__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CONNECT SAVANNAH

connectsavannah.com JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2021

Black, White,

& The

Grey

The new book by Mashama Bailey & John O. Morisano

The Bank That That SERVICE Built® The Bank SERVICE Built® Member FDIC. © 2021 United Community Bank Community | ucbi.comBank | ucbi.com Member FDIC. © 2021 United

SAVANNAH SAVANNAH 27 Bull Street | 912-234-6565 27 Bull Street | 912-234-6565 8201 White Bluff RoadBluff | 912-232-5884 8201 White Road | 912-232-5884 2225 East 2225 Victory Drive | 912-303-9667 East Victory Drive | 912-303-9667


Georgia Locations: 5 E. Perry Street, Savannah, GA 31401 2 Skidaway Village Walk, Ste A, Savannah,GA 31411

South Carolina Locations: 701 Bay Street, Beaufort, SC 29902 2 Harbor Drive, Harbor Island, SC 29920

www.baystreetrealtygroup.com


IT’S FREE FAMILY WEEKEND! JANUARY 29–31 | JEPSON CENTER

PULSE FESTIVAL 1.27–1.31 | VISIT TELFAIR.ORG/PULSE2021

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER FOR VIRTUAL WORKSHOPS AND LECTURES INVESTMENT PROVIDED BY


27

AT A GLANCE

HIGHLIGHTED PICKS FROM HOSTESS CITY HAPPENINGS THIS WEEK TO HAVE YOUR EVENT CONSIDERED FOR INCLUSION IN WEEK AT A GLANCE, PLEASE SEND AN EMAIL TO WAG@CONNECTSAVANNAH.COM. INCLUDE THE EVENT NAME, DATE, TIME, LOCATION WITH ADDRESS, COST, WEBSITE ADDRESS FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, AND A CONTACT NUMBER. THE SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS 5PM EACH FRIDAY BEFORE THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S EDITION.

Four Seasons to Earth, Wind and Fire. Seating limited to 35% capacity for safe social distancing. 8 p.m. Savannah Theatre, 222 Bull Street. $39, $19.50 16 and under savannahtheatre.com

PULSE Free Family Weekend

ANNUAL ROCKIN’ 30 5TH FOR THE VETS

SAT/

It’s the time of year to go rock out with some awesome music for a great cause. For the fifth year in a row, The Wormhole will be showcasing local music and donating all proceeds to The Tiny House Project. Enjoy drink specials, a silent auction, a raffle, and more. A donation of $5 or food items is accepted at the door. 5-10 p.m. The Wormhole Neighborhood Pub & Music Venue, 2307 Bull Street.

WEDNESDAY 1.27 Balanced: Creating a Budget for Success

As a business owner, it is important to understand budgeting and how to manage costs. Register online to join this University of Georgia Small Business Development webinar. 12-1 p.m. training.georgiasbdc.org

THURSDAY 1.28 Buy Local Savannah Luncheon Join Buy Local for their first luncheon of 2021. Outside Networking begins at 11 a.m., and the lecture by the event’s main guest speaker and indoor dining will begin at noon. Register online. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Cohen’s Retreat, 5715 Skidaway Rd. members: $25, non-members:$40 buylocalsavannah.com

2

FRIDAY 1.29 Fun House Comedy Show

Front Porch Improv: Fun House is a never-seen-before improvised comedy show. Using audience suggestions the cast will create original comedic scenes and games. It’s like a live choose-your-own-adventure novel come to life. Tickets are available online. 8-9:30 p.m. Front Porch Improv, 210 W. Victory Drive. VIP: $20, General: $14, Zoom: $10 frontporchimprov.com

Legends Live On Stage

The international vocal group Legacy and the Savannah Theatre band take local audiences on a journey through the decades of timeless music, with the ensemble singing and dancing to hits from the Beatles to Bruno Mars and The

Enjoy a three-day weekend of free admission to the Jepson Center to explore all of the new interactive art for the PULSE Festival and other current exhibitions. Hands-on art-making kits will be available for families to pick up in the Jepson Center atrium. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Jepson Center for the Arts, 207 West York St. telfair.org

SATURDAY 1.30 Axe Throwing Grand Opening

Help us welcome Blade & Bull Axe Throwing: Savannah to the brewery during the Axe Throwing Grand Opening Party. The family-friendly event is free to enter. Craft beer and axe throwing available all day & night. Cheesesteak Jack food truck onsite from 1-5 p.m., and live music plays into the evening. noon-midnight Southbound Brewing Company, 107 East Lathrop Ave.

Beer + Yoga

Join yogi Karrie Comeau (and the Service Brewing brew cats) for an hourlong yoga class in the brew production facility. The $15 class includes a yoga and a refreshing pint of beer. Bring your mats and feel free to arrive as early as 11 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Service Brewing Company, 574 Indian Street. servicebrewing.com

Forsyth Farmers Market

Local and regional produce, honey, meat, dairy, pasta, baked goods and other delights. Rain or shine. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Forsyth Park, Drayton St. & East Park Ave. Free to attend. Items for sale. forsythfarmersmarket.com

Islands Farmers Market

Weekly farmers market on Talahi Island highlighting local growers and makers, healthy foods and a positive environment. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Islands Farmers’ Market, 401 Quarterman Dr. facebook.com/ islandsfarmersmarket

Cooper Bros. concert

Join Ghost Coast Distillery for live music with The Cooper Bros. Sharing a love for rootsy Americana, Southern rock, and Athens-based college rock of the ’80s, they keep that downhome flame burning with songs by the Allman Brothers, REM, and Widespread Panic. 4-6 p.m. Ghost Coast Distillery, 641 Indian St.

Made by Makers at The Alida Hotel

In celebration of the Wild Sam Savannah Field Guide launch, The Alida Hotel and Made by Makers are collaborating to bring you a Mini Makers Market. Peruse a selection of carefully curated locally produced goods and meet the makers face to (masked) face. 12-7 p.m. The Alida Hotel, 412 Williamson Street. facebook.com/ MadebyMakersSavannah EVENTS CONTINUE ON PG. 6

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

WEEK CONNECT SAVANNAH

5


CONNECT SAVANNAH

WEEK

AT A GLANCE

(CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE)

SAVANNAH’S PULSE NEWS | ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

© 2021, Savannah Media, LLC. 611 East Bay Street Savannah, Georgia 31401 Phone: (912) 231-0250 | Fax: (912) 238-2041

ADMINISTRATIVE

ADVERTISING

ERICA BASKIN PUBLISHER erica@connectsavannah.com (912) 721-4378

INFORMATION (912) 721-4378 sales@connectsavannah.com

WENDY WICKHAM BUSINESS MANAGER wendy@connectsavannah.com (912) 721-4373

EDITORIAL NICK ROBERTSON EDITOR-IN-CHIEF nick@connectsavannah.com (912) 721-4360 BRANDY SIMPKINS STAFF WRITER brandy@connectsavannah.com (912) 721-4358

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS Adriana Iris Boatwright, Jessica Farthing, Lindy Moody, Bunny Ware, Lauren Wolverton, Nicole Youngblut

DESIGN & PRODUCTION BRANDON BLATCHER ART DIRECTOR artdirector@connectsavannah.com (912) 721-4379

OUR VALUES

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

At its core, Connect Savannah is focused on the happenings in our community, highlighting local news, arts, and entertainment. Our professional journalists write about community issues and the people who live here. The public has a right to know about issues affecting them, and Connect Savannah is dedicated to keeping readers informed and aware of all that goes on in the community. The pursuit of truth is a fundamental principle of journalism. But the truth is not always apparent or known immediately. A professional journalist’s role is to impartially report the news based on verifiable facts so readers can, based on their own knowledge and experience, determine the truth behind varied issues and developments. This is often an ongoing pursuit as journalists work to uncover stories and

6

CHRIS GRIFFIN SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE chris@connectsavannah.com (912) 721-4388 BUCKY BRYANT SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE bucky@connectsavannah.com (912) 721-4381 LAUREN WOLVERTON ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE lauren@connectsavannah.com MANDY YOUNCE REGIONAL DIGITAL SALES DIRECTOR mandy@connectsavannah.com (912) 503-0874

DISTRIBUTION WAYNE FRANKLIN DISTRIBUTION MANAGER (912) 721-4376

CLASSIFIEDS CALL (912) 231-0250

follow those stories wherever they lead, regardless of preconceived ideas. The news that they report is separate from opinions shared in our labeled commentary, special columns, reviews and submitted letters to the editor. The presentation of both news and opinion is designed to educate, entertain, and foster conversation. We appreciate and encourage readers to share news tips with us, and to share any criticism and questions. We are your comprehensive local source for current news, arts, entertainment, music, and community events. We are here to serve you. We are blessed to be part of the greatest country in the world and the freedom it bestows on its citizens and its press. Find us on the platforms below or reach out to our newsroom at news@connectsavannah.com or (912) 721-4378.

