Daily Lobo 9/20/2021

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Daily Lobo new mexico

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Monday, S eptember 20, 2021 | Vo l u m e 1 2 6 | I s s u e 6


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PAGE 2 / MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2021

1

Nature Photo

st place

Contest Winners from page

2

“Growing Into Beauty” — Brianna Drapeau (FRONT PAGE) As an upcoming photographer I sought to capture the

beauty of the natural landscape. As a Native American, it is important to represent our culture. I chose to photograph my cousin Jacey in traditional native wear as a

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO way to capture Navajo culture and to represent the contrast of colors/ beauty in our culture. As our grandma once said, "it is important to keep our traditions alive."

1

nd place

“Light” — Ryan del Rosario (RIGHT) This is a photo of a lightning storm over John B. Roberts dam in Albuquerque, NM. I took this photo because I love to photograph storms. Lightning storms are often frustrating to photograph because it’s hard to predict when and where lightning will strike. This kind of photography always comes with a few dark and boring pictures of clouds, but when the timing is just right, the results are spectacular. Watching the night sky momentarily explode with color and light, and then seeing it again on your screen is amazing. It’s hard to put into words the joy one feels after successfully photographing a bolt of lightning.

3

rd place

“Horseshoe Bend” — Tristan Aguilar (LEFT) This photograph, for me, was a bucket list shot that I was able to check off my list this past summer. Traveling to Page, Arizona, I had one thing set in mind, and it was to catch this short trail with an amazing view of the Horseshoe Bend at sunset. Taking photos for close to 30 minutes, waiting and moving positions to finally create this shot was more fun than tasking I would say. Although the trip is not far from New Mexico, I never really thought I would make it out there so soon. Being able to experience this moment was breathtaking to say the least. Sitting and appreciating this atmosphere and beauty that was right in front of me was a special moment that I have often been thinking about. This photo helped me to cherish this memory for longer than just a weekend, and I cannot wait to continue to further these adventures and capture more moments similar to this.

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2021 / PAGE 3

New Mexico Green Amendment to enter next legislative session By Madeline Pukite @madelinepukite Environmental advocates in New Mexico are gearing up for the next legislative session in January, where they will aim to pass the Green Amendment for the second time in the New Mexico Senate. The amendment would establish a constitutional right to clean air and water, as well as preservation of the land for the state. The amendment as presented in the previous session said it would aim to protect “environmental rights, including the right to a clean and healthy environment and the right to the preservation of the environment,” which the state would have to enforce. The idea for this amendment was first proposed by Maya K. Van Rossum. She started Green Amendments For the Generations, a nation-wide organization that works toward passing green amendments in several states. The amendment was first introduced to the New Mexico state legislature in the previous session last January, but it died in the Senate Judiciary Committee. Despite this setback, Rossum says it is still making

great progress in the state. “In New Mexico actually, in comparison to other environmental legislation, it actually progressed pretty strongly,” Rossum said. “It got stymied, because literally, one person refused, who was the chair of a key committee, to even put it up for a hearing.” According to William P. Soules, one of the co-sponsors of the bill, the upcoming legislative session is strictly for budget-related matters. However, because this is an amendment, it involves a slightly different process and will still be allowed to be heard and voted on in the session. The main difference between an amendment and normal legislation is that after it passes through both houses, it goes to the public for a vote on the ballot, which would happen in the general local elections in November, and the governor cannot veto it. Terry Sloan, a board member for Green Amendments For the Generations and director of the nongovernmental organization Southwest Native Cultures, said he believes this is important for the state as a whole, and brings values that Native communities in the state have already been practicing. “For the Native community, it just further enhances what we already

Henry Hammel / Daily Lobo / @DailyLobo

Summertime cottonwood trees overlook the low amount of running water in the Rio Grande.

