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JUNE 2014 THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF CSDA

Fluid Cutting Underwater Wire Sawing Techniques Hard to Beat

WALL SAWING FOR CALIFORNIA WALMART EXPANSION POST-ACCIDENT AND REASONABLE SUSPICION DRUG TESTING GPR IMAGING AT WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY

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PRESIDENT’S PAGE

JUDITH O’DAY CSDA President

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re you a follower of fashion? Do you try to keep up with the latest trends? I imagine that for many in our industry, the answer is a resounding no! There is no time for flashy labels on a slurry-filled jobsite. However, I am sure you could correctly identify some designers simply by their logos. Having a strong brand and recognizable logo is key for almost every company on the planet, but a business cannot survive on a snazzy logo alone. If you look around your office, shop or jobsite, you will no doubt see several logos on tools, equipment, electronics and apparel, but it is likely that none of these things were bought because they were the ‘must have’ item at the time. Rather, they were purchased because they were made by reputable manufacturers with proven track records for producing safe, high-quality products. Whether it is a saw blade, core drill, hard hat or smart phone, there is no point in something looking good on the surface if it does not hold up when put to the test. June marks the release of CSDA’s annual Membership Directory and Resource Guide. This book not only serves as a tool for contractors involved with the association, but as a valuable resource for thousands of general contractors, architects, engineers and government representatives who are looking for concrete cutters, polishers and imaging technicians. The directory highlights companies that have invested time and money to train operators and improve operations through CSDA’s

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certification and training programs. What you will see next to some members is a certification logo—maybe two. It is important to remember what these logos represent and how much hard work and dedication has gone into achieving this status. These companies and operators should be very proud of their accomplishments. CSDA is also more than just a logo. Since 1972, the association has strived to offer the best resources and set the standards for professionals in our industry. With 33 different training and certification courses, comprehensive safety manuals, over 100 Toolbox Safety Tips and almost 40 industry Standards, Specifications, Tolerances and Best Practices, the association has substance. And it does not end there. Our Board, committees and membership continually help us improve and come up with new ways to serve the industry. Whether it be fashion, technology or concrete construction, some brands have come and gone. Those that stand the test of time do so because they remain focused on providing the best quality products and services to their customers. The companies listed in the 2014-2015 CSDA Membership Directory and Resource Guide know that the association offers more to them than just a name in a book or a logo on a hard hat. If you are not a member, visit www.csda.org to find out what CSDA can offer your company.

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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF CSDA

CSDA OFFICERS

CONCRETE CASES

President, Judith O’Day Terra Diamond Industrial joday@terradiamond.com Vice President, Kevin Baron Western Saw, Inc. kevinb@westernsaw.com Secretary/Treasurer, Mike Orzechowski DITEQ Corporation mikeo@diteq.com Past President, Jim Dvoratchek Hard Rock Concrete Cutters, Inc. jimd@hardrockconcretecutters.com Executive Director, Patrick O’Brien Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association pat@csda.org

CSDA BOARD OF DIRECTORS (Terms expiring in 2015)

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Ty Conner Austin Enterprise tconner@austin-enterprise.com Mark DeSchepper Construction Solutions, LLC mdeschepper@construction-solutions.com Matthew Finnigan National Concrete Cutting, Inc. matthewf@nationalconcretecuttinginc.com Mike Greene Greene’s, Inc. mikeg@greenesinc.com Greg Lipscomb Diamond Products Limited glipscomb@diamondproducts.com

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Sid Kilgore Dixie Diamond Manufacturing skilgore@dixiediamond.com

CSDA BOARD OF DIRECTORS (Terms expiring 2016) Paul DeAndrea DeAndrea Coring & Sawing, Inc. paul@deandreacoring.com Matt Dragon Hilti, Inc. matthew.dragon@hilti.com

Underwater Wire Sawing Techniques Hard to Beat

CSDA Contractor Aids Walmart Expansion Wall Sections Cut Using Diamond Tools

Dorm Search

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Concrete Imaging and Core Drilling Helps Renovate Residence Halls

Patrick Harris Concrete Renovation, Inc. ptharris@sbcglobal.net Kellie Vazquez Holes Incorporated kvazquez@holesinc.com Kevin Warnecke ICS, Blount Inc. kwarnecke@icsbestway.com Ryan Wesselschmidt Husqvarna Construction Products ryan.wesselschmidt@husqvarna.com

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Hot Property

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Dream House Renovated by Concrete Cutting

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CONCRETE OPENINGS MAGAZINE Official Magazine of the Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association Volume 23, Number 2 ISSN: 1093-6483 Concrete Openings magazine is published by O’Brien International, Inc., four times each calendar year in March, June, September and December. Editorial contributions are welcomed and advertisements are encouraged. Please contact the Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association 100 2nd Avenue South Suite 402N St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Tel: 727-577-5004 Fax: 727-577-5012 WWW.CSDA.ORG Magazines, newspapers and private individuals are welcome to reproduce, in whole or part, articles published herein provided that acknowledgements are made in the following manner: “Reprinted courtesy of the Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association, Concrete Openings magazine, Issue Date.” No alterations should be made in the text of any article. PUBLISHER Patrick O’Brien ASSOCIATE EDITOR Russell Hitchen CONCRETE CASE CONTRIBUTORS Clifford Carpenter Matt Dragon Brian Kleinkopf Jack Sondergard Luke Wittenbraker EDITORIAL REVIEW COMMITTEE

C O N T E N T S 12 CSDA 2014 Convention & Tech Fair Association Steers Attendees to New Horizons

22 The Business of Business

How Great Leaders Create Highly Innovative Cultures

30 Tech Talk

High Frequency Saws and Drills: Proper Maintenance is Key to Higher Production

34 Safety Counts

Post-Accident and Reasonable Suspicion Drug Testing

42 Social Media Focus

5 Reasons Why Your Social Media Campaign Isn’t Working

44 Polished Perspective

Altering Perceptions to Realize Opportunities

46 Core Health

Keep Calm and Eat Bacon

49 OSHA/CSDA Alliance Latest 50 Industry Bits 56 Certification

Skip Aston Rod Newton Pat Stepenski The information and recommendations in this magazine are provided for use by fully qualified, professional personnel. The Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association and the publisher disclaim any responsibility as to their use by readers and shall not be liable for damages arising out of the use of the foregoing information.

57 Membership 60 Calendar 64 Director’s Dialogue

All bylined articles published in this magazine represent solely the individual opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of the Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association.

30 Cover Photo: Oil platform decommissioning project, Gulf of Mexico.

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Fluid

CUTTING

Underwater Wire Sawing Techniques Hard to Beat

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ffshore oil production is big business, so whenever oil companies need to make repairs or schedule upgrades to their platforms, they look for the fastest and most efficient ways possible to minimize shutdowns and maintain production. A specialty contractor recently traveled offshore to an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico to cut a series of 30-inch-diameter piles 15 feet below the sea bed and show why wire sawing was an ideal cutting technique for this application.

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Patent-approved articulating wire saw systems were used to make the necessary cuts.

The contractor used three articulating wire saws to clamp around 30-inch-diameter piles and make cross-sectional cuts.

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Cut pile sections were rigged and removed from the water by crane with saws still attached.

The Mactech Offshore office of CSDA member Mactech, based in Red Wing, Minnesota, was contracted by a major independent oil and natural gas exploration and production company to cut and remove six concrete-filled steel piles from one of its offshore platforms. The platform was to be removed from the Gulf of Mexico as part of a strategically planned decommissioning project after the well ran dry. The steel casing of the piles was 1.5 inches thick and helped secure the platform jacket to the sea bed. Due to federal regulations, the piles had to be cut 15 feet below the sea bed—or mud line as it is known in the industry. In addition, the weight and handling limitations available at the platform meant the jacket structure also had to be cut just above a ‘mud mat’ on the mud line before dredging and cutting below.

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What are Jackets and Mud Mats? In the oil production industry, a jacket refers to the steel frame that supports the deck and the topside of an oil platform. The jacket, traditionally a steel tubular structure, connects the platform to the sea bed. The feet of the structure are buried deep with the sea bed to help maintain stability. Jackets can measure hundreds of feet in height, depending on the depth of water, and usually continue up at least 50 feet from water level to keep the topside platform a safe distance from rough seas. The topside deck includes living quarters, crane, helideck, wellheads and production equipment.

When additional support is needed for any oil production structures or equipment on a soft sea bed, companies employ subsea mud mats to provide a stronger surface. Usually, a mud mat has a top plate and below that plate are vertical load-bearing beams that distribute loads and stresses. The specific type of mud mat needed for a given location is based on soil composition and the load requirements for the equipment.


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“Below-mud-line cuts are often done with internal abrasive cutters or explosives because they do not require external excavation, saving time and cost,” said Derek Marcks, offshore director for Mactech Offshore. “In this particular case, however, the piles were filled with concrete to a level above the natural bottom. This made the use of explosives or internal cutters impossible.” Aside from internal cutters or the use of explosives, other methods had been considered and ruled out including shears and inline diamond wire sawing. Shears were simply too big and heavy for the job and also left a large footprint, while inline wire sawing was deemed too costly. In the end, the team from Mactech was able to offer a custom wire sawing solution that met the customer’s needs. The company has recently received patent-approval status for an articulating wire saw system its engineers designed for subsea and topside cutting. The saw utilizes an articulating cutting arm for minimal clearance during cuts where other setups may not be able to fit or operate. Needing only 2 feet of clearance around the object being cut and having the cut set at the bottom of the saw, there was no need for extra dredging. Adjustable guide arms clamped around the piles and the diamond wire ran through a series of pulleys on the unit. This design reduced setup, installation and removal times, as the guiding

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Operators controlled the saws from above the surface and divers were used to help set the saws in place.

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arms were closed loosely around the piles to guide the saw down to cutting level before clamping on. This also increased safety on the job as the contractor was able to minimize the need for divers in the water. Power was provided by a diesel hydraulic power unit driving two hydraulic motors. A plan was developed by Mactech for the cutting of the six 30-inch-diameter pile sections above the mud mat structure to free the jacket and platform. These sections would take less time to cut than those below the mud line because they were hollow. Three articulating wire saws were used at the same time to cut piles on one side of the platform, then all three were moved to the other side to cut the three remaining piles. Each saw was installed by a diving team and each cut took an average of four hours and 15 minutes, including setup and takedown, with a 24-foot length of diamond wire supplied by Husqvarna. Once cut, the entire jacket section was rigged and removed from the water by crane and placed on a materials barge. This portion of the work was done in about 48 operational hours. After the majority of the jacket structure was lifted away, Tusk Subsea of Lafayette, Louisiana was brought in to excavate and dredge the areas around the remaining piles. Each area was dredged to a depth of 15 feet below the mud line and 2 feet around the piles. As each area was cleared, Mactech began setting up one of its saws to be lowered into each dredged area ready for cutting. As these pile sections were filled with concrete, it took the wire sawing team an average of one hour and 40 minutes to complete each cut and a total of five days to finish all tasks. While the cutting contractor’s articulating wire saws did minimize the use of divers, there was still a need to have divers in the water and so safety was critical. Once in the water, each diver had to find and set up a saw with limited visibility. Only one diver was allowed in the water at any time. Above the surface, the team from Mactech kept a close eye on sawing progress and the position of the wire through the water. There was a concern that other parts of the platform structure positioned close to the cutting loop would pinch the wires, so operators made regular adjustments to avoid this issue.

Pile sections below the mud line had 1.5-inch-thick steel casings and were filled with concrete.

COMPANY PROFILE Utilizing these custom wire saws, Mactech was able to make 12 underwater cuts through 30-inch-diameter pile sections in nine days, helping to remove hundreds of tons of steel and concrete. The solution offered by the cutting contractor brought the work in ahead of time and within budget. “Our customer was able to realize substantial time and cost savings from this job. The results of the cooperative effort exceeded everyones expectations,” said Marcks. “The saws we used to cut the steel and concrete piles were proven technology, but we had never employed them simultaneously or had to set them up so quickly to meet such a tight time frame before. We were extremely happy with the results,” he concluded.

A new CSDA member for 2014, Mactech is based in Red Wing, Minnesota and has been in business for 25 years. The company’s Mactech Offshore division is based in Lafayette, Louisiana and specializes in the offshore subsea market, deploying operators and equipment worldwide. Mactech has over 80 employees and offers the concrete cutting services of wire sawing and selective demolition.

RESOURCES Sawing and Drilling Contractor: Mactech Offshore Red Wing, Minnesota Phone: 337-839-2793 Email: luke@mactechonsite.com Website: www.mactechonsite.com

REVIEW AND COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE AT: WWW.CONCRETEOPENINGS.COM/FORUM.CFM

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Methods Used: Wire Sawing


BUY RADAR FROM A RADAR COMPANY And tools from a tool company “The StructureScan Mini is useful when scanning overhead, it’s lightweight and easy-to-use.” - Chase Johnson, GPRS San Francisco “As a three-truck cutting and coring operation we knew from day one that we would select GSSI equipment when starting our GPR Company. We visited others and tried others and to us there was just no comparison. From the welcoming we received on our first visit to the customer service we get today, GSSI is a true pleasure to work with. We look forward to many years ahead and can’t wait to see what’s up next in the world of GPR.”

– Storie Quast, Owner of Taylor’s Structural Imaging, Kentucky

W WW. C O N C RE TE OPE N IN GS.COM Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc.

www.geophysical.com • sales@geophysical.com • 800.524.3011

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Back row (from left to right): Greg Lipscomb, Mark DeSchepper, Ryan Wesselschmidt, Kevin Baron, Matthew Finnigan. Middle row: Mike Greene, Sid Kilgore, Patrick Harris, Kevin Warnecke. Front row: Patrick O’Brien, Judith O’Day, Ty Conner, Paul DeAndrea, Mike Orzechowski.

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rofessionals from the concrete cutting, polishing and imaging industries grabbed their cowboy hats and headed west for the 42nd Annual CSDA Convention and Tech Fair in March. The event was held in Tucson, Arizona at the Westin La Paloma Resort, where attendees learned how they could improve their operations and discover ways to do their on-site work more efficiently than ever before. An eye-opening keynote presentation and a special aeronautical-themed ceremony in recognition 1 2 | J U NE .1 4

of an influential industry veteran are just two reasons why this year’s event was an amazing success. The main focus of the 2014 Convention and Tech Fair was personal accountability, highlighted in David Levin’s keynote presentation Question Behind the Question: QBQ! Levin not only explained how a lack of personal accountability can really hurt a business, but also that taking ownership of issues can lead to very positive outcomes. Using a simple, language-based technique,

Levin showed attendees how using the QBQ! can turn bad questions like, “Who’s going to take care of that?” into good ones like, “What can I do to help?” “I got quite a few takeaways from the keynote,” said Dan Foley of Cobra Concrete Cutting Services Co. in Arlington Heights, Illinois. “Some of the presenter’s points on personal accountability really hit close to home. I can now take what I learned and use them in the field, instilling his ‘believe or leave’ mantra in my team.”


