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Iceberg ahead! | 20 Restaurant renovation | 45 EXPLORE BRANSON’S TITANIC TRIBUTE

MOSSIE’S TEA ROOM OPENS IN HISTORIC BUILDING

Also... How do you like Three delicious them apples? apple recipes from the recipe box 53

SEPTEMBER 2012


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w w w. g o c o u n t r y d o d g e . c o m SEPTEMBER 2012


SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE

8 Houses of hope Bird Works creations pay tribute to lives lost in Joplin tornado

15 Vacations made easy Washburn-based motor tour company offers exciting trips year-round

20 Iceberg ahead! Explore Branson’s Titanic tribute

29 Good medicine Access Family Care offers new approach to patient care

34 Heading back to school in style Fall fashion trends for students

41 Going loco Aurora man and his family restore classic steam engine

45 Restaurant renovation Former Marionville mayor opens Mossie’s Tea Room in historic building

50 Senior focus Event will showcase services available to meet the needs of older adults

On the cover: Hayden is ready for class with his Quiksilver backpack, Levi jeans, UnderArmour T-shirt and Sketchers shoes. PHOTO BY CHUCK NICKLE SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 5

CONTENTS

contents


Connection A magazine dedicated to Southwest Missourians PUBLISHER Ron Kemp GENERAL MANAGER Mike Schlichtman EDITOR Lisa Schlichtman editor@monett-times.com ART DIRECTOR Veronica Zucca connection@monett-times.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Greg Gilliam Robyn Blankenship Sheila Harris Marion Chrysler

Always defining

exciting and unique

rley Tilley Photo by Ca

416 Broadway Downtown Monett

417-235-7622

GRAPHIC ARTISTS Melody Rust

Photo by Carley T

illey

TRANSMISSION SERVICE | FUEL INJECTION CLEANING | BATTERY REPLACEMENT FUEL FILTER REPLACEMENT | DIFFERENTIAL SERVICE | RADIATOR AND POWER-STEERING FLUSHES TIRE BALANCING | OIL CHANGES | STATE INSPECTIONS | AND MUCH MORE!

Where friendly, personal auto service is not just a memory.

CONTRIBUTORS Lindsay Reed Murray Bishoff Meagan Ruffing Jo Anne Ellis Nancy Ridgley Lisa Craft Darlene Wierman Sally Reinhardt Melonie Roberts Sheila Harris Susan Funkhouser Anne Angle Heno Head, Jr. Katie Barton PHOTOGRAPHERS Sarah Lee Mike Scott Amanda Solak Chuck Nickle Kerry Hays Patti Richardson Jeff Terry DISTRIBUTION Jim Bower TO ADVERTISE 417-847-2610 - Cassville 417-235-3135 - Monett Send e-mail inquiries to editor@monett-times.com Mailing address: P.O. Box 40, Monett, MO 65708

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Connection is published monthly and distributed free in Cassville, Monett, Exeter, Washburn, Pierce City, Mt. Vernon, Aurora, Verona, Roaring River, Eagle Rock, Shell Knob, Purdy, Wheaton, Freistatt, Marionville, Seligman, Golden and other surrounding areas. Connection is a publication of the Cassville Democrat, The Monett Times and Rust Communications.

SEPTEMBER 2012


EDITOR’SNOTE

A

Send your Connection story ideas to me at editor@monett-times.com. Story ideas and photo submissions are always welcome.

JokAerCK NICKOLS Br

6 417-342-150o. com jacknickols@yaho

T THE END of every summer, as youngsters return to the classroom, I find myself looking back on my school days and remembering the excitement I always experienced when it was time to return to the classroom. Call me a nerd, but I loved school and everything about the ritual of getting ready for a new year -- a challenging schedule of classes and cool new fall clothes that ranged from maxi skirts in the 1970s and corduroy shorts in the 1980s. When my boys were younger, I always made a huge deal about back-to-school shopping. We’d make a day out of it -- filling our cart with pens and paper and whatever backpack was popular that fall -- Ninja Turtles when they were in elementary school and the black North Face backpacks when they reached high school. Another fall tradition was the first-day-of-school pictures When I had the boys pose in their new school clothes on our front porch. One of my favorite photos is the year my oldest son, Nick, started high school. On that day, Mindi Rose (now Mindi Artherton, who currently serves as executive director of the Cassville Chamber) drove to our house and took Nick to school. It was such a kind and thoughtful gesture, and boy did Nick think he was cool as he arrived for his first day at Cassville High School in the company of a gorgeous senior girl. In this issue of Connection, we celebrate September with a special back-toschool photo spread featuring the latest fashions from The Trunk in Monett, one of the area’s longest-operating children’s speciality stores. This month, we also introduce our readers to the area’s newest healthcare facility, Access Family Care clinic in Cassville, and offer a restaurant feature on Mossie’s Tea Room in Marionville. In addition, you’ll learn about two brothers from Aurora who enjoy restoring steam engines, and we give you a look inside the Titanic Museum in Branson in honor of the Titanic’s 100th anniversary. It’s another great issue, and as it hits the street, we wish students the best as they begin the 2012-13 school year, which we hope is marked by new challenges met, new subjects learned and new friendships formed.

Keep connecting,

RY DANIELS LAaltR or Re

417-846-7306om ldaniels@mo-net.c

BaltILorL HILL Re

417-847-324tm1ail.com billhill.realtor@ho

LEaltAor HILL Re

6 417-847-015om lea.hill@hotmail.c

KOLS JokEer/ASaNlesNPeIC rson Br

6 417-880-544o. com jeannickols@yaho

CokINer/DSaYles PeCrsoAnRR Br

4 417-847-751om ccarr7514@aol.c

Lisa Schlichtman editor@monett-times.com

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CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 7


Houses of hope Bird Works creations pay tribute to lives lost in Joplin tornado Story by Sheila Harris | Photos by Sarah Lee What began as a way of repurposing the wood from the homes that were destroyed in the May 22, 2011, Joplin tornado has become a brisk business for Dan and Sharon Sherman, of Bella Vista, Arkansas. Dan, who was a craftsman at Silver Dollar City during the 1980s, is no stranger to creating an object of beauty from what some would consider trash. “We saw large piles of debris shoved to the curb from century-plus old houses in the neighborhoods near St. John’s Hospital in Joplin after the tornado,” said Dan, “and Sharon and I knew what all of that dirt was hiding. “We brought home two large trailer loads of the

8 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

salvaged wood, which also included old hardware, such as doorknobs and drawer pulls, and we set about cleaning some of it up,” he continued. What the Shermans discovered beneath the grime was gorgeous old pine lumber, which because of its age, had a very tight growth ring, making it naturally more resistant to decay. Dan found his love for crafting renewed as he immediately set about constructing unique and elegant birdhouses from the wood. Because of the nearly endless variety of hardware pieces he found and used to embellish his creations, no two were alike. So, from destruction was born Bird Works, a business

SEPTEMBER 2012


offering new miniature homes built from the remains of the old, and offered as symbols of hope for those whose lives had been dramatically changed. “At first, we intended to build only 160 bird houses, one dedicated to each of the tornado victims,” Dan said. “But due to word of mouth, the demand for the birdhouses grew, and we long ago surpassed that 160 mark.” “When we began building the birdhouses,” said Sharon, “we inserted a small piece of paper into each of them with the name of a tornado victim written on it and asked the recipient of the birdhouse to pray for the survivors of that person.” One of these original creations found its way into the hands of Shirley Davis, of Monett, via her daughter Julie Beckwith, also of Monett, who purchased the birdhouse for Shirley as a gift. “I first saw one of the Shermans’ birdhouses when a

SHIRLEY DAVIS AND JULIE BECKWITH

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 9


friend of mine showed me the one she had purchased,” said Julie. “When she told me it had been built from Joplin tornado debris and was dedicated to a victim of the storm, I was really touched. A lot of labor had obviously gone into even getting the wood clean enough to reuse.” Julie purchased three

only victim of the storm I had personally known, Lois Comfort, of Joplin.” Not only had Shirley and her husband, Virgil, known Lois, they also knew her surviving husband, Larry. In fact, Virgil Davis and Larry Comfort had been lifelong friends, graduating from Jasper High School together in 1956. Virgil and

of the birdhouse and was very appreciative of their gift. Dan and Sharon Sherman say they have been overwhelmed by the public’s response to their birdhouses. “As long as our materials last, and as long as there is a demand for them, we will continue to build them,” said the Shermans. “We also build

Freeman hospitals own a birdhouse or a cross,” Dan added. “Last year, the nurses at Freeman’s Cardiac Hospital pooled their resources and bought a birdhouse for all of the doctors for Christmas. “We’ve also had people bring a trunk load of salvage to us, something which held sentimental value for them, and

“We saw large piles of debris shoved to the curb from century-plus old houses in the neighborhoods near St. John’s Hospital in Joplin after the tornado, and Sharon and I knew what all of that dirt was hiding.” DAN SHERMAN

birdhouses herself to give as gifts. After much debating, she finally settled on the one she wanted to give her mother. Shirley, delighted with the gift, carefully pulled the rolled parchment paper from inside and found the name of a tornado victim, along with a request to pray for the surviving members of the family. “Imagine how surprised I was,” said Shirley, “when I found on the paper the name of the

