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A few Leading Conjupers performing thelp favoupltÂŤ Tpioka.


Tlie JKqgic Jïri of Uníeríaining. A Book to interest you in amusing: others.

" SElaBIT," Author of "The Magician's Handbook," ''The Magical Entertainer," etc.

LONDON :

DAWBARN & WARD, LTD., and G. ORNUM & Co. 1907.

j


COPYRIGHT.


PREFACE. The purpose of "The Magic Art of Entertaining" is to lucidly instruct the reader, be he or she entirely ignorant of any technical knowledge of the arts treated, in different ways of entertaining an audience. Not only are the readers taught to give clever and mystifying performances—they are provided with the means of rendering their efforts amusing. Added to every explanation or secret will be found appropriate humorous " patter," which is such an important factor in the success of any entertainment ; this, in itself, is a feature that has never before been placed within the reach of the amateur performer. With few exceptions, any properties required for the items described in this book may be made up at home at the cost of a few pence ; in no case is expensive apparatus necessary. Having regard to the fact that very few amateurs can afford the necessary time to acquire bewildering dexterity, the author has selected only those forms of entertainment that lend themselves to immediate and simple production. Owing to the varied contents of this book, through its medium, no reader of average intelligence will find any difficulty in discovering an outlet for his ability to eotertain.


CONTENTS. Frontispiece

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6

Sub-Title

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7

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9

Introduction

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11

The Egg Bag Trick

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13

The Life History of an Egg

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18

An Entirely New Rising Card Trick

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19

Rice and Water Magic

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25

The Twentieth Century Handkerchief Trick ; or Joining the Colours ... ... ... ...

28

Paper You Cannot Destroy

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31

Wine, Water or What ? ...

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34

Balloons from a Hat

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37

The Sliding Die Box

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40

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45

Preface

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" A Night with the Moon"

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A Magic Kettle Act for 7id

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The Beginning and End of Paper Folding ...

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70

Ventriloquial Dialogue

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82

Lightning Sketches

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88


INTRODUCTION. This following can be given, if desired, in extenso. We recommend the reader to curtail these opening remarks unless he be introducing a very long entertainment, in which case every few minutes that can be stolen without becoming prosy are occasionally useful.

Ladies and gentlemen, if you have nothing better to do perhaps you will be good enough to keep your eyes on me and your hands on your purses. Before I say anything I should like to give a few words of advice to amateur conjurers. Nowadays, everybody performs conjuring tricks, except bank clerks. Anyone with an easy flow of language may become a conjurer; especially cabmen. In fact, the more you talk the easier it is. Ladies would be^very clever at conjuring if they could only keep from speaking the truth. The whole art of conjuring lies—I did not mean to emphasise the lies—in being able to palm a rabbit. To do this you start by palming a policeman. It generally costs sixpence to palm a policeman, but of course it is a question of " force ; " isn't it surprising how many policemen are passive resisters ! The principle rule in magic is, never let your right


18 hand know whom your left is doing. For that reason armless people should not practise sleight-of-hand tricks. There is no harm in them trying, but if they attempt to make a pudding in a gentleman's hat they will be sure to put their foot in it. Unfortunately, you never know where conjuring will lead you. People who do tricks with other people's watches sometimes get a large fee—sometimes a long sentence. It all depends on whether you do the trick neatly or not. Wizards are supposed to be very unscrupulous. I have actually known an old lady to hold her breath for five minutes for fear I should borrow it. I can only say if you will lend me all the money I want during my entertainment I shall not mind if you hold your breath for ever. I think my few remarks will have convinced you before we start that conjuring is very silly. Before I finish you will say that silly isn't the word for it.


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