Highlights of the 12 business sessions held during the 2014 Convention included presentations about how small businesses are affected by the Affordable Care Act, developing a standard for the polishing industry and underwater cutting technologies. In addition, two roundtables entitled Recruiting and Retaining Qualified Employees and The Benefits of Automating Your Processes were extremely well attended and gave key decision-makers a chance to share knowledge and discuss ideas with their peers. Aside from insightful business sessions, CSDA scheduled several networking opportunities, social events and a Tech Fair in Tucson. Attendees had the chance to visit 24 exhibitors and talk with manufacturers in an intimate setting, allowing for in-depth discussions about products and services. Now a mainstay at the convention, the Tech Fair remains a popular event with contractors and manufacturers alike. “I am continually faced with the challenge of finding improved

techniques for completing projects on time and within budget. Meeting with this network of worldwide contractors and equipment suppliers will no doubt be an essential component in the success of my business,” said first-time convention attendee and new CSDA member Sam Skierski of Advanta Asphalt in Live Oak, Florida. The association’s Annual General Meeting was also held during the convention program, where CSDA announced its newly-elected Board members for 2014. Six Board members, whose terms expire in 2016, were elected. They are: Paul DeAndrea, DeAndrea Coring & Sawing, Inc., Henderson, Colorado; Matt Dragon, Hilti, Inc., Tulsa, Oklahoma; Patrick Harris, Concrete Renovation, Inc., San Antonio, Texas; Kellie Vazquez, Holes Incorporated, Houston, Texas; Kevin Warnecke, ICS, Blount Inc., Portland, Oregon and Ryan Wesselschmidt, Husqvarna Construction Products, Olathe, Kansas.

CSDA held two roundtable discussions during the 2014 Convention and Tech Fair. The two topics discussed were Recruiting and Retaining Qualified Employees and The Benefits of Automating Your Processes. The proceedings from these roundtables have been transcribed and are available to download through the “Members” section of the CSDA Website. As is the case in many industries, concrete cutting, polishing and imaging contractors are finding it increasingly difficult to not only find qualified employees, but also to retain them. Many young people do not view construction jobs as desirable or are unaware of the range of jobs available in the concrete renovation industry. The Recruiting and Retaining Qualified Employees roundtable encouraged discussion about successful hiring practices and what methods contractors have found effective for employee retention. Attendees shared information about some of the latest methods they had used and reinforced that some of the tried-and-tested ways still apply. Automating any business process—be it in the field, shop or office—reduces employee involvement in mundane or routine tasks and allows people to concentrate on other pressing business matters. Proper office automation allows a few people to do the job of many, so attendees of The Benefits of Automating Your Processes discussed the possibilities and practicalities of this concept. Conversations revolved around why automation is beneficial and how some business owners are using automation and technology to make their lives simpler. The release of these proceedings allows other business owners to benefit from the wisdom shared, and any member can take advantage of the information provided to improve their company. CSDA currently has 27 roundtable transcripts on a wide range of topics, all available to download in PDF format. For more information, contact the CSDA office at 727-577-5004 or email russell@csda.org.

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CSDA 2014 CONVENTION & TECH FAIR The CSDA Officers, halfway through their two-year term ending in 2015, are: President Judith O’Day, Terra Diamond Industrial, Salt Lake City, Utah; Vice-President Kevin Baron, Western Saw, Oxnard, California; Secretary/ Treasurer Mike Orzechowski, DITEQ Corporation, Lee’s Summit, Missouri; Past President Jim Dvoratchek, Hard Rock Concrete Cutters, Inc., Wheeling, Illinois and CSDA Executive Director Patrick O’Brien, St. Petersburg, Florida. Returning for the second year of their term on the CSDA Board of Directors are: Ty Conner, Austin Enterprise, Bakersfield, California; Mark DeSchepper, Construction Solutions, LLC, Paola, Kansas; Matthew Finnigan, National Concrete Cutting Inc., Milton, Washington;

continued Mike Greene, Greene’s, Inc., Woods Cross, Utah; Greg Lipscomb, Diamond Products Limited, Elyria, Ohio and Sid Kilgore, Dixie Diamond Manufacturing, Lilburn, Georgia. Not only are the concrete cutting, polishing and imaging industries continually evolving, but so is the business world in general. The only way for many contractors and business owners to survive is to look at where others have succeeded and failed. By doing this, these industry professionals can make sure their companies are heading in the right direction and heading for bright horizons. The CSDA Convention and Tech Fair provides the perfect platform for people to share ideas with their peers and learn from carefully selected business sessions. Consider joining the association at one of its upcoming quarterly meetings and attending the 2015 Convention and Tech Fair, scheduled for March 30–April 2 at The Vinoy Renaissance Resort in St. Petersburg, Florida. For more information, visit www.csda.org, call the CSDA office at 727-577-5004 or email info@csda.org.

CSDA Lifetime Achievement Award

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lso during the three-day CSDA Convention and Tech Fair, the association honored one of its Past Presidents and longstanding supporters for his outstanding contribution. Tom Stowell became the sixth recipient of the CSDA Lifetime Achievement Award since its inception in 2005. He was presented with the award during a special ceremony at the Pima Air and Space Museum in front of a UH-1 Huey—the helicopter he piloted during the Vietnam War. Tom has been involved in the industry for over 40 years and has been influential in the growth of the association. He began his career with Norton Diamond Products in 1971 and spent 36 years in sales, product management, sales management and marketing. Following his retirement in 2004, Tom acted as a consultant for Norton and then for Dixie Diamond Manufacturing, focusing on the support of CSDA. He served as CSDA President in 2007-2008 and participated in almost every committee within the association. Current CSDA President Judith O’Day and Executive Director Patrick O’Brien presented Stowell with the award. “The Lifetime Achievement Award has several meanings to me. It will always be a reminder of the privilege it has been to work with such an exceptional, dedicated team of individuals. It also represents the good times we have had, both at work and at play. It is a reminder of the challenging issues we have faced and, more importantly, all the things we have accomplished together,” said Stowell. “To me, these are more important than any individual achievement. It has been an honor and a privilege to have been selected to serve CSDA in so many capacities all these years. If I had another career to spend, I cannot think of a finer group to spend it with than our CSDA members.”

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CSDA Lifetime Achievement Award winner Tom Stowell receives his award from Executive Director Patrick O’Brien.


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CSDA Contractor Aids Walmart Expansion Wall Sections Cut Using Diamond Tools

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A Walmart store in Los Ba単os, California was being upgraded to a supercenter.

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he speed and precision of modern concrete cutting tools and equipment are just two reasons why sawing and drilling contractors can offer intelligent solutions to customers. So when retail giant Walmart needed almost 270 cubic yards of concrete cleanly removed from one of its store fronts, this CSDA member had the answer.

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Operators created over 250 cut sections, each measuring 5 feet by 6 feet.

Walmart is the largest retailer in the world. Founder Sam Walton opened his first Walmart in 1962 in Rogers, Arkansas and the company has been growing ever since. Each week, more than 245 million customers use a store or website owned by the company. Walmart has 11,000 stores under 69 banners in 27 countries, including e-commerce websites in 10 countries. The company employs 2.2 million associates worldwide and in the 2013 fiscal year, sales were approximately $466 billion. In January, general contractor Shames Construction of Livermore, California began the upgrade of a Walmart store in Los Baños, converting it into a supercenter. The expanded store will be 67,200 square feet larger and accommodate more services for customers when finished, adding 85 new employees. Before the upgrade could begin, however, the general contractor had to figure out a way to remove a 482-foot-wide, 18-foot-tall section of 10-inch-thick concrete wall at the front of the store without causing damage to the remaining structure. To expand the store, this wall had to be moved out 15 feet from its original location.

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Shames Construction contracted CSDA member Housley Demolition Co., Inc. of Visalia, California to perform the cutting work. The concrete sawing and drilling techniques employed by Housley would enable the wall to be cut and removed without damaging beams and keep the roof of the store stable. The contractor was given a time frame of 30 days to complete all tasks. “Obviously this was a high-profile job for us,” said Brain Kleinkopf, CEO for Housley Demolition. “The store remained open while we cut, so our safety procedures had to be right on and our operators were well prepared. Cutting with diamond tools was by far the cleanest and most cost effective way to do the work,” By using wall sawing techniques with diamond tools, the contractor was able to create uniform pieces with clean edges that could be easily picked and removed from the work area by crane or forklift. To make sure the roof was stabilized and prevent a possible collapse, a specialist contractor was brought onto the jobsite to install the most suitable shoring for the


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“Obviously this was a high-profile job for us... The store remained open while we cut, so our safety procedures had to be right on and our operators were well prepared.” —BRAIN KLEINKOPF, CEO FOR HOUSLEY DEMOLITION

building. Following that, Housley Demolition moved in to begin cutting. Operators used a WS 482 high frequency wall saw fitted with 30-inch-diameter blades, supplied by Husqvarna Construction Products, to make the cuts. The plan involved cutting the wall into a series of 289 sections measuring 5 feet wide by 6 feet tall, with each section weighing around 2,000 pounds. Sections were shored before cutting commenced and the track-mounted wall saw was used to make all cuts. First, operators used a Husqvarna DM 220 core drill and AD10 automatic drilling machine to create the 6-inch-diameter pick holes through the 10-inch-thick wall as per the marked sections. Each hole took 12 minutes to complete. The wall saw was then set up and a 5-foot horizontal cut was made at the bottom of the wall first, which helped to eliminate any binding or pinching on the blade, The 6-foot vertical cuts were done next before a further horizontal cut was made across the top of the section, Before the final horizontal cut was made on each section, however, the team placed the forks of an excavation machine through the core holes to safely take the weight of the 2,000-pound piece for removal.

Some 18-foot-tall sections were cut before an excavator operator performed controlled drops to the ground.

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Uncommon Bonds

“Central Concrete Cutting Inc. has used DDM products since 2012. The sales people worked with us closely to develop products that met our needs. They made jobsite visits and quickly supplied tools when needed. We are very satisfied with Dixie Diamond and the service they provide. We will be an ongoing customer.” —Jack Sondergard, President Central Concrete Cutting, Inc., Edgar, WI

Our Bond with Customers

Our Bond with the Industry

Since 1969, we’ve been dedicated to the customer. From our commitment to on-time delivery to our reputation for service, we’ve spent years building relationships with our customers.

We are fully American owned and operated. And we are one of the few true manufacturers left in the country. Combined with our heavy involvement with CSDA...no one knows the U.S. market better than us.

Our Bond Performance

M A N U F A C T U R I N G 100% virgin synthetic diamonds. Advanced production. And a complete understanding of the unique cutting needs across the country. No matter the job, our bond performance delivers the ideal cut speed and longevity.

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The contractor completed 481 linear feet of wall sawing and core drilled 577 pick holes. On average, the wall saw operator was able to complete the 6-foot vertical cuts in 20 minutes and the 5-foot horizontal cuts in 15 minutes. As the work progressed, Housley Demolition found that there was adequate space in parts of the work area to cut larger sections of the wall. In these instances, the company’s excavator operator would hold the top of a 15-foot-wide, 18-foot-tall section wall while it was cut and separated from the beams behind. Controlled wall drops were performed to lower these sections to the ground where they were broken up for removal. This reduced the original estimate of 289 cut sections to 253, saving the general contractor time and money. All cut pieces were placed on trucks and hauled off-site for safe disposal. Working eight-hour shifts for three straight weeks, the team from Housley Demolition successfully completed 481 linear feet of wall sawing, created 577 core drilled pick holes and removed 268 cubic yards of concrete at the Los Baños Walmart store. The work was completed ahead of schedule, within budget and without causing any disturbances to store employees or customers. “Walmart has some of the strictest safety practices in the nation, so we made sure we maintained its minimum safety requirements and then some,” explained Klienkopf. “All gloves, glasses, hard hats and safety visors were worn during all tasks. The only problem we faced was some flooding of the work area that inhibited our access to the wall. We overcame this by setting all wall tracks on the wall with our boom lift,” he added. The team from Housley Demolition was completely satisfied with project, as was the general contractor. The cutting contractor launched its concrete sawing and drilling division just a few years ago, and the REVIEW AND COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE AT: WWW.CONCRETEOPENINGS.COM/FORUM.CFM

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company’s participation in the CSDA Training Program has taught its operators faster and more efficient ways to systematically cut and demolish any project it is awarded. The Los Baños Walmart is set to officially open as a supercenter in August 2014.

COMPANY PROFILE Housley Demolition Co., Inc., joined CSDA in 2012 and has been in business for seven years. The company is based in Visalia, California, with a support location in Bakersfield. Housley Demolition has nine trucks, 35 employees and offers the concrete cutting services of slab sawing, wall sawing, hand sawing, core drilling and floor grinding. The company employs CSDA Certified Operators.

RESOURCES General Contractor: Shames Construction Sawing and Drilling Contractor: Housley Demolition Co., Inc. Visalia, California Phone: 559-909-0019 Email: brian@housleydemo.com Website: www.housleydemo.com Methods Used: Wall Sawing, Core Drilling

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THE BUSINESS OF BUSINESS

How Great Leaders Create Highly Innovative Cultures By Matt Tenney

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eaders in most organizations know that the ability to continuously innovate is one of the few competitive advantages that remain in this new economy. The concrete cutting, polishing and imaging industry is no exception. Perhaps this is why the word “innovative” appears so often in marketing materials and industry literature. While there is certainly consensus among most leaders that innovation is essential, there seems to be a lot of confusion around what exactly innovation is and how to create a highly innovative culture. Interestingly, by getting clear on what innovation actually is, approaches for creating a more innovative culture also become clear.

The vast majority of people are not naturally inclined to innovate. This is because most people have a moderate to strong cognitive bias, called the status quo bias. The status quo bias results in a strong, subconscious preference for maintaining things the way they have been. It is based on our need to fit in. The need for belonging is one of the most powerful human needs, and doing things that buck the status quo can certainly be associated with taking the risk of not being accepted by others. Unfortunately, the stronger the status quo bias is in a person, the less likely he or she is to create innovative solutions to problems that add value for his or her organization or for customers.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION

CREATING A HIGHLY INNOVATIVE CULTURE

For many, the words creativity and innovation are synonymous. However, they are actually quite different. Although creativity can assist in innovating, it is certainly not necessary. In fact, there is research showing that people who are “too creative” are actually very unlikely to innovate. This is because innovation has a lot more to do with execution than it does with creativity. Someone who has too many creative ideas often never sticks with one of the ideas long enough to create the disruption in the field, marketplace, etc., that we refer to as an innovation. The most important element of being innovative is the ability to stay with an idea long enough, even in the face of significant opposition, to actually make the idea a reality and have it adopted by at least a small group of people. A perfect real-world example of this is Bill Gates, one of the most innovative people of our time. Gates did not create DOS, which was the foundation on which Microsoft was built. He bought DOS from people who were likely much more creative than him. But those people weren’t innovators. They didn’t have the vision and the courage to stick with their idea for years, despite having no real market for it, until the market emerged around their idea. But Bill Gates did. He is an innovator. As you might guess, people like Bill Gates who are naturally very innovative are quite rare.

