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WINTER 2013

Get up. Get out. Get going. 14 | OFF THE

BEATEN PATH

Yellow Rock Trail in the Boston Mountains

25 | EXHILARATION on four short legs

36 | BRINGING THE OUTSIDE IN

How to stay active during cold weather

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WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

PADDLING IN WINTER


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INSIDE

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

WINTER 2013

PADDLING IN WINTER

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AMERICAN ORIGINALS Premium fishing lures made right here in the Ozarks

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OFF THE BEATEN PATH Yellow Rock Trail in the Boston Mountains

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TIM’S FLY FISHING TIPS

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WALKING EUREKA SPRINGS Self-guided tour of historic town

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ALL-SEASONS RUNNER A running lesson: take time off when necessary

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THE RUN AROUND A list of running events in the four-state area

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EXHILARATION ON FOUR SHORT LEGS Beagles on the hunt for rabbits

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BULLETS AND BOWS Bounding into the hunting arena

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FLIES AND LIES CLUB Learn to tie flies in time for trout season

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5 THINGS TO DO ON THE LAKE IN THE WINTER

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BRINGING THE OUTSIDE IN Local venues help you stay active during the cold weather

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COOL STUFF Some must-haves for the outdoor gearhead

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TAKE YOUR PIC


STAFF

FROM THE EDITOR

As the new year begins, I challenge our Ozarks Outdoors readers to set some type of goal that will get them up, get them out and get them going. In our first-ever winter issue, we are providing you with lots of inspiration. There’s an article on winter canoeing and another on places where you can enjoy your outdoor activities inside. We also have added a new feature that we’re calling “Off the Beaten Path.” In each issue, Jennifer Johnson will introduce our readers to a new hiking trail to explore. Jennifer’s first submission focuses on a trail in the Boston Mountains, which are gorgeous any season of the year. We hope you enjoy our latest issue of Ozarks Outdoors. Since we’re still a new publication, especially in the southwest Missouri area, please continue to provide feedback and story ideas for upcoming issues. Here’s to another great year in the beautiful Ozarks.

Lisa Schlichtman Ozarks Outdoors editor

ART DIRECTOR Veronica Zucca connection@monett-times.com ADVERTISING Robyn Blankenship Sheila Harris Marion Chrysler Cassie Brewer Annie George Steven Johnson Shelly Anderson Mary Ann Carlson Chip Ford Jim Sexton GRAPHIC ARTISTS Melody Rust CONTRIBUTORS Lindsay Reed Melonie Roberts Beth Bartlett Tim Homesley Larry Dablemont Lee Stubblefield Mark Conner Jennifer Johnson PHOTOGRAPHERS Charles Henry Ford II Lori Duncan Chuck Nickle Kerry Hays Jeff Terry

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To advertise: 417-847-2610 - Cassville | 417-235-3135 - Monett 870-423-6636 - Berryville | 479-253-0070 - Eureka Springs Send e-mail inquiries to editor@monett-times.com | Mailing address: P.O. Box 40, Monett, MO 65708 Ozarks Outdoors is published and distributed free in Southwest Missouri and Northwest Arkansas. Ozarks Outdoors is a publication of the Cassville Democrat, The Monett Times, the Lovely County Citizen, Carroll County News and Rust Communications.

EDITOR Lisa Schlichtman editor@monett-times.com

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

Like a bear, I want to hibernate during the winter. I let cold temperatures and short days affect my workout schedule, and in January and February, my aversion to the treadmill serves as my reason for skipping training runs and I usually pack on a few pounds. But this winter, those excuses will have to end. I have signed up for the GO! St. Louis halfmarathon in April, and my training officially began on Dec. 24. I will be following a plan created by Runner’s World and monitored through the online Training Peaks program. I’ve never paid for a training schedule before, but I think the dollars I’m spending will help propel me off the couch and onto the pavement this winter. I’m sure there will be days when I’m forced to complete my run on the dreaded treadmill, but this winter, I plan to bundle up and do most of my running outside. With proper clothing and preparation, I am confident I can stay warm and get in my miles each week. I actually think I am beginning to prefer running in cold weather over the blistering temperatures we experienced this past summer.


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THE CONFLUENCE OF TURNER SPRING AND THE ELEVEN POINT RIVER.

Paddling in Winter

S TO R Y A N D PH OTO S BY M A R K C O NNE R WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

Hear that? It’s a strange notion to some that there are rivers here in the Ozarks where silence actually exists. Where you’re more likely to see deer on gravel bars than hops-fueled revelers. Where you can float all day and not see another soul. So where are these hidden watery gems? The answer is not so much where, but when. Pick any hot Saturday in July, and most rivers are full of boats and people. Pick the same river in January, and it’s a completely different scene. Yes, January. Winter paddling offers experiences and views summer months just can’t offer. While you may not be working on your tan or hitting up the rope swing, winter floats are still a lot of fun.

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For the most part, floating in winter is the same as in summer. You take a boat, put it in a river and work your way downstream. But rivers are different in the winter. There’s a certain solemnity, and a reverence, that winter water carries. It’s as if after all summer spent accommodating the recreational whims of man, rivers settle down and enjoy getting back to what they’re best at: just being. For those who do

float in the winter (and fall and early spring), this river vibe is hard not to notice. Jason Frantz is the incoming president of the Ozark Mountain Paddlers, a group that promotes enjoying and protecting local waterways. He has also logged many winter river miles. “Have you ever been on a river in a snowstorm?” he asked. “It’s very quiet, very serene.”

ELEVEN POINT RIVER

To some, paddling in a snowstorm sounds amazing. To others, it probably sounds crazy. Maybe stupid. But with the right preparation, a winter float can become an exciting new adventure. BE PREPARED “A common saying among paddlers is there is no such thing as bad weather,” Frantz said. “Only bad gear.” His main advice for winter floaters is to be prepared. Take along a complete set of dry clothes, stored safely in a dry bag. Even if it’s a calm river. Even if it’s one you’ve floated hundreds of times. Frantz said to stay away from cotton clothes and stick with synthetics because they dry quicker. Wool is another good option. The problem is when cotton gets wet, it stays wet -- not good when combined with cold temperatures. Have a way to build a fire and take food and extra water. Know first aid, particularly how to identify and treat hypothermia. And keep an eye on the forecast. If things look dicey -- like rain or really cold temperatures -- don’t hesitate to postpone.

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

BALD EAGLE HUNTING ON THE ELEVEN POINT

THE REWARDS But is it worth it -- packing twice as much gear and not being able to swim? Depends on what you’re after. If you want to truly experience the river and experience nature, then absolutely. Most animals do not appreciate the ruckus of summer-fueled humans, so they stay away. On a crowded river, you may be lucky to catch a crow scavenging a campsite. But when you paddle during the “off-season,” you’ll likely see more wildlife.


EVEN IN WINTER, COLOR CAN STILL BE FOUND.

