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DAILY LOBO new mexico

Taze or be tazed see page 4

November 30, 2011

wednesday The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895

Bishop explains complaint filed against UNM by Luke Holmen holmen@unm.edu

Bishop David C. Cooper Bishop David Cooper, Senior Pastor of New Hope Full Gospel Baptist Church’s Albuquerque location, said the complaint he helped file against UNM for discrimination against African Americans is supported by UNM’s own documentation. The Daily Lobo spoke with Cooper, who on Nov. 10 filed the joint Title VI complaint with the Ministers Fellowship of Albuquerque & Vicinity and the Albuquerque Chapter of the NAACP.

Cooper said complaints against UNM include documented cases of the following: 1) Hostile Climate for AfricanAmericans 2) Compensation Disparities 3) Adverse impacts of policies upon African Americans that reduce the number of African-American role models, reduce quality of health care and reduce delivery of services to African Americans 4) Inequitable distribution of federal funding for minority health care research Daily Lobo: What is a Title VI complaint? David Cooper: We filed a Title VI complaint against the University of New Mexico, which is based on discrimination based on race, color, or national origin and the Title VI provides that no institution receiving national funds can be found guilty of discriminating on these bases. DL: How were you made aware of the situation at UNM? DC: My organization, in partnership with the NAACP local chapter,

sought to address some issues that came to our attention in April of last year with UNM, especially Health Sciences on north campus and especially considering treatment of African-American physicians. We have been in contact with Dr. (Paul) Roth (dean of the School of Medicine and chancellor for Health Sciences), and during that some of the African-American faculty on campus came to us and asked us to help them, and we began to advocate for some of their concerns. This is a campus-wide problem. To my knowledge, there is only one black full-time tenured professor on the campus. DL: How did you document this discrimination? DC: We then conducted an investigation into some of these activities. We talked to many professors and doctors who had left UNM under adverse conditions, or because of a hostile environment. I have all their names and phone numbers, which I am not divulging to the University but which I have given to the Department of Justice

Egyptian Christians vote against radicals by Aya Batrawy and Maggie Michael The Associated Press

ASSIUT, Egypt — Ahead of elections, Egypt’s Coptic Church discreetly told followers to vote for an alliance of leftist and liberal parties sponsored by a Christian tycoon. The move by a Church normally wary of inserting itself into politics showed how deeply Egyptian Christians fear that Islamists will come to power. The country’s Christian minority turned out in droves for voting Monday and Tuesday in the first parliamentary elections since the fall of Hosni Mubarak in February. Many indeed said they had “voted for the eye” — a reference to the Egyptian Bloc, the coalition that the Church pointed to. Each party has a campaign symbol so that illiterate voters can identify their choices on the ballot, and the Bloc’s symbol was the eye. In pockets where their community is concentrated, the flow of Christians to the polls was strong. In the Cairo district of Shoubra, men and women with cross tattoos on their wrists — a common tradition among Egyptian Christians — kept lines full throughout the day. White-haired elders, equipped with chairs and bottles of water for the long wait, queued with young men and women who took time off from jobs to get to the ballot box. Almost all expressed a common motivation: Stop the Islamists. “We are voting for liberal parties as a means of survival,” said Farid George, a Christian in the southern city of Assiut. “Egypt is our country. My kids were raised here and I will die here.” The prospect of an Islamist victory in the election has Egypt’s Christians, who make up about 10 percent of the population of 85 million, terrified that one day strict Islamic law will be imposed. Talk of leaving Egypt has increasingly circulated among many Christians since Mubarak’s fall, raising fears over the fate of a community that predates the coming of