With this understanding, a general approach becomes clear for creating a culture that is more conducive to innovation. We need to create a culture where people feel safe to take the risk of suggesting and acting on ideas that don’t conform to the status quo, and that aren’t met with broad acceptance when first introduced. In general terms, we accomplish this by working to serve the people on our team and consistently demonstrating that we truly care about them. One reason serving and caring for team members helps to build and sustain an innovative culture, is that leaders who effectively care for team members are much better at modeling and teaching empathy. Being able to empathize with others is essential for determining what they might need and how we can solve their problems. People with high levels of empathy are much more likely to identify customer needs and can thereby add value for those customers by meeting their needs. This could simply be a matter of better customer service or offering an entirely new product or service. Empathy is also extremely helpful when we are in the process of advancing a new idea. As we discussed above, the most important element of innovation is the ability to execute on an idea. Unless we are in a one-person company, this means that we often need the support of others to be able to move our idea

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forward. We need to be able to understand the point of view of others and discern their motivations. According to a study published in the Harvard Business Review, this ability to understand the motivations of others and craft a message that addresses their needs is the most essential skill for people trying to innovate within an organization.1 Another reason serving and caring for team members is so important is that with consistent care, people trust us more, and they know that we will not fire them for taking appropriate risks and failing. The more secure people feel, the more likely they are to suggest and act on innovative ideas. We are essentially removing the status quo bias by removing the status quo. Two companies that have been demonstrating for years just how powerful this can be are Google and the software giant, SAS, which are among the most innovative companies in the world. Every year, these two companies are also both highly ranked among the best companies to work for. On the 2013 list of the Fortune Magazine Best Companies to Work For, they were listed as number one and two, respectively. The examples of how Google works to care for employees are almost legendary. They include free, on-site haircuts; gyms; pools; break rooms with video games, ping pong, billiards and foosball; on-site medical staff for easy doctor appointments and the option to bring one’s dog in to work. But Google didn’t invent this type of incredible workplace culture. They actually emulated the culture at SAS, a company that has produced absolutely phenomenal business outcomes. SAS has posted record earnings for 37 consecutive years, including $2.8 billion in 2012. CEO Jim Goodnight often says that the secret to their success is taking care of employees. Although perks like the ones offered at Google and SAS are nice, what’s more important


is that we do the little things every day to show the people on our team that we truly care about them. When we consistently do the little things to serve and care for team members—like listening well, empowering people, forgiving mistakes, giving credit where it’s due and offering sincere appreciation—we create a culture that is highly conducive to innovation. Also, by making a habit of doing the little things every day, and valuing relationships above short-term goals and numbers, we are more likely to put relationships first when it is very challenging to do so. In the fall of 2008, when the Great Recession was imminent, Jim Goodnight offered an incredible example of his commitment to putting people first. SAS faced the same issues that every other company in the industry faced. Sales plunged and almost every business was making budget cuts in preparation for what seemed like a long downturn. Many companies in almost every industry started laying off large numbers of employees to make their numbers work so SAS employees began to fear that the same thing would happen at their company. But Goodnight’s response to the recession was dramatically different, as Mark C. Crowley, author of Lead From the Heart: Transformational Leadership for the 21st Century, describes in an article he wrote for Fast Company: “In early January 2009, Goodnight held a global webcast and announced that none of its 13,000 worldwide employees would lose their job. He simply asked them all to be vigilant with spending and to help the firm endure the storm. ‘By making it very clear that no one was going to be laid off,’ Goodnight told me, ‘suddenly we cut out huge amounts of chatter, concern and worry—and people got back to work.’” At the time, SAS had a 33-year streak of record revenues. Jim Goodnight was perfectly willing to let that record go to make sure that people felt safe. He knew that by caring for team members and ensuring that they felt safe, he would be creating the space for continued innovation. As a result of his care, employees at SAS did continue to disrupt the market with innovations and the company had another record year while everyone else struggled just to stay alive.

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DORM SEARCH Concrete Imaging and Core Drilling Helps Renovate Residence Halls

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C O N C R E T E

C A S E S

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efore a $7.9-million renovation project could begin at the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) in Menomonie, Wisconsin, a closer inspection of a student dormitory building was required. The building had to be thoroughly scanned to identify hidden objects in concrete walls, floors and ceilings so that 1,000 core holes could be drilled for utility, HVAC and fire protection requirements. Founded in 1891 by James Huff Stout, UW-Stout currently has over 9,200 students and offers 66 undergraduate and graduate programs. The University maintains 10 on-campus residence halls that offer different types of living environments for first-year, sophomore and upper-class students. In September 2013, the Wisconsin State Building Commission approved a project to renovate one of these residences—McCalmont Hall—that had not had any major work done since it was built in 1963. The renovations would increase the hall’s capacity from 144 to 194 beds as some faculty offices would be moved elsewhere on campus. The hall’s mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems had deteriorated and were obsolete, plus the restrooms and showers no longer met building codes, so the renovations were essential. SMA Construction Services LLC of Abrams, Wisconsin, was appointed the general contractor for the work. As the renovations at McCalmont Hall included access for new bathrooms fixtures and updated plumbing, new conduit runs for electrical power and new fire and communication systems, a large quantity of openings were required in the existing structure. Structural engineers on the project counted over 1,000 new penetrations from 2 to 8 inches in diameter through the

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6-inch-thick concrete slabs of the existing four-story structure. Their concern was that this many openings would affect the structural integrity of the building, especially if many areas of steel reinforcement were compromised. Therefore, scanning with Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was specified to locate any hidden layers of steel and other objects like electrical conduit. This was so contractors could avoid rebar and power lines while sawing or drilling. CSDA member Central Concrete Cutting, Inc. of Edgar, Wisconsin, was selected to provide imaging and core drilling services for the McCalmont Hall renovation project. “With this being a production based job, the use of x-ray scanning was not going to be practical. This would have required the building to be vacated and there would have been a lengthy turnaround time for the results,” said Deven Hall, lead GPR technician for Central Concrete Cutting. “We convinced the general contractor and university that the best technique to employ was imaging with GPR equipment.” The cutting and imaging contractor was tasked with imaging all 1,000 locations and coring 400 of the specified holes. The remaining holes were created by plumbing contractors. In addition to ensuring sawing and drilling locations were accurately marked, the specialty contractor was also responsible for creating smooth, accurate holes for the installation of new pipe work. The team from Central Concrete Cutting was under pressure to quickly and accurately mark out structural steel and locate any potential conduits. The GPR imaging results needed to be submitted to the structural engineers for approval before any coring could be done. In turn, tradesmen relying on these images and core holes could not start their projects until the engineers approved the results. The plan was for the imaging technician to begin on the fourth floor of the building and work down, covering approximately 250 locations per floor. Because of the close proximity of marked drilling locations, the imaging equipment could cover two or three locations in one pass. The majority of the GPR imaging work was done with two-dimensional imaging. This process involves the collection of real-time data and the subsequent marking of targets that appear in each of the image results. Two-dimensional imaging is often considered faster than three-dimensional imaging because there is less site preparation required.

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This is a three-dimensional rendering of two-dimensional image files. This view allows for full visualization of two images 6 inches wide and 12 inches deep. The two layers of steel reinforcement were identified from the data.

Top down View

Cross-sectional View

Second Layer of Reinforcement

This plan view image displays a cross-sectional view as well as a top-down view of twodimensional data. Steel reinforcement can be checked by comparing the two views offered.


C O N C R E T E This top-down view represents a 2-foot by 2-foot area imaged and then analyzed in the field for core hole locations. The top layer of rebar is the current view, as shown by the slice lines in the cross-sectional data.

C A S E S

Three-dimensional imaging is achieved by collecting data in a grid format, which requires the positioning of a grid at the imaging location in order to collect accurate grid scan data, whereas two-dimensional imaging does not need a grid. Three-dimensional imaging is often saved for locating multiple closely-spaced targets in a challenging slab. A PS 1000 X-Scan system from Hilti, Inc. was used for the image and data collection tasks. It took Central Concrete Cutting’s imaging technician approximately two weeks to cover all 400 locations at McCalmont Hall, imaging as many as 54 locations in one day. The job ran as scheduled for the contractor. One issue that came up at the start of the work, was the correct identification of a 0.5-inch-thick steel plate in the slab. The plate was so close to the bottom of the slab that the ‘noise’ created on the imaging was being confused with the actual bottom of slab. On further inspection, the imaging technician realized that there was a steel plate present and made reference to its position when imaging the rest of the marked locations.

Bottom of concrete slab

Slice lines showing the depth of the top down view.

Viewing the data in a cube format that can be rotated exposes the three-dimensional reflections from all sides. X and Y steel reinforcements can be color coded to highlight direction and depth.

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C O N C R E T E

C A S E S

A GPR technician imaged hundreds of locations for the coring of 1,000 holes.

Holes ranging from 2 to 8 inches in diameter were created for the installation of electrical lines, plumbing and a new fire control system. After all imaging was complete, the cutting contractor returned to the jobsite to core drill the contracted 400 holes for the installation of piping and conduit. As the job was indoors and part of a residential renovation, operators from Central Concrete Cutting used wet cutting techniques to eliminate dust. Operators used a six-speed electric core drill from Cardi to make the 2 to 8-inch-diameter holes, taking one week to complete. The combination of the contractor’s skilled GPR imaging technician and modern equipment meant that the drilling work was completed without operators hitting any steel or other hidden objects. Jack Sondergard, owner of Central Concrete Cutting, said, “We are very satisfied with the results of this project. We became very familiar with our new GPR equipment before this job and it paid off. Utilizing this technology helped us increase production and kept the structural engineers happy. We avoided all reinforcement, which made the core drilling work much easier too.” The McCalmont Hall renovation project at UW-Stout is scheduled for completion in August 2014, in time for a new school year. Thanks to the imaging and core drilling capabilities of this CSDA member, the dormitory building was thoroughly searched and prepared for its new look.

COMPANY PROFILE Based in Edgar, Wisconsin, Central Concrete Cutting, Inc. has been in business since 1997 and became a CSDA member that same year. The company has 10 trucks, 10 employees and offers the concrete cutting services of slab sawing, wall sawing, hand sawing, wire sawing, core drilling, GPR imaging and selective demolition. Central Concrete Cutting, Inc., is a CSDA Certified Company and employs CSDA Certified Operators.

RESOURCES General Contractor: SMA Construction Services LLC Sawing and Drilling Contractor: Central Concrete Cutting, Inc. Edgar, Wisconsin Phone: 715-352-2552 Email: jacksondergard@sprynet.com Website: www.centralconcretecutting.com Methods Used: GPR Imaging, Core Drilling

REVIEW AND COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE AT: WWW.CONCRETEOPENINGS.COM/FORUM.CFM

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TECH TALK Tech Talk is a regular feature of Concrete Openings magazine, focusing on equipment, maintenance and technical issues of interest to concrete cutting, polishing and imaging contractors. Readers wishing to have a particular subject addressed can call or email CSDA with their suggestions at 727-577-5004 or rhitchen@concreteopenings.com.

High Frequency Saws and Drills: Proper Maintenance is Key to Higher Production By Terry Martin

A

growing number of concrete cutting and drilling contractors have adopted new technically advanced hi-cycle/high frequency equipment with the expectation that these user-friendly, smaller and lighter high-power units will yield greater production than their hydraulic predecessors. As with any equipment in this industry, these hi-cycle units are often subjected to job conditions that are less than ideal. Although reliability is very high, there are controllable factors that can reduce performance and even lead to equipment failure. Lack of regular service and maintenance is the number one cause of premature failures with hi-cycle equipment. As more of this equipment is put to work, the need for maintenance and service becomes paramount. Preventative checks will help reduce downtime and lower maintenance costs. The initial fear is that this type of equipment is much more difficult to maintain, and that the mechanic will need to be a rocket scientist to perform the required maintenance procedures. This is simply not true. Although there are more electronics to deal with, most are modular and easily serviced. The rest of the system consists of electric cables, an electric 3-phase motor and a saw carriage/ gearbox. After operating and servicing a hi-cycle system, it soon becomes apparent that it really does not require a degree from MIT, just some common sense. Technical assistance provided by the manufacturer will make most mechanics and operators comfortable when repairs are needed. OIL/GREASE CHANGE Lubrication is the simplest item and should be done on a regular schedule. The cost of oil or grease is minimal compared to the cost of replacing damaged parts because of old, dirty oil. Grease and oil provide a protective film between metal parts such as

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gears, chains and bearings. When the oil or grease reaches the end of its life cycle, it can no longer effectively provide this protective film. If left unchanged, gear or bearing wear accelerates and failure will follow. Inspect for oil leaks or oil seal damage and correct as needed. An oil leak will eventually stop leaking, not because it fixed itself, but because all of the oil has leaked out and the system is now dry. Metal to metal contact accelerates wear on dry bearings, then failure quickly follows (usually when the unit is a hundred feet in the air on a wall, or an operator has carried it up 20 flights of stairs). ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS AND CABLES This is the most important item on any electrical system and, therefore, needs the most attention. Much like hydraulic connectors, ‘clean and tight’ is required. Connections and cables from the equipment all the way back to the generator panel must be inspected before each use. Look for obvious cuts in the cables or exposed wires, loose or broken parts and worn or dirty slurry-caked connector pins or blades. These pins or blades require 100% surface contact for the connection to be effective. A loose or damaged connection will create arcing and heat, then failure. Connectors on cords with set screws to hold wires should be inspected for loose connections every week. Look for evidence of arcing on the connector pin/socket or blade and wires, as this indicates a loose connection and should be corrected immediately. Generators have many connections and are usually overlooked during maintenance. Check all connections at the front and back of the power panel and also at the terminal block where the main wires are connected from the generator to the power panel and/or circuit breakers. Again, loose connections are the

enemy and will cause either a hard failure or intermittent operation. This will slowly cause damage to some electric motors that do not have protection against lost phases. Most inverter type hi-cycle systems will protect against a lost phase, but some do not provide this protection. HI-CYCLE MOTOR A hi-cycle, 3-phase motor is much smaller than a 60-cycle, 3-phase motor. Due to the higher frequency (most commonly between 400 and 1,000 hertz) the internal hi-cycle motor revolutions per minute (rpm) is much higher. Depending on the manufacturer’s design, the rpm can be anywhere from about 6,000 up to 30,000 while a 60-hertz, 3-phase motor is about 1,750 rpm. Bearings, seals and reduction gears at higher speeds do require more attention and service. The difference between 1,750 rpm and 6,000-30,000 rpm is a significant factor when it comes to the lifespan of some components of a motor. The manufacturer’s recommendations should be strictly followed. The items to service or replace are the rotor bearings and oil seals along with the reduction gearbox bearings and seals. Reduction gears should be inspected for wear. Look for pitting or cracking on the gear tooth surface. The rotor and stator should be inspected. Look for damage from water or oil intrusion into the stator housing. Check all electrical connections and test the water path for obstructions. SAWHEAD/CARRIAGE ASSEMBLY As with any equipment, an inspection of the main components should be a daily routine. This includes rollers, clamping devices, spindle area, blade flanges, connectors, attachments for the motor, guards and all other moving parts. Look for excessively dirty, worn, out-of-adjustment or damaged components.