believe in and we already are trying to do to protect Mother Earth,” Sloan said. “It's just another mechanism to get that done in a non-Native community and society.” Sloan also said that through his work on the citizen-run Sandoval County Oil and Gas Ordinance team, he got a greater understanding of the geological makeup of the state and how devastating an oil spill would be. While this amendment would not eradicate oil and gas companies from the state, it would create the opportunity for more expansive regulations to be

put in place. “It gives us the power to manage that, (and) put in better reporting, better guidance, regulations, laws, etc. … to help monitor those activities,” Sloan said. Anni Hanna, director of NM Climate Justice, an organization dedicated to raising awareness to environmental movements in the state, said there is, unfortunately, partisanship involved in climate justice but that this amendment would allow a healthy environment to be “a human right.” “I think that's what's so important

about this amendment is that it'll give teeth to actually having a constitutional change so that it's not a partisan issue,” Hanna said. Some students from the University of New Mexico have come out in support of the amendment. The Leaders for Environmental Action and Foresight collectively wrote in a statement to the Daily Lobo that the amendment will help fight against environmental oppression. “As a university comprised majorly of minority and frontline communities, we see the effects of the climate crisis in nearly every corner of our community,” LEAF wrote. “We support the Green Amendment as it paves way for protections against environmentally charged oppression.” Beyond New Mexico, Green Amendments For the Generations aims to see other green amendments pass across the nation, according to its website. This would secure “for all people constitutional recognition and protection of their inalienable rights to pure water, clean air, a stable climate and healthy environments.” Madeline Pukite is a beat reporter at the Daily Lobo. They can be contacted at news@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @madelinepukite

Loose Leaf Farm bolsters local food systems By Rebecca Hobart @DailyLobo From growing food with her grandmother as a young child to owning Loose Leaf Farm in Albuquerque’s North Valley, Sarah Robertson has had a long history of understanding the critical role

of farming in global food systems and climate change. Robertson graduated from the University of New Mexico in 2012 with a degree in communications. Shortly thereafter, she started working in a management position for La Montañita Co-op Food Market, where she began to seriously consider farming as a

career option. Robertson said La Montañita was where she was able to work closely with local farmers, which set in motion profound conversations with her now-husband about local food. “Seeing, on a (more personal) level, how broken the food system is, I realized that one of the

only ways I was going to be able to make the world the place I wanted it to be — to see the change I wanted to see — was to farm,” Robertson said. Loose Leaf Farm is operated by Robertson and her husband Mark, with support from their part-time employee Charlotte Steiner. The farm has approximately three-

fourths of an acre of land, with dairy goats, laying hens, geese and a broiler chicken operation, according to Robertson. “They have a wonderful combination of fastidiousness and non-perfectionism,” landlord and close friend David Rubin said.

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Farm

from page

4

3

“You have to have that to be a good farmer. If you want to pick every single weed, you’ll drive yourself mad and end up with a Japanese garden.” The Robertsons live on Rubin’s property in exchange for helping with his greenhouse, which grows ginger and turmeric, Rubin said. They sell their crops separately through their respective markets, but farm on the same land. “(Sourcing locally) is important on an ecological level with the soil health and management practices,” Robertson said. “Plus, you’re supporting someone in your community — a real person, not a big (agriculture) corporation.” The U.S. food chain relies on importing internationally grown produce during seasons when it can’t grow

locally, Robertson said. She said another benefit to sourcing locally at a place like Loose Leaf Farm is that the food is better quality and isn’t grown with chemical fertilizers. “It really isn’t reasonable to grow a bunch of food in one place and try to send it somewhere else,” Robertson said. Though Robertson and her husband had long intended on developing a communitysupported agriculture (CSA) system, the pandemic was the push they needed to get it started. “It’s just a natural, orbital thing for me that I gravitate towards fresh and local food,” Robertson said. Loose Leaf Farm has a 24-week CSA which is structured around when they have the most product available,

though Robertson said they grow year-round. This season, the farm has 18 full-share and 12 half-share customers. Additionally, they sell at the Los Ranchos Growers’ Market and do some restaurant sales. “Our CSA is, by far, our favorite mode of sales,” Robertson said. “People pay upfront and come pick up one a week or biweekly, depending on if they signed up for a half- or full-share, and then we don’t have to have any exchange of money. They just come to the farm for the rest of the (season).” The CSA model is particularly valuable to small farmers because they get their money for the season upfront and are able to purchase materials before the season, according to Robertson.