Larry, along with other classmates, had made it a point to stay in contact with each other through the years and actually had another gettogether in the works at the time Lois’s name was discovered in the birdhouse. At the scheduled reunion, Shirley presented Larry with the birdhouse that had contained his wife’s name. Larry was deeply touched by the seemingly providential set of circumstances behind his receipt

10 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

crosses from the wood with unique hardware details attached to them.” “The cross is a sign of hope,” added Sharon. “It’s a connection -- a bridge from the past to a new future.” The Shermans have given away over 120 of the crosses to the families of tornado victims and others who lost their homes. “I wouldn’t be surprised if the majority of doctors and nurses at St. John’s and

SEPTEMBER 2012


asked us to make birdhouses from it,” Dan shared. “One man brought wood debris from his mother’s home on Connecticut, one of the areas hardest hit by the storm. Another lady brought a pedestal salvaged from her destroyed home on Michigan. We made a monster birdhouse to set on top of it.” The Shermans are not

SEPTEMBER 2012

building these birdhouses strictly for their own financial gain. A portion of the profits from their sales is donated to the Salvation Army as a way of repaying the organization for the work volunteers did in Joplin after the tornado. “The Salvation Army delivered over 16,000 meals to victims and volunteers in just

four days following the tornado last May,” Dan said. “They have done an incredible job.” If you’re interested in seeing the Shermans’ handcrafted birdhouses, you may find them on the square in Bentonville, Arkansas, on Saturday mornings when they set up a booth at the Bentonville Farmer’s Market.

They also have a booth at Rangeline Antiques on North Rangeline in Joplin where Connie’s Antiques was formerly located. Their birdhouses may also be found at Southside Antiques on 32nd Street in Joplin. To place an order directly with the Shermans, call 479899-2989.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 11


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SEPTEMBER 2012


by Jenny Wingfield REVIEWED BY ANNE ANGLE Samuel Lake knows he loves the Lord. He also believes that he is among the most faithful of God’s children. He is a preacher, after all. But God is about to teach him a thing or two about faith. Swan Lake, Samuel’s 11-year-old daughter, really believes in miracles while Samuel just pays lip service to the idea. Before the story is over, the whole Lake family is going to need miracles to help them get through the darkest summer of their lives. This debut novel by Jenny Wingfield takes place in Arkansas sometime in the 1950s, and this reading audience will feel right at home with unusual Ozark names like: Willadee, Samuel’s wife; Toy Moses, Samuel’s amputeed brother-in-law; Calla, Samuel’s mother-in-law; Blade, the 8-yearold runaway boy; Ras, the really bad guy; Early, the sheriff who was born prematurely; and Never Closes, the bar in the back of the Moses’ house. Sounds hokey, I know, but the theme of the novel is not fluff. It shows the dark side of mankind capable of horrific cruelty versus faith, hope, tenacity, softened hearts, noble sacrifices, a convoluted kind of justice and redemption. Even though this family goes through the deepest, darkest valleys of life, including suicide, alcoholism, child abuse, animal abuse, murder, rape and domestic violence, many of the characters learn the power of love and empowerment through God’s boundless grace. This is a story of contrasting marriages. Grandma Calla and Grandpa John, married

for 35 years, is a marriage full of regret. Samuel and Willadee illustrate a rich, fulfilled marriage based on strong Christian ethics, which enable them to solve disagreements about how to raise their children and how to provide for the family when Samuel loses his church. Toy, who loves Bernice so much he overlooks all of her failures, is wed to Bernice who marries him to spite Samuel. Ras, an abusive husband, and Geraldine, his intimidated wife, show the most destructive type of relationship. Even Blade, the 8-year-old neighbor, proclaims his love for Swan and his intention to marry her when he is a grown boy. Swan, the main character, may remind you of Ree Dolly in “Winter’s Bone” by Daniel Woodrell or Scout Finch in “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee. All of these works of Southern Gothic fiction portray a fearless, high spirited young girl learning early on about the ugliness in their world, a sense of responsibility and guilt and a strong desire to right the wrongs that prevail. A vigilante law mentality threads its way through each of the stories also. If you rate a book by how much you are tempted to turn to the last pages and see what happens, this one is for you. In this book, I would put that aspect at a nine on a scale of one to 10. The suspense and tension are prevalent, and the “need to know” is a driving force as you become acquainted with these characters who start to tug at your heartstrings or make the hackles stand up on the back of your

neck. However, DON”T peek at the end, because you will spoil the twists and turns that make “The Homecoming of Samuel Lake” one suspenseful read. If you believe in miracles, this story will satisfy your soul. If you are not a believer, then maybe this story will plant a seed that will help you recognize them when they do occur.

Anne Angle is a retired Cassville High School life sciences teacher who now lives in El Paso, Texas. An avid reader, Anne is an associate member of Crowe’s Cronies Book Club based in Cassville.

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 13

BOOKREVIEW

The Homecoming of Samuel Lake


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By Lindsay Reed

Vacations made easy

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Washburn-based motor tour company offers exciting trips year-round

MAGINE taking a 65-mile journey on the Grand Canyon Railway, watching hundreds of hot air balloons inflate simultaneously at Fiesta Park in

Albuquerque, New Mexico, or visiting a Cold War bunker at the Greenbrier Hotel in Beckley, West Virginia. Celebrate the approaching holidays on the Riverwalk in San Antonio, Texas, take a leisure cruise through the Caribbean or enjoy a guided pilgrimage through Israel. What would be better than exploring the Charleston Harbor by water, visiting the magnificent castle ruins of Heidelberger Schloss in Germany or spending a few days relaxing on Lake Michigan’s Mackinac Island?

SEPTEMBER 2012

Making Memories Tours, which is owned and operated by Jerry and Angie Varner, of Washburn, provides those bitten by the travel bug with an opportunity to visit a variety of locations without worrying about travel plans, driving agendas or hotel reservations. “You don’t have to worry about missing an exit, fighting the road map or where you are going to go to bed that night,” said Jerry. “All you have to do is pack. We take care of the rest.” A love of traveling inspired the Varners to start the motorcoach tour company around three years ago. The business, which is designed to serve vacationers from

southwest Missouri and northwest Arkansas, offers around a dozen different trips each year. “In 2013, we will offer a trip to the Holy Land in Israel and a trip through Europe,” said Jerry. “We are planning 14 longer trips and a few day trips.” Day trips will take participants to the Muskogee Azalea Festival in Oklahoma and on a spooky adventure through Eureka Springs, Arkansas, in celebration of Halloween in October.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 15


“People really like the 12day trip through New England in the fall,” said Jerry. “We have a waiting list for that trip this year. “I really enjoyed visiting Mackinac Island,” said Jerry. “I also enjoyed Washington, D.C., and New York City. We visited the Statue of Liberty, the Empire State Building, the 9-11 Memorial and then we had free time when they could take in a Broadway show. We stayed just a block and a half from downtown.” Making Memories Tours strives to achieve the perfect balance between free time and organized tours and activities. Although each trip includes an assortment of preplanned guided tours and activities, time is also alloted for shopping,

dining and sightseeing. “I spend time interacting with each person or couple throughout the trip,” said Jerry. “I enjoy getting to know them. It is usually the second day

16 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

when they really start to settle in. Then, you begin to see couples who have been married for 50 years holding hands and moms and daughters reconnecting.

“You start to see them having fun,” added Jerry. “I really enjoy that.” Making Memories has five trips left this year. Vacationers can choose to visit the Grand

SEPTEMBER 2012


ANGIE AND JERRY VARNER

and George Washington Vanderbilt’s 250-room French Renaissance-style chateau. Next June, vacationers can choose to take the tour company’s adventure across Europe. Travelers will visit Germany, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and France during the 14-day trip. Highlights will include visits to the concentration camp in Dachau, Germany, the Picasso Canyon, view the fall colors of New England, attend the Albuquerque Aloft in New Mexico, take in the sights of West Virginia or celebrate Christmas in the Lone Star State. The tour company has also planned six vacations for the first half of 2013. “We are offering a cruise for the first time next year,” said Jerry. Cruisin’ and Croonin’ is scheduled for Jan. 19 through Jan. 28, 2013. The Carnival Conquest Cruise will depart from New Orleans, Louisiana, and journey through the Caribbean to Montego Bay, Jamaica and Grand Cayman Island and Cozumel, Mexico. The cruise will offer entertainment by southern gospel singers and speakers. At the end of February 2013, vacationers will have the opportunity to visit Tallahassee, Ft. Myers and Key West, Florida. The trip will include a two-hour glass bottom boat cruise over the Coral Reef and visits to Sea World in Orlando, the Trinity Broadcasting Network’s Holy Land Experience and Pensacola Beach. In mid-March, Cassville First Baptist Church Pastor James Weaver will guide a