Ignoring regular oil changes can lead to equipement failure. BLADE FLANGE AND FLUSH FLANGE A blade flange is subjected to tremendous forces and should not be ignored. Inspect daily for wear, damage, warping or clamping area fatigue. The blade flange bolt or nut should also be inspected daily and grease applied to the threads to prevent rust. When inspecting a flush flange, look closely at the counter sink bolts and threads on the flange and replace if needed. Never run a flush flange if there is a bolt missing. All bolts must be in prime condition and installed properly. POWER INVERTER (FREQUENCY INVERTER) Keep clean by wiping down with a wet towel. Do not submerge or pressure wash. Connectors, switches and buttons should all be inspected daily for damage. Check for any missing bolts, handles, etc. and correct immediately. CLUTCHES: MECHANICAL AND ELECTRONIC The purpose of a clutch is to protect the components of a system. Electric motor driven systems must utilize clutches as the forces of an electric motor when suddenly stopped (if a blade locks up, for example) must be dealt with immediately. A mechanical clutch is made up of discs and plates that are tightened to a calculated torque. This will allow the clutch to slip until the inertia from the motor is absorbed, effectively protecting system components. An electronic clutch uses information gathered by software to determine

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Use fresh, clean oil for maximum performance.

if there is a need to react by turning off power to the motor, effectively stopping the driving forces. Depending on the manufacturer’s design, some systems use mechanical clutches, some use electronic clutches and some use both mechanical and electronic. When servicing a mechanical clutch, there are some types that require replacement and others that have replaceable components. Whenever rebuilding a clutch, take into consideration the break-away torque (when does the clutch start to slip?). If not properly adjusted, the clutch could slip too soon, not slip in time or at all. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations and procedures. REMOTE CONTROL A remote control provides a high level of safety as it takes the operator away from the area being cut. Servicing consists of cleaning with a wet towel (do not submerge or pressure wash) and inspecting for damage to connectors, buttons, switches, housing, displays, boots or seals. Inspect the cable if equipped. WATER PUMP PRESSURE AND VOLUME Water pressure is very important to a hi-cycle system. Pumps should be checked for pressure and volume on a regular basis. A good rule of thumb is 30-60 pounds per square inch (psi) and 1 gallon per minute (gpm). A drop-in water transfer pump will not always be enough, as many will not create the pressure needed. They are designed

to transfer, not pressurize a liquid. It is also a good idea to put a sediment filter before the pump to capture debris that may be in the water tank. The life of the pump will be much longer with a filter installed. In hi-cycle systems, water is needed to cool many components. A fact that is not always understood is that the consumption of water should and will be less than with older, slower cutting equipment. This is due to faster cutting speeds. If a previous saw took 60 minutes of cutting time (with water running) and now a more powerful hi-cycle system takes just 30 minutes, it means a laborer is only having to vacuum and dispose of half the amount of slurry! Hi-cycle/high frequency systems have become the tool of choice for many cutting contractors. Those who make proper and timely maintenance a priority will be rewarded with higher dependability and higher production.

Terry Martin is the Director of Business Development-Pentruder for ICS, Blount Inc. of Portland, Oregon. He is based at the ICS/ Pentruder facility in Chandler, Arizona. With 32 years experience in the concrete cutting industry, Terry has worked with all aspects of hi-cycle equipment including repair, design, manufacture, technical sales and support. He continues to provide sales support, technical support, training and demonstrations of the Pentruder product line. Terry can be reached at 562-445-6429 or at terry.martin@blount.com.

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SAFETY COUNTS

Post-Accident and Reasonable Suspicion Drug Testing By Mark A. Lies II & Kerry M. Mohan

R

ecent state legislative enactments have expanded the scope of marijuana use for medicinal and recreational purposes. As a result, we can all expect the use of marijuana will greatly increase across the country. These legislative developments have also led to increased uncertainty over whether and when an employer can test an employee for suspected marijuana use. Further, despite the fact that marijuana remains illegal under Federal law, employers are subject to the whims of each individual state’s marijuana laws. This article addresses an employer’s ability to conduct two forms of drug testing: (1) post-accident testing; and (2) reasonable suspicion testing. We address these two forms of testing, because while employers are generally permitted to conduct pre-employment drug screens for illegal drugs, an employer’s uncertainty generally arises when a current employee has been involved in an accident or exhibits behavior that indicates impairment. PRIOR TO TESTING It is advisable that employers implement some form of a drug testing policy providing for pre-employment, post-accident and reasonable suspicion drug and alcohol testing. However, if an employer wishes to conduct drug and alcohol testing, the employer should first develop and distribute copies of its drug testing policy to all employees in advance. This allows them to adjust their behavior, including use of marijuana, prior to the effective date to avoid a positive drug test. If the workplace is subject to a labor agreement, the employer will most likely have to bargain with the union over the terms and conditions of the policy.

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To withstand potential challenges, the testing policy should: • identify the types of testing, i.e., pre-employment, for cause and post-accident; • identify that the testing is limited to the presence of specific drugs; • use a scientifically valid testing method, which involves private specimen collection and chain of custody procedures to ensure proper identification, labeling, recordkeeping, handling and testing of specimens; • notify employees of the consequences that follow a positive drug test; • reinforce the employer’s commitment to maintaining the testing’s confidentiality; • consider providing sources for help for drug abuse or alcohol misuse problems. STATE SPECIFIC STATUTORY RESTRICTIONS As briefly mentioned above, many states (and municipalities) have drug testing restrictions specific for that jurisdiction. Thus, employers must analyze the laws of their local states and municipalities to determine whether they:

Certainly, no employer would want an employee to cause an accident because he or she is under the influence, but also would not want to be prohibited from taking corrective or disciplinary action because its policy did not comply with local requirements.

• impose written policy and notice requirements;

POST-ACCIDENT TESTING

• regulate the specimen collection and testing process; • impose rehabilitation requirements; • restrict employers’ disciplinary actions against employees who test positive; and • mandate appeal procedures.

As the term suggests, post-accident testing happens after an accident has occurred in the workplace. Post-accident testing is often encouraged by an employer’s workers’ compensation carrier, which either specifically mandates the testing or offers reduced


K2DiamondWireSaws1/2Pg_K2DiamondAd-10/08 10/9/13 2:48 PM Page 1 premiums for conducting such testing. The employer may also be able to successfully defend against an OSHA citation issued as a result of the accident on the basis of the employee’s impairment which was unknown to the employer. Though most states freely permit employers to conduct post-accident drug tests, a few states impose limitations on when post-accident testing can occur. For instance, some jurisdictions such as Boulder, Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island, San Francisco and Vermont permit post-accident testing only if the employer has reasonable suspicion to believe that the employee was impaired at the time of the accident. Further, some states, such as California, Iowa and Montana, require that the accident reach certain threshold levels for the extent of personal injury or property damage before an employee can be tested. Thus, employers must check applicable state laws to confirm such requirements.

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REASONABLE SUSPICION TESTING Under most state laws, an employer is required to provide an employee a safe place to work. In addition, the Occupational Safety and Health Act requires that employers provide their employees safe and healthy places of employment, which means that the employer must identify and address potential hazards. As such, employers must ensure that employees operating equipment, driving vehicles or performing potentially hazardous work are not under the influence of drugs or alcohol which can create hazardous conditions to any employee who may be impaired or to co-employees who may be injured because of the impaired employee’s actions. One component of ensuring safe operations is reasonable suspicion drug testing. Under most jurisdictions, an employer is permitted to require a drug test when it has a reasonable suspicion, based upon specific, contemporaneous objective and articulable facts concerning an employer’s appearance, behavior, speech or body odors, that an employee is under the influence. One of the biggest concerns regarding reasonable suspicion testing is whether the employer’s suspicion was objectively reasonable under the circumstances. To avoid this issue, it is advisable that employers define reasonable suspicion in its drug testing policy and identify specific behaviors that may trigger such suspicion. To develop this definition, employers should look to

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SAFETY COUNTS

continued

their state and municipal jurisdictions, which may specifically define reasonable suspicion, “cause” or “probable cause.” For example, the Illinois Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, which became effective on January 1, 2014, defines impairment as follows: “An employer may consider a registered qualifying patient to be impaired when he or she manifests specific, articulable symptoms while working that decrease or lessen his or her performance of the duties or tasks of the employee’s job position, including symptoms of the employee’s speech, physical dexterity, agility, coordination, demeanor, irrational or unusual behavior, negligence or carelessness in operating equipment or machinery, disregard for the safety of the employee or others, or involvement in an accident that results in any injury to the employee or others. If an employer elects to discipline a qualifying patient under this subsection, it must afford the employee a reasonable opportunity to contest the basis of the determination.” It is also advisable that an employer implement a written “Reasonable Suspicion Checklist” for a supervisor to document incidents involving reasonable suspicion of impairment. The employer should complete the checklist within 24 hours of the observed appearance that led to the reasonable suspicion. The employer should also document all of the indications that led to the reasonable suspicion, such as: • Breath/clothes smell like alcohol

• Movements jerky or uncoordinated • Acts hyperactive • Moves very slowly • Trembles/shakes • Nausea or vomiting • Sweating • Erratic or violent actions • Depressed • Confused/disoriented • Unusually anxious The checklist should be signed and dated by the supervisor who made the observation on the same day as the observation. If possible, it should be countersigned and dated by another supervisor on the same day as the observation to corroborate the observation. IMPOSE DISCIPLINE Once an employer has determined, through a timely investigation and documented positive drug test results, that there has been a violation of its drug testing policy, the employer must impose discipline in a uniform fashion in accordance with its policy, including:

• Breath/hair/hands/clothes smell like marijuana

• Written warning

• Breath smells like mouthwash, mints or gum

• Suspension

• Physical appearance disheveled/unkempt

• Termination

• Eyes bloodshot

• Participation in a “second chance” agreement in lieu of immediate termination, requiring an employee who has tested positive to participate in a drug rehabilitation program for a specified period of time and thereafter to remain drug free. In the event of a future violation of the policy, the employee will be subject to immediate termination for violation of the policy and agreement.

• Eyelids droopy or puffy • Eyes glassy • Eyes watery • Pupils dilated • Pinpoint pupils • Involuntary eye movements • Wearing sunglasses • Face flushed • Face pale • Sudden, marked mood swings, particularly after breaks • Sudden, marked changes in activity level • Unusually argumentative, irritable or hostile

All employers should consider developing and implementing a drug testing policy to create a safer work environment. The authors are aware of numerous tragic workplace accidents that are the result of employee use of marijuana (and other drugs). It is important that employers review their local laws to ensure their testing policies do not inadvertently violate such laws. If the foregoing actions are taken, the employer can substantially limit its potential legal liabilities arising out of illegal drug usage which results in employee impairment.

• Paranoid • Sniffles • Sleepy/drowsy

Mark A. Lies II is a labor and employment law attorney and partner with

• Unusual sweating

Seyfarth Shaw LLP in Chicago, Illinois. He specializes in occupational

• Speech slurred

safety and health law and related employment law and personal injury

• Speech incoherent • Speech rambling • Will not stop talking

litigation. In addition, Seyfarth Shaw has assisted CSDA members by holding presentations and moderating roundtable discussions at annual conventions. He can be reached at 312-460-5877 or at mlies@seyfarth.com.

• Will not talk • Voice unusually loud or soft • Stumbles, staggers or falls when walking

Kerry M. Mohan is an associate with Seyfarth Shaw. His practice focuses

• Sways, sags or leans on support when standing

on occupational safety and health, traditional labor matters and related employment law and civil litigation. Mohan can be reached at 312-460-5659 or at kmohan@seyfarth.com.

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HOT PROPERTY Dream House Renovated by Concrete Cutting

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The new owner of the property planned extensive renovations. 3 8 | J U NE .1 4

CSDA member was recently invited to spend some time at a very expensive home—and cut part of it into pieces! The contractor was tasked with cutting and removing 130 square meters (1,399 square feet) of 340-millimeter-thick (13.4-inch) reinforced concrete as part of a series of renovations.


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A track-mounted wall saw was used to cut a mezzanine slab into 87 sections. The property, located in Bassonia, an affluent residential area just south of Johannesburg, South Africa, had recently been sold and the new owner was looking to make some major changes. The four-story, 14-bedroom house also had eight bathrooms, a rooftop pool, a garage large enough to fit six cars and overlooked a golf course. Having reviewed the plans for the house, the new owner realized that a mezzanine level had been added below the pool that was not part of the original structure. It was decided that this mezzanine would be removed to make better use of the space. To try and cut costs, the owner had attempted to remove the floor by renting a jackhammer and a small floor saw, but he did not get the desired results. It was clear that a professional contractor specializing in concrete cutting was needed to remove the mezzanine slab and complete the renovation safely and efficiently. An Internet search led the homeowner to an advertisement for local concrete cutter and CSDA member T&K Lifts cc of Southdale, Johannesburg. “After hearing about the customer’s attempts to do the work himself, we quickly advised him that cutting was the best technique to use and that he should let professionals like us do the work with diamond tools,� said Clifford Carpenter, project manager for T&K. Measuring 130 square meters (1,399 square feet) in area and 340 millimeters (13.4 inches) thick, the mezzanine slab was situated 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) above the ground floor of the property, supported by eight 250-millimeter-diameter (9.8-inch) reinforced concrete columns and cast around eight 900-millimeter-diameter (35.4-inch) columns that

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Most cut sections measured around 1.2 meters (3.9 feet) long and weighed approximately 1.2 tons.

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Each piece was rigged and lowered to the floor below using a custom gantry.

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stood from ground level to roof height. The team from T&K came up with a plan to cut the slab into 87 pieces, each measuring around 1.2 meters (3.9 feet) long, 1.3 meters (4.1 feet) wide and weighing approximately 1.2 tons. An alternative method was to chop the slab out, which would have required the whole slab to be propped and supported. Using cutting techniques was considered a better option, as only one section needed props and supports at one time while it was being cut. T&K arrived on site and began setting up for the first cuts. The plan was to begin at the outside edge of the mezzanine and work back toward the main building structure. The cutting team positioned five telescopic tubular steel (acrow) props below the slab for support while cutting, before setting up a DS TS 20E hi-cycle wall saw supplied by Hilti, Inc. Fitted with a 32-inch-diameter blade from Diamond Products South Africa, the track-mounted saw was equipped to create the necessary 2-meter-long (6.6-foot) cuts through the slab. To free the first section, T&K made two cuts though the slab at a right angle to each other using the track and saw. Each cut took around 15 minutes to complete, including setup, and on average the cutting team was able to cut and remove seven sections during a eight-hour work day. To remove sections that were connected to the 250-millimeter-


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The contractor cut and lowered over 104 tons of concrete.

diameter (9.8-inch) support columns, an operator anchored the wall saw to each column and performed one cut. The sections that were cast around the eight larger columns were each connected by two 20-millimeter (0.8-inch) dowels, so the contractor left some pieces in place that were removed by sledgehammer. Because the slab above the work area was too high to attach a rigging bracket, the contractor used its own custom-manufactured steel gantry with a chain block and rigging brackets to lower each 1.2-ton section to the floor below when cut. Upon completion of the cutting work, the customer either planned to use a tractor-loaderbackhoe to lift and remove the cut sections from the property or use a concrete breaker to make smaller pieces for removal. In total, the team from T&K performed 150 linear meters (492 feet) of cutting over 13 work days at the property in Bassonia, creating 87 cut sections that weighed approximately 104.4 tons. The contractor had a team of two helpers and one operator equipped with the Hilti hi-cycle wall saw. As the cutting contractor was working directly for the property owner, it was especially important that safety measures were implemented, checked and double-checked. There was no general contractor on site to oversee things and provide safety guidelines, so T&K employees maintained good standards and best practices in the work area and wore all necessary personal protective equipment. The work area was elevated and open, not to mention the whole property was on an incline, so all employees had to be continually aware of their surroundings to avoid slips, trips and fall hazards. The other important issue for this job, was the correct positioning and setup of props and support structures. Any oversights would have caused the support to fail, creating a dangerous environment for the cutting team and the equipment.

