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CONNECT SAVANNAH

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Savannah’s 2021 American Traditions Competition winner

MARCH 3-9, 2021


SETTING SAIL MARCH 17TH! Shamrock Soiree @ Convention Center 11am - 5pm Flotilla Passes Convention Center 1pm - 3pm

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Rising Tide Experiences & the Savannah Irish Festival are proud to partner with the Savannah Convention Center & Outside Savannah as we celebrate safely on March 17th! Want To Join The Flotilla!?

Starting in Turner’s Creek, we’ll head through Thunderbolt en route to the Soiree at the Convention Center. Prizes awarded for Best Decoration, Ship Spirit, and People’s Choice! Registration: $30 Individual / $250 Business

Watch From The Official Shamrock Soiree! Family-friendly atmosphere, live music & performances, festive drinks, food trucks, and auction supporting the Undefeated Warrior Foundation. Early Bird Pricing: Adults $8-$15, Kids Free-$5. Parking $5

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MARCH 31

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WEEK CONNECT SAVANNAH

AT A GLANCE

HIGHLIGHTED PICKS FROM HOSTESS CITY HAPPENINGS THIS WEEK TO HAVE YOUR EVENT CONSIDERED FOR INCLUSION IN WEEK AT A GLANCE, PLEASE SEND AN EMAIL TO WAG@CONNECTSAVANNAH.COM. INCLUDE THE EVENT NAME, DATE, TIME, LOCATION WITH ADDRESS, COST, WEBSITE ADDRESS FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, AND A CONTACT NUMBER. THE SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS 5PM EACH FRIDAY BEFORE THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S EDITION.

WEDNESDAY 3.3

An Evening with Seldom Sober and Carroll Brown

2021 Virtual Savannah Jewish Film Festival

Georgia Beer Day at Two Tides Join Two Tides for their Georgia Beer Day celebration. Special glassware will be available for purchase and a portion of the proceeds will go to the Georgia Brewer’s Guild. noon-midnight Two Tides Brewing Company 12 West 41st St.

Drunk Spelling Bee

Join El-Rocko Lounge each Wednesday for an all-new drunken scholastic event. Enter by purchasing three drinks between 8 and 10 p.m. Bee runs 10 p.m.-1 a.m. El-Rocko Lounge 117 Whitaker St. elrockolounge.com

Free Yoga at CQ Forsyth

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MARCH/

NEOSUBLIME AT SULFUR STUDIOS

Sulfur Art Studios debuts Neosublime, a solo exhibition by Kathy Varadi. The exhibition will be available for viewing at The Sentient Bean during the shop’s operating hours. Through April 27 13 E. Park Ave.

family fun, good food at the snack bar and many chances to win cash. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Elks Lodge, 183 Wilshire Blvd.

Faces of 2020 by Elise Aleman Elise Aleman’s collection will be on display at Gallery Espresso. Feb. 27-March 31 The Gallery Espresso 234 Bull St. galleryespresso.com

Head out to Forsyth for free Vinyasa Yoga sponsored by the Collins Quarter Forsyth. Meet in front of the Collins Quarter Patio. 9-10 a.m. Collins Quarter at Forsyth 621 Drayton St. thecollinsquarter.com

Are you a Pure-Blood, Half-Blood or Muggle? B&D Burgers-Southside is calling all Potter-loves to join them for a fun night of Harry Potter trivia. 7-10 p.m. B & D Burgers, 11108 Abercorn St.

THURSDAY 3.4

Lemons(X5) A Play

Bingo! at Elks Lodge

Join Elks Lodge for Bingo on Thursdays and Sundays. Enjoy great

Harry Potter Trivia at B&D

Join Front Porch Improv Theatre for a two-person dramedy about love in the time of limits. Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons

is a thought-provoking play by Sam Steiner. Purchase tickets online. 8 p.m. Front Porch Improv 210 W. Victory Drive. $5-20

“Revival: A Call for Radical Care” at Sulfur Studios

Curated by Antonia B. Larkin “Revival” is a multi-faceted exhibition on display in the Main Gallery of Sulfur Studios. March 4-28 Sulfur Studios, 2301 Bull St.

FRIDAY 3.5 Bluegrass By The Pint with Swamptooth

Join Service Brewing for Bluegrass by the Pint featuring live bluegrass from favorite local favorites, Swamptooth. 6 p.m. Service Brewing Company 574 Indian St.

First Friday for Folk Music Part One

Savannah’s First Friday for Folk Music goes virtual for view on Facebook. Part One: Joe Nelson and James Pittman will entertain us with their favorite ‘old-time’ tunes. 7:30-8:25 p.m. savannahfolk.org

SATURDAY 3.6 Third annual Savannah Local Artist Market - SLAM The Savannah Local Artist Market – SLAM – will return on March 6 to spotlight works by over 60 area visionaries, encompassing everything from paintings, prints, and jewelry to sculptures, woodwork, and more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 3000 Bee Rd. Free facebook.com/ savannahlocalartistmarket

Fire & Wine

Enjoy half-off bottles of wine and fire pits in the courtyard. Purchase one of their sweet s’mores kits (marshmallows included). 6-9 p.m. Foxy Loxy Cafe 1919 Bull St. EVENTS CONTINUE ON PG. 6

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

The Joan & Murray Gefen Memorial Savannah Jewish Film Festival is hosting its 18th annual event virtually as a pandemic precaution. Register online to enjoy the films and talks with experts on films, actors and directors. Feb. 28-March 11 savj.org

Perry Lane Hotel presents an evening of Irish tunes and songs with Seldom Sober and Carroll Brown. Go out and enjoy an outdoor, socially distanced evening of wonderful music to celebrate the memory of Saint Patrick. Peregrin rooftop bar 256 E Perry Ln. $25-50 perrylanehotel.com

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CONNECT SAVANNAH

SAVANNAH’S PULSE NEWS | ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

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OUR VALUES

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

At its core, Connect Savannah is focused on the happenings in our community, highlighting local news, arts, and entertainment. Our professional journalists write about community issues and the people who live here. The public has a right to know about issues affecting them, and Connect Savannah is dedicated to keeping readers informed and aware of all that goes on in the community. The pursuit of truth is a fundamental principle of journalism. But the truth is not always apparent or known immediately. A professional journalist’s role is to impartially report the news based on verifiable facts so readers can, based on their own knowledge and experience, determine the truth behind varied issues and developments. This is often an ongoing pursuit as journalists work to uncover stories and

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follow those stories wherever they lead, regardless of preconceived ideas. The news that they report is separate from opinions shared in our labeled commentary, special columns, reviews and submitted letters to the editor. The presentation of both news and opinion is designed to educate, entertain, and foster conversation. We appreciate and encourage readers to share news tips with us, and to share any criticism and questions. We are your comprehensive local source for current news, arts, entertainment, music, and community events. We are here to serve you. We are blessed to be part of the greatest country in the world and the freedom it bestows on its citizens and its press. Find us on the platforms below or reach out to our newsroom at news@connectsavannah.com or (912) 721-4378.

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Singer Nicole Zuraitis, 2021 American Traditions Vocal Competition winner. Photo by Holy Smoke Photography

WEEK

AT A GLANCE

(CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE)

The Firms Grand Opening

You’re invited to the Firms Fitness, Health and Empowerment studio’s grand opening. Enjoy light refreshments, giveaways, good music with great peeps. 7:30-10 p.m. The Firms 903 E 70th St.

MONDAY 3.8 Tybee Island Farmers Market

This moderately-paced, three-mile hike will include a talk about the different ecosystems of the park. Wear sturdy shoes and bring water and insect repellant. Parking pass is $5. 10-11 a.m. Fort McAllister Historic Park 3894 Fort McAllister Rd. gastateparks.org/FortMcAllister

Weekly market featuring a variety of produce, baked goods, honey, eggs, BBQ sauces, dressings, popsicles, dog treats , natural body products and featured artisans. The market is non-smoking and pet friendly. We are right behind the Historic Tybee Lighthouse. 4 p.m. 30 Meddin Dr. tybeeislandfarmersmarket.com

Forsyth Farmers Market

TUESDAY 3.9

First Saturday Hike

Local and regional produce, honey, meat, dairy, pasta, baked goods and other delights. Rain or shine. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Forsyth Park Drayton St. and East Park Ave. Free to attend. Items for sale. forsythfarmersmarket.com

Islands Farmers Market

Weekly farmers market on Talahi Island highlighting local growers and makers, healthy foods and a positive environment. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Islands Farmers’ Market 401 Quarterman Dr. facebook.com/ islandsfarmersmarket

Toss For a Cause

Join Southbound Brewing Co. for a Cornhole Tournament benefitting Park Place Outreach to fight teen homelessness. Signups start at 1 p.m.,games start at 2 p.m. 1 p.m. Southbound Brewing Company, 107 East Lathrop Ave.

SUNDAY 3.7 CONNECT SAVANNAH IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY

family fun, good food at the snack bar and many chances to win cash. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Elks Lodge 183 Wilshire Blvd.