Inside the

Daily Lobo volume 116

issue 69

Islam to the country in the seventh century. Islamist parties are expected to be the biggest winners in the election — likely to gain a plurality or even a majority in the new parliament. Most prominent is the Muslim Brotherhood, the best organized political force in Egypt. Christians are nervous enough about the Brotherhood, but even more daunting to them are the Salafis, ultraconservatives whose ideology is close to the puritanical doctrines of Saudi Arabia. Assiut, a rural province with a capital of the same name 320 kilometers (200 miles) south of Cairo, has the biggest Christian population in the south. It also has a strong presence of Islamic hard-liners. In the 1990s, it was a main battleground between the government and Islamic militants trying to overthrow the state. The Islamic Group, or Gama’a al-Islamiyya, a former militant group that renounced violence and is now a political party, is believed to have been behind fliers distributed in Assiut warning that Christians were trying to block an Islamist victory and that “the enemies of Islam” must be countered at the ballot box. “This is dangerous, very dangerous,” George, a prominent businessman with several car dealerships in Assiut, said while talking about the fliers with his employees. George is himself a candidate in the vote, though not with the Egyptian Bloc. “I will not have a man in a beard tell me how to dress my wife, how to raise my kids, how to run my business.” Under Mubarak’s nearly 30-year rule, Christians — most of whom belong to the Coptic Orthodox Church — complained of discrimination by the Muslim majority and of a second-class status. Their general reaction only increased their ghettoization: They drew closer to the Church and relied on Mubarak to protect them. Mubarak did little to advance Christian civil rights, but his

see Egypt PAGE 3

and the Department of Education. I can’t give you any of their contact information because many of them are in litigation or wish to have their identities protected. We also used UNM’s own documentation to show this adverse climate (UNM’s African-American/ Black Climate Review Report and UNM’s Equity Report). People in the same job with the same experience were making less. The evaluation tools said that if there is a 1 percent difference in compensation, it is discrimination. Among African Americans, the average difference was 4.4 percent according to UNM’s own report. DL: Was Dr. Roth receptive to talking about the issue? DC: Our conversations were productive in that they opened up communication, and we agreed to work on three different areas (recruitment, retention and promotion), but it’s now December and we were supposed to do something within three months.

see NAACP PAGE 3

The full text of the UNM Equity Report and the African American/Black Climate Review Report are available at

DL Dailylobo.com

ANTIQUE CHIC

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo This art piece sits in a back room of Christian Dimery Antiques and Oddities. Dimery says the sculpture is a ‘60s black manikin from Germany. It features Northern New Mexico prison tattoos and wears a Native American headdress. The manikin is valued at $1,000, while the headdress costs $365. The shop is located at the intersection of Morningside Drive and Central Avenue.

Economic woes abroad

Three wins isn’t luck

See page 3

See page 6

TODAY

58|29


PageTwo

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Career Paths A weekly peek at unique niches

by Luke Holmen holmen@unm.edu

Christian Dimery started out as a “picker,� someone who buys and sells antiques as a hobby, in 1987 while he traveled across the United States. He now owns Christian Dimery Antiques and Oddities, located on the corner of Central Avenue and Morningside Drive in Nob Hill. Dimery moved to Albuquerque in 1989 and attended UNM in pursuit of a career as a park ranger, but soon found himself dealing antiques and has been doing so ever since. “I got a job at what was then Morningside Antiques in this same location (as his current antique store),� he said. “I intended to be a park ranger, I really did, but the owner said, ‘You don’t need to be working for me, you need to be working with me,’ so I became a partner.� The original owner of Morningside Antiques, Jerry Turner, died in 2000, and Dimery took over the shop. Dimery said he typically doesn’t sell antiques that sit around and collect dust. “I like to sell antiques that are usable; something that’s not only beautiful, but also useful,� he said. “Not every antique is going to be utilitarian, but the winning combination is something that is both. It’s something that has persisted despite the march of time and that we’ve kept because it’s useful.� Still, he said there’s a limit to the

usefulness of antiques. “I think that people are looking to accent their home with antiques, but very few people have a home that is 100 percent antique because that means you would have an antique refrigerator and an antique washer,â€? he said. “Lots of things aren’t sensible anymore, and we have modern conveniences ‌ but you can look to antiques to personalize your space.â€? Dimery said antiques aren’t only aesthetically pleasing, but are environmentally friendly as well. “I don’t mean to bash new furniture, because everything that is in here was once new, and someone had to have the good sense to buy it then,â€? he said, “but when you’re buying anything new you are using resources on the planet now.â€? Dimery said antiquing also supports the local economy. “If you buy antiques, you aren’t even sending money out of your town,â€? he said. “It’s extremely local and it’s recycled, and the price of it now would be far, far less than if it were to be produced today.â€? Dimery said a common misconception about antiques is that they are outrageously expensive. “One-half of 1 percent of antiques are so rare and were made by a specific artist that they would cost more,â€? he said, “but the rest of the time antiques are better quality for less money, and I think only one-half of 1 percent of people know that.â€?

