive occasions. Saris run from five to nine yards and are commonly worn by women throughout India with each region styling them differently.The sari is worn over a petticoat with a cropped top or blouse with sleeves of varied lengths. It is draped around the waist such that the other end is draped over the shoulder/head while baring the midriff. According to the Natya Shastra, the ancient Indian treatise which describes the classical dances and costumes of India, the midriff is left bare because the navel is considered to be the origin of life and creativity. The sari is the garment of all goddesses in India so it makes it all the more special and traditional for women in India.

25


STYLE

LEA TRUC LE VIETNAM I’m from Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam’s largest metropolis. It is also commonly known as Saigon and located in the southern part of Vietnam. The áo dài is a Vietnamese national costume, now most commonly worn by women. In its current form, it is a tight-fitting silk tunic worn over pants. Áo classifies the item as a piece of clothing on the upper part of the body. Dài means “long”. The word “áo dài” was originally applied to the outfit worn at the court of the Nguyên Lords at Hue in the 18th century. This is considered one of the most beautiful and attractive national costumes in the world. Academic commentary on the áo dài emphasizes the way the dress ties feminine beauty to Vietnamese nationalism. “Áo dài” is one of the few Vietnamese words to appear in English-language dictionaries.

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015

~

~


STYLE

VALHERIA ROCHA COLOMBIA Colombia is a very colorful country. We are known for our vibrant and intricate handwoven designs and textiles. Fashion has progressed a lot throughout the years in Colombia. Modern fashion is rich in texture, as well as energetic colors and patterns that are reminiscent of the native cultures in the Andes mountains and other rural areas of Colombia. What I love most about current Colombian fashion are the loose and flowy embroidered pieces. I also enjoy the ethnic prints and colors. Most importantly, I love how unique and modern our fashion is while keeping in touch with our traditional roots.

27


DIVeRSITy DIVeRSITy

RACE/ /ETHNICITY ETHNICITY RACE

At scad scad At ••

<1% American Indian / Alaskan Native <1% 7%American Asian Indian / Alaskan Native 7% Asian 26% Black, non-Hispanic 26% non-Hispanic 6%Black, Hispanic 6% Hispanic <1% Multiracial, non-Hispanic <1% Multiracial, non-Hispanic <1% Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander <1% Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander 22% Non-resident alien 22% Non-resident alien 6% Race / ethnicity unknown 6% Race / ethnicity unknown 32% White, non-Hispanic 32% White, non-Hispanic

ATlaNtA ATlaNtA

STUDENTSTUDENTS BODY INCOMING

AVERAGEAGE AGE AVERAGE

25% 25%

transfer students students transfer

24

students allall students

46% 46% freshmen

494 494

24 29 29

freshmen

graduate students graduate students 22 22

total totalstudents students

undergraduate students undergraduate students 1919

first-time freshmen first-time freshmen

29% 29%

graduate students graduate students

1717

35 35

70 70

photography photography printmaking printmaking sculpture sculpture sequential art sequential art television producing television producing visual communication visual communication visual effects visual effects writing writing other* other*

painting painting

motion media design motion media design

interior design interior design luxury and fashion mgt. luxury and fashion mgt.

illustration illustration

interactive and game development interactive and game development

50 50

graphicdesign design graphic

filmand andtelevision television film

fashionmarketing marketing fashion

100 100

fashion fashion

150 150

animation animation

200 200

advertising advertising

MAJORS MAJORSAT ATSCAD SCADATLANTA ATLANTA undergraduate undergraduate graduate graduate

*other: architecture, arts administration, design management, digital media, furniture design, industrial design, and sound design *other: architecture, arts administration, design management, digital media, furniture design, industrial design, and sound design

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015

Source: SCAD Student Profile 2014


R

INTERESTED IN JOINING?

STUDENT MEDIA OPEN HOUSE FRIDAY, SEPT. 18 SPRING HOUSE 1-3 P.M.

PIEDMONT 3330 Piedmont Road NE, Suite 18 404.237.6331 MON-FRI 9-8 SAT 10-7 SUN 11-6

FREE PARKING FOR BINDERS CUSTOMERS

PONCE CITY MARKET 650 North Ave NE, Suite S 102 404.682.6999 MON-FRI 9-8 SAT 10-9 SUN 11-6

LET’S

Connect!!

STUDENT MEDIA INTEREST MEETING TUESDAY, SEPT. 22 CALIFORNIA ROOM 8 P.M.

www.BindersArt.com | #BindersArt *May not be combined with any other offer or for sale and promotional pricing. Valid only on non-sale items.

Creativity Community Connected


COMICS CORNER

AMBER BELLERJEAU Sequential Art

ANDERSON CARMAN Sequential Art

RAEONDA RAMOUTAR Sequential Art

SHANNON CONNELLY Sequential Art

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015


COMICS CORNER

A NOTE FROM THE COMICS EDITOR Given the topic of diversity I wanted to explore the many ways that artists will approach the same original concept. For this edition of “Comics Corner” I sent a one line pitch to several artists to make a short comic strip. The pitch was simple, “A duck gets bread.” The artists could use as many panels, color or black and white, silent or dialogue, it was entirely up to them. I loved watching all the different results come back to me. This proves the point that there is more than one way to skin a cat. Please enjoy these diverse takes on, “A duck gets bread.”

31


PORTFOLIO PEP TALK written by Glennis Lofland | illustrated by Hanna Schroy

S

o let’s talk about that portfolio. I know, I know, it’s fall quarter – a new academic year is only just getting started. The last thing on your mind is prepping your portfolio amiright? It shouldn’t be. I’m not going to go all Mom on you and say that your portfolio should be the first thing on your mind. But think about it: Say you start prepping your portfolio now – putting a little bit more work into each project to make sure it’s polished and ready to put up on Behance or your website or whatever platform you find suitable. By the time senior spring aka job-search-cue-the-quarterlife-crisis rolls around, you’ll be the one kicking back while everyone else scrambles to not just polish, but find those projects to polish and put into their portfolio. You don’t have to be them if you start now. Your portfolio is not just a representation of how awesome an artist you are. It’s how you can get a job in this wacky, post-2008 recession world we live in. More and more often, creative people are being hired because of their online presence – because they have portfolios that show a potential employer exactly what they can do.

SCAN MAGAZINE // FALL 2015

So what exactly should go into your portfolio? This is kind of like asking people what networking is exactly. No one has a solid answer, but everyone will tell you it is critical to your professional career. The obvious answer is that your portfolio should be your best work. The more complex answer is that your portfolio should be your best work – across a range of skillsets. The worst thing you can do is presume to know exactly what an employer is looking for and limit your portfolio to just that. You might be majoring in just one subject (or two) but that doesn’t mean you can only do one thing. Your portfolio should represent all of the things you are able to do for a potential employer. For example: say you’re majoring in photography. You’re really good at headshots and fashion photography, but enjoy the art of analog. Maybe most employers are looking for those who do digital, but what if that one person looking for someone who knows their way around a dark room comes across your website – and you don’t have your analog work up? Opportunity lost. Think of your portfolio as a resume, a “trial run” at a new job, and a networking opportunity all in one. As creative people, sometimes it’s hard to describe exactly what we do. If you have a polished, diverse portfolio, you don’t have to. It can do the talking for you.


PORTFOLIO TIPS

PORTFOLIO TIP #1 Make your portfolio available online, either through your website or linked to your website.

PORTFOLIO TIP #2 You need to start working on your portfolio yesterday.

PORTFOLIO TIP #3 Your portfolio should represent your wide range of skillsets.


SCAN Fall 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you