ON THE COVER /connectsav

@ConnectSavannah

/connectsavannah

John O. Morisano and Mashama Bailey of The Grey. Photo by Marcus Kenney

CONNECT SAVANNAH

PROUD SPONSOR OF

connectsavannah.com JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2021

Black, White,

& The

Grey

The new book by Mashama Bailey & John O. Morisano

CONNECT SAVANNAH IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY

The Bank That That SERVICE Built® The Bank SERVICE Built® Member FDIC. © 2021 United Community Bank Community | ucbi.comBank | ucbi.com Member FDIC. © 2021 United

SAVANNAH SAVANNAH 27 Bull Street | 912-234-6565 27 Bull Street | 912-234-6565 8201 White Bluff RoadBluff | 912-232-5884 8201 White Road | 912-232-5884 2225 East 2225 Victory Drive | 912-303-9667 East Victory Drive | 912-303-9667

Mindful Flow New Yoga

All-levels flow yoga overlooking the Savannah River. This 60 minute class is designed to renew the senses, reset your mind, and help (re)build a more supple body. Expect a fluid sequence built around mobility-based movements to cultivate strength & flexibility. Class is held on the river walk in Montgomery Park. 9-10 a.m. Plant Riverside District, 500 W. River St. $15 newyoganow.com

SUNDAY 1.31 I DO Savannah Wedding Expo

This unique event will be an exciting introduction to 2021 trends and fashion for couples as they begin the initial planning for their upcoming celebrations. The Hyatt Regency Savannah will open its Harbor Side Ballroom doors to a carefully curated selection of Savannah’s most prestigious wedding industry exhibitors on Jan. 31. The community is invited to experience this extravaganza showcasing the talent and creativity of Savannah and Chatham County’s top weddingindustry leaders. 1-2, 2-3 & 3-4 p.m. Hyatt Regency Savannah, 2 West Bay St.

Sunday Brunch Cruise

Partake in a sumptuous midday feast while feasting your eyes on moving panoramas of the local riverfront while gently plying the waters aboard the old-fashioned Georgia Queen or the Savannah River Queen riverboats. Enjoy live entertainment along with dishes including Southern-fried chicken, honey-glazed spiral ham, shrimp and grits, and a variety of breakfast items, salads and desserts. 1-2:30 p.m. Savannah Riverboat Cruises, 9 E. River St. $58.95 for adults, $38.95 for youths savannahriverboat.com

MONDAY 2. 1 Community Pet Food Drive

The Humane Society for Greater Savannah is supporting those in need with their Community Pet Food Drive. While supplies last, pick up some free pet food from their location a Sallie Mood Drive! 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humane Society for Greater Savannah, 7215 Sallie Mood Dr.

Tybee Island Farmers Market

Weekly market featuring a variety of produce, baked goods, honey, eggs, BBQ, sauces and dressings, popsicles, dog treats and natural body products. Artisans are also featured each week. The market is located right behind the Historic Tybee Lighthouse. 4 p.m. 30 Meddin Drive. tybeeislandfarmersmarket.com

TUESDAY 2. 2 Courses and Conversations

At the Savannah Area Chamber of Commerce’s lunchtime networking opportunity, participants will begin their meal with an appetizer course and networking with the people at their table, then after 20 minutes, rotate to another table to meet another group. After the rotations and a full meal, each attendee leaves with business cards from potential clients and partners. 11:15 a.m.-1 p.m. Tubby’s Tank House (Thunderbolt), 2909 River Dr. $15

Toddler Tuesday at Oatland Island Wildlife Center

Explore the wonders of nature with all kinds of animal fun for your wee ones. This week’s theme is “Cow Tails”. Pre-registration is required. 10 & 11 a.m. Oatland Island Wildlife Center, 711 Sandtown Rd. $5 per child and adult spsccpss.com/schools/oatland


NEWS

BRIEFS

Former Chatham DA gets appointment to Georgia parole board

FORMER CHATHAM Assistance Program of the County District Attorney Savannah District AttorMeg Heap was appointed ney’s Office, according to her by Georgia Governor Brian 2020 reelection-campaign Kemp to the State Board of website. Pardons and Paroles, accordAfter graduating from ing to a Jan. 21 announceMercer University’s Walment by Kemp’s office. ter F. George School of Law Created by a Constituin 1992, Heap served as an tional amendment in 1943, assistant DA for the Eastthe State Board of Pardons Former Chatham County ern Judicial Circuit District DA Meg Heap. and Paroles exercises the Attorney’s Office, and was authority of executive clema staff attorney for Judge ency through informed decision-making Penny Haas Freesemann in the Superior to provide offenders with opportunities Court of Chatham County. for positive change while ensuring pubA Savannah native, Heap attended St. lic safety and protecting victims’ rights, Vincent’s Academy before studying sociolaccording to the board’s website. Heap ogy at Georgia Southern University. is replacing former State Representative “I am very honored and humbled that James Mills, whose term ended on Dec. 31. the governor appointed me to this board,” Heap served two terms as Chatham Heap stated. “I look forward to working County DA from 2013 through 2020, when with the other board members to strive to she was unseated by challenger Shalena have transparency and to ensure that the Cook Jones. Previously, Heap began her rights of the victims and those incarcercareer as a volunteer coordinator and ated are represented.” victim advocate with the Victim-Witness − Nick Robertson

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION PRESENTS THE

Virtual Norman Fries Distinguished Lectureship Series Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Educating Past Pandemic Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D. PEDAGOGICAL THEORIST, TEACHER EDUCATOR, AUTHOR

Monday, February 8 7 p.m. Join the virtual lecture via Zoom at GeorgiaSouthern.edu/Fries

A SOMBER bell-ringing ceremony was Houses of worship, businesses, and indiheld at Savannah City Hall as the local viduals were invited to participate in the community joined cities across the nation national memorial in their own respective in honoring the lives lost to the coronavisocially distanced ways. Displays on Charus pandemic during a COVID-19 memotham Area Transit buses read “Savannah rial on the evening of Jan. 19. Remembers” and “Savannah Strong” on Savannah Mayor Van Jan. 19. The Adams Funeral Johnson and City CounHome honored the lives lost cil members observed the with a white rose tribute, and memorial while standing on many individuals showed their the balcony of City Hall. For support by posting their perthis solemn event, City Hall sonal memorials and photos on was illuminated in red, and social media with the hashtags a bell rang once for every ten #SavannahRemembers and of the 264 lives reported lost #SavannahStrong. to COVID-19 in Chatham Savannah’s memorial City Hall during the ceremony. PHOTO BY County as of Jan. 19. coincided with ceremonies “These are more than sta- BRANDY SIMPKINS nationwide, including a lighttistics, these are 264 souls, ing ceremony at the Lincoln 264 mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, Memorial Reflecting Pool in Washington, empty seats at the table, 264 calls that will D.C. While 264 Chatham County residents not be answered,” Johnson said at a Jan. 19 were reported to have died from COVIDpress conference. “So we do this not only 19 on Jan. 19, that number rose to 273 by in memory of the lives that were lost in Jan. 24, according to the Georgia Departthis war against COVID-19, but we also do ment of Public Health. it to support the families that still remain.” − Brandy Simpkins

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Savannah honors locals lost due to COVID-19

7


NEWS

BRIEFS

Savannah Fire participates in high-tech pilot program to reduce community risk

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

VP Kamala Harris wears SCAD grad’s attire on Jan. 20

8

DURING THE Jan. 20 Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C., Vice-President Kamala Harris – the first woman, first African American, and first Asian American to fill the second-in-command role – wore purple attire designed by Christopher John Rogers, a 2016 BFA graduate from the Savannah College of Art and Design. According to Harper’s BAZAAR, Vice-President Harris chose to be sworn in while wearing the elegant outfit by Rogers accessorized with pearls by Puerto Rican-American designer Wilfredo Rosado. Rogers, a 27-yearold queer Black fashion designer, is the 2020 Council of Fashion Designers of America winner of the American Emerging Designer of the Year award. “This morning, Vice President Kamala Harris – the embodiment of historical firsts – strode proudly onto the world stage as a modern superwoman. Her regal Inauguration Day ensemble was created by SCAD alumnus and CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fundwinner Christopher John Rogers,” stated SCAD President and Founder Paula Wallace. According to Wallace, Rogers has also designed attire for Michelle Obama, Jennifer Lopez, and Lady Gaga, all of whom attended the Jan. 20 inauguration of President Joe Biden and Harris. Rogers launched the CJR brand with his SCAD senior thesis collection and friends from the class of 2016, according to his Instagram page. He credits the many Sundays spent attending Baptist church as a driving inspiration for his interest in monochromatically coordinated ensembles, such as the one worn by Harris on Inauguration Day. “We are so honored and humbled to have played a small part in this historic moment,” Rogers stated in an Instagram post thanking Harris for choosing his design. − Nick Robertson