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“The client was very happy with how we did the job. We were able to complete all the cutting work within budget and on time,” said Carpenter. “I was also really happy with how the team performed on the job. They were professional and took all safety issues into account without having a general contractor on site to enforce safety guidelines. As for me, I just enjoyed looking at the view every morning!,” he joked. By using fast and efficient wall sawing techniques with hi-cycle equipment, this CSDA member not only proved that this type of work can be done on any type of property, but that the service provided by concrete cutters is also a hot commodity. Specialty contractors like T&K Lifts cc use the latest techniques to do a professional job, and in this case helped a homeowner realize his dream. REVIEW AND COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE AT: WWW.CONCRETEOPENINGS.COM/FORUM.CFM

COMPANY PROFILE A CSDA member since 2011, T&K Lifts cc has been in business for 24 years and has offered concrete cutting services for 20 of those years. The company is based in Johannesburg, South Africa, has five trucks and 20 employees. T&K Lifts cc offers the concrete cutting services of slab sawing, wall sawing, hand sawing, wire sawing and core drilling.

RESOURCES Sawing and Drilling Contractor: T&K Lifts cc Johannesburg, South Africa Phone: 27-11 942 1306 Email: clifford@concretecut.co.za Website: www.concretecut.co.za Methods Used: Wall Sawing, Hand Sawing

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SOCIAL MEDIA FOCUS

5 Reasons Why Your Social Media Campaign Isn’t Working By Jayson DeMers

L

et’s get real. Common sense pretty much tells us most of what we need to know to get our fans and followers engaged with our social media content. The problem (as I see it) isn’t so much a lack of knowledge, as a lack of time, energy and resources to consistently carry out the proper strategies. It is easy to read an article about social media engagement and say, “that’s SO true! I really need to do that!” But, as often happens, life gets in the way. The phone rings, a deadline looms or we simply lose the motivation to carry through on our plans. Below you will find five reasons why your social media accounts aren’t getting any engagement, along with an easy, practical, actionable tip that will help ensure you avoid falling into each trap.

1. YOU ARE NOT CONSISTENT Social media works best when you are able to be active consistently. Problem is, things come up that impede your ability to hop onto social media at regularly scheduled times. To ensure you post regularly, you need to have a posting plan in place. This involves using a tool like HootSuite, Buffer or SproutSocial for social media updates and scheduling your blog posts to go live at set intervals. You may also want to consider having an editorial calendar for your content, which you can download from websites like HubSpot or get an editorial calendar plugin from WordPress. An editorial calendar is, after all, the best way to double your content marketing ROI in 2014. Be sure you also schedule in time to read and respond to comments and reply to questions.

2. YOU ARE NOT OFFERING ANYTHING UNIQUE Too often, business owners invest an insane amount of time and money having excellent content written for their blog or social media accounts. But content can be extremely wellwritten and still not provide anything of value. You need to have a unique angle. Something that is different, special and tailored to your particular audience. When you are coming up with ideas for your blog and social media posts, do not be content to just post what everyone else is posting. What unique angle or spin can you put on the topic at hand? How can you tailor it to your audience? When you come up with a schedule for your posts (see #1), keep these questions in mind to avoid rehashing the same old content and ideas.

3. YOU ARE FOCUSED ON RECEIVING RATHER THAN GIVING A trap most of us fall into (at least sometimes), is focusing more on what our followers can do for us rather than the other way around. There is a time and place on social media for promoting your products, but these should only make up a very small portion of your social media activity. One of the best ways to keep your focus on your customers is to have a clearly-articulated mission statement that guides all your content creation and promotion. Write out your mission statement and keep it in a place you can see it when you are at your computer. Take Starbucks’ mission statement for instance: “To inspire and nurture the human spirit—one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.” When you let your customer-focused mission statement guide your content creation, your social media content cannot help but meet the needs and desires of your target market.

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4. YOU ARE NOT USING THE RIGHT NETWORKS FOR YOUR AUDIENCE You can post the most engaging content, but if it is not finding your target audience then what is the point? Many businesses choose the social networks they prefer, without determining if that is actually where their audience wants to connect with them. Do some research into where your target market is hanging out. There are a number of ways you can do this. First, do some research on the key demographics of each of the social networks. A recent study by PewResearch has found that 71% of online adults use Facebook while the percentage of over-65’s using social media is on the rise. Visit this link for the full results of the study: http://www.pewinternet.org/2013/12/30/ demographics-of-key-social-networkingplatforms/. Second, ask your current customers where they prefer to connect with you. You can set up a quick survey using Survey Monkey or KwikSurveys, and post it on your site or send it out to your email subscribers.

5. YOU ARE IMPERSONAL Sometimes, big brands can get away with generic, impersonal posts…particularly since we know that a majority of people still cite coupons and discounts as the #1 reason they follow a brand on social media (who cares if a post is impersonal as long as you are saving 30%?).


But for most businesses, being impersonal will turn away followers and make them disinterested in your posts, your brand and your company. One of the core purposes of social media involvement is humanization of your brand, which builds loyalty, awareness, trust, traffic and conversion rates. Here are a few tips for connecting with your audience in a more authentic, personal way: 1. Sign your name occasionally so your fans and followers know there is a real person behind your posts. This is especially useful if you have a social media team. Barack Obama is famous for doing this when he personally posts tweets to his Twitter account. 2. Don’t be all business, all the time. Don’t be afraid to post a personal photo, opinion or anecdote from time to time. This will help you stand out by bringing a strong human element to your brand. Your followers are not one-dimensional, and they don’t expect you to be either. 3. Don’t overcomplicate things. Focus less on strategy and more on being real with your audience. When you make a mistake, admit it. Put yourself in the shoes of your audience and give them what they want. In his book Human to Human: #H2H, Bryan Kramer writes, “Communication shouldn’t be complicated. It should just be genuine and simple, with the humility and understanding that we’re all multi-dimensional humans, every one of which has spent time in both the dark and delightful parts of life.” Focus less on being a marketer, and more on being human. It is time to move beyond just knowing what makes for great social media engagement, and actually do it. Hopefully this article has given you some ideas for how you can be more proactive, consistent and real on social media…and increase your engagement levels as a result.

Jayson DeMers graduated from the University of

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POLISHED PERSPECTIVE

Altering Perceptions to Realize Opportunities By Andy Bowman

I

have seen many changes in the decorative concrete industry over the past six months. It makes me wonder how these changes are being perceived by others and if they, like me, see the industry evolving into a more diverse market. The decorative concrete industry has been ripe for consolidation recently as many equipment manufacturers have aligned themselves with specific tool and chemical manufacturers. This provides customers with a complete package of products that is related to their specific concrete application. New faces and corporations are entering a growing market and larger companies are in acquisition mode, aiming to expand their current product offering to the industry. There have been several blogs posted recently that discuss these market changes, and naturally these bloggers feel compelled to talk about change—how we identify changes and whether we accept them or not. However, one of history’s great thinkers provides us with a different outlook on the concept of change. The basic notions of Aristotle’s philosophy of nature can be understood from his analysis of change. Aristotle confronted the seemingly iron-clad logic of Parmenides, who was forced to the position that there is, in reality, no change at all and that change is mere appearance. As he began to understand the terms of the problem, Parmenides realized that change is logically not possible. Parmenides argued that there are only two alternatives for anything, being and non-being. No new being can come from non-being since, “nothing comes from nothing.” Neither can a new being come from being. “Being cannot come from being, since it is already.” Aristotle also discovered the concept of potency. He observed that a sculptor can make a statue from a block of marble, which is possible only because the block of marble is endowed with a certain property—the

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possibility and capacity to be transformed. The figure of the statue is in potency in the block of marble. Every change implies duality. It implies a subject in potency which, by the action of some agent, passes into act, receives some new perfection or actuality. Something new is acquired while something previously held is lost. Therefore, there are three principles necessary for change to take place. There must be: 1 something new that comes to be 2 something old that passes away 3 something that stays the same throughout

In the case of Michelangelo’s “David,” for example, the shape of the sculpture is the form that comes to be when a formless block of marble becomes a statue. The marble, in its transition from formless block to sculpture, stays the same throughout. “Life is change. Growth is optional. Choose wisely.” ~Karen Kaiser Clark Life can be a persistent teacher. When we fail to learn life’s lessons the first time around, life has a way of repeating them to foster understanding. A few years ago,


my life was shaken up in dramatic fashion as I realized my understanding of polishing concrete was wrong. I initially resisted the implications of what I had learned and struggled with embracing a new perspective. While I resisted these lessons, the industry continued to evolve regardless and I realized that I had to evolve too. Now, what I once believed—that polished concrete is some form of art—has become a more predictable scientific process through having a better understanding of the process. What I once thought were variable components impeding a successful completion are now just mere hurdles that can be easily managed. Processes can be changed and products can be used that are more capable of dealing with a given problem. Every product has a maximum capacity to which it was designed to work. We cannot expect that all products have the ability of mitigating the same problem with the same efficiency. We all need to continually educate ourselves on the capacity of the products we use and continue to learn more about products entering the market. This allows us to make educated decisions about potentially improving our overall product for the customer. Remember, the customer deserves the best of your potential and they are doing business with you because they have trust and confidence in your abilities. The customer/contractor relationship starts with trust, now it is your turn to demonstrate to the customer that he made the right decision by hiring you. The CSDA Training Committee is considering a new training class based on the association’s Standard CSDA-ST-115 Measuring Concrete Micro Surface Texture. The class aims to educate contractors about surface texture and how the information included in CSDA-ST-115 can improve their polishing processes. The potency of a highquality polished concrete floor exists in almost every surface. Before you approach your next polishing project, ask yourself if you are trying to change the surface, or release its potency.

Andy Bowman is the owner of Adaptive Concrete Innovations based in Rose Bud, Arkansas. He has 14 years experience of concrete polishing, is the chair of the CSDA Polishing Committee and

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the lead trainer of the association’s Concrete Polishing training class. Bowman can be reached at 419-408-5906 or by email at abowman@ gmiengineeredproducts.com.

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CORE HEALTH

Keep Calm and Eat Bacon! By Erin O’Brien

B

acon is bad for you. Bacon makes you fat. Bacon causes heart disease. We’ve all heard these statements, along with hundreds of others slamming high-fat diets and encouraging a low-fat, low-calorie diet. A diet containing whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, fruits and vegetables has been pushed on the public for the last several decades. But why have we been told to abandon the traditional diet our grandparents and parents ate? Back in the 1950s, the results of a study were released linking saturated fat (found in many meat and dairy products) to heart disease and obesity. Since then, groups like the American Heart Association, the Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Government have encouraged all of us to eat a diet low in fat and high in carbohydrates. Recent studies from a variety of educational institutions and independent experts have shown this earlier research to be incorrect and have announced new findings in the field of nutrition, making us all re-think what is good and bad for us. After all, the obesity epidemic is worse than it has ever been so obviously something is not working. These new findings suggest that most fat is actually good for us and necessary for the body to carry on its daily functions. A lack of good fats, combined with higher amounts of processed carbohydrates and sugars in the modern diet, may very well be responsible for the obesity epidemic exploding over the last quarter century. Recent research has proven that in its pure, unprocessed form, fat doesn’t make you fat and cholesterol doesn’t clog your arteries.

Part 2 of this article, which will appear in the September 2014 issue of Concrete Openings, will look at the other side of this subject—foods that are marketed as healthy that actually aren’t.

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Bacon is a popular topic these days. Most of us cannot deny how much we love it, whether it is good or bad for us. You can find bacon-themed clothing, websites and hundreds of different varieties of bacon. Some bars have even begun to serve it as a complimentary bar snack. So what’s a bacon-loving concrete cutter to do? The answer is simple—keep calm and eat bacon! Sure, bacon is not the ideal health food. Just like any food, it should be eaten in moderation. That should not, however, discourage most of us from enjoying bacon with Sunday brunch, on a BLT and on a cheeseburger (yes, I said and!) Bacon does have a high percentage of fat— but over half of that fat is monounsaturated fat, which helps lower levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol. Monounsaturated fat also helps keep you feeling full, supports metabolism and actually helps you to not gain weight. Forty percent of the fat is saturated, which contrary to what most of us have been told, does not cause heart disease and obesity. Only ten percent of the fat is considered bad fat—polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which contain a high amount of Omega-6 fatty acids. This percentage varies based upon the animal’s diet. Pasture-raised pigs fed a natural diet will

have a much lower percentage of PUFAs than pigs fed a highly-processed diet and confined in pens. Bacon contains no trans fat, which all experts agree is the worst of all fats. Bacon is high in many beneficial nutrients, like choline, several B vitamins, selenium and phosphorus. The most obvious beneficial nutrient in bacon is protein, which our bodies require to function properly and helps keeps us full longer. Moderate amounts of iron, magnesium, zinc and potassium round out the nutritional benefits of bacon. The negatives include high amounts of sodium and nitrates— although studies have shown that nitrates,


which were once thought to cause cancer, are only activated when bacon is cooked to a very high temperature—so don’t burn your bacon! Another nutritious food that has also been promoted as bad for you are eggs, especially egg yolks. Egg-whites and egg-substitutes are everywhere. The whole egg got a bad reputation for containing high amounts of cholesterol, and therefore contributing to heart disease and obesity. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Eggs are one of the most nutritious foods on the planet. One whole egg contains large amounts of Vitamins A, B2, B5 and B12, choline, folate, phosphorus, selenium and small amounts of Vitamins D, E, K and B6, calcium and zinc. If you have been paying attention, you will notice that eggs and bacon contain many of the same nutrients. One egg also contains only 77 calories, 6 grams of protein and 5 grams of healthy fats. It is true that eggs contain high amounts of cholesterol, however, many studies have shown that dietary cholesterol does not affect blood cholesterol in most people. Eggs do raise the level of HDL cholesterol, or “good” cholesterol, which is linked to a reduced risk for many diseases. Eggs also reduce levels of LDL, or bad cholesterol, in the blood. The antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin are both important for eye health and can help prevent macular degeneration and cataracts. Eggs are high in both of them. Studies show that eating up to three whole eggs per day is perfectly healthy for most people. High in protein and nutrients, they will keep you full longer than your typical cereal or bagel breakfast. Finally, one last food that has been mislabeled as bad for you—butter! That margarine or “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter” stuff in your fridge? Not even close to butter. It’s nothing but dangerous fat and chemicals with artificial flavors and colors added to make it taste like butter. Do yourself a favor and spend a little extra money on some goodquality, pure butter made from grass-fed cows—try Kerrygold. Butter has been vilified for containing high amounts of saturated fat, which is absolutely true, but we’ve already discussed that saturated fat, in moderation, is not bad for you. It also contains fat-soluble vitamins, especially K2, which is deficient in most people, and two types of fatty acids that inhibit weight gain and promote weight loss—butyrate and conjugated linoleic acid. Conjugated linoleic acid is actually sold as a weight-loss aid commercially and has been shown in some studies to have anti-cancer properties. Again it should be emphasized that these foods, in addition to most foods we eat, should be consumed in moderation. A natural, varied

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and balanced diet in addition to consistent, moderate exercise is the key to a healthy lifestyle. And if bacon, eggs and butter can be part of that diet, all the better!