SEPTEMBER 2012

Wisconsin, and Bonner’s Christmas Wonderland in Frankenmuth, Michigan. “We want those who go on our trips to make happy memories,” said Jerry. “We just want them to relax, enjoy their friends and family and have a good time.” The Varners are assisted by the Making Memories team, which includes Angie’s mother, Diana Rose, Ruth Lay, Kristen

Holy Land Pilgrimage through Crawford and Gale Webb, Museum in Switzerland and the Israel. Participants will visit Mt. owner of Viking Motor Coach Black Forest in Germany. Carmel, Galilee, Nazareth Company. Making Memories Tours Village, Jerusalem and an “None of this would be will also return to Mackinac assortment of other sacred possible without Gale,” said Island, Michigan, in June of sites. Jerry. “He’s been in this 2013. Travelers will shop and The sweet Carolinas will business for 40 years, and he dine at a variety of businesses beacon travelers in April. has been very helpful. and restaurants while lodging Participants will take a trip “Diana is also tremendously downtown. The trip also through historic Charleston, helpful,” added Jerry. “She even includes visits to the Mitchell South Carolina, and to the guides the trips when I can’t be Domes Conservatory and Carolina Opry in Myrtle Beach, on them.” sunken gardens in Milwaukee, and the Billy Graham Library Making Memories offers free catalogs. To request a and Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina. Travelers will catalog or obtain more information on an upcoming trip, call also enjoy the Biltmore Mansion 1-888-845-9582 or visit www.makingmemoriestours.com.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 17


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SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 19


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE TITANIC MUSEUM

A 26-foot model of the Titanic is on display at the museum in Branson. 20 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

SEPTEMBER 2012


STORY BY KATIE BARTON

J

Explore Branson’s Titanic tribute

piece together what life was really like on the Titanic. Gerda Dahlberg was a 22-year-old third class passenger. She was traveling from Stockholm, Sweden, to join her sisters in Chicago. Molly and Carter, sister King Charles Spaniels, are one of the first The Titanic Museum in Branson has memorialized the stops in the museum. The dogs are part of one of the world’s first journey of the ship that famously sank on its maiden voyage across the tributes to the 10 dogs aboard the Titanic. Atlantic Ocean 100 years ago. After petting the dogs, or watching them sleep, guests move into Once heralded by Shipbuilder’s Magazine as “practically the Drafting Room. Here, a ship crew member explains the trip the unsinkable,” the Titanic struck an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on April 15, Titanic took while illuminating its path on a world map. 1912, and sank in less than three hours. Museum visitors then learn a little about what it The Branson museum combines interactive took to power the large ship. There’s a cutaway view exhibits with artifact collections and replications of the ship that shows the boiler room and the in a way that gets guests involved and makes coal supply. Guests all get to take a turn history enticing, while remembering the shoveling pretend coal into a pretend passengers who lost their lives. furnace. The Titanic Museum experience The next room of the museum begins before guests have even is filled with the photos of Father entered the ship-shaped building. Francis Mary Hegarty Browne, S.J., a Crew members dressed in photography enthusiast who was black and white, turn-of-theon the Titanic and documented century maid costumes greet the journey well. Browne’s photos visitors with a boarding pass and impressed the head of Kodak Great an audio player that provides Britain so much Browne was given additional information while guests free film for the rest of his life. move through the museum. Frederic Seward was a 34-yearEach boarding pass describes a old first class passenger. He played cards different passenger aboard the Titanic. with William Sloper and Dorothy Gibson Guests won’t learn the fate of their The Titanic’s Molly and Carter the night the Titanic sank. passenger until the end of the museum From there, the museum tour leads tour. you into the Third Class Corridor where a life-size And then, with the touch of an iceberg, the replica of the third class living quarters is surrounded by voyage begins. one of three surviving third class menu and other artifacts. Guests wander through the museum at their own pace, but The grand staircase marks the halfway point of the tour as it leads they aren’t completely on their own. Crew members are stationed museum visitors on to the First Class State Room. The linoleum that throughout the museum to share extra details and answer any covers the floor of the staircase was, at the time of the Titanic’s voyage, questions. considered to be top of the line, more luxurious than marble and With personal artifacts in almost every room, museum guests can granite. learn about the individual journey of many of the passengers as they

ust an hour’s drive away, there’s a museum filled with icebergs, interactive exhibits and an abundance of history.

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 21


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Visitors can test their hand at shoveling coal into the furnace. | The Titanic Museum’s Discovery Room | A look inside an elegant first-class suite recreated from original architect’s drawings. | All 2,208 passengers and crew who sailed on Titanic are acknowledged and honored with their names etched in glass on the Memorial Wall. CIRCLE: The Titanic’s Molly and Carter with First Class Maid Jaynee.

The re-creation of the spacious first class living quarters at the top of the grand staircase is the complete opposite of the third class space. Wallace Hartley, leader of the Titanic orchestra, led the band in playing “Nearer My God to Thee” as the ship sank. The Captain’s Bridge is a tribute to Captain E.J. Smith and his crew. After 38 years of service, Smith was set to

retire at the end of Titanic’s first voyage. Museum guests have the chance to turn the ship’s wheel while staring out into a starry night sky searching for an illuminated iceberg and listening to the words Smith shared with his crew on the night of the ship’s sinking -“Men, you have done your full duty . . . I release you. That’s the way of it at this kind of time. Every man for himself.”

22 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

From there, museum visitors walk through the cool air across the ship’s promenade to the theater. Video footage from 1912 is on loop in the theater, allowing guests to watch as long as they want. The footage includes the building of Titanic’s sister ship, the scene outside the White Star Line office in New York City as the world waited for more news about the sinking ship

and people bringing clothes and donations to meet the passengers who survived as they arrived on land. Anna Abelson was a 28-yearold second class passenger. She was traveling to New York with her husband, Samuel. A variety of interactive exhibits are stationed near the end of the walk through the museum. Guests can sit in a replica of lifeboat No. 6 and hear SEPTEMBER 2012


CLOCKWISEFROM FROMTOP TOPLEFT: LEFT:The TheTitanic Titanic in in Branson Branson isis built built half-scale half-scale to to her her original original size. size. || AA full-scale full-scale replica replica of of the theTitanic Titanic Grand Grand Staircase. Staircase. CLOCKWISE The Titanic Museum attraction has many interactive areas. | The Marconi Room sent one of the first SOS signals from a ship in distress. CIRCLE: The Margaret “Molly” Brown Gallery at the Titanic Museum in Branson.

the stories of survivors. Lifeboat No. 6 was designed to hold 65 passengers but left with 24. A timer and a bucket of 28 degree water lets guests test how long they can withstand the frigid temperatures that passengers endured. One exhibit allows museum guests to experience the sloping deck at three points during the ship’s sinking. Another exhibit gives visitors a chance to try their SEPTEMBER 2012

hand at sending a message in Morse code. Lucile Carter was a 13-yearold first class passenger whose father owned the only car aboard the Titanic. One of the final rooms of the museum displays photos of the Titanic underwater. John Joslyn, the owner of The Titanic Museum, was a member of the second group to explore the ship’s wreckage.

At the end of the tour, the Wall of Survivors displays the names of the Titanic’s 2,208 passengers, and museum guests learn the fate of the passenger described on their boarding pass and any other passengers they learned about throughout the museum. Gerda Dahlberg died. Harry Sadowitz died. Frederic Seward lived. Wallace Hartley died.

Anna Abelson lived. Lucile Carter lived. The Titanic Museum is located in the heart of Branson near the intersection of 76 Country Road and Highway 165. The museum is open seven days a week, but hours change throughout the year, so for the latest updates, visit the attraction’s website at www. titanicbranson.com. For ticket information, call 1-800-381-7670.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 23


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24 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

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SEPTEMBER 2012


three years later BY NANCY RIDGLEY

Nancy Ridgley, RD, LD, CDE, is a registered and licensed dietitian, certified diabetes educator, a Mad Dogg-certified spinning instructor and director of community wellness at Cox Monett Hospital. She also holds certifications in adult weight management and childhood and adolescent weight management. The mother of three enjoys spinning, reading, Mizzou football, travel, spending time with children and extended family and having coffee with friends. For more information about wellness and living a healthy lifestyle, check out Cox Monett Hospital’s wellness blog at www.realwellnessforrealpeople.blogspot.com.