DAILY LOBO new mexico

volume 116

issue 69

Telephone: (505) 277-7527 Fax: (505) 277-7530 news@dailylobo.com advertising@dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com

Editor-in-Chief Chris Quintana Managing Editor Elizabeth Cleary News Editor Chelsea Erven Assistant News Editor Luke Holmen Staff Reporter Charlie Shipley Photo Editor Dylan Smith

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo Christian Dimery and Mathilde Antoszek chat over the value and origin of a figurine. Antoszek brought the antique into Dimery’s shop for appraisal Tuesday.

Culture Editor Alexandra Swanberg Assistant Culture Editor Nicole Perez Sports Editor Nathan Farmer Assistant Sports Editor Cesar Davila Copy Chief Craig Dubyk Multimedia Editor Junfu Han

Design Director Jackson Morsey Design Assistants Connor Coleman Jason Gabel Elyse Jalbert Stephanie Kean Sarah Lynas Advertising Manager Shawn Jimenez Sales Manager Nick Parsons Classified Manager Renee Tolson

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The New Mexico Daily Lobo is an independent student newspaper published daily except Saturday, Sunday and school holidays during the fall and spring semesters and weekly during the summer session. Subscription rate is $75 per academic year. E-mail accounting@dailylobo.com for more information on subscriptions. The New Mexico Daily Lobo is published by the Board of UNM Student Publications. The editorial opinions expressed in the New Mexico Daily Lobo are those of the respective writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the students, faculty, staff and Printed by regents of the University of New Mexico. Inquiries concerning editorial content Signature should be made to the editor-in-chief. Offset All content appearing in the New Mexico Daily Lobo and the Web site dailylobo. com may not be reproduced without the consent of the editor-in-chief. A single copy of the New Mexico Daily Lobo is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies is considered theft and may be prosecuted. Letter submission policy: The opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. Letters and guest columns must be concisely written, signed by the author and include address and telephone. No names will be withheld.

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PageTwo

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Career Paths A weekly peek at unique niches

by Luke Holmen holmen@unm.edu

Christian Dimery started out as a “picker,� someone who buys and sells antiques as a hobby, in 1987 while he traveled across the United States. He now owns Christian Dimery Antiques and Oddities, located on the corner of Central Avenue and Morningside Drive in Nob Hill. Dimery moved to Albuquerque in 1989 and attended UNM in pursuit of a career as a park ranger, but soon found himself dealing antiques and has been doing so ever since. “I got a job at what was then Morningside Antiques in this same location (as his current antique store),� he said. “I intended to be a park ranger, I really did, but the owner said, ‘You don’t need to be working for me, you need to be working with me,’ so I became a partner.� The original owner of Morningside Antiques, Jerry Turner, died in 2000, and Dimery took over the shop. Dimery said he typically doesn’t sell antiques that sit around and collect dust. “I like to sell antiques that are usable; something that’s not only beautiful, but also useful,� he said. “Not every antique is going to be utilitarian, but the winning combination is something that is both. It’s something that has persisted despite the march of time and that we’ve kept because it’s useful.� Still, he said there’s a limit to the

usefulness of antiques. “I think that people are looking to accent their home with antiques, but very few people have a home that is 100 percent antique because that means you would have an antique refrigerator and an antique washer,â€? he said. “Lots of things aren’t sensible anymore, and we have modern conveniences ‌ but you can look to antiques to personalize your space.â€? Dimery said antiques aren’t only aesthetically pleasing, but are environmentally friendly as well. “I don’t mean to bash new furniture, because everything that is in here was once new, and someone had to have the good sense to buy it then,â€? he said, “but when you’re buying anything new you are using resources on the planet now.â€? Dimery said antiquing also supports the local economy. “If you buy antiques, you aren’t even sending money out of your town,â€? he said. “It’s extremely local and it’s recycled, and the price of it now would be far, far less than if it were to be produced today.â€? Dimery said a common misconception about antiques is that they are outrageously expensive. “One-half of 1 percent of antiques are so rare and were made by a specific artist that they would cost more,â€? he said, “but the rest of the time antiques are better quality for less money, and I think only one-half of 1 percent of people know that.â€?