Bachelor of Science degree in Athletic Training from Ohio University and her Master of Science degree in Applied Physiology and Kinesiology from the University of Florida. She is also a Certified Level 1 CrossFit

Erin O’Brien, MS, ATC is a Certified Athletic Trainer and Marketing Director for O’Brien International, the association management company that manages the Concrete Sawing

Instructor and member of CrossFit9 in St. Petersburg, FL. She is a regular contributor to Concrete Openings magazine. She can be reached at erin@csda.org or 727-577-5002.

& Drilling Association. O’Brien received her

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OSHA/CSDA Alliance Latest The Alliance between the Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association (CSDA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is now in its eigth year and continues to educate contractors, prevent on-the-job accidents and injuries and provide vital materials to advance a safe work environment for sawing and drilling professionals. Here is the latest news from the Alliance Program.

CSDA TESTIMONY ON OSHA SILICA RULE Representatives from the association recently testified at public hearings at the Department of Labor in Washington D.C. as OSHA looks to implement its proposed new rule for respirable crystalline silica. On March 26 and 31 respectively, CSDA Silica Sub-Committee chair, Kellie Vazquez and CSDA Executive Director Patrick O’Brien gave testimony on behalf of the industry. The proposed silica rule, released by OSHA in September 2013, would cut the current permissible exposure limit (PEL) in half, from 100 to 50 μg/m3, and demand the execution of set procedures at or above 25 μg/m3. The arguments made by Vazquez and O’Brien described how silica-related deaths continue to decrease with the existing PEL in place, explained how the proposed on-site sampling procedure would be unworkable for contractors on multiple jobsites per day and told how CSDA has been proactive in the reduction of silica related deaths with the release of CSDA-BP-016 Silica Data Analysis Chart. This chart is available to anyone in the industry via the CSDA Website. For more information about the OSHA/CSDA Alliance program, or to view documents released by this partnership, visit www.csda.org and click on the “OSHA Alliance” link under “Safety” or call 727-577-5004.

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INDUSTRY BITS

New Electric Drill Motor from Husqvarna

Redesigned Brokk 400 Released Brokk, Inc. has upgraded its electric Brokk 400 remote-controlled demolition machine to include a larger undercarriage for enhanced stability when operating with heavy attachments. Brokk also has improved the machine’s hydraulic system to provide more efficient fluid flow when operating a drill attachment. The new Brokk 400 features a bigger drive axis, rollers and sidetracks. It also has new tracks that are 10% longer than the ones on its predecessor. The machine can handle attachments up to 1,420 pounds and has a hydraulic quick-hitch system that eliminates the need for hard pinning during attachment changes. The Brokk 400 has a hitting power of 773 foot-pounds at the tip of the tool, weighs 11,240 pounds, measures 63 inches wide and nearly 81 inches tall and is powered by a 30-kilowatt electric motor. A three-part boom can operate at angles of up to 30 degrees, reach 22 feet horizontally and 24 feet vertically. The boom also features a box-weld design that provides additional protection for cylinders and hoses. For More Information Tel: 800-621-7856 Email: info@brokkinc.com

Husqvarna has launched its new DM 650 electric drill motor. The DM 650 delivers 6 kilowatts of power on the spindle on 3-phase and 3 kilowatts on 1-phase. It weighs 31 pounds and features torque boost to reduce speed and increase drilling torque when encountering steel reinforced substrates. The DM 650 is suitable for core drilling holes 4 to 24 inches in diameter. The 18-step adjustable rpm range ensures optimal speed for all drill bit dimensions. The drill motor, recommended to be used with the corresponding DS 450 stand, performs effectively when operating on reinforced concrete, brick and other building materials. The DM 650 is equipped with advanced electronic overload protection, Elgard™ and also features LED load indicators to guide the operator and attain optimal performance. It runs with the separate PP 65 power pack, which is also compatible with some of the company’s electric hand-held cutters. For More Information Tel: 913-928-1442 Web: www.husqvarnacp.com

CS Unitec Introduces New Diamond Core Drill CS Unitec’s new ETN 162/3 P diamond core drill can be used wet or dry, hand-held or stand-mounted. The 19-amp/110-volt motor can drill holes up to 6 inches in diameter through concrete, reinforced concrete, brick, block and stone. Electronic torque limitation and speed control features guarantee constant revolutions per minute, even under load. The safety slip clutch prevents jamming and allows hand-held operation. The motor includes a ground fault circuit interrupter to prevent electric shock. An integrated water swivel is built directly into the spindle for wet drilling when required, or the unit can be connected to a vacuum with a standard hose connection for dry drilling. The vacuum port is built directly into the drill spindle, allowing the operator to capture the dust from inside the core bit. The ETN 162/3 P weighs 15 pounds and a quick-change mount allows the user to switch from handheld to stand-mounted operation. The drill stand is fully adjustable up to 45 degrees and the total weight, including drill, is 46 pounds. For More Information Tel: 800-700-5919 Web: www.csunitec.com

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Dixie Diamond Manufacturing Offers Free Factory Tours All CSDA contractor members are invited to a free factory tour of Dixie Diamond Manufacturing’s facility in Atlanta, Georgia. The company will cover accommodation, meals and provide an in-depth look at how diamond blades and bits are manufactured. There will also be the chance to discuss the latest techniques and opportunities in saw cutting and drilling. Please contact Dixie Diamond Manufacturing to arrange an appointment. For More Information Contact: Sid Kilgore Tel: 800-654-7224 Email: skilgore@dixiediamond.com


New HR4013C Rotary Hammer from Makita Makita has expanded its lineup of concrete hammers with the new 1.563inch HR4013C AVT® rotary hammer. The 11-amp motor delivers 8.4 foot pounds of impact energy—20% more than its predecessor. The hammer is engineered with enhanced Anti-Vibration Technology (AVT®), a synchronized three-component system for reduced vibration. The result is a vibration rating of 5 meters per second squared, which is 45% less than its predecessor. The three-component AVT® system includes an air actuated counterbalance, vibration-absorbing housing and an integrated damper spring. The HR4013C has lock-on or trigger-activated settings in “chipping only” mode, while a constant speed control feature automatically applies additional power to the motor to maintain speed under load. The hammer also features soft start for more control and greater accuracy, a torquelimiting clutch, 24 bit angle settings and a one-touch sliding chuck. For More Information Contact: Wayne Hart Tel: 714-522-8088 ext. 4410 Email: whart@makitausa.com

Mactech Offshore Receives Patent for Articulating Diamond Wire Saw Mactech Offshore, a provider of subsea and offshore machining solutions, has recently received patent-approval status for its articulating diamond wire saw. The saw is designed for subsea and topside cutting of a variety of materials in the offshore oil industry and utilizes an articulating cutting arm. It is designed for cutting multi-string applications or heavy wall legs and cross members in the offshore platform decommissioning industry. The vertical stance means the saw can fit into cofferdams or excavations with minimal dredging. The articulating design requires only 2 feet of clearance around casings and the cut is made at the bottom of the saw, so no need for extra dredging. The compact and robust design reduces setup, installation and removal time. Guiding arms can be closed around pipes to use them as guides while the saw is lowered to the cut location. Videos of the saw in action can be found on the MactechOnSite YouTube channel. For More Information Contact: Derek Marcks Tel: 337-839-2793 Web: www.mactechoffshore.com

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Diamond Vantage introduces V Series Diamond Blade Diamond Vantage is pleased to announce the all-new V Series Blade, equipped with Zenesis™ 2.0 pattern diamond technology for cutting hard, reinforced concrete. The all-new 12-millimeter (0.5-inch) segment matrix has been designed for fast cutting speeds and long blade life in a variety of aggregates. The blade is available in diameters ranging from 12 to 60 inches with segment thicknesses up to 0.25 inches, making it a suitable blade for a wide variety of cutting jobs. For More Information Contact: John Conrad Tel: 866-322-4078 Email: johnconrad@diamondvantage.com

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Marci Clements, 1952-2014 Industry professional Marcilee Maughan Clements of Gainesville, Georgia, passed away March 27, 2014. She was 61 years old. Marci was born November 15, 1952 to the late Clarke and Ruth Maughan in Logan, Utah. She was the owner and president of CSDA member Pro Contractor Supply, Inc., based in Oakwood, Georgia, and regularly attended association conventions and industry events with her husband, Mark. Marci was a one-ofa-kind spirit that loved her family and friends very much. She was avid about the outdoors, especially boating on Lake Lanier, golfing, water and snow skiing, traveling the Utah Mountains and watching the Atlanta Braves. She also enjoyed “Happy Marci Clements Hour” with all her close friends. Marci is survived by her husband, Mark Clements; sons, Colby Clements and Travis Clements all of Gainesville; brothers, Allan Maughan of St. George, Utah, Brian Maughan and Glade Smith both of Wellsville, Utah; sisters, Marilyn Smith, Phoenix, Arizona, Michelle Lyle of Wellsville, Utah and Janice Reese of Benson, Utah; and several nieces & nephews. She will be missed by her friends within CSDA and all who knew her.

Bosch V-Groove Diamond Blades The V-Groove line of diamond blades from Bosch has been designed for concrete crack and fissure repair in hard or soft concrete. The company has developed an optimized diamond formula that is said to deliver twice the cutting speed of competitor diamond blades for concrete restoration. The blades measure 4.5 inches in diameter and are 0.375 inches thick. A 0.875-inch bore hole fits standard angle grinders, both large and small, so V-Groove blades do not require specialized equipment. V-Groove blades are designed specifically with concrete contractors, masons, tuckpointers and dedicated concrete restoration professionals. For More Information Tel: 877-207-2499 Web: www.boschtools.com

New Vertical Electric Power Pack from Wolverine Equipment Wolverine Equipment is pleased to introduce the latest addition to its line of hydraulic power packs. The new WP-15EV24 vertical electric hydraulic power pack features automatic phase control to ensure the proper operational direction of the motor and prevents the pump from running backwards. If the unit is not set up correctly, a warning light warns the operator to make the necessary adjustments. In addition, the unit comes with a new switch allowing conversion from 230-volt, 3-phase power to 460-volt, 3-phase power. This allows the user to access various power sources on the jobsite. The WP-15EV24 is built on a portable hand-cart frame. Measuring 18 by 21 inches and weighing 282 pounds, this power pack is transportable and suitable for hand sawing or core drilling inside buildings, underground areas or in other enclosed spaces. Other key features include automatic shutdown for low oil and a fully adjustable flow from 0 to 12 gallons per minute. For More Information Contact: Bill Darling Tel: 253-867-6209 Email: bill@wolverineequipment.com

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Third-Generation Blades Introduced by DITEQ DITEQ Corporation is pleased to introduce its third generation of ARIX diamond blades with G3 technology. The new line of blades features advanced multi-layered diamond segments with precise distribution of diamond particles. DITEQ offers some of the world’s most innovative metallurgical engineering with its ARIX technology, which allows for precise diamond arrangement and alignment throughout each blade segment, set to control wear and make the blade cut faster. ARIX G3 blades provide 20% faster speed and 30% longer life than their predecessors. For More Information Tel: 816-246-5515 Web: www.diteq.com


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B I T S

Traxx Construction Products Joins Forces with Scanmaskin Traxx Construction Products is pleased to announce it has joined forces with European surface preparation equipment manufacturer Scanmaskin in Australia and New Zealand. Traxx managing director, Lloyd Williams, is delighted with the new arrangement. “We have worked with Scanmaskin for some time now with a product of our own brand. Given the company’s fast global growth, it made sense for us to ‘go red.’ We could see the massive brand recognition the products were getting as a result of expansion not only in Europe, but in the USA and North Asia. We are very excited about the future of the Scanmaskin products, knowing what is currently in the pipeline and the ambitions of the company.” For More Information Contact: Lloyd Williams Tel: 61-3 9646 9200 Email: lloyd.williams@traxxcp.com.au

ICS Announces New Staff Appointment ICS is pleased to announce the addition of Bruce Knotts as diamond tool application specialist for North America. In this new role, Bruce will support and manage the diamond Knotts blade, core bit and diamond wire category for the professional sawing and drilling contractor market. He comes to ICS with over twenty years of professional diamond tooling experience that includes extensive knowledge of diamond tool manufacturing, diamond segment recipe design and project sales.

Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association Visit us online www.csda.org

For More Information Tel: 503-653-4393 Email: marketing@icsbestway.com

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ASCC Elects Scott Anderson as First Vice-President

Makita Expands Lineup of Dust Extraction Solutions Makita has introduced a new dust extraction attachment, model 196571-4. The dust extraction attachment is engineered to help reduce dust created from breaking and chipping concrete. Model 196571-4 is a six-piece kit for use with a jobsite vacuum (sold separately), and is compatible with Makita’s SDS-max® line of rotary and demolition hammers. After attaching the dust cover and hose assembly to the shaft of the bit, an operator can attach the hose to the hammer using one of two hose holders that are designed to fit the hammer’s handle. Additionally, a third hose holder allows the operator to attach the hose to a power cord. This allows the operator to direct the hose to the jobsite vacuum efficiently and keep it out of the way during use. The kit also includes an additional hose joint for increased compatibility. The attachment is engineered for use with bull point or chisel bits commonly used in concrete demolition applications.

The American Society of Concrete Contractors (ASCC), a non-profit organization, is pleased to announce that Scott Anderson, Keyston Structural Concrete, LLC, Houston, Texas, has been elected first vice president for 2014. Rocky Geans, Mishawaka, Indiana; Chris Plue, San Mateo, California and Thomas Zinchiak, Woodbine, Maryland, were re-elected as Anderson vice presidents. Keith Wayne, Kannapolis, North Carolina, was re-elected as treasurer and William Bramschreiber, Glendora, California; Steve Lloyd, Forest, Virginia; and Scott Winkler, Hamilton, Ohio, were re-elected as directors. For a full list of ASCC’s 2014 Board members or for more information, visit www.ascconline.org or call 866-788-2722.

For More Information Contact: Wayne Hart Tel: 714-522-8088 ext. 4410 Email: whart@makitausa.com

Hilti Launches Tools on Demand Service

Husqvarna Introduces K 6500 Ring Saw

Hilti’s new Tools on Demand service allows customers to access Hilti tools for a time period of 3-24 months to match seasonal and projectspecific needs. Currently, the company’s Tool Fleet Management service is the most suitable service for tools used year in and year out, while its authorized independent rental network remains the best option for emergency, daily or weekly tool needs. Tools on Demand compliments these existing offerings to provide tools for those months when projects peak. It includes a comprehensive review of a contractor’s tool fleet and provides recommendations based on tool usage intensity, tool age and the profitability drivers of upcoming projects. Hilti then delivers the tools and the contractor returns them when they are no longer needed. If a tool being used via Tools on Demand fails, it can be returned and replaced immediately. The idea is to eliminate estimates, purchase orders or internal delays.

Husqvarna has launched a new electric ring cutter within its PRIME™ product range—the new generation of high performance technology for electric cutting equipment. The K 6500 works on both 1- and 3-phase power, with an output of 5.5 kilowatts on 3-phase and 3 kilowatts on 1-phase, 230-volt. It is the most powerful electric ring cutter offered by Husqvarna. The K 6500 is well suited for deep cutting, indoors and outdoors. It cuts concrete, stone and masonry, cutting smaller openings in windows and doors. Built-in electronic intelligence ensures optimal power and rpm for each cutting job while an adjustable water flow feature assists with wet cutting operations. Power is supplied by a separate power pack, making it less exposed to dirt and vibrations, and a load indicator LED warns the operator of the risk of motor overload while working.