THE SAVANNAH Fire Department is one of 250 firefighting forces nationwide selected to participate in a pilot program to build a digital community risk assessment tool, which could help pinpoint where fires and accidents are probable to occur, according to a Savannah Fire Savannah Fire Station 8. PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON spokesperson. The National Fire Protection Association chose Savannah Fire to categories such as demographics, geogratake part in the second phase of developing phy, building stock, infrastructure, and the high-tech risk assessment tool, called a event-loss history. “dashboard” that works to help fire depart“This is a wonderful opportunity for ments aggregate and disseminate data that Savannah Fire to help with the developidentifies where blazes and other emergen- ment of an important risk reduction tool, cies are most likely to transpire. and at the same time, gain insight into According to the agency’s Jan. 22 the areas of greatest need in our comannouncement, Savannah Fire will be munity,” stated Savannah Fire Departgiven free access to the dashboard proment Research and Planning Chief Jack totype that includes customized maps, McCutchen, Jr. charts, and graphs that illustrate commuAccording to National Fire Protection nity risks. Hazards are identified in varied Association officials, the dashboard will

also provide an overview of local capacity for risk-reduction activities with information about public-safety response agencies and community-service organizations, giving Savannah Fire a cuttingedge advantage in planning future strategies. “Access to accurate data will allow [community risk reduction] leaders to use insights and make informed decisions about where to focus efforts and resources,” stated Karen Berard-Reed, a National Fire Protection Association community-risk strategist. “Participation in this project allows each fire department to provide important feedback that will be used to improve future versions of the dashboard.” Participating in this program also provides local firefighters a chance to network with other agencies selected by the National Fire Protection Association for this dashboard trial, according to the Savannah Fire announcement. − Nick Robertson

Creamy confections await school-aged winners of local creative-writing challenge SAVANNAH-AREA schoolkids who enter a creative-writing challenge can win icecream feasts thanks to the Live Oak library system teaming up with a classic local confectionery once again. Savannah’s famed Leopold’s Ice Cream announced its collaboration with Live Oak Public Libraries for the ice-cream shop’s 11th Annual Creative Writing Challenge, themed “Family & Friends,” according to a Live Oak announcement. All schoolchildren − including homeschooled children − in Chatham, Effingham, and Liberty counties are invited to submit a poem of 20 lines or less for this 11th-annual writing challenge. Students will be judged on the creativity of their poem, which should focus on the “Family & Friends” theme. Prizes are awarded in four separate groups by grade: K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and high school. The top winners in each group will receive a cooler filled with Leopold’s Ice Cream delivered to their homes, while second-place winners are awarded a $25 Leopold’s Ice Cream gift certificate. “We’re always excited to see and encourage the art of written word in this community,” said Leopold’s owner Stratton

The flagship Savannah location of Leopold’s Ice Cream. PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON

Leopold. “The first ten years of this challenge have been great, so we look forward to many more years of engaging with young people in Savannah.” Hundreds of entries are expected, based on responses to the challenge received in previous years. The deadline for submissions is Friday, Feb. 19, and winners will be announced on Friday, March 5 at leopoldsicecream.com and liveoakpl.org.

Submissions can be e-mailed to baldwinc@liveoakpl.org, or printed and dropped off at any Live Oak Public Library or the Leopold’s Ice Cream shop on Broughton Street in downtown Savannah. Entries must include the student’s name, teacher’s name, home address, age, school, grade, and e-mail address.  Visit liveoakpl. org/events/cwc2021 for more information. − Brandy Simpkins


NEWS

COMMUNITY

SINCE 2001 – BREWING COFFEE & COMMUNITY

Savannah tackles human trafficking with first-ever virtual conference The Savannah Interagency Diversity Council hosts online Traffick Jam events

Award-Winning Organic Vegetarian Food + Fair-Trade Coffees & Teas

BY BRANDY SIMPKINS

MON - SUN OPEN 7AM–5PM

brandy@connectsavannah.com

COUNTER SERVICE AND TAKEOUT

13 E. Park Ave •232.4447

full listings @ sentientbean.com

Looking for a safer meeting space? Jerome Elam, a 2021 Traffick Jam speaker. PHOTO COURTESY OF END SLAVERY NOW

William Gettis. “We also want to ensure the public gains knowledge of who our partners are, including the local organizations we want the public to know who they are, because that’s who they would call for assistance.” The conference’s educational topics include the operations and rescue efforts of the National Human Trafficking Hotline, victim resources and rehabilitation services, how sex-trafficking victims are targeted and groomed, victim and survivor stories, and local prevention partners. Going virtual is not the only difference between this sixth-annual conference and previous ones. This year, the Traffick Jam is featuring its first male survivor of human trafficking as a speaker: Jerome Elam, the president and CEO of the Trafficking in America Task Force. Elam is a former victim of child abuse, child sex trafficking, and child pornography. Other main-event speakers include nurse practitioner Heather Quaile, Sarah Pederson with Georgia’s Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, and Mel Meyer, director of the Atlanta Dream Center’s Anti-Sex Trafficking Department. “These are top-level speakers that will be at the January 30 main conference

weekend,” said Gettis. By reaching out to diverse community members, Traffick Jam organizers hope to raise awareness of what to look out for to identify human trafficking in all sectors of society, according to Browning. “How important it is that every individual in their respective roles, including employees, business owners, and partners, understand really what human trafficking is, who’s at risk, and the negative impact of trafficking on individuals,” said Browning. “A lot of people think it’s just sex trafficking, but it’s also the forced labor where they have the domestic servitude, and it occurs everywhere.” Over 600 participants joined 2020’s Traffick Jam, and this year, more are taking part in the virtual conference, according to organizers. Gettis enthusiastically added that the conference is attracting participants from faraway locations. “We think that it’s important that this gets out in media that’s in every area, and we’re not going to let COVID pull us back,” said Browning. cs Visit thesidc.org for more information about the 2021 Traffick Jam and to register for the Jan. 30 conference events.

We are offering our dining room in the evenings for limited capacity, community building events. Email details to sentientbooking@gmail.com for consideration.

ORDER ONLINE! SENTIENTBEAN.COM

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

WHILE MANY activities are disrupted by the ongoing pandemic, human trafficking is not one of them. Experts say that human trafficking is now proliferating due to how COVID-19 is worsening the social and economic conditions that are root causes of this global crime. Locally, the Savannah Interagency Diversity Council’s annual Traffick Jam is taking action to diminish this increase through education. Because of the pandemic, the SIDC was not able to hold its annual in-person Traffick Jam event this year to raise awareness about human trafficking in this region, but the group is adapting and reaching new crowds by hosting their annual conference online this month. The SIDC will conclude its 2021 Traffick Jam conference, themed “Breaking the Cycle of Human Trafficking One Human at a Time,” with the main event open to the public on Jan. 30 from 8 a.m. to noon. Like many other events that have taken place since the pandemic’s outbreak, this is the first time that the Traffick Jam conference has gone virtual. This year’s conference was hosted by the streaming platform Airmeet with sponsors including Memorial Health and International Paper, according to SIDC Marketing Chair and Treasurer Tina Browning. The Traffick Jam is usually held at Savannah State University on a single day with varied speakers addressing area professionals who confront human trafficking – including law-enforcement officers and mental-health specialists – along with one seminar series welcoming the public. To accommodate its online platform, this year’s Traffick Jam is taking place over the course of four consecutive Saturdays, with the three sessions of specialized educational training workshops for professionals held on Jan. 9, 16, and 23, and the final session for all community members happening on Saturday. “The reason why we have this every year is to ensure that the public obtains awareness as to what to look for, the signs, and who to contact in case they see or suspect human trafficking,” said SIDC Chairman

THE SENTIENT BEAN

9


LIFESTYLE

FITNESS

FRESH

AIR,

NO GNATS A man walks his dog along a stretch of the recently completed Truman Linear Park Trail. PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

BY JESSICA FARTHING

10

A bicyclist rides around the trail surrounding Lake Mayer. PHOTO BY ADRIANA IRIS BOATWRIGHT

IT’S EASY to enjoy Savannah’s beautiful spring and summer seasons, but we are barely tolerant of the colder months. Spoiled by our reasonable temperatures, winter may seem like a poor time to visit the many appealing parks and outdoor recreation areas around our city. However, open-air exercise not only helps you shape up, but also relieves stress and reduces depression and anxiety. And as an added bonus, wintertime fresh-air fitness activities can generally be enjoyed without encountering the clouds of gnats that frequently fly around this region in warmer months. In many ways, there couldn’t be a better time than winter to explore Savannah’s outdoor-fitness options – especially since shoveling snow is almost certainly never to be one of them.