Robertson said their CSA predominantly consists of seasonal fruits and vegetables that are grown on-site, chicken eggs and the intermittent availability of pickled products. “It just seems like their vision of a CSA brings a lot of joy to the people who are members,” Rubin said. “They don’t just come and get their food; they kind of wander around the property and get to know the animals.” Rubin said he has learned a lot about farming and “the unique satisfaction of daily life” from Loose Leaf Farm. Rebecca Hobart is a freelance reporter at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @DailyLobo

Sparse tree canopy in International District indicates environmental racism By Rebecca Hobart @DailyLobo The International District, one of the least-affluent areas of Albuquerque, might as well be the poster child for environmental injustice. This ethnically diverse area is knee-deep in the cruxes of climate change, seen by way of the urban heat island effect, which comes to fruition through substantial infrastructure development such as concrete buildings and asphalt in cities.

The effect causes cities to absorb and trap heat in areas like the International District, which is an area between Lomas, Eubank, Gibson and San Mateo. This trapped heat results in hotter temperatures during the day and less cooling at night, which is particularly impactful on the most densely populated neighborhood in New Mexico. Rising temperatures in the International District are due to a wide array of anthropogenic influences, but certainly worth highlighting is the destruction of natural land cov-

John Scott / Daily Lobo / @JScott050901

The sign at the ART bus station in the International District, an area of Albuquerque located between San Mateo, Eubank, Lomas and Gibson.

erage and lack of tree canopies. Frankly, the data is alarming. As of 2011 the International District is roughly 3,174 acres in area and, of that, 1,583.9 acres (49.95%) is “plantable space,” meaning trees could grow there if sown, according to USDA Forest Service software iTree. Though there’s an abundance of potential for planting, only 18.4 acres (0.58%) of the International District has tree canopy. Tree canopies provide a natural barrier to intercept the sunlight that would otherwise be absorbed by urban surface areas. This barrier creates the shade that keeps temperatures down and serves to lessen the impacts of warming. The shade that trees provide has a significant impact on the surface temperatures of the area, with a 2045°F reduction from peak, unshaded temperatures, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. There is both a clear need for greater shading and an opportunity, given the “plantable space” of the district. The distinct opportunity here has been overlooked as conversations on how to weather the intensifying impacts of climate

change seem to be reserved for the more affluent. It’s critical to note that the lack of tree canopy — and the subsequent urban heat island effect — is fairly exclusive to low-income areas like Albuquerque’s International District and South Valley, which parallels the issue on a slightly less grievous scale. Disparities in temperatures and access to tree canopy are clearly correlated with income-based inequities. The median household income of the International District was $26,201 as compared to the median income of $49,878 for Albuquerque overall, according to a 2016 Bernalillo County Urban Agriculture Project report. Agricultural resources and tree canopy are a relevant part in cultural and socio-economic discussions and it’s something that tends to signify community wealth, as an analysis on trees and poverty by the New York Times illustrated. Cities where low-income communities are suffering from lack of tree canopy are complicit in perpetuating environmental racism. Oftentimes, it’s the global economic stakeholders that are releasing obscene quantities of greenhouse gases through industrial and commercial activity, but underprivileged communities are the ones who are enduring the dis-

By Victor Martinez / Daily Lobo / @sirbluescreen

Volume 126 Issue 6 The New Mexico Daily Lobo is an independent student newspaper published on Monday except school holidays during the fall and spring semesters. Subscription rate is $75 per academic year. E-mail accounting@dailylobo.com for more information on subscriptions. The New Mexico Daily Lobo is published by the Board of UNM Student Publications. The editorial opinions expressed in the New Mexico Daily Lobo are those of the respective writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the students, faculty, staff and regents of the University of New Mexico. Inquiries concerning editorial content should be made to the editor-in-chief. All content appearing in the New Mexico Daily Lobo and the Web site dailylobo.com may not be reproduced without the consent of the editor-in-chief. A single copy of the New Mexico Daily Lobo is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies is considered theft and may be prosecuted. Letter submission policy: The opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. Letters and guest columns must be concisely written, signed by the author and include address and telephone. No names will be withheld.