DAILY LOBO new mexico

volume 116

issue 69

Telephone: (505) 277-7527 Fax: (505) 277-7530 news@dailylobo.com advertising@dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com

Editor-in-Chief Chris Quintana Managing Editor Elizabeth Cleary News Editor Chelsea Erven Assistant News Editor Luke Holmen Staff Reporter Charlie Shipley Photo Editor Dylan Smith

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo Christian Dimery and Mathilde Antoszek chat over the value and origin of a figurine. Antoszek brought the antique into Dimery’s shop for appraisal Tuesday.

Culture Editor Alexandra Swanberg Assistant Culture Editor Nicole Perez Sports Editor Nathan Farmer Assistant Sports Editor Cesar Davila Copy Chief Craig Dubyk Multimedia Editor Junfu Han

Design Director Jackson Morsey Design Assistants Connor Coleman Jason Gabel Elyse Jalbert Stephanie Kean Sarah Lynas Advertising Manager Shawn Jimenez Sales Manager Nick Parsons Classified Manager Renee Tolson

"TLB-JCSBSJBOr elibrary.unm.edu

University Libraries FINALS HOURS December 6 – 17, 2011 Center for Ask a Librarian Southwest Research 505-277-9100 & Special Collections CHAT IS ONLY M-F, 8am-5pm

Centennial Science and Engineering Library

Fine Arts and Design Library

Parish Memorial Library for Business and Economics

The New Mexico Daily Lobo is an independent student newspaper published daily except Saturday, Sunday and school holidays during the fall and spring semesters and weekly during the summer session. Subscription rate is $75 per academic year. E-mail accounting@dailylobo.com for more information on subscriptions. The New Mexico Daily Lobo is published by the Board of UNM Student Publications. The editorial opinions expressed in the New Mexico Daily Lobo are those of the respective writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the students, faculty, staff and Printed by regents of the University of New Mexico. Inquiries concerning editorial content Signature should be made to the editor-in-chief. Offset All content appearing in the New Mexico Daily Lobo and the Web site dailylobo. com may not be reproduced without the consent of the editor-in-chief. A single copy of the New Mexico Daily Lobo is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies is considered theft and may be prosecuted. Letter submission policy: The opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. Letters and guest columns must be concisely written, signed by the author and include address and telephone. No names will be withheld.

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New Mexico Daily Lobo

NAACP

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 / Page 3

from page 1

‌ We’ve been in dialogue for 11 months and we haven’t seen any changes. In his defense, they said they had talked to a couple people who said (discrimination) was not why they left. ‌ But several of the employees who left had decided to settle (with UNM for monetary compensation) regarding these claims, but some just left. DL: Have you been in contact with the University since filing the complaint? DC: I got a call from Dr. Anne Simpson saying that Dr. Roth would like to meet, but I’ve been in Chicago for a couple of days, so I won’t be meeting with them until next week. ‌ I don’t think he knew at the time we had filed the complaint. They

did contact me before we made the complaint public. DL: Does the discrimination just involve employees? In what other places have you seen disparities? DC: Recently the University got a $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, and when the University put out its brochure on how it was going to improve minority health, they noted Hispanics and Native Americans, but not African Americans, even though we have the larger percentage of our people being affected. DL: Do you think this is just an African-American issue, or does this go across racial boundaries? DC: I think it does cross racial boundaries, but ‌ we are focused as

African Americans on the discrimination at hand and haven’t yet addressed all discrimination issues at UNM. ‌ There are some women on campus with disparity of pay as well. Our concern is the minority of the minority in a majority/minority state. DL: Why did you file this complaint in the first place? Are you seeking any monetary compensation? DC: No, no, some of the individuals involved are seeking reparation in their individual suits, but we want to see equal treatment of African Americans. Look for continuing coverage of this issue with comments and interviews from UNM administrators and student leaders.