COLORFUL GRAVEL BAR ON THE ELEVEN POINT.

practically no snakes, ticks or mosquitoes. There’s a quote by Greek philosopher Heraclitus that Frantz recalled: “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he is not the same man.” Heraclitus wasn’t just referring to physical, tangible characteristics but also to things that can’t be described or counted. Things that can only be felt. When you silently glide under an eagle looking for food or through the silence of snowflakes, you understand. And that’s what helps make winter floating so magical.

TURNER SPRING, WHICH FEEDS THE ELEVEN POINT. WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

Eagles, deer and turkey sightings are common. Frantz has even seen bear. In addition to animals, you’ll also see more of the landscape. Without the foliage, the world behind the bank appears. You may see bluffs or remnants of old homesteads. You may come across caves, springs and other natural formations that would otherwise have been hidden in summer’s leafy shell. Even the water is generally clearer, allowing you to see more of the fish and rocks below. For some, the biggest plus is there are

JUST GO Yes, winter is typically colder than summer, but Frantz said preparing for colder temperatures is a small price to pay for the rewards. For the novice, he recommended finding someone with experience floating and asking if you can go on their next float. The Ozark Mountain Paddlers (http:// ozarkmtnpaddlers.org/) regularly schedule winter floats and even hold beginners paddling clinics. The Arkansas Canoe Association and local outdoor-related retailers are also great ways to connect with others who enjoy winter paddling. “The key is to find the closest river and try it,” Frantz said. “Don’t be afraid to experience the rivers year round. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.”

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

Helping Catch Fish For Over 50 years

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AMERICAN ORIGINALS STORY BY LINDSAY REED | PHOTOS BY KERRY HAYS

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

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In addition to offering fishing enthusiasts expansive lakes and winding waterways, the local area is home to one of the leading manufacturers of lures and baits in the Midwest with Luck “E” Strike headquartered in Cassville, Missouri. A little over a year ago, Luck “E” Strike expanded its impressive line of fishing lures to include an entirely American-made bait.” “We are producing around 2,500 American Originals lures a day,” said Bob Dennis, Luck “E” Strike manufacturing consultant. “Those are painted and finished baits.”

“TODAY, LUCK “E” STRIKE IS A FULL LINE LURE COMPANY WITH BRANDS SUCH AS AMERICAN ORIGINALS, WALLEYE FEVER, NEMIRE SCROUNGER, RC2 AND CHESAPEAKE BAY TACKLE.”

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

JOHN HENDRICKS

The idea for the American Originals product line, which includes the Deep Smoothies and G5 lures, originated over two years ago when Luck “E” Strike owner John Hendricks was comparing the baits available today to the ones he fished with in the past. “Why can’t we get baits like we used to?” asked Hendricks. “Can we build baits that are affordable?” Although the American Originals lures were originally molded and glued at a facility in Arkansas, the glueing process was transferred to the Cassville facility last year. Molding is still completed at a plant in Harrison, Arkansas. “There is a vast difference between these lures and the ones produced overseas, and these are more affordable than imports,” said Dennis. In order to mass produce baits at manufacturing facilities outside the United States, producers changed the materials used to make the lures, said Dennis. “Everything is automated. They use sonic welding, and the color is printed on rather than painted. When they change the

materials, the bait doesn’t sound the same or run the same. “Each American Originals lure is hand glued and hand painted,” continued Dennis. “They are painted here and hooked by our home contractors.” Luck “E” Strike employees who create the American Originals baits go through several weeks of training in order to learn the proper way to hand paint the Americanmade lures. “It takes a month for them to build their speed to the numbers needed,” said Dennis. “They have to understand what the


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“One day, my dad was looking at a bolt he had just bought at a hardware store and realized that those same grooves would adapt to a plastic worm,” said Hendricks. “This innovation changed the soft plastic market forever and led to the continuing evolution of styles and colors.” In honor of his father, Hendricks plans to name a portion of the new product line the Ring Master Series. Luck “E” Strike has also developed a new lead head bait that will complement the umbrella rigs that were painted at the Cassville plant over the last two years. Umbrella rigs, which allow anglers to fish with three to five lures using one fishing rod, have become increasingly popular over the last few years. “John is very aggressive about new product lines,” said Dennis. “He is always working to add to what we offer.” Luck “E” Strike sells a complete line of hard and soft baits, umbrella rigs, jigs, spinnerbaits, buzz baits, spoons and bay kits for bass, crappie, walleye, trout and other types of fishing. “Today, Luck “E” Strike is a full line lure company with brands such as American Originals, Walleye Fever, Nemire Scrounger, RC2 and Chesapeake Bay Tackle,” said Hendricks. “With more than eight Classic wins under its belt, Luck “E” Strike has continued the tradition of new innovation, premium quality and affordable prices.” For more information on Luck “E” Strike lures, visit www.luck-e-strike.us. To request a catalog, call 417-847-3158.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

finishing color is going to look like in order to get the paint scheme correct. It can take three to six passes with the airbrush to get the right color for a particular lure.” Currently, Luck “E” Strike’s catalog offers 14 different color schemes for the Deep Smoothies and nearly two dozen color schemes for the G5. New color schemes are added throughout the year based on customer feedback and requests, said Dennis. “Walmart has picked up the American Originals line,” said Dennis. “Dick Sporting Goods will also be carrying the baits. All of the major distributors have picked them up now.” In the fall, Luck “E” Strike employees were working to complete over 50,000 American Originals lures to stock the shelves of retail stores across the country by Jan. 1, 2013. The lures first appeared in Bass Pro Shops and around 600 small bait and tackle stores last year. In addition to relocating the glueing process to the Cassville plant, Luck “E” Strike bait designers also worked to change the action of the American-made lure. The change was made after receiving feedback from professional anglers and customers. As if the local lure manufacturer wasn’t busy enough, Luck “E” Strike is currently working to add four new soft plastic baits and several new hard baits to its product line in 2013. The new baits will include an enhanced variation of the ring worm bait created by Hendricks’ father, John Sr., around 50 years ago.


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LEE CREEK VALLEY VIEW FROM YELLOW ROCK.

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With the holidays approaching, I was ready to decompress from the shopping stress by stretching my legs while the weather was still relatively balmy. Burnt out from the holiday season already, I needed an escape. John Muir’s quote came to mind, “The mountains are calling, and I must go.” That settled it -- a trip to the Boston Mountains was in order. I hiked Yellow Rock Trail last fall, but I was interested in the view now that the trees were bare. Also, since it was a short


Off e beaten path S TO R Y A N D PH OTO S BY JEN N IF ER JO HNS ON

Yellow Rock Trail in the Boston Mountains ELEVATION CHANGE: approximately 300 feet LENGTH: 3 miles DIFFICULTY LEVEL: 2.5 stars out of 5 (1 being flat/super easy and 5 being rigorous). Easy to moderate difficulty, some elevation change. GEAR: A couple bottles of water and sturdy shoes with traction. TIME: Approximately 2 hours First, the trail is a loop with two spurs, so if you hike the loop from the overlook you risk missing the lower spur, which boasts some gorgeous geological formations. Next, as you hike from the valley, scenic vistas

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approximately 13 miles into the heart of the state park, where you will begin the hike from Lee Creek Valley. If it’s your first excursion on this trail, I recommend the trailhead from the valley.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

hike, I could venture into the woods for a few hours leaving just enough time to Christmas shop. Yellow Rock Trail is located in the Boston Mountains, approximately 30 minutes southwest of Fayetteville, Arkansas, in Devil’s Den State Park. There are two trailheads: one is accessed by taking the first Devil’s Den exit from Fayetteville (Hwy 170 West) for 18 miles to the overlook; and the other is accessed by taking the second Devil’s Den exit for


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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

Small wonder

Have you ever found a stick that looked slightly out of place and then suddenly it started to move? Phasmids, commonly referred to as “Walking Sticks,” can be found in the Ozarks woods by the observant explorer. Old wives tales postulated that walking sticks were sinister entities in cahoots with the devil. As a result of this stigma, locals would chop these maligned insects in half to rid the area of evil. Of course, we now know that the walking stick is a natural part of the Ozarks ecology and pretty cool looking to boot.