Bingo! at Elks Lodge

Join Elks Lodge for Bingo. Enjoy great

Business on the Move

Join the Chamber for March’s Business on the Move event — a special networking opportunity to highlight local Chamber businesses. The Baxly Savannah 5:30-7:30 p.m. 630 Indian St. savannah.simpleviewcrm.com

Surviving Savannah Book Launch

Join Surviving Savannah author Patti Callahan, E. Shaver Booksellers, Good Cause Marketing, and Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum for a virtual event featuring never-beforeseen artifacts from the Pulaski Shipwreck Exhibit. 6 p.m. shipsofthesea.org/events $10-40

Toddler Tuesday at Oatland Island Wildlife Center

Explore the wonders of nature with all kinds of wild fun for your wee ones. This week’s theme is “Toads & Frogs Will Sing Again.” $5 per child, $3 for adults 10 and 11 a.m. Oatland Island Wildlife Center 711 Sandtown Rd. sccpss.com/schools/oatland


NEWS

BRIEFS

COVID-19 vaccinations to expand in Chatham

FOLLOWING GEORGIA Gov. Brian demand for first-dose vaccinations has Kemp’s Feb. 25 announcement that the “seen some drop-off ” since early February, COVID-19 vaccine will soon become avail- likely leading to Kemp’s decision to expand able to teachers, school staff, adults with inoculation eligibility. disabilities and their caregivers, and parDavis added that he expects vaccine ents of children who have complex medical supply to increase soon with the approval conditions, Chatham County officials are of Johnson & Johnson’s new single-dose preparing to expand local inoculations. COVID-19 vaccine. Nonetheless, Davis Kemp said that he encouraged anyone who expects vaccine-eligibility is eligible for inoculations expansion to begin on to jump at the chance to March 8. According to Dr. receive vaccination shots. Lawton Davis, the Coastal “We’re not sure what Health District health our vaccine supply will director, when the vacbe,” Davis said. “If you cine does become availhave the opportunity to able to teachers and school get a vaccine, get it.” staff in Chatham County, Additionally, Davis local officials plan to staglauded an initiative spearger its administration headed by St. Joseph’s/ to educators to help preCandler to organize popvent disruptions to class up vaccination centers at Dr. Lawton Davis on Feb. 26. schedules. Chatham County churches PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON “Some [teachers] are in an effort to increase going to have side effects inoculations among local and be out of school,” Davis said during his minority communities, with the endeavor biweekly COVID-19 response update at planned to continue into springtime. the Feb. 26 Chatham County Commission Meanwhile, the level of COVID-19 infecmeeting. “We may be interrupting school tion rates remains troubling in Chatham somewhat to vaccinate.” County, according to Davis, with the averPrior to March 8, Georgia remains in age daily number of new confirmed cases Phase 1A+ of the COVID-19 vaccine rollrising locally since mid-February. out, meaning that it is only available for “We still have very high levels of transresidents aged 65 and up, caregivers for mission going on,” Davis said, adding that the elderly, healthcare workers, and first Chatham residents remain under threat of responders. However, Davis noted that mutated coronavirus variants. in Chatham County and across Georgia, − Nick Robertson

WE WOULD LOVE YOUR VOTE FOR

TOP LOCAL DISTILLERY

CHATHAM COUNTY political activist Jeanne Seaver is throwing her hat in the ring to become Georgia’s next Lt. Governor, according to an announcement issued on Feb. 25 by Seaver’s campaign. “Georgians deserve representatives who put the interest of the people first and push partisan politics to the back burner,” Seaver stated, citing her being “disheartened with the failed leadership in the Lieutenant Governor’s office” as a primary motivation to run for the seat currently held by Republican Geoff Duncan. An outspoken supporter of former President Donald Trump, Seaver leads the Savannah-based Stand Up, Lead or Shut Up organization of “patriots that

love America and all the freedoms it has to offer,” according to the organization’s website. Seaver is a legal administrator and comptroller who was a former employee of attorney F. Lee Bailey, and she has served as a child advocate for the Savannah/ Chatham County Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) program, and is also a member of the Exchange Club of Savannah, according to her campaign website. “I understand the needs of Georgians and promise to work with the leaders of Georgia to increase everyone’s opportunities for success,” Seaver stated. − Nick Robertson

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CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

Seaver announces bid for Lt. Governor post

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NEWS

BRIEFS

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JUST MONTHS AFTER Savannah’s City among candidates. Council tapped retired City Manager Michael Brown said that a recruitment brochure will be Brown to resume his former role on an interim sent out through professional journals, newspabasis, a new search for a permanent city manpers, and websites, with the nationwide recruitager is officially underway. ment phase expected to last for about a month and During their Feb. 26 meeting, City Council a half. The consultant will help narrow the field approved the motion to execute a search proto determine the best options, before the councess for a new city manager with an 8-0 vote. cil must take an active role in the final selection According to Brown, the process is slated to process. Savannah Mayor Van Johnson begin within the next three weeks. Alderwoman Estella Shabazz estimated that (left) appears with interim City Brown served as Savannah’s city manager based upon the city manager’s timeline, the produring 1995-2010. In 2016, City Council hired Manager Michael Brown at a cess may be finished toward the end of June. December press conference. Rob Hernandez to permanently fill the role, “I want it to go quickly, but not where people PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON but he abruptly resigned in April of 2019 and will lose confidence that it’s being thorough and was replaced on an interim basis by retired inclusive,” said Brown, adding that his replaceChatham County Assistant Manager Pat Monahan. Monahan ment should be selected with discernment. oversaw a nationwide city manager search in 2020, but City Coun“This city of Savannah needs a manager who can handle these cil declined to hire any of the short-listed candidates, and instead top issues of poverty reduction, income equity, eradicating blight asked Brown to return as a fill-in beginning in November after in this community, especially and above all reducing violence − Monahan re-retired. just the tragedy of violence − and then finally the housing initiaThe first step in the search for a long-term city manager will be tive that is underway, so we need a candidate who must be totally for a headhunting consultant to speak with each council member comfortable and dedicated to this task,” said Brown. for input about what traits the candidates should possess, Brown “And they have to have the patience of Job,” Mayor Van Johnsaid. Next, the city will solicit community input through a survey son added right before the motion passed. requesting suggestions about desired characteristics and skills − Brandy Simpkins

Historic sites to welcome visitors again with pandemic precautions THE COASTAL HERITAGE Sundays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., while Society will reopen all Savannahthe Savannah Children’s Museum will area historic sites and museums be open Wednesdays through Saturthat the organization manages days from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. with comprehensive pandemicThe Pin Point Heritage Museum safety precautions beginning on will be open Thursdays through SatMarch 4, according to a CHS press urdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., while the announcement. Harper Fowlkes House will be open For the safety of all guests and Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays staff, each CHS site and museum from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with a special will be observing social-distancing opening day on March 4. protocols, implementing enhanced While some CHS attractions have sanitizing procedures, and will been open for special occasions since require both staff and guests to the pandemic forced the closure of wear face masks. Visitors are asked its sites and museums, this is the first to adhere to the pandemic-safety time since the pandemic’s onset that regulations and recommendations all six of its historic locations are imposed by Savannah’s municipal planned to remain open to the public government, the Chatham County indefinitely. Commission, and the Centers for The mission of the nonprofit Coastal Disease Control and Prevention. Heritage Society, founded in 1975, is “People are looking for safe activi- The Savannah Children’s Museum will again welcome to provide educational experiences to ties and, because our museums are visitors this spring. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHS the public through the preservation spacious and largely open-air, people and presentation of historic cultural feel confident about coming to them,” said Sandra Baxter, CHS CEO. resources in the region, often through historical reenactments During the initial reopening phase, CHS sites and museums will staged amid significant sites in the Savannah area. each observe new operating hours. Visit chsgeorgia.org to learn more about CHS sites, admission The Georgia State Railroad Museum, the Savannah History information, ticket sales, and membership opportunities. Museum, and Old Fort Jackson will be open Wednesdays through − Noelle Wiehe


NEWS

COMMUNITY

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THE OFFICIAL

SAINT PATRICK’S DAY PULSE OF SAVANNAH! IN PRINT AND ONLINE

CONNECTSAVANNAH.COM

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

Papy first urged the commissioners to declare Chatham County as a restorative BY NICK ROBERTSON community, and take action by establishnick@connectsavannah.com ing committees focused on restorative justice and examining alternatives to Representatives of Deep Center – a local arresting low-level offenders. Papy also nonprofit founded in 2008 to address detcalled for better data-collection collaborarimental effects of poverty on literacy in tion between the Chatham County Police Savannah – presented a new policy briefing Department and the Savannah Police to members of the Chatham County Com- Department, and making this information mission with recommendations aiming to directly available to the public. establish a more just and equitable com“Data is the key for us measuring what munity, including abolishing wealth-based our metrics look like, where our successes detention practices are and where our and decriminalizgaps continue to ing nonviolent misbe,” Papy said. demeanor offenses. Another Deep While Deep CenCenter recommenter is best known dation is to pass an for its Young ordinance addressAuthor Program ing cash-bond and other literacypractices in Chaboosting projects tham County, with offered in 15 of the policy briefing Chatham’s public stating detrimenmiddle schools tal impacts of the and two area high Deep Center’s Coco Papy addresses the cash-bail system on schools, the orga- Chatham County Commission on Feb. 26. the lives of impovPHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON nization has conerished detainees tinually expanded who may be innoits scope of activities since its foundation, cent of crimes they are charged with. and in 2018 started pursuing policy advo“In effect, cash bail often criminalcacy and legislative change, according to izes poverty, as people who are unable Deep Center Director of Development and to afford even the most simple bail are Communications Coco Papy. detained while they await trial, for weeks, “We believe the best in our young peosometimes months, often days,” Papy said. ple, not just the things that are terrible “Doing away with cash bail for low-level, around them,” Papy said while presenting nonviolent misdemeanors would reduce the policy briefing, “Building a Restorative unnecessary stays in our jail.” Community,” during the commission’s Other recommendations conveyed to Feb. 26 meeting. “We believe strongly that the commissioners were decriminalizing we cannot continue to honorably uphold local misdemeanors like possession of less our young people if we are not going to do than an ounce of marijuana, establishing all we could to challenge the policies and an external crisis team to aid law enforcelaws that created barriers for them and ment, and developing incentives to attract their families.” more mental-healthcare workers who are According to Papy, Deep Center defines Black, Indigenous, or people of color to a restorative community as one that supChatham County. ports active investment in meaningful After Papy’s presentation, some comjuvenile- and criminal-justice reform, missioners lauded Deep Center’s efforts. a strong social safety net, and access to “I have seen the changes with the Deep mental healthcare. While the “Building a Center and the children that you work Restorative Community” policy briefing with. They are totally amazing,” said Comfirst released in December has ten widemissioner Tanya Milton. cs ranging recommendations, during her Visit deepcenter.org to view the “Building a presentation Papy focused only on goals Restorative Community” policy briefing. aimed at a county-government level.