For More Information Tel: 800-879-8000 (U.S.), 800-363-4458 (Canada) Web: www.us.hilti.com (U.S.), www.hilti.ca (Canada) 5 4 | J U NE .1 4

For More Information Contact: Cate Stratemeier Tel: 913-928-1442 Email: cate.stratemeier@husqvarnagroup.com


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Husqvarna Announces New Staff Appointments Husqvarna Construction Products is pleased to announce four new staff appointments. Ryan Chamberlin has joined the company as the district manager for heavy user sales in Southern California (Orange County, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara). Chamberlin has a Masters Degree in Leadership and over four years of industry experience, the last two as part of the HD Supply White Cap team. With over 27 years of experience in the concrete construction industry, Chris Gosney has become the company’s Soff-Cut® specialist—western region, based out of Sacramento, California. Gosney was most recently owner and operator of Rainier Floors, Inc. and has been involved with Soff-Cut® saws since 1988. He brings a wealth of knowledge to this position and understands the contractor’s point of view. For More Information Contact: Cate Stratemeier Tel: 913-928-1442 Email: cate.stratemeier@husqvarnagroup.com

Chamberlin

Gosney

EDCO Celebrates Four Years Accident Free In April, Equipment Development Co., Inc. (EDCO), manufacturers of surface preparation, professional sawing equipment, concrete polishing machines and hand tools, celebrated four consecutive years without a work-related lost time injury. All company products are manufactured in one facility. This safety milestone is credited to the EDCO employees who, through continuous improvement, have created and maintained superior workspaces. As of March 31, 2014, EDCO recorded 1,473 consecutive accident-free working days. For More Information Contact: Jason Stanczyk Tel: 800-638-3326 Email: jstanczyk@edcoinc.com

Advanced RH745 Rotary Hammer Introduced by Bosch Bosch is pleased to introduce a new and upgraded version of the RH745 rotary hammer as part of the company’s SDS-max® lineup. The new hammer has been upgraded to feature increased impact energy, measured in accordance with the European Power Tool Association’s guidelines. The RH745 delivers 7.6 foot pounds of impact energy and can drill up to 10% faster than its predecessor, the 11263EVS. Weighing 18.5 pounds and measuring 21 inches long, the 13.5-amp rotary hammer features Bosch’s standard SDS-max® chuck and a variable speed dial for improved control during drilling or chiseling applications. A vario-lock function allows the chisel to be rotated to 12 positions while in chiseling mode. For More Information Tel: 877-207-2499 Web: www.boschtools.com

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CERTIFICATION OPERATOR CERTIFICATION

COMPANY CERTIFICATION

Companies listed here have invested time and money to send their operators to CSDA’s Operator Certification. If you are committed to professionalism in the concrete cutting industry, consider sending your operators through the training programs offered by the CSDA.

The CSDA Company Certification Program is the first of its kind in the industry. This program has been created for cutting contractors to provide owners, architects, engineers, general contractors and government officials with a valuable pre-qualification tool that acknowledges sound business practices. It is available to all sawing and drilling contractors.

ABC CUTTING CONTRACTORS BIRMINGHAM Bessemer, Alabama

DIXIE CONCRETE CUTTING CO. College Park, Georgia

ABC CUTTING CONTRACTORS MOBILE Daphine, Alabama

EAST COAST CONCRETE SPECIALITIES, INC. Jessup, Maryland

ACCU-CUT CONCRETE SERVICES Palm Harbor, Florida

ELMER’S CRANE & DOZER, INC. Traverse City, Michigan

ANDERS CONSTRUCTION, INC. Harvey, Louisiana

HAFNER & SON, INC. Danielsville, Pennsylvania

ATLANTIC CONCRETE CUTTING, INC. Mt. Holly, New Jersey

HARD ROCK CONCRETE CUTTERS, INC. Wheeling, Illinois

AUSTIN ENTERPRISE Bakersfield, California

HARD ROCK SAWING & DRILLING SPECIALIST CO. Keshena, Wisconsin

B.T. RENTALS LIMITED Woodbrook, Trinidad & Tobago

HOLES INCORPORATED Houston, Texas

CENTRAL CONCRETE CUTTING, INC. Edgar, Wisconsin

HOLES OF SAN ANTONIO, INC. San Antonio, Texas

CHICAGO CUT CONCRETE CUTTING Chicago, Illinois

HOUSLEY DEMOLITION CO., INC. Visalia, California

COBRA CONCRETE CUTTING SERVICES CO. Arlington Heights, Illinois

INTERNATIONAL DRILLING & SAWING, INC. Montgomery, Alabama

CONCRETE CUTTING & BREAKING CO. Jacksonville, Florida

J-RAY CONTRACTORS, LLC Marrero, Louisiana

CONCRETE CUTTING SPECIALISTS, INC. Freeland, Michigan

JACK DOHERTY CONTRACTING Woburn, Massachussetts

CONCRETE PENETRATING CO. Dallas, Texas

K.C. CORING & CUTTING CONSTRUCTION, INC. Kansas City, Missouri

CONCRETE RENOVATION, INC. San Antonio, Texas

L&S FORMLESS CURB COMPANY Hanover, Pennsylvania

CONSTRUCTION DEBRIS REMOVAL, INC. St. Augustine, Florida

LIUNA LOCAL 506 TRAINING CENTRE Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada

CORE SOLUTIONS LTD. Maraval, Trinidad & Tobago

LOMBARDO DIAMOND CORE DRILLING CO. Santa Clara, California

CORING & CUTTING OF SPRINGFIELD, INC. Nixa, Missouri

M6 CONCRETE CUTTING & CORING Wichita, Kansas

DI-TECH INTERNATIONAL, INC. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

CORING & CUTTING SERVICES, INC. Bentonville, Arkansas

PENHALL COMPANY/CONCRETE CORING COMPANY OF HAWAII Aiea, Hawaii

GREENE’S, INC. Woods Cross, Utah

CORING & CUTTING SERVICES, INC. Jacksonville, Arkansas CUT-RITE CONCRETE CUTTING CORP. Pawtucket, Rhode Island CUTTING EDGE SERVICES CORP. Batavia, Ohio D.M. CONLON/DAN-KEL CONCRETE CORING, SAWING & SCANNING Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

QUICK CUTS CONCRETE CUTTING SERVICES, LLC Belvidere, Illinois ROUGHNECK CONCRETE DRILLING & SAWING Morton Grove, Illinois SUPER CITY CONCRETE CUTTING Ocean Grove, Victoria, Australia TRUE LINE CORING & CUTTING OF CHATTANOOGA, LLC Chattanooga, Tennessee

DARI CONCRETE SAWING AND DRILLING Raleigh, North Carolina

TRUE LINE CORING & CUTTING OF KNOXVILLE, LLC Knoxville, Tennessee

DEANDREA CORING & SAWING, INC. Henderson, Colorado

TRUE LINE CORING & CUTTING OF NASHVILLE, LLC Nashville, Tennessee

DELTA CONTRACTORS & ASSOCIATES, LLC Baltimore, Maryland

WOLF INDUSTRIAL SERVICES San Francisco, California

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ATLANTIC CONCRETE CUTTING, INC. Mount Holly, New Jersey AUSTIN ENTERPRISE Bakersfield, California CENTRAL CONCRETE CUTTING, INC. Edgar, Wisconsin COBRA CONCRETE CUTTING SERVICES CO. Arlington Heights, Illinois CONCRETE RENOVATION, INC. San Antonio, Texas CUTTING EDGE SERVICES CORP. Batavia, Ohio DEANDREA CORING & SAWING, INC. Henderson, Colorado

HARD ROCK CONCRETE CUTTERS, INC. Wheeling, Illinois HOLES INCORPORATED Houston, Texas ONLINE CONCRETE CUTTING SERVICES PTY. LTD Seven Hills, New South Wales, Australia WESTCOAST CUTTING & CORING, LTD. Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada


MEMBERSHIP NEW MEMBERS The Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association is a nonprofit trade association of contractors, manufacturers and affiliated members from the construction and renovation industry. Diamond tools for projects requiring sawing, drilling, selective demolition, cutting and polishing offers the construction industry many benefits including lower total project costs, precision cutting, maintenance of structural integrity, reduced downtime, reduced noise, dust and debris, limited access cutting and the ability to cut heavily-reinforced concrete. Founded in 1972, CSDA has 500 member companies worldwide.

MEMBER BENEFIT TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS

North American Contractors CELEBRATION DEMOLITION SERVICES Orlando, Florida CR MEYER Oshkosh, Wisconsin DIAMOND EQUIPMENT CONTRACTING Virginia Beach, Virginia HILLEN SAWING Commerce City, Colorado INDIANA CONCRETE CUTTING, INC. Indianapolis, Indiana TITAN SAWING & DRILLING LTD. Rocky View County, Alberta, Canada

Over 4,000 industry professionals have graduated from more than 30 classroom, hands-on and online training courses since the program was launched in 1993. CSDA Member receive significant discounts on training and certification classes. Classes include the introductory yet comprehensive Cutting Edge online course, hands-on “101” classes like Slab Sawing & Core Drilling, Wall & Hand Sawing and advanced CSDA Operator Certification courses of the afore-mentioned disciplines plus Wire Sawing. The association also offers classes for Estimating and Concrete Polishing, with additional online training classes available via www.csdatraining.com for those not able to afford the time or money to send operators to remote classes.

MEMBER TESTIMONIAL I was first introduced to Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in 2003 when I was hired by a company that offered this service. During the seven years I spent working for this firm, I learned all different applications of this technology. In 2009, when the construction industry was slow, my wife and I had the opportunity to purchase Safe2core. The company offered concrete imaging and cutting services. In an effort to stay ahead of the economy, I took some time to research organizations in the construction industry that could help our company grow and reach the next level. That is when I came across CSDA’s website, where I learned about the great tools and programs that would benefit Safe2core and decided to become a member. CSDA has helped our business get more exposure on a national level through our job story coverage in Concrete Openings magazine. In addition, it has allowed us to network with fellow contractors and stay on top of the new industry standards and regulations. In the future, I plan to attend upcoming conventions and have my team go through CSDA’s training courses to stay ahead of the curve.

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Antonio Guzman Safe2core, Inc. San Jose, California antonio@safe2core.com

The CSDA Company Certification audit program has been developed to provide owners, architects, engineers, general contractors and government officials with a valuable prequalification tool, to qualify that hiring a certified company will ensure a demonstrated capability from a sawing and drilling professional. For more information about CSDA’s training and certification programs, or other partnerships and member benefits available, visit www.csda.org or call 727-577-5004.

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Membership Application COMPANY INFORMATION

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

COMPANY

START UP DATE

ADDRESS

AVERAGE ANNUAL GROSS INCOME $

CITY ZIP/POSTAL CODE

PHONE

YEARS IN BUSINESS

STATE/PROVINCE

ANNUAL GROWTH RATE

COUNTRY

NO. BRANCH LOCATIONS

FAX

CONTRACTORS: NO. TRUCKS

NO. EMPLOYEES

EMAIL

PRINCIPALS/OWNERS OF BUSINESS

WEB ADDRESS

OTHER PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS

OFFICIAL REPRESENTATIVE OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN CSDA ACTIVITIES

CONTRACTORS ONLY—CHECK BELOW TO IDENTIFY THE SERVICES YOU OFFER, WHICH WILL BE LISTED IN THE PRINT AND ONLINE DIRECTORIES:

PRINCIPAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY

FLAT SAWING

CORE DRILLING

WALL SAWING

SELECTIVE DEMOLITION

CURB CUTTING

GROUND PENETRATING RADAR

WIRE SAWING

CONCRETE POLISHING

SURFACE PREPARATION

SLURRY RECYCLING

MEMBERSHIP DUES SCHEDULE PLEASE CIRCLE YOUR DUES AMOUNT GROSS SALES NORTH AMERICAN CONTRACTOR

POLISHING CONTRACTOR GPR IMAGING CONTRACTOR MANUFACTURER DISTRIBUTOR OVERSEAS CONTRACTOR AFFILIATE*

$0–1M

$575

$750

$1,225

$895

$1–2M

$940

$1,520

$1,140

$2–3M

$2,255

$1,690

$3M–5M

$1,420 $750 $1,910 $1,250

$5–10M

$2,400

$4,880

>$10M

$3,035

$6,065

$3,640

$395

$710

$2,725

*AFFILIATE: A person, firm, corporation, society, government agency or other organization providing services to the concrete sawing, polishing and scanning industry.

MEMBERSHIP DUES

PAYMENT CHECK ENCLOSED (US FUNDS AND DRAWN ON A US BANK) VISA MASTERCARD DISCOVER

COMPANY ANNUAL DUES (FROM ABOVE)

$

ADDITIONAL BRANCH LOCATIONS ($130 PER LOCATION)

$

CSDA WEBSITE HOTLINK ($100) LINKS DIRECTLY TO YOUR COMPANY WEBSITE

$

CARD NO. EXPIRATION DATE

3-DIGIT VERIFICATION (CSC)

NAME ON CARD BILLING ADDRESS

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP TOTAL

$

SIGNATURE

CSDA • 100 2ND AVENUE SOUTH, SUITE 402N, ST. PETERSBURG, FL 33701 • TEL: 727.577.5004 • FAX: 727.577.5012 • E-MAIL: INFO@CSDA.ORG • WWW.CSDA.ORG

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BENEFITS Networking at the Annual Convention and Quarterly Meetings The number one benefit for members has always been the opportunity to network with industry professionals at the annual convention and quarterly meetings. This networking provides opportunities to forge new relationships and learn from other experienced professionals.

Representation with Governmental Organizations CSDA has an Alliance with OSHA to advance the safety of cutting contractors. This partnership included issuing Best Practice and Toolbox Safety Talk documents, joint exhibitions at trade shows, review of safety materials and round tables.

Discount Programs The Association negotiates member benefit programs with national vendors in order to provide cost-savings opportunities for CSDA Members.

CSDA Website The CSDA Website at www.csda.org contains a wealth of information available 24/7 in the “Members” section. The online discussion boards also provide members a forum to discuss technical issues, sell equipment, hire employees or any other relevant topics.

Concrete Openings CSDA Training and Certification Programs Over 4,000 members have graduated from more than 30 classroom, hands-on and online training programs. In addition, CSDA has certification programs for companies and individual operators.

CSDA Safety Resources and Toolbox Safety Tips (TSTs) The 230-page CSDA Safety Manual, CSDA 57-page Safety Handbook and six safety DVDs are designed specifically for concrete cutters and are available to members at a significant discount. TSTs can be used in employee safety meetings and can be an important part of your company’s safety program. CSDA has released a total of TSTs since the program began. A new TST is released every month.

World of Concrete Co-Sponsor Members receive significant discounts on registration and educational seminars fees. CSDA also supports the industry by exhibiting at this event and sponsoring seminar sessions.

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ConcreteOpenings at www.concreteopenings.com is the only professional magazine dedicated to concrete cutting with a circulation of 18,000 per issue. Members can advertise at significant discounts and use the opportunity to have their job stories reach almost 7,000 architects, engineers, general contractors and government officials.