“I was telling my kids to eat healthy, but mom wasn’t,” said Jodi. “I decided that if I wanted to help them, I had to live it myself in order for them to do it. “Journeys was overwhelming and scary at first. I was afraid something bad would happen to me. I was scared to exercise. I had not purposefully exercised in 20 years. “My family was, and still is, very supportive. My kids, husband, brothers and sister-in-law were there for me. My husband has now started walking with me and has lost 70 pounds in just the past three months.” I asked Jodi to explain how her life has changed as a result of her weight loss. “I am happier and more outgoing. People said I used to be quiet and timid, but not anymore. I never sit down, not at home or work. Before I always had to sit now I don’t have to. I know I Put your mind to it, have a good down, can keep going, and I feel good. support system, and you can do it The other day I went running down the hall at work and another nurse too. I am living proof! was surprised I was running . . . I said ‘YES, I can run now.’” Jodi says she stays active by walking as much as she can outdoors. “I also dance around the house and do silly stuff while cleaning to make myself move more.” When asked about her eating habits now, Jodi answered, “I try to stay within 1,200 calories per day. I still have a great appetite but continue to make the right food choices. It is easier now, but food is still a temptation. It is all how you react to that temptation. I splurge now and then on a cookie or something else, but I have learned portion control.” How did the Journeys weight management program help Jodi? “Journeys provided me with the support I needed away from home. No one ever made me feel self-conscious. Brad (Ridenour)’s behavior change classes helped a lot. I had heard it before, but it finally ‘clicked.’” Jodi says that “Journeys” saved her life. She wants others to know that it can be done.

It has been three years since Jodi Curry started the “Journeys” weight management program in September 2009. Jodi and I met several times each week for 18 months at Cox Monett Hospital. After a very successful weight loss, Jodi was ready to take off on her own. She has maintained her weight ever since. Jodi has lost 147 pounds and is in a very good place in her life. I spoke with Jodi, and here is how it all started and how she feels today. Jodi tells people she was getting ready to quit her job working on the Med-Surg unit at Cox Monett because her weight was affecting her work. Another motivating factor for losing weight was the fact that two of her three children have Type 1 diabetes.

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 25

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SEPTEMBER 2012


LOVIN’LIFE

Lovin’ life sidecar-sally@juno.com

after 55

BY SALLY REINHARDT Sally Reinhardt is a transplant from the big city of St. Louis, who now lives in Monett with her husband. Sally said it was strictly by accident or fate that she ended up living in Monett. “I never imagined I would one day be living in the Ozarks, much less enjoy the opportunity to share my writings,” said Sally. “This, of course, just proves it is best to keep life’s options open. I have found here an entirely new outlook and a new set of sights, sounds and friendships.”

I have become aware lately that my conversation with friends quickly embraces the sudden passage of time, along with confusion over the advancement of technology. Although I can’t imagine life without computers, operating one has become quite a challenge for many of us as we strive to remain connected. In this phase of life’s journey, I’ve become a magician. I can make things and thoughts disappear from the computer screen without even moving from the spot. For some of us born before 1960, we also have the generation virus to contend with. It causes you to hit send when you meant to hit delete or to forget how to cut and paste. How many times lately have you talked about relief from the discomfort of the summer heat? As we look ahead to cooler temperatures, let me share with you the details of a seven-hour winter sojourn home from St. Louis.

SEPTEMBER 2012

On that day, the sky was unsettled, but according to the weatherman, the snow would be to the north of St. Louis and clear after Rolla, prompting my confidence level for the trip. Only a half hour into my journey, the clouds began to gather and a few snowflakes made an appearance. Seemingly out of nowhere, storm clouds burst forth. As I approached Interstate 44, I could hardly see in front of me because the snow was so heavy. About this time, I realized I had been following a big truck and the driver seemed to be driving very carefully. “God has provided a guiding light and I will just stay behind him,” I thought, and for the next three and a half hours, at a speed of 30 miles per hour or less, he was my focus. As we approached Rolla, the weather began to subside as promised. “It sure would be nice if I could thank him for his careful driving and let him know that he

was my guiding light,” I prayed. And just then, he pulled into McDonald’s, which presented me with the opportunity to follow and express my thanks. The road from Rolla to Monett was dry all the way, and it was a wonderful coincidence that the driver entered the highway at the same time, and we headed off in the same direction once again. This event is a reminder today that our part in keeping calm and happy is to provide a listening ear for that “small, still voice.” God does the rest. Whatever sorrow or difficulty the day may bring, His tender command to us is still the same. I also urge you to confront the habit of counting the miles. Instead, climb more mountains, eat more ice cream, go barefoot more and watch more sunsets. “This is the day which the Lord has made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.” - Psalm 118:24 See ya down the road.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 27


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SEPTEMBER 2012


Good medicine Access Family Care offers new approach to patient care

T BY MELONIE ROBERTS

SEPTEMBER 2012

HERE IS A HEALTHCARE facility in the area that is taking an innovative approach to the way it serves its patients. Access Family Care, which opened a new 9,000-squarefoot, $1.8 million health center at 4016 Main Street in Cassville this spring, is leading the way with a team approach to patient care.

“Patients enrolled in the Health Care Home initiative will have a dedicated physician, nurse and medical assistant, who offer information and education on how to manage chronic disease, such as emphysema, asthma, hypertension, diabetes, depression and obesity,” said Cheryl Dalton, a nurse

practitioner and Patient Centered Healthcare home director. “One of those persons will always be available to the patient. “We are very excited to not only be able to provide medical services, but dental as well,” Dalton continued. “Access Family Care also has a behavioral health counselor

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 29


available to work with clients in learning to cope with chronic illness. “The patient-centered healthcare home program is a new approach to taking care of the patient in a clinic setting,” she said. Through MoHealthNet, Missouri is the only state in the nation to receive affordable healthcare funding to help with clinics. “This is a gold star for the state of Missouri, and Access got into the program,” Dalton said. “It’s an exciting, novel and challenging approach. It’s ‘Mobetter.’” A dedicated and talented staff of healthcare providers is also key to Access Family Care’s mission of improving the

health of southwest Missouri’s medically underserved population. “Our staff is incredible,” said Cristine Henderson, RNC and clinic manager. “They make the difference here.” In addition to medical, the facility is home to a state-ofthe-art dental center. Access Family Care also has a mobile/portable dental unit that travels to area schools to provide needed services. Kelly Paul is the outreach coordinator for the organization. “We are the area’s biggest outreach in mobile dental service. We visit 15 Head Starts twice a year, providing oral health screens and free fluoride provided by Missouri Oral

Health Preventative Services program,” Paul said. The mobile dental unit provides cleanings, exams, fillings, X-rays and extractions, as well as setting up a treatment plan for clients. “Sadly, there are some children out there that don’t have a toothbrush,” Paul said. “We’ve treated kids who have never seen a dentist, and some need extensive work.” The mobile dental unit, staffed with a hygienist, dentist and dental assistant, spends about a week at each school campus. Appointments are set up through the school nurse. “We visit several area schools annually, providing onsite dental care,” said Paul. “We welcome any area school to

participate. “The clinic serves all populations,” Paul continued. “Patients do not have to be residents of Lawrence or Barry counties to get services.” Dr. Allen Smith, DDS, is the lead dentist at the Access Family Care facility in Cassville. “I had a private practice in Florida and suffered a wrist injury that made it impossible to work,” Smith said. “After my wrist got better, I realized I missed working and read about Access Family Care. “I didn’t want to go back into private practice,” Smith said. “Dr. Charles Bentlage, medical and dental director, called me and asked me if I would be interested in relocating. He told me about

PHOTOS BY KERRY HAYS

30 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

SEPTEMBER 2012


Access and asked me to consider it. “This is something I really wanted to do,” Smith continued. “I have a new lease on life and have skills that benefit people who otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity to receive services. “I love what I am doing here,” Smith said. “This is a small town, it’s a perfect fit, and I’m having the time of my life being able to do some real good and give back to the community.” Dental services now available at the Cassville clinic include periodontal, restorative dentistry and other treatments. “We refer out complicated surgeries,” Smith said, “but most we do here.”

SEPTEMBER 2012

Accessible healthcare The new Access Family Care clinic in Cassville is dedicated in memory of Dr. James D. Warn, who served as the clinic’s first medical director until retirement. The dental clinic is dedicated in honor of Patricia Tichenor, who served Barry County as the health administrator and was also a founding board member of Access Family Care. The clinic is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more information on Access Family Care, visit www.accessfamilycare.org or call the Cassville clinic at 417-847-0057.

The clinic is currently served by the following healthcare practitioners: Dr. Victor Mangler, MD Tammy Dirks, DA Sara Norris, DA Dr. Brian Basham, MD Olena Pomuran, DA Pamela Whitlock, FNP Brittany Phillips, DA Dr. Allen Smith, DDS Dr. Brian Reavley, DDS Maly Cedillo, patient services representative Bianca Salas, patient services representative Stacey Fletcher, RDH Maria Arreola, patient services representative Lorena Leone RDH Rogelio Crespo, patient services representative Angela Kalbaugh, LPN Keri DeWitt, PCMH/RN Elsa Burgos, MA Cristine Henderson RNC/clinic manager Maggie Gonzalez, MA Iris Trevino, MA and translator

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 31


“I have been pleasantly surprised and have seen some tremendous results in children, in getting their mouths healthy,” Smith said. “Pregnant women have a tremendous improvement in their well-being and self-esteem.” Smith is also adjusting to the non-traditional approach to healthcare. “I’m new to this type of healthcare system of treatment,” Smith said. “The way Cristine is running the clinic is tremendous. It promotes a higher level of comprehensive care. We’re team oriented. Everyone works hard to provide the very best care for treatment. This job is more than I ever expected it to be.” Statistics show that

32 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

I love what I am doing here. This is a small town, it’s a perfect fit, and I’m having the time of my life being able to do some real good and give back to the community.