TAKE A HIKE OR RIDE A BIKE

Immersing in nature while hitting the trail is a huge stress reliever, whether it’s for a miles-long bike ride or a short walk with a four-legged friend. Along the way, the Lowcountry’s forested nature can look fascinating during the winter season. Try these trails around the area:

Skidaway Island State Park

The six miles of trails here offer glimpses of coastal Georgia wildlife. There are common sightings of deer, raccoons, and fiddler crabs, as well as excellent birding opportunities on any of the paths. The popular Sandpiper Trail Loop winds through marshes and creeks for about a mile, and is ADA accessible and allows dogs on leashes, but this path is closed to bicycles. The Big Ferry Loop does allow bikes, stretching three miles through the park. The one-mile Avian Loop Trail

passes the Intracoastal Waterway, and the Connector Trail ties them all together. Location: 52 Diamond Causeway, Savannah More info: gastateparks.org/ SkidawayIsland

Whitemarsh Preserve

The Whitemarsh Preserve, a coastal maritime forest full of picturesque live oaks draped with Spanish moss, is encircled by a well-maintained track for walking and jogging. The inner loop is a popular cycling trail – even featuring log-jam crossings and dips for adrenaline-junkie mountain bikers – that is also beloved by dog walkers and hikers. For more relaxed strolling or biking, check out the paved trail that starts on Johnny Mercer Boulevard and ends in an open field near the parcel’s northern edge. Location: Park by the intersection

of Johnny Mercer Boulevard and Bryan Woods Road, Whitemarsh Island

Truman Linear Park Trail

As the first completed phase of Chatham County’s Tide to Town Trail Network Project, this well-structured public path provides easy access for a 4.5-mile trek, including a loop around Lake Mayer. The trail can be reached by parking at the Scarborough Sports Complex by the intersection of Skidaway Road and Bona Bella Avenue, or at Lake Mayer’s parking lots. The trail is also safe during winter’s early evening hours – planners thoughtfully added lighting, security cameras, and emergency call boxes . Location: Spanning Lake Mayer Community Park to DeRenne Avenue largely alongside the Truman Parkway, Savannah More info: tidetotown.org/ 11 truman-linear-park-trail

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

18 options for wintertime outdoor fitness activities around Savannah


FITNESS

The driving range at Bacon Park Golf Course. PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON

The Bacon Park Tennis Complex. PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON

OUTDOOR FITNESS TRACKS

participants of the Savannah Area Tennis Association leagues, but anyone with rackets and balls can make reservations for a court and independently enjoy the love of the game. Location: 1301 E. Victory Dr., Savannah More info: savannahga.gov/813/ Tennis-Program

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Lake Mayer Community Park

Lake Mayer has a 1.5-mile rubberized track with a fitness course. The 18 stations of the course are easy to use, with signs explaining exactly how to do each exercise, broken down into three levels of difficulty. Hardcore health seekers can sprint between jumping jacks and wall sits. Whatever level you choose, the course is designed to provide pleasant lakeside views while getting your heart pumping. Location: 1850 Montgomery Cross Rd., Savannah More info: parks.chathamcounty.org/ Parks/Community-Parks/Lake-Mayer

Tom Triplett Community Park

Calm and peaceful, this park in Pooler also has a 1.5 mile trail that winds its way around a freshwater lake and features a fitness course, with signs explaining how to do the various exercise challenges. The park also provides a shaded playground and a dog-fitness area, along with ten12 nis courts and fishing piers, truly offering

healthy attractions for the entire family. Location: 100 Tom Triplett Rd., Pooler More info: parks.chathamcounty.org/ Parks/Community-Parks/Tom-Triplett

L. Scott Stell Community Park

Located in southwest Chatham County, this forested haven welcomes everyone for a variety of open-air activities. The jogging path is just a mile long at this park, but it is also lined with fitness facilities that will provide a rigorous workout. Other healthy amenities found here include lighted tennis courts, a large playground, a dog-exercise area, and even an archery range. Location: 195 Scott Stell Community Park, Savannah More info: parks.chathamcounty.org/ Parks/Community-Parks/L-Scott-Stell

TENNIS ANYTIME

Thanks to Savannah’s relatively balmy climate, these public open-air tennis courts are available year-round in the Hostess City, providing well-maintained facilities for players of all skill levels:

Daffin Park Tennis Courts

This central Savannah park features six supervised clay courts and three hard courts that are lit up at night, and all of them are easily accessible from Victory Drive. This is a regular playground for

Bacon Park Tennis Complex

This modern facility is large, with 16 lighted hard courts available for play and an elevated clubhouse providing sweeping views over the entire complex. Varied leagues are hosted here as well for adults, juniors, and seniors, but anyone who makes reservations is welcome, and instruction opportunities are also available here. Location: 6262 Skidaway Rd., Savannah More info: savannahsportscouncil. com/facilities/bacon-park-tennis

Forsyth Park Tennis Courts

At the southern end of the biggest park in Savannah’s historic district, four unsupervised public tennis courts welcome more casual players to get into the swing of things. While these free courts are often in high demand − even during wintertime − the other attractions around and within Forsyth Park ease any time spent waiting for an open court.

Location: Near the intersection of E. Park Ave. and Drayton St. More info: savannahsportscouncil. com/facilities/forsyth-park

FAIR-WEATHER FAIRWAYS

Golf is a popular pastime around Savannah all year long, and this area features several public courses that are often less crowded during wintertime, making this a perfect season for sharpening your swinging skills at these facilities:

Henderson Golf Club

Owned and operated by Chatham County’s municipal government, this course has been upgraded in recent years and is now one of the most appealing public courses in the region. While the grass may be dormant in winter, golf here is lovely all year long, and accessible for players of varying skill levels, with PGA professional instruction available onsite. Location: 1 Al Henderson Dr., Savannah More info: hendersongolfclub.com

Bacon Park Golf Course

Designed in 1926 by Donald Ross, this popular Savannah golf spot features a varied array of holes named for their characteristics, with notable links on the first nine including Lowland, The Stretch, Long View, and Dead Aim. With a pro shop, nice

Wintertime fitness fans enjoy an active instruction excursion offered by Sail Savannah. PHOTO COURTESY OF SAIL SAVANNAH

driving range, cart rentals, and both putting and chipping greens, this is an easygoing location to fill all of your golf needs anytime. Location: 1 Shorty Cooper Dr., Savannah More info: baconparkgolf.com

Hunter Golf Course

You don’t need to enlist in the U.S. Army to play on the Hunter Army Airfield links. Hunter’s course is accessible with a base visitor’s pass through the Montgomery Street Gate just off of DeRenne Avenue. Open to military and civilians alike, the greens on the base are beautiful. This course is also home to the Georgia Adaptive Golf Program, an organization devoted to bringing the game of golf to differently abled athletes. Location: 1548 S. Perimeter Rd., Hunter Army Airfield More info: stewarthunter.armymwr. com/programs/hunter-golf-course

Crosswinds Golf Course

Recently rated by Golf Advisor as one of the country’s best courses to play for under $50, this club near the Savannah-Hilton Head International Airport offers discounts for seniors, Gulfstream employees, military members, first responders, and members of varied associations. This can be a great place for those new to the game to give it a go during the less-crowded winter season, with Callaway club rentals available onsite. Location: 232 James B. Blackburn Dr., Savannah More info: crosswindsgolfclub.com

Disc golf

As an alternative to traditional golf, disc golf is growing in popularity locally, with free public courses available at Tom Triplett Park (100 Tom Triplett Rd., Pooler) and Jaycee Park (30 Van Horne Ave., Tybee Island).

WINTER WATER SPORTS

Even though we may sometimes feel like it’s freezing in Savannah during winter, it is much more temperate here than most of the country, making water sports an option all year long. It may be a little daunting to get out in the waves or area waterways, but these organizations aren’t afraid to help you get wet and have fun:

Savannah Canoe and Kayak

Explore the region’s tidal creeks, marshes, and interior waterways with the seasoned guides at Savannah Canoe and Kayak, providing all needed gear for paddlers of every skill level to enjoy active excursions. Meanwhile, extreme athletes with a wetsuit can try out more immersive wintertime water sports like paddleboarding or kayak fishing. Location: 414 Bonaventure Rd., Savannah More info: savannahcanoeandkayak.com

Tybee Island Surf

It may not be an endless summer on Tybee Island, but it’s much balmier than most coasts during wintertime, and with less visitors on the shore this can be a perfect time to paddle out into the Atlantic to catch some waves. The hardy instructors at Tybee Island Surf provide lessons and surfboards to use, but participants must bring their own wetsuit. More info: tybeeislandsurf.com

Sail Savannah

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Anyone seeking a vigorous workout has several free fitness tracks to choose from in Chatham, with varied aerobic challenges placed alongside paths for jogging or biking to provide completely customizable exercise regimens at these locations:

While the folks at Sail Savannah specialize in providing leisurely sailboat cruises, they also provide active instruction excursions all year long. Participants can raise sails, crank winches, and take the helm to discover just how exhilarating and invigorating it can be to ride the wind in Savannah’s local waters that served at the Olympic sailing venue in 1996. 13 More info: sailsav.com cs


CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

&The Grey 14

The revealing new book by renowned Savannah restaurateurs Mashama Bailey and John O. Morisano

BY BRANDY SIMPKINS

A NEW MEMOIR by the co-owners of one of Savannah’s most praised restaurants reveals that success stories are not always black and white. The Grey restaurant in downtown Savannah is a stylish reinvention of a formerly segregated, Art Deco-styled Greyhound bus station originally built in 1938. Since opening in December 2016, The Grey is now an internationally acclaimed restaurant recognized for its impeccable cuisine of the American South by co-owner and Executive Chef Mashama Bailey. In 2019, Bailey and co-owner John O. Morisano (known as “Johno”) won the James Beard Award in the Best Restaurant: Southeast category. To outsiders the restaurant may appear to be an overnight success, but in Black, White, and The Grey − the revealing new memoir that was jointly written by Bailey and Morisano and freshly released

in mid-January – the duo behind the acclaimed eatery explain that the yearslong process of establishing their accoladeenamored restaurant was not all peaches and cream. Besides the expected difficulties that Morisano, a media entrepreneur, and Bailey, a former sous-chef, experienced while teaming up to start a restaurant with no prior experience in running a kitchen, the business partners encountered challenges that they were unprepared for.  The memoir is not your average “foodie” read. During a virtual forum hosted on Jan. 18 by E. Shaver, Bookseller, Bailey, a Black chef from Queens, New York, and Morisano, a white media entrepreneur from Staten Island, plunged into a discussion confronting biases of race, gender, and culture, telling the tale of how they went from tentative business partners to dear friends while turning a battered old bus station into a highly revered eatery.  During the virtual forum, Morisano mentioned that he introduced the idea to

write a book about The Grey years ago. Bailey was initially unenthusiastic about this, since they were still striving to get their new restaurant off the ground, yet she encouraged her partner to write the book himself if he wished. After presenting a complete manuscript to several interested publishing houses, Morisano chose Lorena Jones Books as the publisher, who suggested that Bailey add her own experience to the manuscript. Assuming that the process would be simple since the work was mostly done, Bailey agreed, bringing about a turn of events that made the book what it is today.  “When I handed her the manuscript I put a helmet on and waited for the fallout, because they were conversations that we had never had,” Morisano said.  Bailey recalls feeling a mix of negative emotions upon reading Morisano’s perspective of their surrounding environment.  “I was angry when I read the first manuscript,” said Bailey. “This was a book that

our relationship wasn’t ready for, because we never really discussed the nuances of race between us.” According to Morisano, when Bailey inserted her ideas into the manuscript, the book transformed from being about a guy opening a restaurant to the experiences of two partners running an eatery − and because they were of different ethnicities, issues of race became a central concept in the work because of their different perspectives on life in the South.  “I had to push myself to be vulnerable because I didn’t want to have those conversations,” said Bailey of the memoir’s revision process. “I kind of just wanted to write ‘F you’ on every page.”  Morisano said that when he and Bailey started working on the book, he had no idea that it would grow legs and teeth and contribute to the conversation of social and racial justice occurring during an era when issues of racial disparities have been highlighted nationally, including the impacts from the killing of Ahmaud

Black, White, and The Grey is available at Savannah’s E. Shaver, Bookseller store as well as online in hardcover and paperback editions. Visit thegreyrestaurant.com for more information.

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Black, White,

LEFT: John O. Morisano (left) and Mashama Bailey are the partners behind The Grey, one of Savannah’s most renowned restaurants. PHOTO BY MARCUS KENNEY ABOVE: A hardcover copy of the new book, ‘Black, White, and The Grey,’ which was released in mid-January. PHOTO COURTESY OF TEN SPEED PRESS

Arbery in nearby Glynn County in February of 2020. Furthermore, Morisano came to recognize that the book’s conversation about racial biases hit closer to home with some experiences that he encountered with Bailey at The Grey. He discussed a rude awakening as to how deep the problems can be while recalling a time when he went to a table to ask a group of white patrons how they were enjoying their meal, and was met with an unexpected response about a new watermelon salad that Bailey had prepared.  “‘Y’know, us crackers don’t usually go in for this, but when one of them makes it,’ and he points toward the open kitchen at Mashama, he’s like, ‘it’s just so damn good.’ And he looks at his wife and says something like ‘you know how they love watermelon,’” Morisano said of the scene included in the memoir. “I was just flabbergasted, absolutely flabbergasted, because I had prepared myself for a negative guest experience, getting yelled at, hating the food, but I was not prepared for that at all.”  Shocked, Morisano remembers that he ran around the outside of the restaurant and through a door to the kitchen to relay the experience to Bailey, who responded, “We’re in the South. Is a bigoted redneck really shocking to you?”  Morisano said he felt guilty for not defending Bailey’s honor, but in conversations following the encounter, Bailey said she’s just glad that Morisano can now see the depth of this issue and understand it for himself.  “For this person to come in there and act like that, I was like, ‘Goddammit.’ You know it’s there, you know we’re Americans in this liberal city in this small pocket, and you just kind of hope that no one has the guts to come out and tell you exactly who they are,” Bailey said of the bigoted restaurant patron. “I wasn’t hurt, I was just disappointed in the fact that he was even in this space. Like, you’re not welcome here, don’t come here.”  Reflecting on their own realizations discovered while telling their story, Bailey and Morisano see Black, White, and The Grey as an opportunity for readers to recognize their own biases. “Mashama and I think we have a point of view that we wanted to share with the public, and we could have been successful at that or we may have failed at that, but that’s just the risk that everybody takes when they put themselves out there, whether you’re a writer, or an artist, a chef, a restaurateur,” said Morisano. cs

15


EPICUROPEDIA

The small stage at Bayou Cafe welcomed innumerable musicians over the decades. PHOTO COURTESY OF BAYOU CAFE

A bittersweet goodbye to Savannah’s Bayou Cafe

The River Street mainstay is closing after three decades of Cajun cookin’ and live bands for over 30 years. Despite rumors, Bayou Cafe is not closing due to COVID-19. The property’s landlord has increased the rent, and Bayou Cafe management made this AS THE SAVANNAH tourism industry difficult decision after weighing the cost of grows, appreciation for locally owned inde- continuing business. pendent restaurants is quickly becoming Bayou Cafe served as one of the few a thing of the past. Many Savannahians places in town that put live music front and remember several mom-and-pop eatercenter, standing the test of time for three ies that were on corners for years before decades by providing food and live music watching their unfortunate shuttering. seven days a week. Harboring fond memories of these While living in Savannah during the beloved spots is getting to be part of what it heyday of Southern rock, Jerry Zambito − a means to be a local in Savannah, but it still touring musician in bands such as Tangerhurts to see another longstanding staple ine − played at the venue that preceded the shut its doors. Sadly, at the end of January, Bayou in the same location. He decided to River Street’s Bayou Cafe will be joining open the Bayou and bring his love of music that nostalgic list. to the people. Along with its delicious food, Bayou Cafe In 1991, Zambito first welcomed guests 16 has been a spot for soul-filling live music to Bayou Cafe. Since then, pretty much CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

BY LINDY MOODY

every Savannah native has stopped into the Bayou at some point during their stumbles down River Street, but few know the storied history of what it has meant to Savannah’s live-music scene. Thomas Claxton, the restaurant’s assistant booker and frequent performer, started his musical career at the Bayou. As a junior in high school, Claxton first played on the Bayou Stage. Even though he is classically trained, much of his music education came from the Bayou and learning from other performers at the Bayou. “After you work with guys like Jerry Zambito and Chief, you definitely are more prepared when you go into major cities,” he told me. After learning from them and starting at the Bayou, Claxton claims he was never nervous onstage performing anywhere else.

The ever-popular bar at Bayou Cafe. PHOTO BY LINDY MOODY

The fascinating wall of fame seen at Bayou Cafe. PHOTO BY LINDY MOODY

Though it goes without saying, Claxton also told me that “this place had a serious impact on this area, especially River Street in general. This is a place where people come from all around the country just to come visit every time they are in town.” The quaint stage has hosted a plethora of big names, even drawing other big names to observe from the crowds. Acts like The Black Crowes, Edwin McCain, and Derek St. Holmes have all earned their stripes on the storied stage of Bayou Cafe. When the Black Crowes called Zambito to set up a gig at Bayou, they asked if there was any room for security detail. He jokingly told them that they would have to set them up in the kitchen if they came, because it wasn’t the biggest venue in the world. As legend has it, they ended up coming anyway and were so charmed by Zambito that they asked him to play a few numbers onstage with them. The Black Crowes, incredible though they may be, are not the only famous folks to have walked through the doors at Bayou Cafe. “I looked up from the stage one day and the WWE World Champion was sitting in here,” Claxton told me. It was one of those nights that stood out for him. Like most young boys of the ’80s and ’90s, Claxton grew up watching wrestling. He instantly recognized A.J. Stiles and The Good Brothers, bought them a round, and continued with his show.  Spending most of his career learning and growing with the Bayou, it is fitting that Claxton will host the farewell celebration, but he wanted to ensure that patrons remembered the people who made Bayou Cafe so special. 