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NEWS

EDUCATION

New Beginnings exhibition honors art by Savannah-area students 20th annual exhibit goes virtual to highlight promising young artists

BY NICK ROBERTSON CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

AN ANNUAL SHOWCASE to highlight outstanding artworks by students across Savannah and Chatham County is carrying on virtually this year, as the New Beginnings Youth Art Exhibition features over 125 entries of diverse images that can be viewed online in a 3D gallery space. Presented by The Links, Inc., the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System, and Savannah’s municipal government, the 20th-annual New Beginnings exhibit is a fascinating collection of artworks by middle- and high-school students from across the county. Appropriately based on the theme “Visual Art in a Virtual World,” this year’s exhibit was launched with a Feb. 23 virtual opening reception featuring speakers commending the participating artists, teachers, and sponsors. “The level of the entries this year was nothing short of spectacular,” said Carol Bell of The Links, Inc. “It’s a great honor to chair this competition in conjunction with Black History Month.” Other honored guests at the virtual reception included Savannah Mayor Van Johnson, SCCPSS Superintendent Ann Levett, and Joe Buck, president of the Board of Public Edu10 cation for the SCCPSS.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Art by Tijuana Heyward; art by Brock Betters; art by Amy Oh; art by Avery Sullivan. PHOTOS COURTESY OF SCCPSS

“We are proud of the talented students who participated in this exhibit,” Levett said. “Congratulations to everyone who had a part in putting this together.” Rosemary Dodson, the SCCPSS program coordinator for visual arts, managed the competition and created the virtual exhibition space, which can be visited online via the bit.ly/3aRswQg abbreviated web address. “This was a unique year,” Dodson said. “We had to come up with a way to share all the work in a virtual environment. The exhibit is interactive and engaging.” The competition awards first-, second-, and third-place prizes in both high-school and middle-school divisions, as well as a “Best in Show” award. The winners of the competition for 2020 are: BEST OF SHOW: Avery Sullivan, Savannah Arts Academy HIGH SCHOOL: 1st Place – Mojdah Asimi, Savannah Arts Academy; 2nd Place – Amy Oh, Savannah Arts Academy; 3rd Place – Giselle Berrien, Johnson High School MIDDLE SCHOOL: 1st Place – Elizaveta Kalacheva, Garrison; 2nd Place – Brock Betters, West Chatham Middle School; 3rd Place – Tijuana Heyward, West Chatham Middle School “Art opens many doors for our young students,” said Angela Young, President of the Savannah Chapter of The Links, Inc. cs


OPINION

POLITICS

If it ain’t broke, don’t merge it Chatham County Board of Elections member Marianne Heimes on the push to merge her department with the Board of Registrars same building, so exchange between the two boards is easy − open one door and go AFTER THE 2020 November election in the one across the hall. As the number and the 2021 January election, election of voters grow and elections become even officials breathed a well-deserved sigh of more complex, a new building must be relief. In spite of audits and recounts and considered. Even the storage of the new the largest number of voters ever served, machines was stressful, as they took up Chatham County came through with flying about one-third more space that the old colors. ones, and our warehouse looked like a big At least it seemed so to us. We were still stuffed mushroom. burning from the many disasters of the And the Chatham Commission came to June election. Again a record vote, but our help, renting a new warehouse. Durthis time with more absentee ballots than ing the elections it was used for absenteeever before, a raging pandemic, and new ballot counting; now it is being prepared machines that were bigger, heavier, and in for storage of the new Dominion machines the beginning at least more complicated than those reliable old Diebolds which served us for 20 years. Only two models behind that, Chatham County residents had voted on those lovely old machines with the curtain that you pulled to close yourself in and to let yourself out. And at the end of the day, poll workers had to fill in pages of statistics by hand. What happened? Well, I guess most importantly, voters happened. The voter rolls grew steadily, and then in 2018, (which worked for us accurately, with both moved by Stacey Abrams, they exploded. the manual and machine recounts being That was another disaster for us − no one accurate). anticipated the turnout that occurred, So what was the reward for the hardalthough in hindsight perhaps we should working staff and hundreds of volunteers? have. The local political parties decided the But putting an election together is a boards must be merged and, of course, little more complicated than you might reconfigured. Right now our board is think. There is seldom just one ballot. elected, with two Democrats and two Ballots need to be tailored to different Republicans who choose the chair. For the precincts and different parties, which can most part the board acts in a nonpartisan mean sometimes 50 or more different way, especially as it pertains to elections. ballots. We send our lists up to Atlanta, The Board of Registrars is appointed by and they return the ballots and then we judges, but it seems to be nonpartisan as “proof” them. There was a mistake made well. on one ballot recently, which was most So what will consolidation of the boards regrettable, but to my knowledge it was accomplish? Doubtful there will be a budthe only such mistake made in recent local get savings. Surely there will be confusion. elections history. You do not know how much is required There are two separate boards in of both bodies unless you are on them, Chatham County which perform different and once elected or appointed it takes a duties − the Board of Registrars and the very long time to really understand the Board of Elections. We are housed in the mechanics of putting on an election. Just BY MARIANNE HEIMES

working at a polling site or on absentee ballots definitely does not give you the full picture. Since both boards have spent time learning the ropes − and the last two elections, although the largest ever, went well − I would like to propose another possibility. In the past our boards have met jointly

“So what will consolidation of the boards accomplish? Doubtful there will be a budget savings. Surely there will be confusion.” a few times, but it means an extra meeting for that month. However I believe we do realize that we have reached a point where the boards need to meet jointly more often. Not every month, but perhaps quarterly. Our two board chairs have a good rapport, and do not hesitate to call the other if a question or problem arises. Discussion on merging the boards is not new, it pops up from time to time. This seems like the worst time possible − staff of both entities is up to snuff on how to organize an election. We also have a few months to work to make things better, as we have no election until November. If that is a disaster, the Legislators can again consider the merger and pass it before our board is “primaried” in May of 2022. As we are elected officials, it is a little more difficult to send us packing. Then the new board can try to get ready for the next big election in November of 2022. Or, the old board can continue.

I think it would be wiser not to rush into any merger right now − there will be many new election laws which will need to be added to current board knowledge, in addition to the many of which they are already aware. The current legislators might also give some thought as to why the legislators who enabled the board in this manner 47 years ago configured the Chatham County Board of Elections like they did. Just because we are “different” from other election boards doesn’t mean we are worse − it just might mean we are better! Sayings like “don’t throw out the baby with the bathwater” and “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” come to mind. Yes, we are one of Georgia’s only Board of Elections that is elected, but you can look at some of the larger counties with board members who are appointed, and realize they had some pretty big problems. One county recently fired their director, but the reason given was for mistakes in 2017-18. One more saying, if you don’t mind: “Be careful what you wish for.” So. No known cost savings. No accumulated knowledge. No true need, as the last two elections were our biggest ever and very successful. Ability for information-sharing to be done with better communication between boards. At the end of the day, our Elections Board and the Registrars Board wants just one thing: to make sure that every legal voter can vote, and to make that voting experience as problem-free as possible. It ain’t broke. cs Marianne Heimes is a two-term Republican member of the Chatham County Board of Elections.