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by Naguib Sawiris, a Christian telecoms tycoon who is one of the country’s richest men. The alliance is running a mix of Muslim and Christian candidates. The Church leadership put the Bloc at the top of a list of candidates it advised Christians to vote for and distributed the list to the community through Youth Assemblies, according to multiple Coptic voters who received the list. The Assemblies are a church body that usually gives social guidance to youth. The list also circulated on Coptic Facebook pages. Five days before the election, the third-highest church official in Assiut met with Youth Assembly heads and gave them the list to distribute, saying Christians must not split their vote, according to a person who attended the meeting. He spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue. Pastor Al-Qis Baki Sadaqa, head of the Anglican Church in Assiut, says he won’t choose “out of religious motives� but will vote for “the person who is most qualified. That is modernity.� He’s voting for Muslims, though not the Muslim Brotherhood. He’s not concerned about the Brotherhood, saying it’s the most moderate of the Islamists. But Salafis, he says, are the more worrisome because of their “fanaticism� and “narrow-mindedness.� “It’s not only Christians who are in danger, but moderate Muslims,� the 83-year-old pastor said. Youssef Sidhom, a prominent Coptic analyst, said he hopes the various liberal and secular factions in parliament will unite to balance the Islamists. “They are in one boat, and they have to join ranks,� he said. ___ Michael reported from Cairo. AP correspondent Hadeel al-Shalchi in Alexandria contributed to this report.

weird.

would rather eat the

AP Photo Egyptian security forces stand guard at the end of the first round of voting in parliamentary elections in Cairo, Egypt on Tuesday. Egypt’s military rulers were quick to take credit for a strong turnout in the first elections since Hosni Mubarak’s ouster. police state ensured certain lines were not crossed. With Mubarak gone, the election turnout marks a shift for Christians: They increasingly feel they can’t shelter themselves in a corner; they have to engage with the country and assert themselves. “Our country has been stolen from us for 30 years, and we didn’t feel like we lived in our own country,� said Hani Mikhail, who runs the Citizenship League at the All Saints Church in the Mediterranean coastal city of Alexandria. The league is a Church organization formed to spread awareness of citizenship rights. “After the revolution this strange feeling came over us — the country started to feel like ours again and that we want to do something for Egypt.� The All Saints Church was hit by suicide bombers on New Year’s, killing more than 20 people. AntiChristian violence accelerated since Mubarak’s fall, blamed by Christians on increasingly bold Islamists. Salafi preachers have spoken out against the building of churches and accused Christians of seeking to take over “Islamic� Egypt. The Church’s quiet backing of the Egyptian Bloc and other liberal factions highlights how it wanted to ensure the community’s voice is heard. The Coptic Church denies making any official endorsement. Reports of the list raised an outcry from Islamist groups who accuse the Church of meddling. Prominent Copts close to the Church leadership have defended the list in TV appearances — without confirming the Church issued it — pointing out that many parties are unknown so Christians needed guidance and that they have a right to ensure their interests. The Bloc is made up of three liberal, secular-leaning parties, including one founded and financed