“Chief was our house musician here on the weekdays. Sunday through Thursday, from 1991 until he unfortunately passed away in 2011. A good 20 years he was a regular guy up here. I don’t think I met anybody yet that played the Bayou that left a mark on the Bayou quite like he did,” Thomas opined. If you never met Chief, I can tell you that he was an incredible musician. Like any great artist, the music that he played was matched only by his presence onstage − injecting humor and himself into everything that he did. Unlike modern musicians with iPads and holders for their drinks, Chief brought books of music and lyrics with him to every show. He was as old school as they came, and customers still ask about him to this day. When people think back on what made Bayou what it was, visions of Chief will certainly dance in their heads. Going out in style, the Bayou Cafe will say goodbye with a four-day celebration. On Thursday, Jan. 28, Claxton will play an acoustic set that he says is inspired by “those old MTV unplugged type of feels, where Alice In Chains was onstage with just their acoustic guitar.” On Jan. 29, John Lee and the Hextons will play and host an open jam for anyone who wants to join in. And for the big finale weekend, Claxton, Paul Cooper, Jo, Willis, and Gordon Perry will play open-jam sessions on Saturday and Saturday dubbed The Grand Jam Finale. Though the doors may be shutting, the Bayou Cafe food truck will continue to carry the torch of their delicious fare. Vince Zambito, son of the Bayou Cafe’s founder, will be all around Savannah

SERVING FRESH LOCAL SEAFOOD

7906 US-80, Wilmington Island 912-897-2009 flyingfishsavannah.com

The exterior of Bayou Cafe. PHOTO BY LINDY MOODY

filling mouths with delicious bites of Cajun cookin’. The bittersweet closing of Bayou Cafe isn’t lost on anyone that has ever been a part of the family that made Bayou what it was. From employees to patrons to musicians to the folks that sat outside and vibed alone on the cobblestones to the music inside, the Bayou family extends its warmest and most gracious adoration and praise. It’s what both Zambito and Claxton shared as they reminisced about the long history of this long-loved local hangout. cs Bayou Cafe: 14 N. Abercorn Ramp, Savannah. Visit epicuropedia.com to read more by Lindy Moody.

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

FOOD & DRINK

17


THE BAND PAGE

LEVI MOORE @ EDGAR’S PROOF & PROVISION

Part country, part classic rock, and all Americana, the repertoire of Savannah singer-songwriter Levi Moore includes hits by The Eagles, Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band, and The Grateful Dead. Leave your everyday cares behind to enjoy this acoustic show redolent of a trailside performance played by the fire after a long day of driving cattle. SATURDAY, JANUARY 30 | 6:30 P.M.

ERICA FRANKLIN @ JAZZ’D

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

As the lead vocalist and guitarist of Wood and Steel, Erica Franklin gets booties shaking when playing with that five-piece festival favorite, but she’ll be showing off her more sensitive side for this intimate solo show at Jazz’d. Hear Franklin hit the high notes while sharing her acoustic strumming skills that still bring on the funk. FRIDAY, JANUARY 29 | 7:30 P.M.

18

ERIC BRACK @ PLANT RIVERSIDE

Relax while enjoying the spirited rhythms of Eric Brack, a Savannah pianist and vocalist appearing at the PRD’s Piano Bar in the Beethoven Terrace on Saturday night. As a longtime local music teacher and founder of the Sound Mind School of the Arts, Brack’s influence can be heard from the keys of numerous Savannah musicians. SATURDAY, JANUARY 30 | 7:30 P.M.

INDIVIDUALLY TWISTED @ STARLAND YARD

With a hard-rocking sound reminiscent of Rage Against the Machine and occasionally venturing into the realm of psychedelia, this youthful garage band plays solid renditions of classics by the likes of The Beatles, The Who, and The Guess Who. Don’t miss this chance to see Simon Hodgson, Ian Doyle, and Andrew Ottimo get heads banging at Starland Yard. SUNDAY, JANUARY 31 | 6 P.M.


MUSIC

FEATURE

2021 2-DAY SUPERFEST CONCERT PASS

TICKETS ON EVENTBRITE

The stars of ‘Legends Live On’ in Savannah. PHOTO BY NICK ROBERTSON

Stars of the future give life to voices of the past

FRIDAY FEB 5TH

PURPLE MADNESS (PRINCE TRIBUTE)

Five young performers bring the ‘Legends Live On’ show to Savannah

SATURDAY FEB 6TH THE PETTY HEARTS

( TOM PETTY TRIBUTE BAND)

SUNDAY FEB 7TH

LIVE MUSIC WITH JASON, KEITH & ROSS

3016 EAST VICTORY DR. 912.352.2933 • COACHS.NET

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

show calls on all of its performers to use their full vocal ranges. nick@connectsavannah.com “I sing bass most of the show, and we all are jumping all over the place,” says Rivera. SOME ARTISTS are inspired by past Shortly before the pandemic struck, greats. Others are inspired to bring past Woods was playing the title role in the greats back to life. San Francisco production of “Hamilton,” The five young performers starring in and while the musicians that he channels “Legends Live On” – a decade-hopping in this show have a different type of fame revue of energetic song-and-dance tributes than the American statesman, he still feels to iconic chart-toppers ranging from The their historic connections. Temptations to The Beatles to The Jackson “A lot of this music is music that I wish I Five to Bruno Mars – are now lighting up grew up with,” Woods says. the Savannah Theatre’s storied stage. As for Hairston, she’s made a name for The show features the four accomherself starring in “The Donna Summer plished stars of Legacy – Tracy Byrd, JusMusical,” and in “Legends Live On” she tin Reynolds, Noah Rivera, and Deaundre sings a disco medley. Woods – along with widely traveled song“I was actually right in the middle of a stress Alex Hairston, performing at the tour, the ‘Donna Summer’ tour, when the Savannah Theatre on Fridays, Saturdays, pandemic shut everything down,” Hairand Sundays through Feb. 14. ston recalls, adding that this production For New York-based Byrd, who played allows her to “revisit some of those songs, Lionel Ritchie in a touring production of and revisit her spirit in the show.” “Motown: The Musical,” singing hits from All five of these artistes are glad to be the ’70s and ’80s comes naturally. staging “Legends Live On” in the historic “It’s a dream come true to me, honestly,” Savannah Theatre, where pictures of Byrd said, adding that being in “Legends world-renowned actors who have graced Live On” gives him greater understanding this venue hang on numerous walls. of the difficult circumstances endured by “In 40 years, somebody’s going to be many of the artists they’re emulating. looking at our pictures here,” says Byrd as Reynolds, who performed as Smokey the ensemble laughs in agreement. cs Robinson in “The Marvin Gaye Musical,” also experiences flashbacks to his past role. “Legends Live On” is playing at the Savan“We actually don’t have any Smokey in nah Theatre (222 Bull St., Savannah) on Jan. this show, but we do a whole Temptations 29, 30, and 31, and Feb. 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, and medley, which Smokey Robinson wrote a 14. Friday and Saturday shows are at 8 p.m. lot of that music,” Reynolds said. (except on Saturday, Feb. 13, with shows at Since Rivera hit the high notes while 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.) and Sunday shows are at playing Frankie Valli in the Las Vegas 3 p.m. For social distancing during perforproduction of “Jersey Boys,” it might be mances, audiences are limited to 35% of expected that he would belt out all the faltheater capacity. See savannahtheatre.com setto parts in “Legends Live On,” but this for details. BY NICK ROBERTSON

19


CONNECT SAVANNAH MUSIC

SOUNDBOARD

27-

2

WHO IS PLAYING WHERE THIS WEEK

SOUNDBOARD IS A FREE SERVICE. TO BE INCLUDED, PLEASE SEND YOUR LIVE MUSIC INFORMATION WEEKLY TO SOUNDBOARD@CONNECTSAVANNAH.COM. DEADLINE IS 10 A.M. MONDAY, TO APPEAR IN WEDNESDAY’S EDITION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT OR CUT LISTINGS DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS.

WEDNESDAY 1.27

THURSDAY 1.28

FRIDAY 1.29

Driftaway Cafe Chuck Courtenay, 6 p.m. Nickie’s 1971 Ray Tomasino, 7 p.m. Plant Riverside District Aaron Lehrian, 11 a.m.; Eric Britt, 7 p.m. The Wormhole Open Jam, 9 p.m.