Dr. Allen Smith, DDS

approximately 50 million people in the nation are uninsured. In Barry County, about 20 percent of the population is uninsured, compared to 19 percent in Lawrence County. Access Family Care accepts MoHealthNet (Medicaid), Medicare, some medical and dental insurances, self-pay and offers discounts for those meeting eligibility criteria. The clinic strives to meet the needs of the underinsured and underserved populations of all ages, from infants to geriatric patients. “Access Family Care Clinic, as a whole, promotes servant leadership,” Paul said. “We are servants to the community.” “Because we are able to spend more than 15 minutes with a patient, we can take the time to educate and support our clients,” Henderson said. “We talk the talk and walk the walk,” said Dalton. “It’s the

culture of our organization. We have a hard-working staff that provides high quality care to the people of the area regardless of their income or status. We love being a part of Cassville; it’s an exceptional community. “Transforming care is not easy, but it’s very worthwhile,” Dalton continued. “In the end, the patient wins.” Access Family Care has been operating in the Cassville area since 2002. The healthcare consortium, which is headquartered in Neosho, also operates clinics in Joplin, Anderson and Neosho. Dr. Don McBride serves as Access Family Care’s chief executive officer and Dr. Debra Davidson serves as the chief operations officer. Access Family Care is governed by a dynamic and involved board of directors. For more information, visit www.accessfamilycare.org.

SEPTEMBER 2012


proud parent

cutest kid contest

SEPTEMBER’S

CUTEST!

Ava Congratulations to Ava Faye Wilson, the 17-month-old daughter of Kayla Wilson, of Cleveland, Okla. The winning photo was submitted by proud “Gigi” -- Peggy Crownover, of Aurora. PHOTO BY RENEE UNDERWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

Are you a proud parent ? If so, take this opportunity to show off that cute kid of yours. We invite you to share a photo of your child to be featured in Connection’s very own proud parent cutest kid contest. Email your child’s photo to editor@monett-times.com. Photos should be sent in the original JPG format at the highest resolution possible. Remember to include your child’s name, parent’s name, age, city and your contact information. The contest is open to children ages 10 and under. The photos submitted will be used for thesole purpose of this contest.

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 33

PROUDPARENT

connection’s


Carter is looking sharp in his Puma athletic wear with sweatpants and layered T-shirt.

34 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

SEPTEMBER 2012


Hayden is wearing Levi jeans with a Quiksilver striped shirt in tones of gray and black and Sketchers light-up tennis shoes.

SEPTEMBER 2012

Amanda slings a Roxy backpack over a Roxy knit dress with a lace-up tie at the neck and gathered waist. Emma Kate shows her fashion sense in a Peaches and Cream animal print dress with layered netting and coordinating leggings while big sister Megen wears Guess jeans paired with a Roxy hooded sweater and graphic T.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 35


Hayden models a sporty Puma nylon pant and jacket set.

From left: Emma Kate models a Roxy knit dress with a double ruffle hem and a colorful Roxy backpack. Megen strikes a pose in a My Michelle belted multicolored tunic over black leggings with a Roxy purse. Middle sister Amanda sports a Ragdoll and Rockets striped, hooded tunic over chocolate brown leggings and Me Too flats.

36 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

SEPTEMBER 2012


Carter and Hayden pose together in their matching Quiksilver “Sgt. Simian� layered T-shirts with camouflageprint sleeves and the always popular Levi jeans.

Megen models the latest fashion trend -- a patterned Roxy poncho over a long white T-shirt and denim jeggings.

From left: Emma Kate loves her Ragdoll and Rockets pink and brown striped dress over leggings. Amanda looks sharp in a lined, open-weaved A-line dress and leggings by Ragdoll and Rockets. SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 37


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SEPTEMBER 2012


FAVEFIVE

Favefive: BY KATIE BARTON

Store rewards programs

When you’re shopping, the only thing better than finding a great deal is finding a great deal on something you actually want. A lot of stores offer loyalty programs that reward you for buying your favorite things -- some offer amazing discounts, some give free stuff. I’ve put together this list of the best store rewards programs. Have fun shopping!

5

4

3

2

Finish Line

Books a Million

Which Wich

Best Buy

Panera Bread Co.

WINNER’S CIRCLE

MILLIONARE’S CLUB

PUNCH CARD

REWARD ZONE

MYPANERA

Shoppers in the Winner’s Circle earn $20 for every $200 spent. That deal is a pretty cool way to get your kicks.

There’s a $20-per-year fee for being a member of the Millionaire’s Club, but if you shop for literature often, you’ll save much more. Members get a minimum of 10 percent off everything in the store. If you don’t want to make the drive to Branson to shop for books, members get free express shipping for online orders.

In addition to “superior sandwiches,” Springfield’s two Which Wich locations offer customers a punch card. After you purchase 10 Wiches, you get one free. Not having to pay for lunch is a wonderful thing.

Members of the Reward Zone build up points with every purchase. After a set number of points, members are rewarded with a gift certificate.

Swipe a MyPanera card every time you go to Panera, and every now and then the Panera staff will offer something free with your order. Panera hasn’t disclosed when or why rewards are added to cards; the surprise is part of the fun. I’ve gotten bagels, pastry items and bowls of soup.

SEPTEMBER 2012

1

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 39


 Going loco 

Aurora man and his family restore classic steam engine STO R Y by M E L ON I E R OB E R T S Who can forget the little steam locomotive that chugged its way into our hearts at the start of each episode of “Petticoat Junction?� The Hooterville Cannonball was the primary source of transportation between the Shady Rest Hotel and Hooterville, the fictional town around which the series revolved. The coal-fed fire heated the water that drove the engine. As the industrial age progressed, steam-driven engines fell into the background, replaced by their diesel-fueled counterparts. Many of the steam engines and motors that initially drove the industrial movement were eventually scrapped and melted down.

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 41


Today, a handful of steampowered engines remain, some rusting away in broken down barns, and others restored to near pristine condition and exhibited at shows and fairs across the nation. “My dad [Rev. Fred Fieker] and his brother, Paul, bought a 1921 A.D. Baker steam engine, mostly for show,” said Jon Fieker, of Aurora. “It had originally belonged to Al Kitowski, of Nashville, Illinois. It had been neglected for several years and left outside in the weather. It was long out of practical use.” Fred Fieker, of DuQuoin, Illinois, and his brother, Paul, of Stotts City, set about restoring the engine with the help of Marion Schneider, of Pinckneyville, Illinois, and Marion Cook, of DuQuoin, Illinois. Restoration efforts took a year to complete. The brothers had to install new flues in the boiler, fabricate a new

smokestack and water tanks and install a new canopy. The engine was given a fresh coat of paint in the original colors of red, black and silver. “Old #1606 was given new life,” Jon said. “The engine debuted at the 19th annual American Thresherman Association show in Pinckneyville, Illinois, in 1978. Then they transported it to the Steam-O-Rama Show in Republic before being moved to the Paul Fieker home is Stotts City. “My grandfather actually used a similar machine to thresh wheat and run a sawmill operation,” Jon said. “He also used it to pump water out of

42 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

the Stotts City lead and zinc mine so the men could work.” The steam engine was moved from farm to farm to cut lumber for farmers. The threshing business back in the late 1920s and early 1930s was a huge undertaking. “He went to western Kansas each year,” Jon said. “He had his own crew, a cook and a cook shack. He would ship the equipment out by rail and then drive his Oldsmobile truck out there with clothing, sleeping gear and food, along with his crew.” When their Uncle Paul died, the steam engine was left to brothers Dan and Jon Fieker.

“My dad and uncles, Ed and Paul, enjoyed firing it up every year,” Jon said. “It was a toy for them. However, my uncle wasn’t able to fire it up for about 15 years before he died.” Now Jon and his brother have taken over maintenance and upkeep of the classic steam engine. “It’s been a work in process for my brother and I,” Jon said. “About every six months we get together and work on it, repairing pieces, cleaning it up and painting it. Nearly everything has to be manufactured for it now. You don’t find many original parts in working order.

SEPTEMBER 2012


“When my dad was restoring it, I didn’t take much interest in it,” Jon said. “That came later, especially after hearing my grandfather’s history and what he did. It’s a family heirloom now.” The brothers decided to move it once again to the Steam-O-Rama grounds in Republic where the engine could be appreciated by history buffs and antique enthusiasts. “Lots of people come out to see the steam engines, old farm implements and tractors,” Jon said. “Kids love to ride on them.” The annual steam engine show typically features sawmill and threshing demonstrations.