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

The Chatham County Board of Elections and Board of Registrars are already housed together within the Citizens Service Center. PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON

11


CULTURE

HAIR AND HEIRS

A new Savannah African Art Museum exhibit sheds light on various roles of hair BY BRANDY SIMPKINS

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

brandy@connectsavannah.com

HAIR IS MORE than just a physical indicator of beauty, and a new Savannah African Art Museum exhibition sheds light on what hair means in various African cultures. The new exhibition, ROOTS: HairCulture-History, Exploring the Hair & Cultures of West & Central Africa, will be on display until the end of January 2022, giving Savannahians plenty of time to discover how hair is engaged within different cultures. The exhibit aims to honor and explore the hair, culture, and history of West and Central Africa. “Hair is a frequent topic of conversation amongst all women,” said Lisa Jackson, the SAAM education coordinator. “But, when it comes to hair of women of African descent, conversations have been laced with controversy, be it about Europeanbased society’s views about hair beauty, or about the diverse hair choices Black women are rockin’ today.” To shed light on the functionalities of hair across cultures, the exhibition is broken down into four main categories to include status, gender, initiation, and tools. “What style you’re wearing can determine marital status, societal status, and the people that do your hair have to be sacred to you as well,” Assistant Curator Devon Vander Voort said. “We curated this A display of intricately braided hair on view in the Savannah African Art Museum’s new ‘ROOTS’ exhibit, honoring diverse hair cultures in varied African societies. PHOTO COURTESY OF SAAM


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exhibition because the significance of hair revealed through a mask that was caked and how it’s changed over the centuries with various hair types and textures. doesn’t get talked about enough.” “Here we have an Akam leader mask, Ample sculptures and pictures line and this mask is unique because it has real the walls of the exhibit room displaying hair on it,” Vander Voort said. “This mask different hairstyles on varied figures, all would have been given to people with high signifying their own importance. societal status.” “This is a Dan figure from Liberia, and Stultz added, “The hair is also used as she actually depicts one of a chieftain’s or a way of holding that ancestry, so when a high member of society’s favorite wife,” a leader passes away their hair is put on said Billie Stultz, executive director and this mask and it brings their life into the exhibition curator. “We see her hair has object, and this would be celebrated as a beautiful braided plats facing towards the remembrance of the ancestor or the former front, and they are very ornately braided, leader that passed.” showing her high status as a high woman The SAAM curators have also incorpoin society. It shows her education level as rated some interaction components for well as that she is a married woman.” those who want to look and touch as they Stultz then compares the visit the exhibit. Stultz said Dan figure’s forward-facing that they made a board that plats to similar braids on a was put together with differHimba girl of Namibia. ent types of yarn so people “In the Himba culture, can come and practice that’s young girls’ hairstyles braiding, allowing them to until they get their menexplore and have fun with strual cycle, and that’s when hair. they are initiated into getAlso, the museum ting these Otjize locs. So, if encourages individuals to you look up Himba women, participate in the exhibithey will have these beautition virtually by using the ful Otjize locs with big puffs hashtag “#SAAMHairof hair at the end, and that’s story” to share their own an act of nourishing and hair journeys for others to caring for the hair.” see. With the submissions, The curators expressed they will create an online that hairstyling and its sig- The Akam leader mask. exhibit for viewing and PHOTO BY BRANDY SIMPKINS honoring the hair types and nificance is not exclusive to women, so the ROOTS journeys of all participants. exhibit also sheds light on Due to COVID-19 restricmen and their hairstyles throughout varitions, groups will be limited to five persons ous African cultures, including in the pres- per tour to maintain social-distancing ent day. guidelines, and face masks are required. “In modern-day West Africa, women Tours are offered Wednesday through Satfocus more on traditional African urday during 1-5 p.m., with the last tour hairstyles, where men actually look to the beginning at 4 p.m., and workshops will be Americas for their inspiration on hair. So, presented online. cs this is a barbershop sign in Ghana,” Stultz said as she pointed toward a sign painted The Savannah African Art Museum (201 E. with American celebrities. “They have 37th St., Savannah) is a nonprofit instituhairstyles styled after Tupac, Will Smith, tion devoted to spreading awareness and and Obama – so, very clean and very appreciation of African art and culture. short.” Visit savannahafricanartmuseum.org for The significance of initiation was more details.

13


CULTURE

STAGING FRIGHT

The Savannah Underground is a new immersive drama aiming to wreak havoc on the senses BY ADAM MESSER

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

SAVANNAH’S STORIED HISTORY is world-renowned. Travelers venture here to enjoy seeing the carefully restored homes and cobblestone streets, and think about glorious days of the past. Yet while Savannah is undoubtedly the grand Hostess City of the South, there is more to its story than is visible on its beautiful surface. The city’s dark secrets of its oft-brutal history have been swept clean away to usher in the glamour and gentrification of the city’s modern-day scene, but Savannah’s untold horrors still lie just below its cobblestoned streets – and they are ready to be retold in a new and fascinating light. Making its official debut in March, The Savannah Underground is the city’s only interactive theatrical horror performance bringing several stories of Savannah’s scariest history to life. By welcoming audience members into a 360-degree set, the production becomes a fully immersive haunted experience that fans of the macabre won’t want to miss. According to Kewaan K. Drayton – a co-founder of Red Eye Film Productions, the company that created The Savannah Underground – while the goal of the show is to scare people, they also want to share Savannah’s dark history, and hope audiences leave wanting to learn more. Drayton said The Savannah Underground experience is more than a haunted house, and more than a historical reenactment. Attendees will interact with the actors and experience the story as they progress through the different scenes. By combining historical characters and horror fantasy, Drayton and his acting troupe have created a truly terrifying experience. After staging a few preview shows at The Clyde Venue, The Savannah Underground is gearing up to perform regularly with a grand opening on March 3. While preparing for this premiere, Drayton offered a sneak peek into the production with a Connect Savannah interview. CS: Please explain what The Savannah Underground is, and what attendees can expect. KD: The Savannah Underground is a new immersive experience that allows both locals and tourists to experience and interact with Savannah’s terrifying past. Our team has summed it all up by calling it “One Scary History 14 Lesson.”

Audience members at Savannah Underground shows are encouraged to observe the drama directly alongside the actors who recreate the city’s hidden history. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE SAVANNAH UNDERGROUND

CS: How did you and your team take it from the idea to a fully functional venture? KD: We knew a city as haunted as Savannah needed an experience like this. During quarantine, our writer and director John Taylor Timmons carefully picked three true Savannah-based tales that each bring three different elements of horror into one experience. One of those elements is true crime horror [Alice Riley], another is unnerving and atmospheric [Hag], and the last one is just

plain violent and scary [Demon House]. After the script was developed, we went to work assembling the A-team. Kristen Noel Osborne, our casting director and stage manager, cast the incredible local actors that bring each story to life. We hired the brilliant Elliot Szabo as our technical director, and SCAD students Shelby Lutz as our set designer and Mickey Green as our costume designer. … The beauty of how The Savannah Underground was built was that it was/is constructed, funded, and put on solely by Savannahians. It’s a testament to how determined and creative Savannah locals can be. CS: Please talk about your background. KD: Red Eye Film Productions is a team of filmmakers, thespians, writers, and designers all with one goal: “To Disrupt The Predictable.” … Our company is founded on many values, but number one is originality. Nothing we do is what everyone else does. Enter The Savannah Underground. Another goal of Red Eye Film Productions is to grow with the city of Savannah, and aid in that growth also. CS: Can you share some behind-the-scenes scenarios for the audience? KD: Behind the scenes, we spend a lot of time exploring new ideas on how to enhance the experience by adding more horrifying and interactive elements to the show. We love getting feedback from our team by creating an environment where everyone is free to contribute creatively. At the start of the first week of rehearsals, all of our actors were off book and ready to jump right into it. John Taylor worked with each actor individually to explore how everyone visualized their character, and worked that into his vision. He’s a very collaborative director, and


THEATER

The Savannah Underground performances are based on three haunting tales from the city’s past. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE SAVANNAH UNDERGROUND

movements to scare people. He did lots of animal-movement work when training for his performance, and you can probably guess which animals he used when you see the show. CS: What measures are in place for pandemic safety? KD: To stay safe, we are requiring that audience members wear a mask at all times, while at the same time encouraging social distancing. Realistically, each show can hold up to 50 audience members, but we are capping it at 30 audience members to be extra safe. We are also exploring the option of checking temperatures before entering the venue. CS: When does it launch? Schedule? Cost? Will this be ongoing or temporary? KD: We officially launch on March 3, 2021, and we will hold three shows per day every Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and some Saturdays in March. The tickets are priced at $28.99 plus taxes/service fees. The overall goal is to keep things going, but that depends solely on the success of our March shows. CS: Do you have anything else you would like to add? KD: Yes! We’d like to encourage everyone to subscribe to our website to stay up to date on what we will be doing in the future. We would also like for everyone to follow us on Instagram and Facebook. cs Visit thesavannahunderground.com for venue details, a calendar of performance times, and ticketing.