Cohen’s Retreat Munchies & Music, 5-9 p.m. The Perch at Local 11 ten Rachael Shaner Plant Riverside District Aaron Lehrian, 11 a.m.

Barrelhouse South Yours for the Taking, 9 p.m. Dew Drop Inn Bucky & Barry, 8 p.m. Plant Riverside District Howard Paul, 7 p.m. Rancho Alegre JodyJazz Trio, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Wild Wing Cafe Tyler Roe, 7 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC

TRIVIA & GAMES

El-Rocko Lounge Trivia with Jules and Chris Grimmett, 9-11:30 p.m. Service Brewing Company Trivia Night with Daniel, 6:30 p.m.

KARAOKE

Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. Wet Willie’s Karaoke, 9 p.m.

COMEDY

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Totally Awesome Bar Savannah Comedy Underground, 9 p.m.

20

LIVE MUSIC

TRIVIA & GAMES

McDonough’s Family Feud, 7 p.m.

KARAOKE

Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. McDonough’s Karaoke, 9 p.m. Nickie’s 1971 Karaoke Night The Wormhole Karaoke, 9 p.m.

COMEDY

Totally Awesome Bar Open Mic Comedy, 8:30 p.m.

DJ

Club 51 Degrees DJ B-Rad, 9 p.m. Top Deck Sunset Deck Party, 6 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC

TRIVIA & GAMES PS Tavern Beer Pong Tournament, 10 p.m.

KARAOKE

Bay Street Blues Karaoke Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. McDonough’s Karaoke, 9 p.m. Nickie’s 1971 Karaoke Night, 9 p.m. Totally Awesome Bar Karaoke, 10 p.m.

COMEDY

The Wormhole Piere Guyton, 8 p.m.

DJ

Club 51 Degrees DJ Fer, DJ Emalo, DJ Lil G, DJ BRad, 9 p.m. VICE Lounge + Mojito Bar DJ Primal, 9 p.m.

SATURDAY 1.30 LIVE MUSIC

Barrelhouse South Ella Langley, 9 p.m. The Perch at Local 11 ten Dave Smith Plant Riverside District Tell Scarlet, 7 p.m. Rancho Alegre JodyJazz Trio, 6:30-9:30 p.m. River Street Riverboat Co. Bucky & Barry, 6-9 p.m. Wild Wing Cafe Matt Hill, 1 p.m.; Bill Hodgson, 7 p.m.

KARAOKE

Bay Street Blues Karaoke Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. Totally Awesome Bar Karaoke, 10 p.m.

SUNDAY 1.31

TRIVIA & GAMES

LIVE MUSIC

Congress Street Social Club VooDoo Soup, 10 p.m. Flashback Brady Adams, 8 p.m. Myrtle & Rose Fabulous Equinox Krewe, noon Nickie’s 1971 Roy Swindell, 7 p.m. Tubby’s Tank House (Thunderbolt) Bucky & Barry, 1 p.m. Wild Wing Cafe Andrew Gill, 1 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

Club One Super Gay Bingo, 5:30 p.m.

KARAOKE

Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. Wet Willie’s Karaoke, 9 p.m.

BAR & CLUB EVENTS Fia Rua Irish Pub Family Movie Night, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY 2. 2 LIVE MUSIC

Nickie’s 1971 Roy Swindell, 7 p.m.

TRIVIA & GAMES

Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m. McDonough’s Karaoke, 9 p.m.

Basil’s Pizza and Deli Trivia, 7 p.m. Fia Rua Irish Pub Trivia, 7:30 p.m. Oak 36 Bar + Kitchen Trivia Tuesday, 9 p.m.

MONDAY 2. 1

KARAOKE

Moon River Brewing Co. Trivia, 6 p.m.

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

Nickie’s 1971 Ray Tomasino, 7 p.m.

If you like us, throw your thumb in the air

Blueberry Hill Karaoke, 9 p.m.3 a.m. Club One Karaoke, 10 p.m.

DINE IN

Mon-Wed 11-4 Thur-Sat 11-8 Sun 11-4

TAKEOUT & CURBSIDE:

Everyday 11-8

912.354.8745

5320 Water's Ave.

barnesrestaurant.com


CULTURE

Ryan Henderson

DeAnna Laree Craig PHOTOS BY SSC

GO STREAM ALICE

The Savannah Stage Company presents an adapted virtual version of ‘Alice in Wonderland’

BY NICOLE YOUNGBLUT

THE SAVANNAH Stage Company is inviting schoolchildren for a fanciful journey down the rabbit hole by presenting an imaginative virtual production of Alice in Wonderland. Since the Savannah-based troupe remains unable to stage large-scale plays for live audiences for now due to ongoing pandemic precautions, its dedicated artistes decided to expand its reach by launching the Savannah Stage Company’s first-ever “virtual field trip” production with a goal of offering school-aged kids across Georgia and beyond opportunities to participate in a literary-theater experience online. While this virtual field trip will be available to schools by request – as well as a Q&A with the artists that created it and an interactive study guide – the company is presenting an online premiere of its new Alice in Wonderland adaptation via a Facebook Live streaming event from the historic Savannah Theatre at 7 p.m. on Jan. 30. There is no charge to tune into this play, although donations to support the Savannah Stage Company are gratefully accepted. This colorful version of Lewis Carroll’s classic story is a collaborative effort based on a script written by company member Alexis Balaoing Ambrose, who also plays Alice in the show. “Alice in Wonderland appealed to me

because of its sort of nonsensical nature of the world that she falls into, and Lewis Carroll’s absurdism,” Ambrose said. According to director David McCall, that absurdism can be perplexing for some audience members, but this Savannah Stage Company production is custommade so that Carroll’s creative tale will be more accessible for youths. “I remember people talking about Alice in Wonderland not being their favorite story because it just seems like madness. But Lexi [Ambrose] did a really great job of giving context or a message to the madness,” McCall said. In this new adaptation, the audience will be given a fuller look at Alice’s everyday life and provide more depth to largely unseen characters in her world. The script gives Alice’s mom (DeAnna Laree Craig), stepdad (Rayshawn Roberts), and sister (Ashley Cook) a voice, while a tutor (Ryan Henderson) appears later as the White Rabbit, “much like The Wizard of Oz, how you have real-world characters aligning with fantasy characters,” McCall added. McCall said that preparing for this online show was unlike any other production that he’d ever worked on, with challenges including arranging “proper rehearsals” among cast members. “When I say proper rehearsals, I mean proper for 2020. Meaning a Zoom room, with me and a stage manager, Abbie Wells, and then all the cast in their respective spaces,” McCall said. “Who knows what the neighbors must have thought? Shouting lines from Lewis Carroll, but it was so fun!”

While this style of remote direction was limiting in some regards, McCall said that the Savannah Stage Company thespians adapted well to the unconventional circumstances. “As a director, you try to be clear and honor everyone’s input as much as you can. You’re trying to build this world, and it’s already difficult while you’re in the same room. It’s crazy difficult when you’re all over Zoom,” McCall said. “Some things work in our imaginations in Zoom rehearsals that don’t work practically, but this cast was incredible at adapting and problem-solving.” The actors were outfitted by costume designer Megan Wellman Blanton, and the play features original music by McKenna Lyons, a fellow Savannah Stage Company member. “I’d have to say I’m a little biased as a director, but I think it’s some of the most stunning music, especially a lot of her underscoring music. It’s so transporting. I loved it. I loved working with it,” said McCall. For the entire crew behind the Savannah Stage Company’s new Alice in Wonderland show, rehearsing and presenting this play online in a nontraditional way served as a reminder that following your curiosity can lead to fantastic places. cs View the Savannah Stage Company’s play Alice in Wonderland online via Facebook Live at 7 p.m on Jan. 30 by visiting facebook. com/savannahstagecompany.com, and check out savannahstagecompany.com for more details.