“They bring in huge logs and saw them into lumber,” Jon said. “It’s like stepping back in time. It’s part of our nation’s heritage and history.” Owning the steam engine provides its own thrill for the brothers. “You don’t really get what it’s like until you feel the heat and smell the smoke and hear the chug as it works,” Jon said. “Then you’re hooked.” The old engines may be fascinating to watch, but they are dangerous as well. “All units are tested every year before they are fired up,” Jon explained. “They are dangerous. If you don’t know what you’re doing, they can blow up, and that would be a

SEPTEMBER 2012

catastrophic thing. I’m always nervous about running it. And you should be.” Some of those dangers include boiling water and steam hot enough to cook a meal or boiler box welds failing and becoming burning shrapnel. “All of the working steam engines at the show are subject to safety inspections,” said Jon. “If ours gets too old to fire safely, I guess our option is to park it in a museum somewhere.” For now, the brothers invest weekends in repairing and maintaining their steam engine and encouraging their children to take an interest in the family heirloom.

“The kids know how to run it and do a few things,” Jon said. “I hope they take more of an interest in it as they get older. “Out of the 20 or so engines on display at Steam-ORama in Republic, ours works pretty good,” he continued. “I hope to have it completely restored and functional by the time it’s 100 years old (in 2021).” This year, the 51st annual Steam-O-Rama show will be held from Sept. 13 through Sept. 16 at the show grounds located just off Highway 60 between Republic and Springfield. For more information, visit www.steamorama.com.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 43


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SEPTEMBER 2012


Restaurant renovation Former Marionville mayor opens Mossie’s Tea Room in historic building STORY BY MEAGAN RUFFING

Doris Rapp is one-of-akind. At 78 years young, she has accomplished more in her life than anyone I know. Former mayor of Marionville, city council woman, author, artist, historian, mother, wife and now proprietor of Mossie’s Tea Room, Doris is pretty amazing. As a life-long resident of Marionville, Doris jumped at the opportunity to buy the building she once knew as the Marionville Bank. After a year and a half of renovations, Doris and her husband, Jack, were ready to open their doors to the community. Mossie’s Tea Room opened in August of last year and quickly has become a local favorite. Mossie’s Tea Room is a sandwich shop that serves up homemade lunch fare,

SEPTEMBER 2012

including (but not limited to) soups, sandwiches, salads and desserts. One of the secrets to their success is Frankie Ruth. Frankie applied for a waitressing job at the tea room before it

P H O T O S B Y K E R R Y H AY S

opened; little did she know, she’d become their head cook. “I love to cook”, says Frankie. “I want it [food] to sound good, look good and taste good. If we find

something people like, we keep it on the menu.” A prime example of this, would be their latest creation -- quiche. You can choose from spinach and bacon, spinach and mushroom, red pepper and sausage, ham and swiss or four cheese. Each slice is baked to perfection with a flaky, golden crust that Doris makes by hand. Frankie says the menu is a collaborative effort between she and Doris. “What are we gonna make today?” is the question that Frankie asks every day. Some of the ideas for the recipes come from Sandra Lee’s Semi-Homemade cooking show on the Food Network Channel or Betty Crocker. With a little tweak here and there, Frankie and Doris put their own spin on

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 45


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SEPTEMBER 2012


SEPTEMBER 2012

each recipe and churn out something wonderful. Mossie’s signature sandwiches, which include Bistro Beef, Springtime Anytime Chicken Croissant and Orchard Chicken Salad, are all homemade and can be paired with a cup of soup, side salad or sweet basil pasta salad for an additional

the bread; made by Doris herself), you can bet that every bite you eat will be better than the one before. This place also dishes up one heck of a dessert. I went home with apple dumplings, rum cake, chocolate cream pie and cherry surprise. Don’t tell anyone, but I ate them all.

$2.25. Their classic sandwiches stay within the same price range of about $5 to $6 and include: the Ultimate BLT; Hot Ham & Cheese; Ultimate Grilled Cheese; or A Cut Above Deli, a.k.a. the make-your-own sandwich. There is always a special of the day, such as stuffed Peppers, baked spaghetti and a delicious homemade soup. What I like about this tea room is that the food is high quality. Since everything is made from scratch (right down to

My favorite was the apple dumplings. I’ve never had anything like them before. They were sweet and sticky with a gooey, yumminess that totally satisfied my sweet tooth. My only problem with them was that I wanted more.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 47


Mossie’s Tea Room hosts plenty of events and caters to those looking for homemade goodness. The neat décor of the building makes it a great place to visit. The original building was built in 1886, and Doris and Jack have done a phenomenal job at maintaining the building’s historic charm. Doris has even turned a back room into an impromptu museum. In it, she displays old newspapers, Marionville mementos and personal items from former residents of the town. Attached to the tea room is another room that Doris calls “Yesterday’s Treasures Shop.” She allows vendors to rent space from her in exchange for them selling their items there. This addition echoes the efforts of her late mother, Clara, who operated a second hand shop in the 1970s and ‘80s. “She had a zest for life,” says Doris. Running the tea room is something husband, Jack,

helps out with in the best way he knows how. As a former welder and pipe fitter, Jack says he is the maintenance man and dishwasher now. “I’ve never worked so hard for so little in my life,” he jokes. These two lovebirds just celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary and celebrated with dinner at the tea room. Their kids and grandkids treated them by acting as the cooks and servers for their special night. When I asked the two of them how they met, Doris’ first reaction was laughter. “At 16, my dad bought me a horse, so I’d forget about boys,” she says. The two met on horseback just down the road from Mossie’s Tea Room. Doris explains that Jack rode up on a work horse while she rode on a saddle horse. “He wanted to race,” laughs Doris. And that was that. Doris says she wrote a poem about that moment when they met and

gave it to Jack for their anniversary. Mossie’s really is a special place, not only for the food, but for the people you will meet while there. I don’t know any other 78-year-old who has the gusto or desire to renovate an entire building, make homemade food every day and still have enough energy to crank out a smile at the end of it all. “The Lord has blessed me with good health,” says

48 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Doris. “I’d rather wear out than rust out. That’s exactly my sentiments. Doing nothing is not in our plan.” Mossie’s Tea Room is located “on the square” at 101 North Market Street in Marionville. Please call 417207-6269 to place a to-go order or to inquire about that day’s special. Lunch is served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and brunch is available on Saturdays only from 8 to 11 a.m.

SEPTEMBER 2012


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S T O RY BY L I N D S AY R E E D

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SEPTEMBER 2012


or focus

Event will showcase services available to meet the needs of older adults

Businesses and organizations from across Barry County will gather at the Crowder College Cassville Campus to offer a wide variety of information at the first annual Barry County OACAC Neighborhood Center Senior Fair on Friday, Sept. 14. The fair will be held from 8 a.m. to noon at the college, which is located on North Business 37. “When we started planning the senior fair, we realized that even though we are a service agency we don’t know all of the services that are available to local seniors,” said Gail Reed, Barry County OACAC director. “If we don’t know what is available, then local seniors probably don’t know what is available. “This fair is an opportunity for seniors to get all the information on services they might need by visiting one location,” added Reed. The senior fair is designed for community members who are 55 years of age or older, senior caregivers and children of seniors who are interested in gathering information for their parents. “This is an extremely important

SEPTEMBER 2012

event,” said Joni Moore, of Hospice Compassus in Monett, who has helped with event planning. “We have, in Barry County, an enormous amount of resources, but it is hard to get everybody familiar with those resources. We don’t have a resource book with all the services available, so many seniors aren’t aware of what is available to them. “The fair will offer everything from medical to safety information,” said Moore. “We will have information on all kinds of different things that are very important to seniors. This event is totally directed toward the seniors of our community. It is going to be a phenomenal event.” The senior fair will offer information on home healthcare, medical supplies, independent living centers, endof-life services, hospice, skilled nursing homes, dental care, disability services, senior centers, transportation, legal services, consumer credit counseling, durable power of attorney, rehabilitation, physical therapy and volunteer opportunities. Reed estimated that there will be over 40 different businesses and organizations represented at the event. “This is a place for seniors to get their questions

answered,” said Reed. “Services will be well represented county wide. All the senior centers have agreed to attend.” In addition to offering an assortment of valuable information, the senior fair will feature entertainment. Several musicians have volunteered to perform during the event, including a talented individual who will play a hammer dulcimer. Other volunteers have signed up to share their hobbies and talents. A quilting group will show off their needlework skills, and a local photographer will showcase several pieces and answer questions about the shutterbug hobby. “The entertainment is going to be fun,” said Reed. “We are hoping to see everybody come and enjoy the fair with us.” The Barry County OACAC Senior Fair is for all local community members and is not limited to low-income residents. “It’s really important for seniors to see what type of resources are available to them,” said Kelly Paul, ACCESS Family Care outreach coordinator, who is also assisting with event planning. “We are going to have all of that information right there in one place. “Gail had a great idea, and

I was excited to jump on board to help,” said Paul. “We want to be involved in helping area seniors learn about everything that is available to them.” ACCESS Family Care will offer free dental screenings during the senior fair. Paul said other local businesses and organizations will also offer blood pressure screenings, advance directive preparation services and other free services during the fair. “We are all so excited about this fair,” said Reed. “We believe this is going to be a good way to get information out to our seniors about the services available in our community. “OACAC’s mission statement is to strive to help families achieve self sufficiency,” said Reed. “This includes seniors. We are proud to help local seniors and hope this event will help improve their quality of life by helping them stay home longer, make a smoother transition to assisted living or just learn about services available to meet their needs.” Light refreshments will be served during the fair, and door prize drawings will also be held. For more information, call the Barry County OACAC Neighborhood Center at 417847-2140.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 51


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SEPTEMBER 2012


RECIPES

from the RECIPES COLLECTED

FROM

FA M I LY A N D F R I E N D S

Apple Cobbler 3 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup sugar, divided 1-1/2 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 cup butter or margarine 2 eggs 1 tbsp. vanilla extract 3 to 4 tbsp. milk 8 cups thinly sliced peeled baking apples 2 tbsp. quick-cooking tapioca 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

How do you like them apples?