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CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

rehearses each scene with an open mind, while still keeping on track with how he wants the story to play out. Another interesting behind-thescenes information is that we worked with a company based in Los Angeles to create the creature costumes out of 100% silicone. No hokey creature effects here … these creatures are the real deal. CS: What do you hope people will enjoy from their experience at the interaction? KD: We hope to scare the heck out of each guest, while at the same time giving them a deeper understanding of Savannah’s dark history. We hope each guest leaves googling “Gullah Geechee culture Savannah” and “Alice Riley Wright Square Savannah.” CS: Please pick one or two actors and provide a brief overview of them and the character they play. KD: Madison Rae Abernathy graduated from SCAD School of Performing Arts class of 2020. Along with fellow The Savannah Underground co-actor Patrick Saxon, who won Best Actor, Madison won Best Actress in the Savannah 48 Hour Film Festival. Madison plays Mary in the third and final story, “Demon House,” which tells the story of the only confirmed exorcism to happen in Savannah, Georgia. … In order to exorcise the demon who possesses her, prepare to interact in the experience. Khalief Kelly is a Savannah native who portrays the Hag in The Savannah Underground. His favorite part of playing the Hag is being able to use his body

15


MEET NICOLE ZURAITIS

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

The winner of 2021’s American Traditions Vocal Competition can’t wait to return to Savannah


LEFT: The 2021 American Traditions Vocal Competition Gold Medal winner, Nicole Zuraitis. PHOTO BY

HOLY SMOKE PHOTOGRAPHY

RIGHT: Nicole Zuraitis and her husband Dan Pugach at the 2019 Grammy Awards. PHOTO COURTESY OF NICOLE ZURAITIS

BY NICK ROBERTSON

NEW YORK-BASED jazz singer and pianist Nicole Zuraitis was riding a sonic boom of momentum – already a frequent performer at Manhattan’s legendary Birdland and Blue Note clubs, she and her drummer husband Dan Pugach were nominated for a Grammy Award in 2019, all while her songwriting muse was reaching a crescendo. Then came the COVID-19 pandemic, and the world went topsyturvy, especially for up-and-coming musicians who rely on performing concerts to earn a living. As her usual venues were forced to shut down, Zuraitis decided with Pugach to turn the entire online world into their own little cabaret, launching the “Virtual Piano Lounge” featuring live performances streamed through state-of-the-art equipment every Friday night, soon earning an international audience and a mention in Forbes Magazine for their creative ingenuity. Now Zuraitis credits her regular online performances as a major factor behind her Feb. 19 Gold Medal victory in this year’s American Traditions Vocal Competition, the Savannah-based contest for talented singers to celebrate and preserve all styles of classic American music. Along with the recognition, Zuraitis also won a $12,000 cash prize and the opportunity to perform with the Savannah Philharmonic at a future concert in the Hostess City. “I’m very used to singing to nobody. I don’t find it awkward to sing to a camera,” Zuraitis told Connect Savannah soon after her ATC triumph, explaining that her Virtual Piano Lounge performances provided ideal practice for this year’s vocal competition, which had to be carried out virtually as a pandemic precaution. “The transition to performing virtually was very difficult, [but] I just imagined I was singing in front of

people. … It must’ve been really tough for some people, so I was lucky that I’m used to singing to nobody.” This was not Zuraitis’ first time as an ATC competitor − in 2015 she traveled to Savannah to participate in the contest in all its in-person glory, garnering both the Johnny Mercer and People’s Choice awards that year. She looks back on her time in Savannah fondly, where she delighted in the city’s beauty, the familial spirit of the ATC organization, and the warm hospitality provided by her local hosts, Connie and Bert Stagg. “I really have always been amazed by the people of the American Traditions Competition,” Zuraitis said, adding that she finds the contestants are united by a spirit of creative collaboration. “From 2015 I still have friends that I work with.” Zuraitis says that although this year’s contest was dramatically different from her 2015 experience due to its remote nature, the competition’s familiar spirit endured thanks to the ATC leadership, especially from the organization’s Artistic Director Mikki Sodergren, who was the 2014 Gold Medal winner. “Mikki in particular was very welcoming and kind,” Zuraitis said, recalling the many Zoom meetings that Sodergren hosted with all 28 contestants in this year’s competition. “The familial aspect of the competition is one of the biggest draws.” Grammy-winning jazzman Kurt Elling served as a judge this year, further prompting Zuraitis to perform at peak level. “I’m a huge fan,” Zuraitis said of Elling, whom she had previously met in passing during a Birdland show. “I knew that I had to really hone in my jazz choices for the competition.” While progressing through the quarterfinal and semifinal rounds, Zuraitis impressed all of the judges with her full-bodied rendition of Nina Simone’s “Do I Move You” and a performance of her own composition, “The Coffee Song” – something of a beverage-themed cousin to her retro-tinged single “Long Meadow Vine (The Wine Song).” In the end, Zuraitis’ 2021 selections and singing earned her both the Gold Medal and the ATC’s coveted Ben Tucker Jazz Award. In addition to thanking her sponsors in the 2021 competition, Kellee and Don Hasleton, Zuraitis was quick to contact her previous host family in Savannah after getting the good news. “When I won on Friday [Feb. 19], I called my host family from 2015,” Zuraitis said. “Bert died in April, so it was the most bittersweet moment, because my time in Savannah, so much of it was spent with Connie and Bert.” Now Zuraitis is eagerly looking forward to returning to Savannah in the not-too-distant future for her upcoming concert with the Savannah Philharmonic. According to SavPhil Music and Artistic Director Keitaro Harada, plans are already being discussed for the joint performance, even if a specific concert date cannot yet be determined while the pandemic continues to preclude most live shows. “She is just multitalented, with a very beautiful voice,” Harada said of Zuraitis, adding that he will be happy to cater the concert to her vocal strengths. “We’ll program something that is her forte. … This collaboration with ATC is one that is very strong.” As for Zuraitis, she is honored to have the opportunity to perform with Harada and his orchestra. “I would love to do some of my original music with the orchestra,” Zuraitis said, while adding that she’s extremely flexible to accommodate the SavPhil ensemble. “Whatever they want, I’m down.” In the meantime, Zuraitis and Pugach are hard at work on three new albums of original music, investing much of the $12,000 ATC prize into their production. “The prize money is going to go to good work, and more American music,” Zuraitis said. cs

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

MUSIC

Check out nicolezmusic.com to learn more about Nicole Zuraitis, see americantraditionscompetition.com for details about the American Traditions Vocal Competition, and visit savannahphilharmonic.org for 17 information about the Savannah Philharmonic.


FOOD & DRINK BY NOELLE WIEHE noelle@connectsavannah.com

Bringing back the pre-pandemic spirit

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

After earning national recognition, Savannah’s Ghost Coast Distillery looks to celebrate the future

Drinks made with Ghost Coast spirits in the distillery’s Cocktail Room. PHOTO COURTESY OF GHOST COAST

AFTER A DIFFICULT year, 2021 is materializing auspiciously for Savannah’s Ghost Coast Distillery. In January, Ghost Coast was ranked as one of the U.S.A.’s top 25 distilleries, according to a list generated by Yelp.com for Travel + Leisure magazine. Now Ghost Coast is welcoming guests to its recently refurbished onsite Cocktail Room for an ongoing series of fun events featuring live music, diverse cuisine offered by food trucks and other vendors, and, of course, delicious drinks made with their spirits produced just steps away from the bar. While operating the city’s first and only local spirits distillery since Prohibition, Ghost Coast management is celebrating their fourth year of business, especially after experiencing the thrill of being ranked 20th in the Travel + Leisure list. “People are liking what we’re doing,” said Ghost Coast Distillery General Manager and co-founder Chris Sywassink. “We like to think we’re doing something right.” In recent months the distillery renovated their Cocktail Room, allowing more natural light into the space while cultivating socially distanced seating. The facility also added a stage as part of their effort toward becoming more of a venue and less of a bar, according to Ghost Coast Marketing Manager Kelcie Beausir. “Fundamentally, we’ve changed everything that we could possibly do in here,” Sywassink said. “It’s a completely different setup now.” During the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, the distillery was forced to discontinue their tours and stop screening movies in their onsite theater. To support the community’s coronavirus response, Ghost Coast utilized the facility’s alcohol-making capabilities to produce their own line of Daisy Maze Hand Sanitizer. However, now that the pandemic is showing signs of subsiding, Ghost Coast is again hosting events with coronavirussafety measures in place. In addition to their popular Saturday concerts, visitors can enjoy live music performed on the new stage on Fridays and Sundays. “Now that we have a stage, the possibilities are endless,” Beausir said. “Our space is a lot more accommodating for music now. So, we want to be more associated as a venue in town, and not just a bar or a cocktail room, because it really is the perfect space.” During March, Ghost Coast boasts a lineup of talented local musicians playing afternoon and evening concerts in


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Rollercoaster of Rhythm TOP AND ABOVE: Scenes of high-spirited times in Ghost Coast’s Cocktail Room. PHOTOS COURTESY OF GHOST COAST

We want it to be something that everyone can attend and feel super safe with it, and we don’t want to do it [with] limited capacity. So, we’re going to keep postponing it until we’re able to safely have it.” Ghost Coast Distillery opened in 2017 after Sywassink and his business partner, Rob Ingersoll, casually discussed the idea for launching a distillery like in a scene from a movie, which then fermented into a business plan. At the time their experience was limited to simply having consumed spirits, Sywassink admits, but they sought distillation degrees through Moonshine University and learned everything they’d

March 11 7:30 pm $50 The Metal Building at The Kehoe Iron Works

SavPhil Percussion Ensemble Come early or stay late to enjoy a cocktail at the bar for this one-hour, no intermission concert.