HIKERS ON YELLOW ROCK TRAIL.

provide a perfect opportunity for short breaks -- a welcome reprieve during the steep climb. I began my ascent from Lee Creek Valley in the afternoon. The mist of the morning had cleared and the sun peeked out, illuminating the towers of limestone crags that lined the trail. In the winter, we often think of the world as a gray and brown canvas, to be ignored until the world turns white with snow or until spring arrives with her palette of colors. But for those with a keen eye, there are colors to be found. In addition to the golden stone sentinels, dark green moss and lime green lichens blanketed boulders while clusters of red berries on scraggly branches hung, tempting the songbirds. Moist bottomland woods gave way to fragrant glades bursting with cedars that lined the switchbacks and gripped the edge of ledge and space with gnarly, weatherworn roots. An upland forest took the place of dry glades on this leg of the trail where oaks, hickories and maples, now bare of leaves, created a canopy. Here, the trail flattened, allowing for a more leisurely walk. Pileated woodpeckers screeched across the expanse, and black-capped chickadees tittered in bramble thickets. When the trail forked, I took the trail to the right, the most direct route to Yellow Rock. Yellow Rock was glorious in the early fall, but the trees, now barren of their leaves, allowed for an entirely new experience. My mind did a celebratory jig

while I watched the thin blue ribbon of Lee Creek daintily wind her way through the woods, an azure treasure fully revealed in winter. A vortex of black vultures rode the thermal updrafts like cowboys, while the LIMESTONE FEATURE ON LOWER SPUR.


afternoon shadows moved and morphed across the valley’s green cedar trees and dormant hardwoods like molten gold. It was here that I shed that holiday angst, and the season was once again a time to be cherished, much like this hike. As John Muir’s inspiration brought me to the woods, so then did Albert Camus’s quote inspire the walk back through sunny upland woods. “In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.” If you’re feeling extra energetic, check out the overlook spur by taking the trail to your right, otherwise, you won’t be missing much by looping to the left and heading back to the lower trailhead. Contrary to its name, the outlook does not offer a view of nature’s bounty like Yellow Rock, however the heart of Devil’s Den State Park and the bridge over Lee Creek can be observed from this trailhead

MIKE JOHNSON SITTING ON THE EDGE OF YELLOW ROCK SOAKING UP THE VIEW. LOWER SPUR OF YELLOW ROCK TRAIL.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

where a Civilian Conservation Corpsconstructed pavilion provides plenty of benches for a long break or picnic. Returning to the trailhead, I felt renewed. I was finally ready to venture out for some Christmas shopping. I’ve been an outdoor addict long enough to realize that hiking doesn’t have to be a grueling process of buying the right gear, mapping out 20plus miles of trail and planning for every weather event (although those can be fun too)! Sometimes, we just need a few hours away from the noise to re-calibrate and soak up the beauty that surrounds us. This can be accomplished with a couple bottles of water, some decent traction on our shoes, a great little trail like Yellow Rock and the will to step outside!

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TIM’S FLY FISHING TIPS

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

BY TIM HOMESLEY

One of the things I enjoy about winter small stream fishing is the solitude. You will see many more animals in the winter when the crowds are smaller. I see many, many eagles while fishing in the winter, and the mink, otters and muskrats are very common on many streams. Some streams harbor a good amount of beaver. You’ll see one now and again, but they seem to stay in during the day. I’ll see one very early or very late occasionally. Water in the winter is usually very clear, and the use of stealth and camo clothing can really help you stalk a small stream. There are a few streams in southwest Missouri that contain trout year round, and you wouldn’t even know it if you didn’t fish or know someone that has

fished it. There are small springs all over the Ozarks where a trout can find a spot to survive even the hottest of the summers. I know of several small streams that you’ll be wading down in the summer, and you’ll know when you hit the spring, as the water temps and the plant growth change very fast. And of course, you’ll catch a trout now and again. There have been many hatcheries over the years on many of the streams in southwest Missouri; most have been abandoned, but the remnants of them remain. Because self-reproducing trout will be around years after a hatchery has been torn down, you’ll often find trout in these areas. I consider a small stream to be a body of water that is less than 30-feet wide, and

I like fishing these little Ozark jewels. If you decide to fish a small stream, a 4wt fly rod or ultra light spinning rod will usually be just fine. I use a 5’ to 6 1/2’ fly rod for most of my fishing on small streams. I like a 4 1/2’ to 5 1/2’ spinning rod, and a 4-pound line will work on most of the streams. I like to fish when the water is ultra clear and a 2-pound line will work better, but these streams are very brushy. It isn’t like fishing the trout parks. Every flood moves debris in and out, and big trees fall in the water creating all kinds of little hiding areas for trout. I was fishing a small stream just a few days ago, fishing for trout, and did pretty good. I landed seven rainbows in a little less than two hours, and just about quitting time, I landed four nice little smallmouth

Tim Homesley is an avid fly fisherman who owns and operates Tim’s Fly Shop, which is located a half mile from the north entrance of Roaring River State Park on Highway 112. The shop, which is is the only Cortland 444 Pro Shop in the area, is also a Whiting hackle dealer and a Frog Hair tippet dealer and carries a large selection of fly tying products from Wapsi and Spirit River. Tim, a Cassville, Missouri, native, has been fishing and hunting since he was 5 years old. His birthday fittingly falls on March 1, which is the opening day of trout season in Missouri. Although he’s known for his fly fishing expertise, Tim has traveled all over the world chasing the dream. He’s caught big wild rainbows and browns and also saltwater fished in Texas, Florida, Aruba, New Zealand and Louisiana. “I can tie about any kind of knot for fishing, and I’ve put over a million yards of line on reels in my 30 years in the business,” says Tim. For more information on Tim’s Fly Shop, visit www.missouritrout.com/ timsflyshop. Tim is also on Twitter. Check him out at http://twitter.com/Timsfly.