TOPPING: 1 tbsp. milk 3/4 tsp. sugar 1/4 tsp. cinnamon In a bowl, combine flour, 1/4 cup sugar, baking powder and salt. Cut in butter until crumbly. In another bowl, lightly beat eggs and vanilla; add to crumb mixture. With a fork, gently mix in milk to moisten. Stir until dough forms a ball. Press half of the dough into the bottom of a greased 13”x9”x2” baking pan. Chill the remaining dough. Toss apples with tapioca, cinnamon and remaining sugar; place over dough in pan. On a lightly floured surface, roll chilled dough to fit top of pan. Place over apple. Brush with milk. Combine sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle on top. Bake at 350˚ for 45 minutes or until apples are tender and crust is golden.

Apple Dumplings

Double Apple Cake

1 cup sugar 2 cups water 3 tbsp. butter 1/4 tsp. cinnamon Boil together for 3 minutes. This makes enough syrup for 6 dumplings.

1 cup butter or margarine, softened 1-3/4 cups brown sugar, firmly packed 2 eggs 2 cups flour, unsifted 2 tsp. cinnamon 1 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 2 cups apples, diced and chopped 1-1/2 cups applesauce, unsweetened 1 cup raisins 1/2 cup chopped nuts

Peel and core 6 apples. Fill cavities of apples with the following mixture: 1/2 cup sugar 1-1/2 tsp. cinnamon Butter for six dots You will need pastry for two 9” pie crusts. Roll out pastry a little less than 1/8” thick. Cut into 7” squares. Place apples on each square of pastry. Fill cavities with sugar and cinnamon mixture and dot with butter. Bring opposite points of pastry up over the apple. Overlap points, moisten and seal. Place a little apart in baking pan. Pour hot syrup around dumplings. Bake at 425˚ for 40 to 45 minutes.

Cream butter and brown sugar until smooth. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Combine flour, cinnamon, soda and salt. Stir into butter mixture. Stir in apples, applesauce, raisins and nuts. Dough should be stiff. Spoon into a greased 13”x9”x2” baking pan and spread evenly. Bake at 350˚ for 35 to 45 minutes, or until cake shrinks back from edge of pan and springs back when lightly touched.

Do you have a recipe you’d like to share? Send it to Darlene Wierman at darlene@cassville-democrat.com SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 53


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SEPTEMBER 2012


connection My Connection� photos should be e-mailed to editor@monett-times.com. Photos should be sent in the original JPG format at the highest resolution possible. A short explanation of who is in the photo and where the photo was taken should also be included.

Charlotte Schoen recently enjoyed a 10-day vacation in Florida at Disney World, Sea World and Indian Shores Beach on the Gulf with her children and grandchildren. Pictured at the Coronado Springs Resort at Disney World with an issue of Connection are Lauryn Schoen, Tommy Walker, Brian Schoen, Nicholas Schoen, Chris Schoen, Kelli Walker and Charlotte Schoen. Lisa Schlichtman, Connection editor, enjoys reading the July issue of the magazine while lounging on a hammock during a recent family vacation to Pentwater on the shores of Lake Michigan.

Walter and Karen Hamer, of Monett, enjoyed their June issue of Connection magazine as they made the 14-hour flight to Busan, Republic of Korea (South) at the end of June. They attended the District Governor Elect and Spouse School and then the International Convention for Lions Club International. Walter is wearing the traditional dress of a Korean policeman. Karen is attired in a bridal costume. Walter was sworn in as district governor for the 26M6 Lions District, which covers 20 counties in southwest Missouri. SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 55

MYCONNECTION

y M


Angie Varner, of Making Memories Tours in Washburn, is shown on top of the Empire State Building on July 4.

Ronald and Leatrice Strother, of Purdy, pose with a June issue of Connection magazine at the 33rd annual sing at Beacon Park near Harrison, Ark., on June 29 and 30.

A group from Arnhart Baptist Church in Purdy took this photo with the issue of Connection magazine that featured Thailand missions. The local missionaries taught English and the love of Christ at Paamahlah School in rural Mae Sariang, Thailand, during

A missions team from First Baptist Church in Cassville returned to

a week in June. Pictured are group

Thailand this summer and took along the issue of Connection

members Avery Roller, Michelle

magazine that featured the church’s work there and their adopted

Cullers, Addy Roller, Mica Propps,

school. The young student named Fai who graced the cover of the

Jennifer Duncan and Arnhart’s pastor,

April issue is pictured above holding the magazine. She was a

John Duncan.

preschooler on the front cover and is now in the fourth grade. This was First Baptist’s fifth year at the school.

56 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

SEPTEMBER 2012


MYCONNECTION

Lana Curtis, Katrina DeSpain, Jimmie DeSpain II, Shirlene DeSpain, Renee Tichenor and Rick Christman took a trip to Catalina Island in California and took along an issue of Connection.

Gary and Suzan Updike, of Purdy, and Suzan’s mom, Nona Dalke, of Monett, took a trip to South Dakota and brought along several issues of Connection magazine. Gary is pictured above at Fort Meade and Suzan is pictured at Wall Drug Store.

Nona Dalke, of Monett, stands with Buffalo Bill and the July issue of Connection at Wall Drug in South Dakota. SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 57


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Trinity Lutheran Church held its annual Freistatt picnic on July 6. 1. Marge Harris, Judy Lehde and Edith Harmon. 2. Dan and Chris Bremer. 3. Glen and Wilma Seufert. 4. Makenna, April and Ryan Prater. 5. Paul and Pat Kaiser. 6. Mary Ann Buchanan and K.C. Caldwell. 7. James Strahan and Rick Johnson. 8. Bill and Elaine Cole. 9. Doug Bowerman and Brad DeLay. 10. Matt and Isaac Tichenor and Mike Crandall. 11. Stephanie, Chris, Audrey and Chance Jones. 12. Sharon and David Sater.

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The community of Purdy hosted its inaugural Purdy Festival on July 21. The first-time event was a huge success.

20

13. Kaitlin Bringman. 14. Jarek Tettenhrst and Cash Keeling. 15. Devon Bennett and Chelsea Mareth. 16. Patsy Woods and Stephanie Carey. 17. Brad and Carli Henderson. 18. Chloe Jo and Bo Prock. 19. Stephanie Fuller and Tiffany Coble. 20. Donetta and Pat Mareth. 21. Ryan and April Bennett. 22. Patsy Stockton. 23. Weston and Libby Roden. 24. Shayda and Ella Tosh.

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SEPTEMBER 2012

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CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 59

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The Monett Jaycees hosted their annual carnival on July 18, 19, 20 and 21 in Monett’s South Park. 9. Kyle and Wade Preston. 10. Paul and Janet Wimsatt and Delorres Morris. 11. Patrick Valentine and Reyes Pineda. 12. Brianna Morris and Kamryn Carr. 13. Abby Inman, Ashton Snow, Brianna Morris and Adelyn Inman. 14. Katie, Michael and Joy Brittenham. 15. Allen, Kamryn, Kelton, Kasen and Keegan Carr. 16. Norah Hensley and Mabel, Ruby and Hannah Wiley. 17. Cammie Olson, Sarah Parker and Brenley Copeland.

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The annual Stones Prairie Picnic was held July 20 at St. John’s Lutheran Church northwest of Purdy. 18. Betty Brandt. 19. Aaron Wahlert, Scott Fitzpatrick and Janice Varner. 20. Judy Davis and Sylvia Hagebusch. 21. Craig Williams and Bob Foulke. 22. Gene Swadley, Benni Ratterree and Troy Lowe. 23. Jim Moore, Mick Epperly and Mackenzie Lawson. 24. Wayne Hendrix and Mitch Allen. 25. Larry Aeverman and Carmine Androsiglio. 26. Mike Bennett and Larry Brown. 26

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 61

COMMUNITYCONNECTION

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SEPTEMBER 2012


October

S TAY C O N N E C T E D

MONTH OF OCTOBER The Stella Senior Citizens Center and the Aurora Senior Citizens Center hold weekly dances. The Stella dance is held every Friday night from 7 to 10 p.m. with music by the McDonald County Playboys and Frosty Garland and the Road Hogs on alternate Fridays. The Aurora dance is held the second, third and fourth Saturdays of the month from 7 to 10 p.m. featuring the Funtimers band. OCTOBER 1 The monthly dance at the Monett Senior Citizens Center will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. at the senior center on Dairy Street. Admission is $3, and snack foods are welcome. OCTOBER 2 The Cassville Area Chamber of Commerce will host its annual Chili and Salsa Cook-Off on the square in downtown Cassville. There will be live music, craft booths, chili and salsa tasting and competition, a pet parade and food venders. Booths will open at 8 a.m., and activities will be offered throughout the day. For more information, call the chamber office at 417-847-2814. OCTOBER 3 The annual International Walk Your Kids to School Day will be celebrated in Exeter. Students and parents are invited to meet at the First Baptist Church of Exeter parking lot at 7:30 a.m. and walk to school as a group. OCTOBER 4 The Seligman Lions Club is hosting a community dance at the Seligman Community Center from 7 to 10 p.m. Frosty Garland and the Road Hogs is the featured band. There is a $4 cover charge with all proceeds benefitting the Seligman Lions Club.