For tickets visit savannahphilharmonic.org MUSIC DIRECTOR SPONSOR Charles C. Taylor & Samir Nikocevic Charitable Foundation

SAVANNAH PHILHARMONIC

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

the Cocktail Room. On Saturday, March 6, Jacob Evans plays guitar while singing poetic lyrics, and then on Saturday, March 13, the rocking siblings of DRAUCKER play while the Loki Food Truck serves North African and Israeli cuisine, like pitas and Za’atar Fries with harissa ketchup and toum garlic sauce. The following weekend, Ghost Coast welcomes Moss City Groove to perform cool covers on Friday, March 19, before Ben Keiser plays the Cocktail Room with Big E on Saturday, March 20 – and that same afternoon, guests can feast on savory tacos prepared fresh onsite by South of Heaven BBQ. But it’s not always about partying at Ghost Coast. Spearheaded by Beausir, the distillery’s Puppy Time Yoga sessions are back on, with the next canine-enhanced vinyasa class occurring on March 27. Beausir added that Ghost Coast may even start hosting goat-yoga sessions, should there be enough interest. When it is safe to do so, a grand celebration will mark the distillery’s fourth birthday later in 2021, with the event set to feature more live music, food, and drinks, Sywassink said. The distillery also plans to host the Master Bourbon Music Festival, an event originally planned for April of 2020 as the release party for their flagship spirit, Master Straight Bourbon Whiskey. The festival has been postponed to this summer or fall, with a concrete date expected to be announced in the near future, according to Beausir. “That event is going to be huge,” Beausir said. “We definitely don’t want to sacrifice any aspects that we worked so hard to plan.

19


FEATURE

The freshly refurbished Cocktail Room. PHOTO COURTESY OF GHOST COAST

Barrels of Ghost Coast spirits within the distillery. PHOTO COURTESY OF GHOST COAST

need to know about brewing up a distillery. Through the university, the duo met other people interested in the same dream, and a network of distillers was forever bonded. Sywassink said he even appeared on the “Still Talking Podcast” with fellow classmates on Feb. 18. “It’s how the fraternity kind of works – once you go through that, you develop friendships that last forever,” Sywassink said. “That’s one of the fun things about this industry: the competition isn’t against

doesn’t want a beer, per se, they send them down here to get a spirit,” Sywassink said. Going forward, Ghost Coast aims to keep helping surrounding businesses and the community return to normalcy in terms of enjoying life outside of home. Sywassink said he’s looking forward to getting back to a new normal and operating the way they did before the pandemic, while staying as safe as possible. “Now we’re looking for excitement going into 2021, because as we all start

each other, it’s against ourselves to make the best product that the consumer would want.” Beausir and Sywassink echoed sentiments of not trying to compete with their fellow locally owned business down the road, Service Brewing Company. “We can’t be everything to everybody – not everybody likes to drink spirits – so, if someone is looking for a good beer, we send them down the street [to Service Brewing Company], and likewise, if someone

BEST OF SAVANNAH

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

• 2014 •

20

to get vaccinated, we all keep wearing masks, we all wash [our] hands, we do the smart things to get us through this, we are excited to think that that restaurant and bar scene is going to start to come back because we’re all getting to a better place,” Sywassink said. “We’re all dying to get out and just go.” cs Ghost Coast Distillery: 641 Indian St., Savannah. Visit ghostcoastdistillery.com for more details.

2019


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JASON BIBLE @ THE WORMHOLE

Savannah-based musician and songwriter Jason Bible keeps his fans wanting more after releasing his second solo album, Anatta, in October. With his more recent songs having a solid rock sound tinged with folk influences, Bible is exploring issues of addiction that follow up on the theme of his previous post-Train Wrecks album, Anicca. Get your next fix of Bible tunes live at this Wormhole performance. SATURDAY, MARCH 6 | 10 P.M.

LA REUNION NORTEÑA @ COPACABANAS

MUSCADINE BLOODLINE @ VICTORY NORTH

Hailing from Mobile, Alabama, vocalist Charlie Muncaster and guitarist Gary Stanton joined forces to start Muscadine Bloodline in 2016. Since then, the duo is making waves across the countrymusic world with a sound that blends the irreverence of early Southern rockers and the passion of ’90s country love songs. They’ll be stopping in Savannah for an acoustic concert held with limited capacity at Victory North. THURSDAY, MARCH 4 | 8 P.M.

SELDOM SOBER @ PEREGRIN

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

As one of America’s leading bands in the genre of norteño – the regional music from Northern Mexico, made distinctive by its rich sounds of accordion and bajo sexto guitar – La Renuion Norteña from Chihuahua keeps it real by playing traditional corridos, rancheras, polkas, and ballads devoid of the modern pop elements often added by other norteño groups. Join the fiesta in Garden City this weekend. SATURDAY, MARCH 6 | 8 P.M.

It’s beginning to look a lot like St. Patrick’s Day everywhere you go in Savannah, and to get the ceili started, Seldom Sober will be playing Irish tunes with Carroll Brown amid the panoramic views surrounding the rooftop Peregrin bar that crowns the Perry Lane Hotel. Enjoy this open-air event hosted by the Savannah St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee, with social-distancing guidelines in place for pandemic safety. 21 FRIDAY, MARCH 5 | 7:30 P.M.


MUSIC

FEATURE

SOUNDGARDEN EVENTS

FRI., MAR. 5 @7PM THE LOVE HANDLES

SAT., MAR. 6 @7PM

TRIBUTE: A CELEBRATION OF THE ALLMAN BROS BAND

SUN., MAR. 7 @2PM

A CELEBRATION OF THE LIFE OF TERRY HALL

Whaleboat charts a course to post-pandemic concerts Savannah band headlines a three-act outdoor show at The Rail Pub on March 4

The members of Whaleboat are ready to make waves with a return to live performances. PHOTO COURTESY OF WHALEBOAT

BY LAUREN WOLVERTON lauren@connectsavannah.com

FEATURING

BUCKY AND BARRY HIGH VELOCITY THOMAS CLAXTON AND MANY MORE

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

MAR., 13, @7PM MAR., 14, @4PM

22

DEPARTURE

JOURNEY TRIBUTE BAND

TICKETS AVAILABLE ON EVENTBRITE

3016 E. VICTORY DR.

912.352.2933 • COACHS.NET

DOWNLOAD OUR APP!

WHILE BANDS and live-music venues across the country are still struggling to stay afloat amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Savannah’s own Whaleboat is charting a course toward bringing back in-person concerts, headlining a three-act outdoor show happening at The Rail Pub on March 4. “Savannah’s blowing up, the way that it’s changing daily,” said Whaleboat drummer Sean Moloney. “The sooner things open up, the sooner these vaccines get out, we can really go and do a lot of shows, do local festivals, and bring some more bands along with us.” Whaleboat is testing the waters with The Rail Pub’s March 4 show, also featuring the indie-rockers of Chipper Bones and Macon-based band Choir of Babble. Why should Savannahians go to the concert on Thursday? The answer is simple, according to Whaleboat: it’s fun, and it’s free. “The more people who are having fun, and dancing, and tapping their toes, the better. That’s the whole point,” Moloney said. “I want people to leave thinking ‘that was so fun, let’s keep supporting local bands.’” Along with Moloney, Whaleboat’s lead singer and bassist Brent Collins and guitarist Blake Yokeley comprise an

increasingly popular rock trio performing in Savannah and beyond since 2014. Like most bands, Whaleboat has had their routine flipped upside down due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, they’ve taken the last year to record new music, perfect their act, and lead the way in making sure live music is never lost in Savannah. After performing a few virtual shows, Whaleboat is now focusing on bringing live concerts back by performing outdoors. “I would hate if the pandemic killed whatever local scene is in this town,” Collins said. “The more we can play the better, we just have to do it safely.” Collins says The Rail Pub has been extremely supportive of local music, and recent shows have been a huge success. Whaleboat is using that success as fuel to work hard and remain hopeful for the future. Collins says that local music will keep thriving as more venues open up outdoor spaces. “All of these touring bands have been sitting at home for a year,” Collins said. “They’re itching to get out there and play.” Collins hopes that when larger bands start coming to town, Whaleboat and other local acts will get a chance to open. “We won’t be worried about being prepared,” Yokeley said. “We’ll be ready.” In the meantime, Whaleboat says they will continue to play shows at The Rail

Pub. Yokeley says the show will feature a new projected-video element. “It’s an experience,” Yokeley said. “Not many people are trying to do that in Savannah. It’s a really good time.” Other new things from Whaleboat include two singles that are set to drop in late March or early April. One called “Waiting” is a reflection of the recent uncertainty felt across the country. “When you’re going through something like last year, and you don’t know what’s going to happen, you don’t know if the world is ending, you’re just waiting.” Collins said. “You’re waiting for a chance to be normal again, waiting for that chance to be together again. It’s very emotional for me. These guys brought the music and something happened that’s really special.” Overall, Whaleboat says they’re excited to keep working on new material and are extremely hopeful for the future of live music in Savannah. “It’s going to take a lot of creativity and patience,” Moloney said. “I love doing what we’re doing, and people seem to like it. It can only grow from here.” cs Whaleboat | Chipper Bones | Choir of Babble: Thursday, March 4, 6 p.m.; The Rail Pub, 405 W. Congress St., Savannah – visit therailpub. com for more concert info, and see whaleboatband.com to learn about Whaleboat.


CONNECT SAVANNAH MUSIC

3-9

SOUNDBOARD

WHO IS PLAYING WHERE THIS WEEK

SOUNDBOARD IS A FREE SERVICE. TO BE INCLUDED, PLEASE SEND YOUR LIVE MUSIC INFORMATION WEEKLY TO SOUNDBOARD@CONNECTSAVANNAH.COM. DEADLINE IS 10 A.M. MONDAY, TO APPEAR IN WEDNESDAY’S EDITION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT OR CUT LISTINGS DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS.