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bass, another little Ozark jewel. I love these as much as I do trout, and you’ll catch trout and smallmouth on a lot of our area streams. They live pretty good together. I only carry a few flies in the winter. The 10 flies I will always have with me in the winter are: Adams (dry), #12’s-#16’s; Caddis (dry), #14’s-#18’s; Blue Wing Olives (dry), #16’s-#22’s; Crackle Back (dry or wet), green body; Grizzly Hackle, #12’s-#16’s, Woolybuggers (wets-streamer), brown, black, olive and tan, #8’s-#14’s, Pheasant Tail Nymph (nymph), #12’s-#18’s; Glo-balls (nymph), orange, apricot, oregon cheese and white, #8’s-#22’s; San Juan Worms (nymph), white, red, orange, brown and cream, #8’s-#22’s; Hares Ear (nymph), #8’s-#18’s; and last but not least, a Whitlock Squirrel hair nymph (nymph), #8’s-#16’s. Nine-foot leaders are usually best. In real brushy areas, you can get by with a 7 1/2’ leader. If the water is up and or dingy, I’ll sometimes use a 7 1/2’ leader, but most times, I use a 9’ leader. You don’t need a high dollar outfit; any of the $49 to $150 outfits work fine. If you’re buying a kit, you don’t have to worry about it, as they do a good job of matching

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WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

lines on the outfits, but if you have a rod and you’re buying a line, make sure the line and the rod match. Don’t buy a 6wt line for a 4wt rod; you won’t like how it works. Buy a floating line. We just don’t need a sinking line on the small streams very often. Get out and enjoy the small waters in the Ozarks. You don’t have to drive very far no matter where you live to find a small creek with hungry fish just waiting for you.


WALKING EUREKA

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

BY BETH BA RT LET T

Although Eureka Springs, Arkansas, sees hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, very few of those guests explore any further than the shops, spas and art galleries. It’s a shame, because the town is a fascinating mix of history and nature, all within walking distance of the Historic Downtown district. Walking was the preferred way to see the healing springs back in the day, when visitors flocked to the town in the 1890s to rediscover health and vitality, and it’s the best way to enjoy this Victorian gem, especially in winter when all the trees are bare and houses normally hidden are easily seen. Before we tackle a great winter walk, it’s a good idea to remember that Eureka Springs goes up and down; there are very few level spots in the town, so you will be walking along hilly terrain. Wear comfortable, sturdy shoes. Most of the paths are paved, but we’re going to take you along some gravel, too. Allow at least an hour for this walk, and feel free to bring a walking stick if you like. We’ll start at the 1886 Crescent Hotel. This will be the starting and ending point for our adventure, so you can explore the hotel itself before or after, but definitely stop in, look around and take your time. There’s a spa, a lounge with an incredible view of the downtown area, a restaurant, ghost tours and more. Walk out of the parking lot along the stepping stones by the garden, and you’ll see an intersection ahead. Turn left and you’ll be on Crescent Drive. Walk a few yards down this street and you’ll see a small sign on the right marking a walking path to downtown. There’s also a private path that leads to a residence, but that is clearly marked as well.

Further down the street is St. Elizabeth’s Catholic Church, the only church where you enter through the bell tower. You’ll have an opportunity to visit the church later, so take the public walking path to your right. You are walking down the hill along a very old sidewalk into a hidden hollow of natural beauty and Victorian homes. Along the right side of the path are homes located on Fairmount Street, and along the left, you can see the rest of the hill below. As you come out of the hollow, the sidewalk meets up with Magnolia Street. You’ll see several historic homes built before the turn of the last century. Stay to your left on Magnolia Street, and you’ll head downhill toward Spring Street. On your left you’ll see Crystal Terrace, a home built in 1880 and saved from ruin several years ago by a masterful

renovation. You’ll also see some of the limestone retaining walls that wind up and down through the terrain. There are more than 70 miles of retaining walls lining the hills and streets, many of them still filled with the original limestone first placed there after the town was founded in 1879. Take the wooden sidewalk further down the street, and you’ll soon be at the edge of Howell Street, one of the steepest streets in town. When big snowstorms hit Eureka Springs and traffic comes to a standstill, local sledders make their way to Howell Street and take a thrilling ride all the way down. While you probably won’t encounter anyone on sleds, you should still look both ways (this is a two-way street) and carefully make your way down to Spring Street. Once you’re on Spring Street, you’ll see Harding Spring to your right. This tiny city park is also home to Lover’s Leap, where legend has it that a Native American princess jumped to her death rather than marry the man her father picked for her. There are guardrails along the top of the bluff now to


SPRINGS prevent nasty ends to bad relationships, and the stairway up to the bluff is a lovely bit of irony, since the plaque states that the funding for the stairway was made possible by all the couples who married in Eureka Springs in 1987. While there are some amazing views along the trails above the spring, we’re saving those for another day, and so you are to head left on Spring Street past the

Great Passion Play, which went bankrupt in late 2012. One final hike up the hill, and one final grand view of the Crescent Hotel, which looks imposing as it towers over Crescent Drive. From this view, you can better see the towers and the reconstructed conservatory, which connects to the gardens. You can take the stairs up to the hotel or wind your way around to the front.

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Elizabeth’s Catholic Church again. This is a good point for a rest stop if you need it. Legend has it that the bell tower was constructed as a memorial on the spot where Richard Kerens last saw his mother, and the church was built a few years later in 1908. From this vantage point, you can also see the Christ of the Ozarks statue, part of the currently defunct

For more great walks around historic Eureka Springs, we highly recommend a small booklet published by the Eureka Springs Preservation Society, “Six Scenic Walking Tours in Historic Eureka Springs.” For only a few bucks, you can get more history about the ground you’ve just covered and discover several other paths through this historic and fascinating town. You can pick up the booklet at the Eureka Springs Historic Museum on South Main Street or at the Carnegie Public Library.

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Victorian homes and Mountain Adventure Outfitters. Along this street you’ll see the Piedmont House, the oldest continuallyoperated bed and breakfast in Eureka Springs, along with several cottages and homes. As we near the library, on the left, there’s a series of storefronts that once held a grocery store and meat market in 1900. Congress Spring is also located behind the building. Next to these buildings is the Carnegie Public Library, which was built in 1910. This library is only one of two remaining Carnegie libraries in the state and was constructed from limestone left over from the Crescent Hotel building project. Before the library was built, the site was part of a walkway that connected Spring Street to the hotel. Take a few minutes and go in; you can ask to see the library’s impressive collection of historic photos. In those pictures, you’ll spot a lot of the homes you just hiked past. The library is one of the best places to warm up in winter, and if you go to the upper level, you can see the retaining walls ringing the

back and sides of the building. After a rest at the library, walk next door to Crescent Spring. This spring supplied water to the Crescent Hotel above through a series of pipes up the hill, but now it simply provides a lovely spot to rest, think and read a book. No time for reading now, however, because you will take the stairs to the right of the spring leading back up the hill. Depending on your fitness level, these stairs can be a bit steep, so use caution. You can see where some have blazed a trail around the stairs, using the gravel on either side instead of the stair step itself. This can be easier on sore knees. As you progress up the hill, you’ll see the backs of homes on Spring Street; some have connecting bridges to the path. In decades past, it was common for homes to have entrances on different levels, and some are still used to this day. At the end of the path, you’ll find yourself back on Crescent Drive. Turn left, head up the hill and you’ll soon see St.