OCTOBER 5 The Cassville Area Chamber of Commerce will hold its First Friday Coffee from 8 to 8:45 a.m. at the office of Dr. Carolyn Hunter at 77 Smithson Dr. OCTOBER 6 Pierce City will be holding its first Happy Harvest Days, a fall festival featuring crafts and booths. The event will be held from noon to 5 p.m. in downtown Pierce City by the bandstand. For more information, email prideof piercecity@att.net. A fried chicken dinner benefit will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Pierce City Senior Citizens Center with proceeds benefitting the Jenny Garner Memorial. The 33rd annual Homer Sloan Buddy Bass Tournament, sponsored by the Shell Knob Chamber of Commerce, will begin at 7:30 a.m. with staggered flights at Campbell Point Marina and King’s River Marina. Weigh-in will take place at 4 p.m. at Campbell Point Marina. For more information, call the Shell Knob Chamber at 417-858-3300. The 28th annual Autofest will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Oak Park in Aurora. For more information, call the Aurora Chamber at 417-678-4150. OCTOBER 13 An all-day train trip from Seligman to the Van Buren (Ark.) Arts and Crafts Festival is planned. The train will board at 6:40 a.m. and will return to Seligman at approximately 6:30 p.m. For reservations, call 417-662-3611. The Seligman Chamber of Commerce will host an auction at 5:30 p.m. at the Chamber Event Center, located on Highway 37.

If you have an event you would like featured in our monthly events listing, please email the event information to Lisa Craft at community@monett-times.com. SEPTEMBER 2012

VENTS

OCTOBER 12-14 Mt. Vernon will host Apple Butter Makin’ Days on the courthouse square. For more information, call the Mt. Vernon Chamber at 417-466-7654.

OCTOBER 16 The Southern Beekeepers of Missouri will meet at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Monett. Anyone interested in bees is welcome to attend. For more information, call Leon Riggs at 417-235-5053 or Kevin Young at 417-847-5464. OCTOBER 22 The Pierce City Senior Citizens will host a dance from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Pierce City Senior Center. OCTOBER 6-28 The Cassville Area Chamber of Commerce will again sponsor “The Show,” a music variety show featuring Hometown Sound and the Redhots and other local talent. For ticket information and show times, call the chamber office at 417-847-2814. OCTOBER 28 The Ozark Festival Orchestra will hold a concert at 3 p.m. at the Monett Elementary School. OCTOBER 31 The Cassville Area Chamber of Commerce and participating merchants will host “Trick or Treat around the Square” in Cassville. A parade of costumed kids will pick up candy at businesses around the square beginning at 3:30 p.m. at the chamber parking lot. For more information, call the chamber at 417847-2814. A spooktacular, kid-friendly event will be held in downtown Aurora. For more information, call the Aurora Chamber of Commerce at 417-678-4150.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 63


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EXPERIENCE MAKES THE

DIFFERENCE. Cassville, Missouri 417-847-2141 or 417-847-2157 Shell Knob, Missouri 417-858-3151

James L. Stephens N.D., Doctor of Naturopathy

“Touch for Health” Kinesiology Body Balance Nutrition www.lifeforce.net 417-847-9355 18947 State Hwy 37 • Cassville 64 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

McQueen Funeral Home Wheaton, Missouri 417-652-7268 SEPTEMBER 2012


Connecon’s pet contest Cutestwinner

The winner of each month’s Connection’s Cutest Pet contest receives a $25 gift certificate from Preferred Pet Supply in Monett. Submit your entries for next month’s contest to editor@monett-times.com.

SEPTEMBER’S WIN N ER!

SAVE $5.00 Present this ad to get $5.00 off your fir st professional groo ming appointment at Preferred Pet Supply.

Grooming Tue-Fri. Drop off starts at 7:45 a.m. Pick up by 6:00 p.m. We make it convenient for you!

509 Dairy Street Monett, Mo. 417-235-DOGS (3647)

This ain’t no bull! Her name is Sadie and she is a 9-year-old longhorn owned by Tony and Robin Pryor, of Monett.

The runners-up Meet Princess, a 2-year-old ShihTzu, and Lovie, a 13week-old Cairn Terrier Mix. They are both owned by Debra DiBella, of Aurora.

www.preferredpetsupply.com SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 65

CONNECTION’SCUTEST

Be Sure Your 4-Legged Family Members Look Their Best!


ADVERTISINGINDEX

Aaron’s F-5 Storm Shelters Acambaro Mexican Restaurant Barry Electric Cooperative Baywash Car Wash Bennett-Wormington Funeral Home Bookmarks Brownsberger’s Carolyn Hunter, DMD, PC Community National Bank Country Dodge CoxHealth Crane Area Chamber of Commerce Crane Family Dentistry Denali Dreams Diet Center Doug’s Pro Lube Eastside Church of Christ Ed’s Flea Market Edward Jones Feed & More Country Store First State Bank of Purdy Fohn Funeral Home Four Seasons Realty Freedom Bank Hospice Compassus Ila Bohm’s Home Décor Ken’s Collision Lackey Body Works Les Jacobs Ford Lowe’s Auto Glass Making Memories Tours Mercy Missouri Loan Center Mocha Jo’s Coffee Café Monett Rental and Sales Neill’s Home Store Nu-2-U Ozark Healthy Herb Shop Peppers and Company Pine Mountain Theater Preferred Pet Supply

14 24 12 58 62 12 58 26 60 4 68 38 52 54 54 6 28 4 19 18 44 64 7 28 54 18 54 58 3 64 18 2 12 4 24 44 60 64 6 52 65

Robyn Blankenship 417.342.3168 sales@cassville-democrat.com Greg Gilliam 417.489.1718 777caregiver@sbcglobal.net Sheila Harris 417.669.3667 mocassadv@gmail.com Marion Chrysler 479.244.7082 mchrysler@cassville-democrat.com

66 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Race Brothers Sater/Old Town Pharmacy Scott Photography Security Bank Smile Designers Dentistry Snootie Flea Southwest Area Career Center Spiritual Streams Fellowship Starla K Fashion Jewelry St. Lawrence Catholic School Sue Beck Swartz Tractor

14 18 40 38 66 49 19 26 24 3 49 60

The Hornet’s Nest The Trunk Tomblin’s Jewelry & Gifts Trogdon Agency, Inc. UMB Uncle Doc’s Flea Market US Bank Vacation Rentals Visionhealth Eye Center Walmart Pharmacy Whitley Pharmacy Willis Insurance, Inc.

58 19 3 66 6 62 49 62 26 24 28 14

Protecting the Ones You Love Is Our Policy Your family is your top priority. Whatever your budget and your needs, our insurance policies can help protect those who matter most to you.

www.trogdoninsurance.com

Dean Gautney, CIC

P.O. Box 405 • 111 S. Market St. • Mt.Vernon 417.466.2800 • fax: 417.466.3066 Toll Free: 1.800.748.7756 SERVICE

Trogdon Agency, Inc. COMPLETE INSURANCE

New, State-Of-The-Art Dental Office

Children’s & Family Dentistry We offer digital X-rays, ortho, crowns, bridges and root canals. We accept most dental plans Missouri Medicaid providers up to age 21.

Thomas ALMS Jr., D.D.S. 155 W. Patterson • Mt. Vernon, Mo. • 466-3443 HOURS: Mon. - Thur: 8:30 - 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 - 5 p.m. SEPTEMBER 2012


PARTINGSHOT Mourning doves lay two white eggs, which hatch in about two weeks. Baby mourning doves leave the nest after another two weeks. This photograph was captured in the Barry County area by Jeff Terry.

SEPTEMBER 2012

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 67


Experts in your care CoxHealth Center Cassville takes pride in bringing state-of-the-art medical care to our community. As the area’s largest physician clinic and outpatient diagnostic facility, we provide a broad range of services plus a full laboratory for patients of all ages.

To schedule your appointment, call 847-3500.

75 Smithson Drive Cassville

cox h e al t h . co m

Experts. Friends. Neighbors.


Connection September  

A amgazine dedicated to Southest Missourians

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