LIVE MUSIC

Driftaway Cafe Chuck Courtenay, 6 p.m. Nickie’s 1971 Ray Tomasino, 7 p.m. Oak 36 CC Witt, 7 p.m. The Wormhole Open Jam, 9 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

El-Rocko Lounge Trivia, 9 p.m. Service Brewing Trivia Night with Jess Shaw, 6:30 p.m.

KARAOKE

Wet Willie’s Karaoke, 9 p.m.

COMEDY

Totally Awesome Bar Savannah Comedy Underground, 9 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

B & D Burgers Harry Potter Trivia at B&D, 7 p.m. Bar Food Trivia Night, 8 p.m. McDonough’s Family Feud, 7 p.m.

KARAOKE

Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. Nickie’s 1971 Karaoke, 8 p.m. The Wormhole Karaoke, 9 p.m.

COMEDY

Totally Awesome Bar Open Mic Comedy, 8:30 p.m.

DJ

Club 51 Degrees DJ B-Rad, 9 p.m. Top Deck Sunset Deck Party, 6 p.m. VICE Lounge Latin Night, 9 p.m.

THURSDAY 3.4

FRIDAY 3.5

Cohen’s Retreat Munchies & Music, 5 p.m. Oak 36 Sarah Poole, 7 p.m. Victory North Muscadine Bloodline, 9 p.m.

Barrelhouse South Underground Springhouse, 9:15 p.m., Whiskey Run, 9:15 p.m. Churchill’s Chip Staley, Hitman Blues Band, 6 & 9:30 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Coach’s Corner The Love Handles, 7 p.m. Jazz’d Tapas Bar Whiskey and Wine, 7:30 p.m. Molly McGuire’s JD Music Group, 6 p.m. Rancho Alegre JodyJazz Trio, 6:30 p.m. River House Stan Ray, 6 p.m. Service Brewing Company Swamptooth, 6 p.m. The Shrimp Factory Thomas Claxton, 6 p.m. The Wormhole Magnetic Bass: Reconnect, 9 p.m. The Warehouse At Sundown, 8 p.m. Wild Wing Cafe Eric Clark, 7 p.m. Wild Wing Cafe (Pooler) Clear Daze, 9 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

PS Tavern Beer Pong, 10 p.m.

KARAOKE

Bay Street Blues Karaoke, 8 p.m. Nickie’s 1971 Karaoke, 9 p.m. Totally Awesome Bar Karaoke, 10 p.m.

DJ

Club 51 Degrees DJ Fer, DJ Emalo, DJ Lil G, DJ BRad, 9 p.m. VICE Lounge DJ Primal, 9 p.m.

BAR & CLUB EVENTS Club One Drag Show, 10:30 p.m. & 12:30 a.m.

SATURDAY 3.6 LIVE MUSIC

The 5 Spot Eric Daubert, 7 p.m. Barrelhouse South Whiskey Run, 9:15 p.m. Churchill’s Pub The Mandrakes, At Sundown, 6 & 9:30 p.m. Coach’s Corner A Celebration of the Allman Brothers’ Band, 7 p.m. The Firms The Firms Grand Opening, 7:30 p.m. Ghost Coast Jacob Evans, 4 p.m. Jazz’d Tapas Bar Josephine Johnson, 7:30 p.m. Oak 36 Jarrod White, 7 p.m. The Wormhole Jason Bible, 10 p.m. The Warehouse Hitman Blues Band, 8 p.m.

Wild Wing Cafe Jason Courtenay, Free Spirits, 1 & 7 p.m. Wild Wing Cafe (Pooler) Brian Conley, 9 p.m.

KARAOKE

Bay Street Blues Karaoke, 8 p.m. Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. McDonough’s Karaoke, 9 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

BAR & CLUB EVENTS Elan Savannah Glow Party: Horror UV, 8 p.m.

SUNDAY 3.7 LIVE MUSIC

Collins Quarter at Forsyth Ember City, 2 p.m. Congress Street Social Club VooDoo Soup, 10 p.m. Nickie’s 1971 Roy Swindell, 7 p.m. Oak 36 Jason Courtenay, noon Tubby’s (Thunderbolt) Bucky & Barry, 1 p.m. The Warehouse Jason Bible, 6:30 p.m. Wild Wing Cafe Bill Hodgson, 1 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

Moon River Trivia, 6 p.m.

VOTE “Best Lawyer” “Best Law Firm” “Best Commercial”

Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. McDonough’s Karaoke, 9 p.m.

MONDAY 3.8 Nickie’s 1971 Ray Tomasino, 7 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

Club One Super Gay Bingo, 5:30 p.m.

BAR & CLUB EVENTS Fia Rua Irish Pub Family Movie Night, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY 3.9 LIVE MUSIC

Nickie’s 1971 Roy Swindell, 7 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

Basil’s Trivia, 7 p.m. McDonough’s Trivia, 7 p.m. Oak 36 Trivia Tuesday, 9 p.m. Savannah Taphouse Trivia, 7 p.m. Starland Yard Trivia, 6:30 p.m.

KARAOKE

Blueberry Hill Karaoke, 9 p.m. Wet Willie’s Karaoke, 9 p.m.

MIKE HOSTILO LAW FIRM

“Best Lawyer” “Best Law Firm” “Best Commercial”

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

WEDNESDAY 3.3

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CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

CULTURE

EXPLORE THE COSMIC VOID

Emily Furr’s ‘Star Tap’ exhibition probes the nature of control BY NICOLE YOUNGBLUT

EMILY FURR’S NEW solo exhibit at the SCAD Museum of Art challenges our perception of the world, the capitalist society we live in, and incongruences within our universe and nature. Star Tap calls attention to the cosmic void played out in soci24 ety and life through a postmodern lens and

dystopian trip of her works from the last three years, most of them made in 2020. “My work shows two opposing forces: man’s need to dominate his environment, and the life force fueling nature. By showing these two forces together, I’m illustrating how incongruent they are. The machines feel very static and dead, while the starry skies feel alive. Sometimes the machines have tongues or orifices to show ulterior motives,” Furr says of the imagery

on display in her Star Tap exhibit, on view through May 9. When you first walk into Furr’s display space at SCAD – where she studied graphic design, earning her B.F.A. in 2000 – to the right you see tongues with hallucinogenic tablets, which overtly transport the viewer to the psychedelic era’s style of imagery ripped out of magazines from the ’60s and ’70s. In Furr’s “Acid Tongue Series 2020” works on paper, all seven collages

seemingly evoke the rock ’n’ roll energy of Mick Jagger and the iconic Rolling Stones tongue, screaming out “I’m so great, I’m going to lick you.” Furr highlights the sleazy, drug-laden ads to portray the deeper ploy of the marketer: to lure, seduce, or even manipulate the viewer. Brooklyn-based Furr is presenting her first solo exhibit as part of SCAD’s 2021 deFINE ART program highlighting diverse global artists. Represented by Sargent’s


VISUAL ARTS

The paintings by Emily Furr in her ‘Star Tap’ exhibit at the SCAD Museum of Art explore cosmic relationships between humanity and nature, with a psychedelic edge reminiscent of magazine imagery from the ’60s and ’70s. PHOTOS COURTESY

Daughters New York and initially selftaught in oil painting, she makes portrait art at night inspired by the industrial revolution, World War II, 1920s-1930s-style factory conveyor belts, and capitalism. Her work has been featured in the Hyperallergic art forum as well as Artnet. Star Tap features nods to phallic eroticism, war, pollution, and their adverse connections in our society. “It has been a dream come true to exhibit here at the SCAD Museum. Savannah is such a cool town, and I learned so much during my time here, which I still use in my work,” Furr said. Walk directly straight back into the gallery to find a custom-created wallpaper backdrop paying homage to Furr’s graphicdesign work from her time at SCAD. “Clear Cut Shot” hangs in contrast on this wall, showcasing a missile encapsulated by crystal or ice. The projectile appears as if it is being stopped by the artist herself, or perhaps by nature, highlighting the artist’s narrative of the ridiculousness of brutality and war-torn energy when it equals nothing but destruction. “We need to be in harmony with what’s around us, rather than trying to be so brutal and dominate with everything,” explains Furr. Somewhere far away in the cosmos, the show’s theme depicts an incongruence within nature. Furr’s work sometimes conveys the vastness of the universe alongside industrial objects, like the mechanism that funnels the cosmos in “Thirst Trap” or a faucet to regulate the stars in “Star Tap.” Furr is conveying a more decadent narrative than perceived by the naked eye, expressing that, if given the chance, capitalists would manipulate even the stars. Furr points to a larger issue of a cosmic void in our everyday life and our capitalist society as a whole. “In the painting ‘Thirst Trap,’ I’m mechanizing the universe and funneling

it. On the left of the painting is a pinball plunger with a planet serving as the pinball, and it’s about travel through a nonsensical machine maze ending up in a grinder. It’s an example of how man has a need to control the uncontrollable, and it usually doesn’t work out well,” Furr said. “Thirst Trap” is atypical to Furr’s precise smaller-scale paintings. During a Feb. 23 deFINE ART artist talk at SCAD, Furr explained that her smaller works force the viewer to interact more by moving closer to view each piece. In “Thirst Trap” Furr depicts a planet ground down into a tongue − modeled after her own lapper − symbolizing the destruction inflicted by humans “and our need to take control of nature and the cosmos, and break it down into nothing,” Furr said, presenting a metaphor for pollution.  “I think it’s also to show we shouldn’t be using brutality and domination as a means to control. We need to be more in harmony with nature and the cosmos. And each other,” explains Furr. cs Emily Furr’s Star Tap is on view at the SCAD Museum of Art through Sunday, May 9. Visit scad.edu/calendar/exhibitions to learn more.