More walking tours


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A running A high pain threshold is not necessarily a good thing. As a lifelong runner, I have always been one of those guys who could overcome lack of talent with intense training and a disregard for pain. That got me in trouble this year, and I am paying the price right now. Last summer, I pushed my weekly mileage in preparation for the Mother Road Marathon. I wasn’t really aiming at the marathon, though. The real goal was to break the state age group record for 50 miles. In August, I had a sharp twinge in my lower abdomen toward the end of a run. I eased back and coasted the last mile. No other pain besides the one twinge, so I noted it in my log as a “slight groin strain.” The next day, I felt stiff during warmup but had no difficulty in completing my run. This pattern continued daily. I felt stiff in my lower abdomen at the beginning of a run but then could relax and stride comfortably after a mile or so. But after a few days, the pain intensified and never really went away. On my long runs, there was always that aura of dull pain, but I never had any sharp stabbing pains. I finally went to see my general practitioner, a very nice and capable young lady. She checked and poked and thumped and finally said, “Probably a hernia. I’m sending you to the sports medicine clinic.” The sports medicine doc leaned toward a sports hernia, which is a different animal than the conventional hernia and its possibility of strangulated tissue. But X-rays, scans and MRIs revealed nothing with just two weeks left before the marathon. Dr. Kim Coulter, a running friend from Kansas City, provided me with lots of advice during this time, and I am indebted to him for his wise insight. His experience and intuition led to a different conclusion, the only one that fit all the symptoms and presentations of my condition. We spent one night shooting private messages and emails back and forth. I answered his questions as best I could to


ALL-SEASONS RUNNER

lesson: take time off when necessary

BY LEE STUBBLEFIELD help him see what I was going through. “Have you had an accident?” “No.” “Have you been playing any contact sports?” “No.” “Any sudden twists to your hips or pelvis?’ “No.” “Osciitis Pubis,” he finally pronounced. I pored through internet pages, studying this rare sports-related condition. “Self-limiting” was one description that caught my eye. Just like Plantar Faschiitis, it will go away on its own, eventually. Treatment? None, really. Treat the symptoms – as in, take near-lethal doses of painkiller when needed – and train at a level where the pain is manageable. Based on all that, I made the decision to race. Running had not made the problem

any worse, and I hated to waste all the work and background mileage I had put in. But I discovered the hard way that racing 26 miles in pain is a lot different than easing through a 26-mile long run in practice. With three miles to go, I told myself, “We’re done racing now, we’re just doing a little cool down run before we go in.” That became my mantra as I crept toward the finish line. It’s been three weeks since the marathon, and I finally realized I had to take some time off. There will be no 50-mile race for me this year. It is more important to give my body a chance to heal completely than it is to keep pushing my pain threshold to the max just to chase a record. I realize now that I should never have run the race once it was established there was something more serious involved than a slight strain. We as runners sometimes

lose perspective, and not even many years of experience can quench that inner Superman voice that insists, “You can run through it.” I hope that this helps someone who is undergoing a similar struggle to realize that health is more important than any race. There is no sin or shame in taking time off when necessary. When pain hits, back off to a level where pain is no longer present. If no improvement occurs, stop running. Cross training may be possible, but some injuries require a total detachment from all forms of training. Instead of sinking into depression, welcome the opportunity to rest and recover, to regain a little of that weight that you shouldn’t have sacrificed and to spend some more quality time with family and friends. The road will still be there when you are finally ready to resume running.

A B OU T THE AUTH O R :

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

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Lee Stubblefield, who currently lives in Cassville, Missouri, was an All-State half-miler and state champion cross country runner for Fayetteville (Arkansas) High School. He led the Bulldogs to their fifth consecutive state team cross country title in 1973 and ran collegiately for Henderson State University and John Brown University. Stubblefield served as head track and cross country coach for Southwest High School in Washburn, Missouri, from 1999 to 2009 and served as interim track coach for the 2012 season. The Trojans won the Missouri Class 1 boys state cross country title in 2000 – the only state championship in any MSHSAA sport in the history of the school – and finished in the top three at state four times during Stubblefield’s coaching stint. Under Stubblefield, the Southwest boys won the Ozark 7 Track and Field Championships in 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Stubblefield is also an accomplished master’s road racer with a best master’s marathon time of 3:17:54 at the Oklahoma Marathon in 1999 and a 3:21:22 at the Frisco Highline Marathon in 2005. His best master’s 10K is a 38:20 from the 2005 Sunshine Run at age 49. He holds Missouri state 55-59 age-group records for the 25K (1:47:50) and 50K (4:23:44).


r e h t un

u o n r d a

A list of running events in the four-state area.

NOT YOUR TYPICAL RACE:

St. Patty’s Revenge Urban Adventure Race March 17 Wildcat Glades Conservation Area in Joplin, Missouri This one-of-a-kind competition, hosted by Rufus Racing, is held in a different city in the four states every year. The race incorporates a 15-mile bike ride, a three-mile run and eight to 10 checkpoints along the course. The event takes about two to four hours to complete, and the course is not announced until 10 minutes before the race starts. For more information, visit www.rufusracing.com.

Frozen Buns Run

Heart of the Ozarks Run

Ruckus Kansas City

Hosted by the St. Louis Triathlon Club Saturday, January 19 U City Loop at Blueberry Hill St. Louis, Missouri 10K and 5K run For information, visit http://stlouistriclub.com.

Saturday, February 16 West Plains, Missouri 13.1-mile run, 10K and special half-marathon team challenge. For information, visit www.joebilldixon.com.

Saturday, April 6 and Sunday, April 7 Valley Speedway Grain Valley, Missouri The Ruckus includes a 2-mile, 4-mile or 8-mile obstacle course plus a Ruckus Mini for ages 2 and up. For information, visit http://runruckus.com/ ruckus-kansas-city-2012.html.

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

The Polar Bear 5K Saturday, January 26 Seymour, Missouri For information, visit www.runningintheusa. com or www.active.com.

The Gladiator Mud Run Saturday, March 9 Soggy Bottoms Mx Park Elkhead, Missouri A 5- to 7-mile course incorporating 25-plus extreme obstacles ending in The Coliseum finale. For information, visit, www.begladiators.com.

Run with the Wind 2013 Saturday, February 16 Individual 25K run or three-person relay from Sarcoxie High School to Carthage High School -- only certified 25K in the state of Missouri. For information, visit www. joplinroadrunners.com.

Forrest Gump Challenge Saturday, March 30 Reeds Spring, Missouri 13.1-mile run, 26.2-mile run and 50-mile ultra marathon. For more information, visit www. runningintheusa.com or www.active.com.

GO! St. Louis Marathon and Half-Marathon Sunday, April 7 St. Louis, Missouri 13.1-mile run, 26.2-mile run and 26.2-mile relay. Purdy High School graduate and college All-American runner Brian Lyons serves as race director. For information, visit www. gostlouis.org.