goats are

Instead of reading it, a goat

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COLUMN

Atheists reject belief in deities, not festivities by Devon Stevens

Daily Lobo Columnist What do atheists do for Christmas? Now that Thanksgiving is over, I’ve heard this question several times couched in the insulting manner that an atheist couldn’t possibly have fun on a Christian holiday. First, it’s not a wholly Christian holiday. The holiday’s roots go back into pagan solstice holidays, and because the exact date of Christ’s birth is not known, early Church officials decided that Dec. 25 was as good a date as any. That it fell near Saturnalia meant that it could absorb many Roman pagans that didn’t want to give up their winter feasts and orgies. Christmas has other pagan trappings, such as the Christmas tree. Where does the tree appear in the Bible? Is a tree associated with Jesus? It’s not, as far as I can tell. But it is a very Germanic pagan symbol, especially if you set it on fire. Is Santa Claus a Christian saint? No, he is a giant flying magical elf who puts toys in socks. I’m not sure if that is pagan or not, but it is blooming weird. Not Easter bunny weird or leprechaun weird, but still very strange. The biggest criticism of Christmas I can think of isn’t even an objection about paganism: It’s the commercialism of Christmas. I find it both sad and funny that the man who threw the money changers out of the temple now has millions of people celebrating his birthday with greed and avarice. Do you remember that old carol that goes something like, “Love and joy come to you and our Christmas Sales, too, and God bless you and send you a very big TV, and God bless you and send you a TV”? Me neither. Now, I could argue that atheists shouldn’t celebrate any religious holiday, Christian or not. But the pagan stuff is innocuous enough that it shouldn’t offend, and nowhere in the rules of atheism do you find anything against greed. Buying stuff is good for the economy, anyway. I know this because any time there is a crisis where money is scarce, the government tells me that I need to spend all my money to get more money. And then the economic experts tell me that if I don’t have any money to spend I should go and buy things on credit because imaginary money that doesn’t exist will help the economy get more money. The Christmas stimulus is based on these principles. This is where buying stuff nobody needs cheers up the depressed economy because it pleases the great animal spirits in some way that nobody really understands. If you weren’t out there on Black Friday, you were letting your country down. So as an atheist, I call the holiday Saturnalia and do the general things one does on such a holiday: Smoke, drink, curse, hang out with homosexuals, put up a Saturnalia Tree, tell the children that Saturnalia Claus will be coming down the chimney with his sack full of gift cards and discount coupons for good atheist boys and girls, and most important of all — keep away from all that false holiday cheer people assume when they’re miserable and wish the whole holiday would just go away.

EDITORIAL BOARD Chris Quintana Editor-in-chief

Elizabeth Cleary Managing editor

Chelsea Erven News editor

LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY  Letters can be submitted to the Daily Lobo office in Marron Hall or online at DailyLobo. com. The Lobo reserves the right to edit letters for content and length. A name and phone number must accompany all letters. Anonymous letters or those with pseudonyms will not be published. Opinions expressed solely reflect the views of the author and do not reflect the opinions of Lobo employees.

COLUMN

Dr. Peg’s Prescription Are you cracking up now that the summer moisture has deserted you?

Dear Dr. Peg, My skin is so dry it feels like sandpaper, and my fingertips have cracks in them. I put lotion on every day but it’s not helping. What can I do? Dear Dry and Cracking, New Mexico is famous for its dry air. We brag about it in the summer time. “It might be hot, but at least it’s dry heat.” Right? It’s better here than the swamps of Florida. We hardly even notice our own sweat because it evaporates off us so quickly. Winter is a different story. As the mercury drops, so does the humidity. In frigid weather, the gas molecules huddle closer together, crowding out the water molecules. Cold air can’t hold as much water as warm air. Outdoors is a chilly desert, and indoors we seek comfort by turning on our artificial heaters and lighting our wood stoves and fireplaces. The added heat evaporates what little moisture is left. Our bodies need moisture. After all, we are more than half made of water. We acquire it through food and drink and lose it in blood, sweat and tears, not to mention breath and skin. The oils in our skin help hold moisture in, but nature loves balance, which means dry air will suck moisture out of wherever it can, which results in chapped lips, lizard hands and cracking fingers. To approach the problem of dry winter skin, first look at your environment. Now, obviously you can’t change the climate on a macro level, but you can work a little water magic in your own home. A humidifier or vaporizer adds moisture to the indoor environment. Run it in your bedroom with the door closed for your