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

OF THE SCAD MUSEUM OF ART

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CULTURE

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

SLAM ON

A creative community reunites for the thirdannual Savannah Local Artist Market BY CLAIRE MCMILLAN

THE SAVANNAH LOCAL Artist Market – aka SLAM – will return on March 6 for a third year to spotlight works by over 60 area visionaries, encompassing everything from paintings, prints, and jewelry to sculptures, woodwork, textiles, and ceramics. 26 SLAM Founder Charles Ellis says that

along with the artworks, live music, and food trucks, the market will display “a broad range of highly talented people.” Blues guitarist Peter Schmid and Savannah’s Crabettes will be performing, while food vendors include Molly’s Fish & Chips and Jenni’s Ice Cream. In 2019, Ellis consulted with community art leaders who agreed that Savannah needed more art markets, and thus SLAM was born. This year over 20 new artists are slated to present, but in light of the pandemic, coronavirus safety precautions will be in place with social distancing, required use of face masks, and plenty of hand sanitizer. Unlike many art markets, SLAM supports its participants by not charging a sales commission. “I’m a Slammete,” painter Peggy Aughtry proudly shared. “When I started in 2019, it was my very first show and the experience was amazing. There were so many people that came ... and Charlie was so helpful and encouraging,” A fan of oil pastels and abstract art, Aughtry developed “Setting Boundaries,” a therapeutic and emotional portrait series. “There’s people I only see once a year at

Savannah’s SLAM event presents a colorful variety of locally produced artworks amid a lighthearted scene of creative collaboration. PHOTOS COURTESY OF SLAM

SLAM, so it’s really nice to be all together in the art community,” Aughtry said. For anyone looking to fill their home with whimsical conversation pieces, Shawn Turner’s work is a must-see. His creations are all hand-sewn and made

with leftover fabric from high-end design studios. “I really want to see how far I can push blending and collaging fabric,” Turner said. His collection incorporates detailed horses, mice, bunnies, pigs, and – his


VISUAL ARTS

ABOVE: Artist Darlene Cook at her booth with SLAM Founder Charles Ellis. RIGHT: Leaf-imprinted textile art produced by Stella Ranae Von Schmid, a regular SLAM participant. PHOTOS COURTESY OF SLAM

ON VIEW NOW TELFAIR.ORG

“We are going to have a large sheet of plywood up, and everybody can go over and paint their own masterpiece on it,” Ellis said. “The ultimate goal is for everybody to have a good time.” cs The Savannah Local Artist Market will be happening at The Salvation Army Community Center (3000 Bee Rd., Savannah) during 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. on March 6. Visit facebook. com/savannahlocalartistmarket to find more event information.

LEFT: Pablo Picasso, Scene design for Pulcinella, ca. 1920; watercolor and gouache on paper; collection of the McNay Art Museum, gift of The Tobin Endowment; © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. RIGHT: Alexandra Exter, Lighting design for an unknown production of a tragedy, 1928; gouache, graphite, and ink on paper; collection of the McNay Art Museum, gift of The Tobin Endowment.

Picasso to Hockney: Modern Art on Stage is organized by the McNay Art Museum. INVESTMENT PROVIDED BY

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

personal favorite – birds. Aiming to produce zero waste, Turner even utilizes scraps and threads for bird nests. The intricacy of his work can be fully appreciated at SLAM. “When you get to see things in person, it’s a whole different textile sensation,” Turner explained. Savannah native Jim Cone enjoys working with oils, acrylics, wood, glass, and just about anything else that catches his eye. “I clean up the environment and repurpose it into art,” Cone said. A Picasso aficionado, he described his process as “an orchestra of movement that evolves into a concert of art.” His popular series “Street People” focuses attention on the homeless, presenting them as individuals. Stella Ranae Von Schmid, a botanical and fiber artist, believes that making a connection with customers in person adds more meaning to the art. “This past year has been more isolating than normal. So, it’s actually a joy to see someone walk away with [my work]. I miss that connection,” Von Schmid said. Known for mesmerizing silk scarves, kimonos, and bandanas imprinted with leaves and flowers, eco-dyeing felt like a natural progression in her pursuit toward a sustainable lifestyle. “This is the ultimate Savannah souvenir. You are taking a piece of Savannah with you.” Even shoppers can get involved by participating in the Community Canvas.

27


JONESIN’ CROSSWORD BY MATT JONES ©2021

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CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

ACROSS

28

1 Harry’s partner in crime in “Home Alone” 5 Draw forth 10 Fledgling’s home 14 “Scratch a lover and find ___”: Dorothy Parker 15 Ephron and Dunn, for two 16 Italian city known for sparkling wines 17 “The Avengers” star Diana 18 Bed covering 19 Sandcastle shaper 20 Late-night monster movie, maybe 23 Existential boredom 24 Institute in “Contact” and “The X-Files” 25 Throw out 28 Deadly snakes 32 Dollar divs. 35 Paparazzi subject 37 Lake source of the Niagara River 38 Reason for a dashboard warning light 42 Idaho’s neighbor 43 “Okay, so I was wrong” 44 Cartoonist Rall 45 Nursery rhyme loser of sheep 48 Poopdeck ___ (Popeye’s dad) 50 Tournament exemptions 52 Fish wrap spread 55 Places designated for biking, camping, etc. 61 Cooking acronym 62 Barbera’s animation

partner 63 “The Joy of Cooking” author Rombauer 64 “Oh, drat” 65 Prodded, with “on” 66 Barbecue leftovers? 67 Dark gemstone 68 “___ lift?” 69 Prince hit of 1986

DOWN

1 Soft Cell lead singer Almond 2 Glowing 3 Seth of “Future Man” 4 Aquafaba users, e.g. 5 Controversial “National” tabloid that had a TV show in 1999 6 Gloomy 7 Michael of “Ugly Betty” or Brendon of Panic! at the Disco 8 ___ liver (butcher shop option) 9 Appreciation 10 Afternoon breaks of a sort 11 Genesis twin 12 Recipe directive 13 Do some floor work 21 “Stanley ___: Searching for Italy” 22 ___ standstill 26 Hoppy drinks 27 Energize 29 Aftershave brand 30 Ending for million or billion 31 Bit of bird food 32 Multi-level sandwich 33 Group that got the

geography of Africa wrong 34 Trade 36 California’s La ___ Tar Pits 39 Where hip-hop originated 40 Savory turnover 41 Antique photo tone 46 Pupil’s place 47 Female fowl that doesn’t have that ornate tail 49 His skull is held in “Hamlet” 51 Play place? 53 Poet Jones (aka Amiri Baraka) 54 Feet for poets 55 Overhaul 56 Longtime Indiana senator Bayh 57 Booker in the Senate 58 “Natural Affection” playwright William 59 Linear, for short 60 Insolence

CROSSWORD ANSWERS


tree-fifty tuesdays

all beers, jameson, tito's, RBV's: $3.50

Friday, Saturday and Sunday

$3 Glaes of Rosé still or sparkling.

wednesday Half off Boles of Wine

thursdays & Sunday Live dj | 6-9 pm Drink specials

125 West River Street On top of the cotton sail hotel SUNDAY THRU THURSDAY NOON TO 10 PM* FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NOON TO MIDNIGHT*

www.topdeckbar.com *CLOSING HOURS SUBJECT TO CHANGE


Photos by Bunny Ware

PHOTOS FROM LOCAL EVENTS View more photos online at connectsavannah.com/connected

AMERICAN LEGION HOSTS 1ST DISTRICT ORATORICAL CONTEST

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

Students from around Coastal Georgia participate in February’s American Legion Oratorical Contest at American Legion Post 135 on Bull Street. The competition is held to help high-school students develop deeper knowledge and appreciation for the U.S. Constitution. Contest winners are granted scholarships.

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Photos by Robin Leske

PHOTOS FROM LOCAL EVENTS View more photos online at connectsavannah.com/connected

CHILI COOKOFF BOOSTS CHATHAM COUNTY UNITY

CONNECT SAVANNAH | MAR 3 - MAR 9, 2021

Chatham Unity in the Community holds their first Chili Cookoff for Savannah and Chatham County court-appointed special advocates and The Front Porch at Coastal Empire Brewery on Feb. 20. Judges taste-tested several different chilis, and the winner was determined based on their votes.

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Johnny Ganem - Savannah, GA

HEARTFELT CARE YOU CANNOT BEAT.

As an avid walker and jogger, Johnny Ganem knew something was wrong when he started to get winded faster than normal. With his family history of coronary disease, he knew it was best to go to the St. Joseph’s/Candler emergency room. It was determined a procedure was needed, and fast. The Cardiac Cath team at The Heart Hospital at St. Joseph’s Hospital worked with Dr. Flood on a complex procedure to put in two stents through his wrist to open the blockage. After the procedure, Johnny was up and walking in less than 24 hours. Through smart diagnostics and quick action from Dr. Flood and the team at St. Joseph’s/Candler, Johnny was back on his feet in no time.

THAT’S WHY I CHOOSE ST. JOSEPH’S/CANDLER Roy Flood, M.D. - Cardiologist

SJCHS.ORG

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