EXHILARATION ON FOUR SHORT LEGS

B Y LA R R Y DA B L E M O NT

RICH ABDOLER AND RABBIT.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

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You just can’t listen to a group of beagles running a rabbit and not smile. They are so excited about what they are trailing they are nearly beside themselves, and nothing in the world is more important to them than that scent, which mesmerizes them. A beagle on the trail of a rabbit may not know there is anything else around him, or in the whole world for that matter. What a day we had last January while watching and listening to five beagles and the music they made on the trail of one rabbit and then another. If you haven’t heard those little rabbit dogs baying and bawling in pursuit of a cottontail, you have missed something. It is a sound no outdoor writer can properly describe, because no two beagles sound exactly the same, and the squalling and bellowing that comes from five of them at once would make the non-hunter think that the little dogs are hung in a fence and in mortal pain. It isn’t exactly music, but then again it is, if you fancy yourself a rabbit-dog enthusiast. When they are hot on a trail, following a rabbit across an opening where they can really get up a head of steam, a group of beagles is a comical sight. Each dog is trying to get in the lead, and all of them are absolutely sure they are about to catch that rabbit. Those little short legs are


going as hard as they can go, and there’s always that one little dog that can hardly keep up. Nothing ever worked so hard to cover so little ground as a beagle. They aren’t ever going to catch a rabbit, and the rabbit knows it. If he didn’t, he might take refuge in a hole somewhere, but for some reason,

most rabbits pass up the dens in the ground that are fairly common, continuing in a circle that eventually leads them back to where they started, or somewhere close, and into the range of a waiting hunter. There were several of us hunting together last year -- Jim Killer and his son,

Nathan, from Dover, Arkansas, Dennis Whiteside, from Springfield, Rich Abdoler and I. Rich owned one of the beagles, the oldest and most experienced of the pack. Jim owned the other four and had two more in his pickup and two or three more at home. You might say Jim is taken with rabbit hunting and beagles, and nuts about his dogs. He carries a little single-shot 410 that looks something like a toy gun, and seldom fires it if someone else wants to shoot. Jim hunts rabbits because he loves to hear those beagles run, and it is amazing how well he has trained them. Four or five of his dogs are between 2 and 3 years old, and he has them responding to various calls and commands as if they were little shortlegged machines. But you just can’t get a beagle off a hot trail when they are captured by the enticing scent of a cottontail. Unless you can catch them, or shoot the rabbit, they are going to run that rabbit until he finds some trick or

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OZARKS OZARKS OUTDOORS OUTDOORS WINTER WINTER 2013 2013

JIM AND NATHAN KILLER AND A FEW OF THEIR BEAGLES.


maneuver that loses them. You wouldn’t believe how a rabbit can back-track and confuse his trail. He’s escaped his pursuers, the dogs become quiet, and for a while, they try to pick up a trail that just seems to end. And then the older dog finds it...she opens up with an excited bawl and the others rush to join her. The chase is on again! Carrying an old over-and-under Savage, with a .22 rifle barrel over a 20-gauge shotgun barrel, I try to find a good high spot and wait to get a glimpse of that rabbit, knowing he will be quite a ways ahead of the beagles. They turn and head back toward me, 200 yards distant, and about that time, I catch a glimpse of the cottontail, leisurely hopping through a briar patch. Finally, I have my chance, and I take the easy shot. I can get this one with the rifle barrel, so I flip the selector button and squeeze the trigger. The small caliber rifle bullet kicks up dirt in front of the rabbit’s nose.

Nathan that my old friend Rich is something of a game hog. Soon there is another chase going, and the bellowing and bawling is renewed. Somebody yells, “There he goes,” and shortly afterward, “Here he comes,” and then someone else hollers, “There he goes,” again. Jim said he got a good look at him, but couldn’t get off a shot. He said he was pretty sure that rabbit had a hole in one ear.

WINTER 2013 2013 OZARKS OZARKS OUTDOORS OUTDOORS WINTER

Nathan comes up beside me and asks if I missed. I told him I shot a little high, and when someone bagged that cottontail, they’d find a hole in one of his ears. Shortly afterward, Rich got the opportunity to put one more rabbit in his game bag. He already had two, and that last one put him three ahead of me. Oh well, it isn’t rabbits we are after really, it is the music of the chase, the camaraderie of old friends. I point out to

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BULLETS AND BOWS BOUNDS INTO THE HUNTING ARENA A Cassville man may well have revolutionized the art of bow hunting with three inventions that are currently being used by bow manufacturers across the nation.

S TO R Y A N D PH OTO S BY M ELO N IE RO B E RT S

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

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Joe Goade, owner of Bullets and Bows in Cassville, Missouri, patented the Shock Extreme Stabilizer in 1996, followed by the ST1 in 1998. His newest invention, the STS, was patented in 2010 and is now a standard in the bow manufacturing industry. “The STS, the String Stopper, removes the vibration from the string,” Goade said. “That reduces the noise of the bow and improves accuracy. It also stops the string from hitting the shooter’s arm.” The stabilizer “gets in front of the bow,” which alleviates the travel of the bow string, along with the noise that results from the draw and release of the arrow. “Deer will jump at the sound of the string [release] before the arrow can get to it,” Goade said. “The STS makes the bow quieter, more accurate.” Martin Archery, located in Walla Walla, Washington, has partnered with Goade

to make the STS a standard part of its manufacturing process. At his gun and archery shop, Goade also assists customers in tuning bows to meet specific needs. “Many people at the bigger stores are only interested in making the sale,” Goade said. “When I tune the bow to their pull poundage, arm length and weight, they can shoot the arrow perfectly straight.” A well-tuned bow can make an aboveaverage shooter of anyone at any skill level. “I had a little elderly lady come to me in Tennessee,” Goade said. “She was 74 years old and had never shot a bow. She wanted to compete in the Senior Olympics. Two weeks out, she took home a silver medal. She could only pull 26 pounds.” Goade’s 14-year-old daughter, Nicole, placed third in world competition in 2004. “She actually missed two of


the qualifying shoots in the world championship competition and still earned enough points to take third place in the world,” Goade said.

During deer season, when Goade tunes customers’ bows, he averages between 500 to 1,000 shots per day. “On my own, I shoot at least an hour a day,” he said. “We have an indoor DART digital shooting system video range.

“There’s nothing I can’t work on,” he said. Goade carries Martin, BowTech, Diamond and PSE lines, as well as Stryker, Barnett and Horton crossbows. He stocks Remington, Browning, Savage, Marlin, Glock, Springfield, Smith and Wesson, Taurus, Heckler and Koch and Ruger firearms and accessories. There is also an in-house gunsmith to assist customers with their firearm needs. “I carry quality products on my shelves,” Goade said. “Most are American made. My products are all manufactured in Tennessee and assembled right here in the shop.” Bullets and Bows is located at 10826 Farm Road 2172 in Cassville just off of Highway 37. The shop is open from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturdays. For more information, call 417-847-8040.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

“I won’t stock anything I haven’t tried. I stand behind everything I sell.”