Liam DeBonis / Daily Lobo / @LiamDebonis

Sarah Robertson stands in her orchard at Loose Leaf Farm.

proportionate impacts of emissions because their environments aren’t conducive for adapting to extreme climate activity. In addition to more extreme temperatures, the lack of equitable access to trees in impoverished areas also leads to increased need for electricity in the summer months. Trees and shading would reduce the need for air conditioning, which is sustained by fossil fuels. Air conditioning should be treated as a human right and efforts to reduce surface temperatures through the development of green spaces — whether that be tree canopies, rooftop gardens, playgrounds, etc. — should be considered in supporting the public health of communities. Climate change and its detrimental effects will happen to everyone, but not everyone will experience the gravity of those effects in the same way, with increased financial and social capital in some areas alleviating the worst of it. Racial and environmental justice are inextricably connected, as continually seen in the insufficient tree canopy in lowincome, minority communities. Rebecca Hobart is a freelance reporter at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @DailyLobo

By Rhianna Roberts / Daily Lobo / @Rhianna_SR Editor-in-Chief Megan Gleason

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UNM Land Acknowledgement statement Founded in 1889, the University of New Mexico sits on the traditional homelands of the Pueblo of Sandia. The original peoples of New Mexico – Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache – since time immemorial, have deep connections to the land and have made significant contributions to the broader community statewide. We honor the land itself and those who remain stewards of this land throughout the generations and also acknowledge our committed relationship to Indigenous peoples. We gratefully recognize our history. This statement was developed by Pam Agoyo, director of American Indian Student Services and special assistant to the president on American Indian Affairs, in consultation with the Native American Faculty Council.


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NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2021 / PAGE 5

HAPS The Entertainment Guide Monday

Thursday

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Luther House Thursday Centering Prayer 12:00-1:00pm at the Duck Pond

Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. Walk-in HIV Testing Tuesday: 1pm-5pm 801 Encino Pl NE Order Traditional New Mexican & Native American Cuisine at El Roi Cafe! Delivery available through Selflane! Or Visit: 616 Lomas Blvd NW, Suite A M-F: 7am-3pm (505) 401-9313

Wednesday Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. 801 Encino Pl NE 505-272-1312 Order Traditional New Mexican & Native American Cuisine at El Roi Cafe! Delivery available through Selflane! Or Visit: 616 Lomas Blvd NW, Suite A M-F: 7am-3pm (505) 401-9313 Luther House Shared Meal in front of Luther House Every Wednesday 6pm Following the shared meal we offer a variety of Liturgical and Spiritual practices

Order Traditional New Mexican & Native American Cuisine at El Roi Cafe! Delivery available through Selflane! Or Visit: 616 Lomas Blvd NW, Suite A M-F: 7am-3pm (505) 401-9313 Visit Meow Wolf See ad for event information! 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–10PM (505) 395-6369 Luther House Join us to learn, discuss & take action on theological issues At the SUB ( Lower Level North Entrance) 12:00-1:00pm

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wednesday evening shared meal 6pm Enjoy food and fellowship in the front yard of Luther House each Wednesday evening wednesday night liturgy Following the shared meal on Wednesday evenings, we offer a variety of liturgical and spiritual practices thursday centering prayer We offer a time of respite and centering prayer each Thursday at the Duck Pond. 12:00pm-1:00pm. Learn a variety of ways to pray and ground yourself in your faith friday people’s theology at the SUB Join us on Friday’s 12:00pm-1:00pm, just outside the SUB (lower level, north entrance) to learn, discuss, and take action around contemporary theological issues

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PAGE 6 / MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2021

The Lobo photographers’ perspectives on nature

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO Nature can mean many things to many people. For some, nature is trees, grass and rivers. For others, nature is a specific place or even a feeling. For these four Lobo photog-

raphers, though, nature mainly serves as a source of inspiration and an escape from the stress of everyday life. see Nature page 7

Shelby Kleinhans/ Daily Lobo / @realShelbyK

Water from a spring at the Soda Dam Hot Springs crashes into the Jemez River below in a waterfall. Maxwell Minty McGrael/ Daily Lobo / @DailyLobo

The moon reveals itself during sunset near the Menaul Trailhead in the Sandia Foothills.