Wood sign workshops to guide your inner DIY! (912) 675 - 4170

boardandbrush.com/savannah

Savannah’s Oldest

URBAN FARM & PET

SUPPLY STORE

Specializing in

ORGANICS

- WE CARRY -

ALL TYPES OF FEED & SEED

HAY • FENCING • TRAPS • PEST CONTROL POTTERY & STATUARY • ANIMAL BEDDING PROPANE REFILL & EXCHANGE • LAWN & GARDEN • SEASONAL VEGETABLE PLANTS PET SUPPLIES • FARM SUPPLIES & MORE Located downtown at

307 Carolan St BRING THIS AD & 912.233.9862 10% GET OFF Just west of Bay St. Viaduct We Deliver!

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1938

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Alexis Balaoing Ambrose

THEATER

21


CULTURE

VISUAL ARTS

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

22

THE BEAT GOES ON Experience the Telfair PULSE Art + Technology Festival both in person and online

BY LAUREN WOLVERTON lauren@connectsavannah.com

EACH YEAR, Savannah’s PULSE Art + Technology Festival draws thousands of people to the Telfair Museums Jepson Center. Locals and visitors get a glimpse into the future amid immersive installations that combine traditional art with modern technology. This year, the festival will go on, but will look a little different due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Beginning on Jan. 27, PULSE will take on a hybrid format with exhibitions at the Jepson Center, a virtual STEM Chat with Diana Eng and Natalie Zee Drieu, a virtual curator’s tour, and workshops for both children and adults. The main attraction at the Jepson Center will be the first U.S. solo exhibition of Caribbean artist David Gumbs, titled From Dust to Gold. Gumbs’ exhibition includes multiple interactive digital installations and

drawings. His art, projected onto the Jepson Center’s walls, features moving explosions of color with incredibly detailed drawings of butterflies, tropical leaves, and more. “It’s really about the resilience of the Caribbean people, from having to deal with massive Category 5 hurricanes and devastation, to dust blowing from the Sahara, to the legacy of colonialism,” said Harry DeLorme, the Telfair senior curator of education and PULSE. The psychedelic exhibit is a lighthearted, fun experience that draws visitors in, then leaves them thinking and feeling connected to the world around them. DeLorme says themes of the natural world, spirituality, and current events are clear in Gumbs’ work. “I think there are qualities in his work that anyone can appreciate,” DeLorme said. All of Gumbs’ installations are handsfree, making his exhibit perfect for an event in a COVID-19 world. In the past, exhibits included features like cranks to

turn and buttons to push. “The largest one we’ll have this year, Blossoms, will be sound-activated, so it’s an entirely hands-free experience,” DeLorme said. Also at the Jepson Center are installations by local artists. Remains to be Seen by Greg Finger allows visitors to be “seen” by a giant projection eyeball. Marionette by SCAD student Guanzhi Kou features a motion controller that detects hand gestures and lets visitors play with digital puppets. “There are folks right here in our own community who are doing really interesting and innovative work,” DeLorme said, adding that PULSE contributes to Savannah’s rich art scene by being a cheerleader for creators of all ages. “I think, and I hope, that we’ve encouraged a lot of artists here in our community to keep doing work of this kind,” DeLorme said. “I know we’ve had some students from [the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System] and some teachers who have been very involved. It’s been exciting to see students from past years come in with robots they’ve built and other tech projects that they’ve created.” DeLorme says one of the most popular attractions each year is the PULSE family day. To spread out the crowd of excited children and parents, organizers have created three-day free-admission weekends. They’ve also created “art kits” for children to replace all of the hands-on activities missing from this year’s event. Each kit

Due to the ongoing pandemic, all works in the 2021 PULSE Festival are touchless. PHOTOS COURTESY OF TELFAIR MUSEUMS

includes materials and instructions for children to create their own masterpieces at home. At the end of the day, DeLorme says, PULSE is about having fun, learning something new, and energizing the creative

sides of visitors. “Hopefully we’re having an effect and inspiring folks,” DeLorme said. “Whether you make art or not, I think inspiring people is one of the things we really hope to do.” cs

The Telfair PULSE Art + Technology Festival kicks off on Jan. 27 at 6 p.m. with a virtual opening lecture delivered by featured artist David Gumbs. Visit telfair. org/pulse2021 for more information and to register for online events.

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Featured artist David Gumbs.

LEFT AND ABOVE: Hands-free modern artworks featured in the 2021 PULSE Festival.

23


JONESIN’ CROSSWORD BY MATT JONES ©2021

“CASHING IN” --A PUZZLE WITH SOME REDEEMING VALUE.

JUST LISTED!

CROSSWORD ANSWERS

2232 Daffin Drive, Savannah

Super Cute - Super Convenient Midtown Cottage 3 BR’S, 1 Bath. New Roof! New HVAC!! $185,500

TOM ANDERSON • 912.433.4340

KW Coastal Area Partners • Keller Williams REALTY • 912.356.5001

ACROSS

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Georgia Southern University invites applicants for the following vacancies on the Armstrong campus:

24

Learning Commons Assistant Part-Time (19 hour) - JOB ID 222211

Please visit the Georgia Southern University employment website and complete the application process at http://apptrkr.com/2127789 The application process must be completed by the deadline to be considered. Georgia is an open records state. Individuals in need of reasonable accommodations under the ADA to participate in the search process should notify Human Resources: (912) 478-6947. Georgia Southern University is an EEO/AA/ADA/Veteran employer.

1 Palindromic title (even with the apostrophe) 5 Dutch-speaking Caribbean island 10 Gum blobs 14 Prefix that means “both” 15 Littlest bits 16 Chain with stacks and syrups 17 “How You Remind Me” rock band 19 Croft of the Tomb Raider games 20 Pointer by another name 21 Place to get drinks before you turn in, maybe 23 “Take This Job and Shove It” singer David Allan ___ 24 “Qué ___?” (“How’s it going?”) 27 Area near NYU 28 Dressed like a judge 30 Nocturnal newborn 34 Monopoly token until 2017 39 Language suffix 40 Equal share, often 41 Wall crawlers 42 Apothecary’s container 43 “The King and I” star Brynner 44 Get red in the face and shy away, maybe 46 First “Blue’s Clues” host 48 Willie Nelson’s son who leads the band Promise of the Real

49 An official language of Pakistan 52 Remained on the shelf 53 Drugstore with long receipts 56 Smoked Polish sausage 60 Most Nunavut inhabitants 62 Monty Python member Idle 63 Like bottles and cans, in some states (or what five long Across answers all literally contain) 66 Delany of “China Beach” 67 Hospital figure 68 Luxor river 69 Out in the open 70 Secretly watch 71 Sailed through

DOWN

1 ___ Panic (hair color brand that’s still around) 2 Protein-building acid 3 Start of a popular children’s song 4 (Soon-to-be) former VP name (depending on when this is published) 5 Have a cold, perhaps 6 Shoplift 7 Ogden’s locale 8 Maple go-with, in some recipes 9 Seek permission for 10 Ron Howard fantasy film of 1988 11 Moby-Dick captain 12 Bilingual TV explorer

13 Practice for a boxing match 18 Endorse enthusiastically 22 Website for DIYers with instructional steps 25 “Steal This Book” author Hoffman 26 Remain’s counterpart in Brexit 28 NFL official 29 It gets boring pretty quickly 31 1970s teen idol Garrett 32 Genesis brother 33 Poker player’s giveaway 34 Motivations 35 High, in Haiti 36 Dakota Fanning’s younger sister 37 “Classic Concentration” puzzle type 38 Tennis star Naomi 42 Initials that may be collecting dust in your TV room 44 “Phineas and ___” 45 Pillowcase material 47 Lt. Tuvok, for one 50 Does sock repair 51 Consume 53 Like 8, 27, and 64 54 Coupe de ___ (old Cadillac model) 55 Chariot horse 56 Canvas shoe brand 57 “Dies ___” (Latin hymn) 58 A, to Germans 59 “It’s worth ___!” 61 Grandma, informally 64 Show stager for GIs 65 Neurotic cartoon chihuahua


tree-fifty tuesdays all beers, titos, jameson: $3.50

Friday, Saturday and Sunday

$3 Glaes of Rosé still or sparkling.

wednesday Half off Boles of Wine

thursdays & Sunday Live dj | 6-9 pm Drink specials

125 West River Street On top of the cotton sail hotel SUNDAY THRU THURSDAY NOON TO 10 PM* FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NOON TO MIDNIGHT*

www.topdeckbar.com *CLOSING HOURS SUBJECT TO CHANGE


by Chris Sweat

PHOTOS FROM LOCAL EVENTS View more photos online at connectsavannah.com/connected

3 POINTS FOOD COURT GRAND OPENING

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Savannah’s newest food-truck haven got rolling with a festive ribbon-cutting ceremony on Jan. 16, when the 3 Points Food Court welcomed a wide selection of mobile kitchens and diverse area residents. Intended to serve as a community gathering place, 3 Points went on to host a celebration for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Jan. 18, and this central locale will regularly showcase live music and other events. Visit 3pointsfoodcourt.com for more information.

26


PHOTOS FROM LOCAL EVENTS

by Bunny Ware

View more photos online at connectsavannah.com/connected

BLESSINGS IN A BOOKBAG’S 9TH ANNUAL MLK WALK IT OUT EVENT AT DAFFIN PARK

CONNECT SAVANNAH | JAN 27 -FEB 2, 2021

Combining reverence for the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. with a family-focused event to boost healthy activity among all ages, the annual MLK Walk It Out was held on Jan. 16 amid Savannah’s Daffin Park. Organized by Blessings in a Bookbag, a nonprofit organization founded by Mahogany Bowers to feed underprivileged schoolchildren, this year’s MLK Walk It Out welcomed participants to do laps around the park’s perimeter trail while also hosting fun activities.

27


Profile for Connect Savannah

Connect Savannah, January 27, 2021  

Connect Savannah, January 27, 2021  

Advertisement