Customers can either use the video screen that simulates an African safari or bag targets against the back wall.” While most people believe that splitting an arrow with another is a rare occurrence, Goade has a bag filled with trophies of just those shots. A stuffed deer head, mounted on the wall, has a rack full of arrows of those same shots made by his customers. “You can do that with a well-tuned bow,” he said. “A tuned bow is accurate at any speed.” Goade also has a wall filled with hunting supplies and aids that he has personally tried and endorses. “I won’t stock anything I haven’t tried,” he said. “I stand behind everything I sell.” Known as the “Bow Doc,” Goade not only tunes bows of all kinds but rebuilds them.

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someone, something, somewhere you’d like to see featured in Ozarks Outdoors? Share it with us.

e Wher ms hing r a e fir NOT a t are he past! of t

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

BUY • SELL • TR ADE

We stock new and used rifles, shotguns, pistols and revolvers.

Email your story idea to editor@monett-times.com

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FLIES AND LIES CLUB Learn to tie flies in time for trout season BY M ELO N IE RO BERT S

CLUB MEMBER TIES A FLY.

cover the cost of supplies. Individuals can choose to come to one class or all of them. “We like to get together and make flies when it is too cold to fish,” said Bennett. “That way, when the weather is warmer, we’re ready to go.”

For more information on the Flies and Lies Club, contact Bennett at 417-772-7029 or visit Denali Dreams, located at 316 East Broadway in Monett, Missouri.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

The Flies and Lies Club, based in Monett, Missouri, is gearing up for the opening day of trout season on March 1 by gathering together to stock up on hand-tied flies. “Anyone is welcome to join,” said Shaun Bennett, owner of Denali Dreams in Monett, where fishing enthusiasts meet weekly to custom tie a variety of fishing flies to use during warm weather fishing expeditions. “If someone is a beginner, we have some supplies and loaner equipment to use, or we can get them their own equipment at a discounted price from a vendor in Cassville. “Additionally, there are members who can help beginners learning to tie flies with advice or hands-on practice,” Bennett added. Club members meet at Denali Dreams each Thursday night at 6:30 p.m. Meetings began on January 3 and will continue through February 28. There is no membership fee, but those attending for the first time are asked to donate $2 to help

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5

THINGS

to do on the lake in the winter (That don’t involve swim trunks) BY BET H BA RT LET T

Broken-hearted because every time you jump in the lake, you turn blue? Don’t worry, there’s plenty to do at area lakes until summertime rolls around again!

PHOTOGRAPHY Winter is the perfect season for nature photography in the Ozarks. Want a picture of a stunning sunset and still make it back home in time for dinner? Done. Thinking about time-lapse photos or intricate close-ups? The lakes are always quiet this time of year, so you can take your

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

SAILING Sailboats are occasionally seen on Beaver Lake during the summer. While those lazy cruises under the summer sun are lovely, nothing gets into a sailor’s blood like the fierce winds of winter. New Year’s regattas are held, weather-permitting, as a celebration of new beginnings amid the elements. You can often find out about these events at local marinas. Even if you don’t have a boat, you can cheer on your favorites from the shore. Remember to dress warmly in light, water-resistant layers and don’t forget the sunscreen, lip balm and deck shoes.

time with set-ups without interruption. Due to the low lake levels on Beaver Lake this summer, you may even be able to snap shots of places like the Monte Ne historic site, including the tower, amphitheater and some foundations left from the 1900-era resort that was flooded when the lake

was formed. Just remember to respect areas that are closed for the season, such as campgrounds and roads maintained by the U.S. Corps of Engineers, and don’t go on private property for that ultimate lake view shot unless you have permission from the property owner.

HIKING Is there anything better than the crisp air of February and a long, winding trail ahead of you? As long as you’re prepared for the cold, nothing can stop you from seeing the Ozarks as few have the courage to do this time of year. If you’re not accustomed to winter hiking, try the short Dogwood Trail near Beaver Dam or the 1.5-mile Chinquapin Trail at Table Rock State Park. Ready to level up, challenge wise? Tackle the 24-mile Hidden Diversity Multi-Use


WILDLIFE SPOTTING With most forms of hunting season past, these early months in the year are excellent for watching wildlife. The trees are bare, so you can see movement even farther away. Of course, that means the animals can see you, too, so remember to keep your distance, never approach the animals and record your experiences with a notebook or camera. If you’re just starting out as a birdwatcher and would like to team up with like-minded fowl fans, groups like the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society or the Greater Ozarks Audubon Society hold regular field trips and events.

FISHING With less recreational traffic on the water, fishermen often hit their stride during the winter months. Fishing is allowed all year long on both Beaver Lake and Table Rock Lake, and bass are often seen in schools near the surface instead of deeper waters. The winter season is a great time for stripers, crappie, white bass, walleye and more. If you’ve never been winter fishing before, hire a guide who can point you to the best spots depending on weather and location.

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Trail at Hobbs State Park by Beaver Lake, the 10.25-mile White River Valley Trail System at Table Rock Lake, or the 21 miles of trails at Lake Leatherwood Park near Eureka Springs.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES TRAILERS


bringing the outside in BY BET H B ARTLE TT

An Ozarks winter can be a fickle thing -- mild one week and bitterly cold the next. Sometimes even the most dedicated outdoor fans need to come in from the ice, snow and cold. Luckily, this area has several excellent facilities to keep you in shape, whether you enjoy walking, jogging, rock climbing or ice skating.

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

ROCK CLIMBING OUTDOOR RECREATION CENTER

BIG ROCK CLIMBING GYM

HPER Building, University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas

Springfield, Missouri

http://urec.uark.edu/8051.htm 479-575-4646 The HPER building offers a bouldering wall and a climbing wall. Equipment is available on site, or climbers can use their personal equipment. To use the facilities, you must be a HPER member, have a valid UA student ID or a guest pass.

www.bigrockclimbinggym.com 417-866-3308 This indoor climbing facility offers a variety of climbing challenges, including walls and a bouldering island. A daily pass for adults is $10, and a junior pass is $8. Training and certifications are also available, along with youth programs and climbing parties.

LEWIS & CLARK OUTFITTERS Rogers and Springdale locations in Arkansas www.gooutandplay.com Rogers store: 479-845-1344 Springdale store: 479-756-1344 Their climbing walls are open to the public on weekend afternoons and evenings; admission to the wall is $2. You can also arrange for climbing wall parties on Monday through Friday, plus Saturday mornings. The charge for parties is per hour and depends on how many attendees will be present and facilitators needed.


WALKING

THE JONES CENTER Springdale, Arkansas http://www.thejonescenter.net 479-756-8090 The center offers a four-lane walking/jogging track inside the gymnasium. You can purchase an annual membership or a $3 day pass. An indoor pool is also available, as well as many other amenities. Call ahead to check availability for any activity, since the Jones Center is a popular site for parties and other special events.

HPER BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Fayetteville, Arkansas http://urec.uark.edu/2591.htm 479-575-4646 A synthetic-surface indoor jogging track is available, as well as an Olympic-sized swimming pool. To use the facilities, you must be a HPER member, have a valid UA student ID or a guest pass.

BERRYVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER http://www.berryville.com/bcc.html 870-423-3139 This public community center offers an indoor three-lane walking/jogging track, indoor swimming pool and workout equipment. Several membership levels are available, from daily to yearly. A one-day pass is $3.

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Berryville, Arkansas

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ICE SKATING MEDIACOM ICE PARK Springfield, Missouri

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

http://www.parkboard.org/ice_park/ index.html 417-866-7444 Although the park is home to the Missouri State University Hockey Bears and several youth teams, there are still sessions slated for open skating and parties. Public skating sessions are usually available seven days a week and cost per session is $4 for kids, students and seniors, and $5 for adults. Skate rentals are available for $2.50. Call ahead or check the website for the current schedule.

THE JONES CENTER Springdale, Arkansas http://www.thejonescenter.net 479-756-8090 Ice skating in the Joel Carver Ice Arena requires a $5 session fee, and skate rentals are available for $2. The arena is open in the afternoons, Tuesday through Sunday, yet closed on Monday and other selected days for special events and hockey games. Call ahead before planning a day on the ice.

Located near Whitney Mountain Chapel

Private, secluded, luxury lakeview honeymoon & family cabins • • •

Jacuzzi for Two Rock Fireplace Full Kitchen

• • •

Private Deck King Size Bed BBQ Grill

Pick the cabin of your taste, from romantic décor to rustic Located between Rogers & Eureka Springs 1-888-694-4773 www.whisperinghillscabins.com


We supply your outdoor needs! Mr. Heater • Lodge Dutch Ovens • LED MAG Lites

JOURNAGAN

®

HARDWARE & LUMBER

“Serving Southwest Missouri for Over 37 Years” 1200 E. Church St. • Aurora, MO

417-678-4488

Place your ad here.

HASSLE FREE INSTANT LOANS Point your customers in the right direction by advertising in Ozarks Outdoors. COVERING SOUTHWEST MISSOURI AND NORTHWEST ARKANSAS.

417-847-2610 - Cassville, Mo. 417-235-3135 - Monett, Mo. 870-423-6636 - Berryville, Ark. 479-253-0070 - Eureka Springs, Ark.

775 Chapel Drive, Suite F • MONETT

For more information call 417-235-4200

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Mon - Fri: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Sat: 9 - noon

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TO ADVERTISE:


f f u t s l o o c RECORD YOUR RIDE

The OUTRIDE case by mophie turns iPhones into rugged video cameras. Record your outdoor adventure and share it with others.

JACK OF ALL TRADES Leatherman OHT is a one-handed operable multi-tool that should be in every outdoorsman’s pocket. The stainless steel body features countless tools, including needlenose pliers, a bottle opener, wire cutters, screwdrivers and a saw.

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

TOASTY TOES

Come shop our selection of specialized road and mountain bikes. Or spend a day enjoying the lakes and rivers in a new or rented kayak. Plus, all the gear needed to enjoy your day on the trails, pedaling around town or on the water. 151 Spring Street • Eureka Springs, Arkansas • Wed. - Sat. 9-5 Phone: 479-253-0900 or 479-466-6095 Fax: 479-253-0901

Experience one of the lightest winter boots ever made by putting on a pair of Teva’s Lifty collection. The boot has a waterproof shell with a removable Thinsulate LiteLoft liner that can be worn inside as a bootie.


ROOMY RUCKSAC The Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Daypack is lightweight, compact and super tough with seams that are double stitched and sealed with seam tape. A lacing system secures items well and the roll top keeps items dry.

VINTAGE VALUE The rugged yet stylish Timex Expedition Military Field Watch is water resistant at 100 meters. Its design and canvas band are reminiscent of World War II aviation equipment.

HOT HEAD Black Rock down-insulated hat is warm and light. The hat, which comes in four different colors, is lined with soft-wicking fabric and filled with 900-loft goose down.

PERSONAL TRAINER Motorola MOTOACTV boasts that it is the world’s first GPS fitness tracker with a Smart MP3 player all in one. The device plays music and keeps track of workout data like time, distance, speed, calories burned and heart rate.

WINTER WARMTH First Ascent Guide Gloves are a water-repellent leather glove that is tough but supple and extremely warm. It’s a glove that’s perfect for winter aerobic activity like mountain biking or hiking.

GO GREEN

SIDE SADDLE

The campstove by BioLite is a green gadget that utilizes thermoelectric technology that requires no fuel. It can also be used to charge small electronics like cell phones. This compact stove is also good to have around for when the power goes out at home.

The Blackburn SideRoller bottle cage is a water bottle mount that opens from the side. Made of alloy and polycarbonate, the mount is perfect for all bike types.

LET THERE BE LIGHT Light up the night or the inside of a cave with the Black Diamond ReVolt headlamp. The lamp features a TriplePower LED that throws a beam up to 70 meters when powered by AAA alkaline batteries. A dimmer switch lets the user control the light output.

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The Polar Hooded Jacket by North Face provides warmth where its needed most while maintaining breathability. The sleek soft shell jacket is new and designed to replace the more bulky, puffy down jacket.

WINTER 2013 OZARKS OUTDOORS

NO MORE PUFFY JACKETS


takeyourpic

PEACEFUL PASTORAL IN PURDY. PHOTO BY JEFF TERRY.

A RED BELLIED WOODPECKER ON A GUM TREE IN MONETT DURING A SNOW STORM EARLY IN THE YEAR. PHOTO BY DOUG PHILLIPS, OF MONETT.

A WINTER SUNSET. PHOTO BY JOHN R. BATY, JR., OF MONETT.

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

A HOUSE SPARROW SUNNING ITSELF ON A COLD DAY. PHOTO BY DOUG PHILLIPS, OF MONETT.

NATURE DECORATES WITH SNOW. PHOTO BY JEFF TERRY.


A TUFTED TITMOUSE. PHOTO BY JEFF TERRY.

In each issue of Ozarks Outdoors, we want to feature nature photographs taken and submitted by our readers. In this issue, we are featuring photos snapped by local photographers Doug Phillips, John R. Baty, Jr., and Jeff Terry. To submit nature photos for our spring edition of Ozarks Outdoors, send your high resolution images to editor@ monett-times.com.

THIS PHOTO OF ICE-COVERED TREE BRANCHES WAS TAKEN DURING THE 2007 ICE STORM, WHICH LEFT PEOPLE WITHOUT POWER FOR SEVERAL DAYS AND BROUGHT DOWN TREES AND BRANCHES THAT FOREVER CHANGED THE LANDSCAPE OF MANY NEIGHBORHOODS. PHOTO BY JOHN R. BATY, JR., OF MONETT.

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The road less traveled starts at Adventure Subaru.

Loving your Subaru is even easier now, because Adventure Subaru is looking after you. Every new Subaru gets 2 years or 24,000 miles

1.866.500.5666 2269 N Henbest Dr, Fayetteville adventuresubaru.com

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OZARKS OUTDOORS WINTER 2013

of complimentary maintenance.

Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) See Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitation. Customer must take delivery before 4-1-2013 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See dealer for program details and eligibility.


Ozarks Outdoors Winter