Menaul Trailhead

ways relaxes me and gives me some space from all my troubles in the city. The trailhead is currently open all day and into the evening until 9 p.m. I highly suggest checking out this spot, especially at sunset or just after.

The Menaul Trailhead at the Sandia Foothills is my favorite nature spot in the city. Being 15 to 20 minutes away from the University of New Mexico, it really allows me to take a step back and clear my head. My favorite time to be here is at night with a couple friends. Usually, we sit on a rock just off of the trail and observe the twinkling lights of the city. This spot al-

Maxwell Minty McGrael is a freelance photographer at the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @MintyMcGrael

Soda Dam Hot Springs The telltale smell of rotten eggs is something you’ll get used to if you ever stop at the iconic geologic site that is the Soda Dam Hot Springs. I love admiring the intricate natural features, listening to the waterfall crash into the river and dipping my hand into the surprisingly warm water.

Part of the fun of visiting this natural beauty is the drive up to the Jemez Mountains that takes you past brilliant red and orange landscapes that look like they belong on another planet. It’s places like these that remind me of how truly sacred the nature that we live around is. Shelby Kleinhans is the multimedia editor at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo. com or on Twitter @BirdsNotReal99

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Nature

from page

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2021 / PAGE 7

6

Henry Hammel / Daily Lobo / @DailyLobo

Theresa Monjaras / Daily Lobo / @DailyLobo

A glass bottle rests in the mud, surrounded by the Rio Grande’s tree-lined banks.

Trees stand tall along the Mars Court Trailhead in Cibola National Forest.

Rio Grande

Mars Court Trailhead

Walking through nature and taking photos is one of my favorite hobbies. It’s fun to find little curiosities like this bottle since they make good subjects for photos, but it’s also depressing to see a place like the Rio Grande be filled with litter and dry swaths of mud. Despite this, I still enjoy listening to the

wind blow through the cottonwood trees and gazing at the sunlight reflecting off the water. The trip outdoors is definitely worth capturing photos of. Henry Hammel is a freelance photographer at the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @DailyLobo

Taken in the Cibola National Forest, the Mars Court Trailhead is one of the few places just outside Albuquerque to see greenery. The trail is one of my favorite places to go to get out of the city and away from everything. This environment is like stepping into a different world. For me, nature is a break

from normal life. In nature, everything is different: it smells different, feels different and is the only place where I feel I can truly relax and de-stress. Theresa Monjaras is a freelance photographer at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @DailyLobo

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sudoku

Level 1 2 3 4 September 13th issue puzzle solved

ACROSS 1 DEA agent 5 Traveller in London’s Tube 9 With 15-Across, Apple media player since 2005 13 Over the hill 14 Colorado-based brewery 15 See 9-Across 16 *Feature of gated community entrances 18 Sprouted 19 Like checks, when splitting the tab 20 Dungeness and Alaskan king 21 *GEICO product 24 “I got a great break!” 27 ID card picture 28 Adam’s grandson 29 “... disguised as Clark Kent, mild-__ reporter” 32 Hoopla 33 *Plaything for a backyard swimming spot 36 Fifth month 37 Warns of 39 Batman’s hideout 40 Donna Summer’s music 41 Spun, as a baton 44 *Source of showroom shock? 47 The Stones’ “__ Tonk Women” 48 Subscribers’ continuations 52 And others, in Lat. 53 Abundant farm yield ... and what the first words of the answers to starred clues comprise? 55 Past the deadline 56 Foreign relief org. created by JFK 57 Pac-12 sch. 58 Hotfooted it 59 Curve in a road

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

8/21/17

By Roger and Kathy Wienberg

60 Easier said __ done DOWN 1 Badgers 2 Fever with chills 3 Garner from the fields 4 Music media holders 5 Infant foot warmer 6 City where Joan of Arc died 7 Tax form org. 8 “The Waste Land” poet’s monogram 9 Thankless sort 10 Like “X-Files” cases 11 Year before AD yrs. started 12 Wield a divining rod 14 Captivate 17 Low, sturdy cart 20 Close friend 22 Quarrel 23 “Sorry, that’s not happening” 24 Jump 25 “Go back” computer command