CSDA Next Generation Committee The committee aims to continue the growth of the association while serving the needs and wants of the younger generation, with the goal of continuing to set a standard of excellence.

Mentor Program New Members can receive personalized assistance from a current CSDA Board or Committee member during their first year of membership.

Market Intelligence • Helps you plan, measure, understand trends and markets. • 3rd party non biased market research • Surveys and reports

Other benefits and programs can be reviewed by visiting the CSDA Website at www.csda.org or call the CSDA office at 727-577-5004.

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CALENDAR 2014 JUNE 12

OCTOBER 9-10

IACDS Annual General Meeting Hotel Intercontinental Madrid Madrid, Spain Email: info@csda.org www.iacds.org

CSDA Wire Sawing 101 Training K2 Diamond Torrance, CA Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

JUNE 12-14 EDA Deconstruction Forum 2014 Hotel Intercontinental Madrid Madrid, Spain Tel: 32-280 827 60 Email: info@europeandemolition.org www.europeandemolition.org

JULY 31-AUGUST 3 2014 Joint Convention–FICAP and MAF Longboat Key Club Longboat Key, FL Tel: 407-302-3316 Email: michele@ficap.org www.ficap.org

AUGUST 20-22 Our World in Concrete & Structures Conference Singapore Email: ci-p@cipremier.com www.cipremier.com

SEPTEMBER 4-5 CSDA Fall Meetings Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront Portland, OR Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

SEPTEMBER 29OCTOBER 3 Concrete Décor Show Fort Worth Convention Center Fort Worth, Texas Email: bent@protradepubinc.com www.concretedecorshow.com

OCTOBER 6-8 2014 Design-Build Conference & Expo Sheraton Dallas Hotel Dallas, TX Tel: 301-270-3171 pwilson@dbia.org www.designbuildexpo.com

OCTOBER 7-8 CSDA Wall Sawing 101 Training K2 Diamond Torrance, CA Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

6 0 | J U NE .1 4

OCTOBER 16-17 Protection of Structures Against Hazards Conference Tianjin University Tianjin, China Email: ci-p@cipremier.com www.cipremier.com

OCTOBER 20-21 CSDA Hand Sawing & Drilling 101 Training Diamond Products Elyria, OH Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

OCTOBER 20-22 Infra Oman 2014 Oman International Exhibition Center Sultanate of Oman Email: mail@ alnimrexpo.com www.alnimrexpo.com/infraoman

NOVEMBER 10-11 CSDA Slab Sawing & Drilling 201 Certification St. Petersburg College Clearwater, FL Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

CSDA HAND SAWING & DRILLING 101 TRAINING

DECEMBER 4-5

FEBRUARY 4-5

CSDA Winter Meetings Westin Riverwalk San Antonio, Texas Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

CSDA Concrete Polishing Class Las Vegas Convention Center Las Vegas, NV Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

FEBRUARY 4-5

2015 FEBRUARY 2-3 CSDA Estimating Class Las Vegas Convention Center Las Vegas, NV Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

NOVEMBER 12-13

FEBRUARY 3-6

CSDA Wall & Hand Sawing 201 Certification St. Petersburg College Clearwater, FL Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

World of Concrete Las Vegas Convention Center Las Vegas, NV Tel: 972-536-6423 www.worldofconcrete.com

NOVEMBER 14-15 CSDA Wire Sawing 201 Certification St. Petersburg College Clearwater, FL Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

NOVEMBER 17-20 Middle East Concrete 2014 Dubai World Trade Centre – Saeed Halls Dubai, United Arab Emirates Tel: 97-14 438 0355 Email: nathanwaugh@dmgeventsme.com www.middleeastconcrete.com

FEBRUARY 4 CSDA Board Meeting Las Vegas Convention Center Las Vegas, NV Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

FEBRUARY 4 CSDA Next Generation Reception Las Vegas Convention Center Las Vegas, NV Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

CSDA Hand Sawing & Drilling 101 Training Las Vegas Convention Center Las Vegas, NV Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org

MARCH 9-11 2015 Design-Build in Transportation Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center San Antonio, TX Tel: 301-270-3171 pwilson@dbia.org www.dbtranspo.com

MARCH 11-13 2015 Design-Build for Water/ Wastewater Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center San Antonio, TX Tel: 301-270-3171 pwilson@dbia.org www.dbwater.com

MARCH 30-APRIL 2 CSDA Convention and Tech Fair The Vinoy Renaissance Resort St. Petersburg, FL Tel: 727-577-5004 Email: info@csda.org www.csda.org


ADVERTISING AND READERSHIP

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF CSDA

Concrete Openings Website

Target the Specialized Industry of Concrete Cutting, Polishing and Imaging Advertising in Concrete Openings magazine is the only way to reach the specialty market of cutting, polishing and imaging contractors who work with concrete, asphalt or masonry because it is specifically targeted to this segment of the industry.

How Do You Reach 18,000+ Concrete industry Professionals? Each issue of Concrete Openings magazine is sent to more than 11,000 operators, equipment manufacturers and suppliers in the concrete cutting, polishing and imaging industry, and more than 7,000 specifiers of these services around the world.

Who Reads the Magazine? Concrete Openings reaches cutting, polishing and imaging contractors as well as specifiers of these services, including engineers, architects, general contractors and governmental agencies. Why waste your message on unnecessary circulation? Advertising in Concrete Openings guarantees a targeted audience of industry professionals.

Concrete Openings has its own website. Advertisers have direct links to their websites placed on our Advertisers page as a complimentary addition to ad placement. A full page-turning copy of the magazine, including ads, is also available for visitors to read on the website. Visitors to the site can now access our advertisers at the touch of a button. The Concrete Openings Website also has banner advertising opportunities available throughout the year. Visit www.concreteopenings.com for more information.

Readership Per Issue A poll of Concrete Openings subscribers revealed that 66% pass on their copy of the magazine to at least one other person, with almost 25% stating that the magazine is passed on to four or more people each issue. This translates to an average of four people reading each issue of the magazine for a total readership per year of approximately 60,000.

52%

8% 40%

• Specifiers • Contractors • Manufacturers, Distributors

Circulation 18,000+ minimum, per issue 11,000+ member and prospective member companies made up of contractors, manufacturers, distributors and affiliates 7,000+

Not a Subscriber? Get your free subscription today! Visit www.concreteopenings.com and click “subscribe”.

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF CSDA

W WW. C O N C RE TE OPE N IN GS.COM

READERSHIP BY PROFESSION

general contractors, engineers, architects and government officials who specify cutting, polishing and imaging

Do you “Like” CSDA? CSDA is on Facebook, and we hope you “like” it! The CSDA page is packed with all the latest news, updates, photos and videos from the association and Concrete Openings magazine. Look out for exclusive content and become “friends” with others who are looking to network and promote the sawing and drilling industry. Join our growing fan base and stay in touch with the association through your PC, laptop or mobile device.

C O N C RET E O P EN I N G S | 6 1


ADVERTISERS To receive additional information about products advertised in this issue, visit the advertisers page on concreteopenings.com, or contact the vendors below. PAGE

ADVERTISER

PHONE

53

Apollo General Insurance Company

707-996-2912

bobe@apgen.com

18

Brokk, Inc.

877-276-5548

peter@brokkinc.com

40

Concrete Cutters Network

781-771-1672

concretecutting1@gmail.com

63

Concut, Inc.

253-872-3507

suemayer@concutusa.com

48

CS Unitec, Inc.

203-853-9522

info@csunitec.com

28, Inside Front Cover

Diamond Products

800-321-5336

jpalmer@diamondproducts.com

15

Diamond Tools Technology

612-408-9253

mark@diamondtoolstechnology.com

5

Diamond Vantage

866-322-4078

johnconrad@diamondvantage.com

45

DITEQ Corporation

816-246-5515

jmiller@diteq.com

20

Dixie Diamond Manufacturing

678-296-3751

skilgore@dixiediamond.com

40

Expert Equipment Company

713-797-9886

expertequipment@sbcglobal.net

23

GDM Technologies/Terra Diamond

801-990-9034

gdmsaws@yahoo.com

49, 53

GelMaxx

619-701-7246

info@gelmaxx.net

11

Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc. (GSSI)

603-893-1109

harmonj@geophysical.com

Inside Back Cover

Hilti North America

918-872-3079

claire.combs@hilti.com

32, 33, Outside Back Cover

Husqvarna Construction Products

913-928-1442

cate.stratemeier@husqvarna.com

2

ICS, Blount Inc.

503-653-4644

joet@icsbestway.com

35

K2 Diamond

800-539-6116

mike.nelson@k2diamond.com

37

Makita

714-522-8088

whart@makitausa.com

47

Merit Engineering & Equipment Company

928-771-0575

r.ferguson@meritsaws.com

9

Reimann & Georger Corporation

716-895-1156

jpeter.kowalczyk@rgcproducts.com

43

Spidercut Systems, LLC

262-763-9002

rdrkw@aol.com

EMAIL

CUTTERS CORNER EXPERIENCED CONCRETE CUTTER REQUIRED Hillen Corporation in Commerce City, Colorado is looking for operator with at least 5 years of slab sawing, core drilling, hand sawing and wall sawing experience. Full time position with year-round work. For immediate hire with compensation dependent on experience. Requirements: • Reliable and hard working • Able to lift up to 50 pounds, shovel material and other manual jobs • Able to follow directions and perform duties as required • Able to work with others including subcontractors • Hold a valid Driver’s License, Social Security Card, birth certificate and/or Permanent Resident Card/Work Visa • Able to pass a drug/alcohol test and background check (no felonies) The company is also looking to hire a helper/laborer for an immediate start. For more information or to apply for either position, call 303-287-2664 or email hillenjc@aol.com.

6 2 | J U NE .1 4

This classified section is for use by anyone who wants to sell or buy used equipment, post help wanted ads or advertise business opportunities. Anyone interested in placing ads should send copy to Concrete Openings Classifieds, 100 2nd Ave S, Ste 402N St. Petersburg, FL 33701. Copy can also be faxed to 727-577-5012 or emailed to rhitchen@concreteopenings.com. Cost: $100 for 10 lines for members; $200 for non-members. Additional lines $10 each. Copy must be in the CSDA office no later than the first day of the month preceding publication


Concut Slab Saw Assembly Line - Circa 1949

TRUSTED BY PROS SINCE 1946 Concut has been manufacturing diamond blades, core bits and equipment in the United States for more than 67 years. From our base in the Pacific Northwest, we have grown to be the nation’s largest US owned manufacturer of diamond tools. We are proud to produce some of the highest quality products in our industry – and we pledge to stand behind them. For more information or to request a catalog, please call 800.243.5888 or visit us on the web at Concutusa.com

Leading U.S. Owned Manufacturer of Diamond Tools & Equipment Since 1946 © 2014 Concut Inc. All Rights Reserved


DIRECTOR’S DIALOGUE

What Has CSDA Done for Me?

PATRICK O’BRIEN Executive Director

A

n age-old member question for an association is often, “What has the association done for me?” A corollary to that is the reply, “What have you done for the association, or the industry?” Rather than getting into an ‘us versus them’ argument, let’s assume that both members and the association need to utilize their respective strengths to make the association, and the industry, better for all involved. CSDA has been particularly proactive in dealing with new proposed OSHA regulations on respirable silica. To just accept the proposed OSHA regulation would be disastrous for CSDA contractors from a business and an economic standpoint. Kellie Vazquez and I traveled to the Department of Labor in Washington, D.C. in March to testify in front of OSHA on the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Occupational Exposure to Crystalline Silica. Kellie testified on behalf of contractors and my testimony focused on the association and the industry. CSDA and 25 other associations formed the Construction Industry Safety Coalition to formally respond to OSHA on specific points within the proposed rule. The CSDA testimony was focused on facts that added to the comments made by others. CSDA asked OSHA how it can state that lowering the PEL from 100 µg/m3 to 50, or even 25, will “save nearly 700 lives.” The government’s own data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 1968 to 2012 indicate that deaths attributed to silicosis in construction have decreased dramatically from 1,157 to 102 per year. The PEL established over 40 years ago is working. The focus should not be on introducing a vastly more complicated rule, but to figure out a way

6 4 | J U NE .1 4

to increase compliance with the current rule. Simple works in the construction industry. CSDA has worked with NIOSH and contractors to collect data on all of the sawing and drilling operations over the past decade to produce a Best Practice document CSDA-BP-016. This Best Practice is simple but effective. An operator on the job can look at the chart and easily determine if respiratory protection is required and what type of protection is needed. In addition, the proposed silica rule would be laborious, costly and overly-complicated. The majority of CSDA type contractors perform work on multiple locations and jobsites each day. The average operator will be on 4-5 job sites in a single day. Many contractors have had operators on 7-8 job sites in a single day. To have someone monitor an operator on each of these jobs and take air samples is just not economically feasible or practical. In addition, taking an air sample reading would provide meaningless data just days later, as the operator may never be on that jobsite again. Finally, CSDA-type contractors are professionals and are different from many in the construction industry. The image of a saw generating a large plume of dust does not accurately reflect what our contractors do. Nearly 100% of CSDA contractors use water on each and every job, and this has to do with extending the life of the expensive diamond tools. Water that is used to keep the diamond tools cool, also greatly reduces the chance for silica particles to become airborne. CSDA is committed to protecting construction workers and has been proactive on their behalf. This is what CSDA is doing for you and we look forward to doing even more in the future with your help, membership and input.


Hilti Tool Fleet Management

NEW AND NOW IT’S FOR YOU.

More and more professionals are coming to realize that tool ownership doesn’t make them money - using the most innovative, high-performing tools does. Hilti Tool Fleet Management provides industry-leading services that are customized to your unique business needs like no-cost repair, new tool cycling, flexible terms, and exclusive access to Tools On Demand. Visit Hilti Online or contact your Hilti representative for more information. Hilti Diamond Systems 1-800-879-4000 www.us.hilti.com • www.hilti.ca

Hilti. Outperform. Outlast.


More power, cleaner environment. Introducing a cleaner, smarter and faster generation of flat saws.

Why? Because we wanted to exceed expectations. These saws comply with EPA Tier 4 regulations through modern diesel engine technology. We also loaded them with cool features to get the job done. To learn more, visit www.husqvarnacp.com or call your Husqvarna representative today!

NEW

HUSQVARNA FS 7000 D 74 hp Deutz diesel EPA Tier 4 compliant. Max blade capacity 42 in. Max weight 2,357 lbs.

The new Husqvarna FS 5000 D & 7000 D

CLEANER ROADWORK AHEAD 17400 West 119th Street • Olathe, Kansas 66061 • T 800-288-5040 • F 800-825-0028 • www.husqvarnacp.com 2077 Bond Street • North Bay, Ontario P1B 4V6 • T 800-461-9589 • F 800-825-0028 • www.husqvarnacp.ca Copyright © 2014 Husqvarna AB (publ.). All rights reserved. Husqvarna is a registered trademark of Husqvarna AB (publ.).

NEW

HUSQVARNA FS 5000 D 48 hp Yanmar diesel EPA Tier 4 compliant. Max blade capacity 36 in. Max weight 1,760 lbs.

Jun14 co full iss  

June 2014 issue of Concrete Openings, the official magazine of CSDA. Innovative job stories, insightful articles and all the latest news fro...

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