Saturday’s Solved September 13th Puzzle issue puzzle solved

©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

26 Match, as clothing colors 29 Chicago Fire’s org. 30 Roof projection 31 Colored like Easter eggs 33 Bothersome 34 Fairy tale start 35 Skunk’s defense 38 Got giggles out of 39 Close-cropped hair style

8/21/17

41 Apprehensive 42 __ and dined 43 Cake decorator 44 Bookcase unit 45 Sum 46 Image maker, briefly 49 Curved foot part 50 1970 Kinks hit 51 Stretch across 53 Fella 54 Employ

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SUBSTITUTES NEEDED. WORKING with children ages 18 months - 8th grade. Must be available at least two days a week either 8:30AM-3:30PM, or 3-6PM. Pay DOE. Please email resume to OFFICE@EDELSOL.ORG HOME & OFFICE Cleaners. Wanted $600 Weekly. Cleaning Position: Available. Working Days: Mon - Fri. Time Schedule: 11 AM - 2 PM. Minimum Requirement. Email: candice75312@gmail.com

MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS TUTOR. Billy Brown PhD. College and HS. Telephone and internet tutoring available. 505-401-8139, WELBERT53@AOL.COM

SEEKING ACCOUNTING STUDENT for part-time bookkeeping for small company. Hours very flexible. If interested call Dave at 505-881-1000.

Apartments Awesome university apartments. Unique, hardwood floors, FPs, courtyards, fenced yards. Houses, cottages, efficiencies, studios, 1, 2 and 505-843-9642. 3BDRMs. Garages. Open 6 days/week.

Rooms for Rent ROOM FOR RENT near UNM, $595/ mo. +1/3 utilities. 505-385-9927.

LOOKING FOR A full-time Site Director for the Top Workplace 8 years in a row! Site Directors are responsible for the dayto-day operation of an individual schoolbased program site. Site Directors work directly with children, families, school faculty, and staff. Program Directors supervise the Assistants, Caregivers, Enrichment Instructors, and Associate Directors. Starting pay is $18.50/hour with benefits, paid holidays, and paid time off. Apply online at www.childrens-choice.org

Jobs Off Campus RETREAT HEALTHCARE HIRING CAREGIVERS Rio Rancho. Retreat is a campus of 3 senior care facilities that specialize in Alzheimer’s care. If you have experience in caregiving (child, adult, DD, senior), we are interested in meeting you. We have full-time and parttime positions. Make the most of your work experience by doing something that is so meaningful. Retreat is supportive of your education goals and will work around school schedules. Call our 24/7 employee hotline at: 505-366-4460 for more information and an interview time. www.retreatnm.com

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CAREGIVER POSITION FOR the Top Workplace 8 years in a row! Looking for someone who enjoys working with kids and believes that play is an important part of childhood development. Positions available for part-time and full-time during the summer, and before and after school during the school year. Starting pay is $13/hour with paid holidays and paid time off. Apply online at www.childrens-choice.org

CAMP FIRE IS seeking enthusiastic individuals to help elementary age children discover their inner sparks! Parttime. Monday – Friday. $13.00 - $15.00/ hr. with paid training! Apply online at www.campfireabq.org

CAMP FIRE IS looking for Activity Leaders to help facilitate fun activities with kids! Arts and crafts, sports, group games, and more! $13.00/hr. with paid training! Apply at www.campfireabq.org

TEAM LEADERS NEEDED to help Camp Fire guide children towards their full potential! $15.00/hr. plus paid training! Must have 3 years childcare experience. Apply at www.campfireabq.org

TALIN MARKET WORLD Food is hiring for the following positions FT/PT: cashier, stocker, produce clerk, customer service representative. Flexible scheduling, 401k, health benefits available. Apply online at employment.talinmarket.com

SPORTS ENTHUSIASTS WANTED to help Camp Fire lead children in beforeand after-school indoor and outdoor sports activities! $13.00/hr. and paid training! Apply at www.campfireabq.org

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