Mandatory recycling fee a waste of money Editor, Why does everyone pay a recycling fee on their water bill? I was reviewing my water bill and noticed that I am being charged a recycling fee and I don’t get recycling services. I just don’t understand why everyone has to pay this fee if there are no services provided. For that matter, it was just in the news not that long ago that they were closing the recycling center here and having it outsourced. So, not only are they charging a fee for this service, but the jobs in New Mexico are being

slumbering comfort. Next, maximize your own moisture. Drink plenty of water and other liquids to moisturize from the inside out. Cover up when you go outside so those cold winter winds won’t whip the water out of your skin. Most importantly, think body oil. Body oil is the major player here. We are covered with tiny oil glands, one for each hair follicle. These little miracles keep our skin from flaking up and falling off. Without them, we’d be poured out in a puddle on the sidewalk. Madison Avenue has tried to convince us all that natural body oils are at best unnecessary and at worst disgusting, to be scrubbed off daily and replaced by an expensive scented cream or lotion. I don’t have anything against lotions and creams, as you will see. But our natural oils do a better job, so I suggest you let them do it. Limit your bathing. Now, I’m not suggesting you never wash — filth is never in fashion. But if you scrub every inch of your body every day in scalding hot water, you will strip your oils quicker than you can say Crème de la Mer. Shorten your shower, lower the temperature to warm, and use a gentle soap only when and where you need it. It probably won’t surprise you to hear that the sweat glands in your armpits and genitals are deeper that anywhere else, and produce a thicker, more aromatic form of sweat than the sweat glands on, say, your abdomen or forearm. You probably want to soap your armpits and genitals every day, but lots of the rest of you can get by with a rinse. (Bonus factoid: the special sweat in your pits and pants contains pheromones that actually increase your sense of smell, as well as that of any potential mates).

After you turn off the not-too-hot water in the shower, while you’re still wet, apply a little baby oil to your palms and rub in into your skin. Then pat dry gently. Rubbing with a towel can damage your tender integument, and damaged skin loses moisture more easily. Then, if you are still parched, lotion up by all means. But you don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to moisturize them. Cheap stuff often works just fine. Finally, those frustrating finger cracks. I can totally relate. We medical providers wash our hands before and after every patient, any time we eat or use the bathroom, and many more times during the day. Finger cracks are an occupational hazard. I’m going to let you in on a little trade secret: super glue. I use it all the time. Squeeze the split skin together, apply super glue, hold for a few seconds and voila! Just be careful not to glue your fingers together. If you do all this and your skin is still stressing you, you might have something more serious than simple seasonal dryness. Call 277-3136 for an appointment at Student Health and Counseling. We even have a dermatology clinic for the extra-tough cases.

outsourced to another out-of-state company. This seems like a slap in the face not only for the people who pay the fee, but also for the people who may now be out of a job. Back in May the mayor said that recycling was costing the city too much money. How was it costing the city? It seems to me that it was costing the taxpayers and still is. The fee is still on my water bill and I still have no recycling bin at my house. If the city wants to make money, then make it so that everyone has to recycle, and if not then they could be fined. There are many cities around the country that make money on recycling, but everyone within the city must participate in the program. This would help to clean

the city and reduce the trash in the landfill. It seems easy enough, but there is a cost with it as well. It would mean that the city would have to give every household recycle bins and they would also have to have a pick up system just for the recycled goods. Therefore if the fee is to stay then get bins to all of these households and make recycling happen. If there is a bin and there is the means to do it there is no reason that it can’t be done. It takes no more time to recycle than it does to throw it in the trash can.

Dr. Peggy Spencer is a student health physician. She is also the co-author of “50 ways to leave your 40s.” Email your questions directly to her at pspencer@unm.edu. All questions will be considered anonymous, and all questioners will remain anonymous. This column has general health information and cannot replace a trip to a health provider.

LETTER

Sabrina Vigil CNM student


news

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Europe unites against debt

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 / Page 5 The Latin American & Iberian Institute announces the availability of:

Title VI Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships FOR SUMMER 2012 AND ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013 Application and Information at: http://laii.unm.edu/node/16 An APPLICATION HELP SESSION will be held at the LAII on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2011 at 12:00 p.m. (co-sponsored by SOLAS) Application Deadline: Monday, February 13, 2012 by 5 p.m. Questions? Please contact Alexandra Blodget at laiicomm@unm.edu or 277-7049

AP Photo Elena Salgado, Spain’s finance minister, left, speaks with German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble during a round table meeting of the Eurogroup at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday.

by Don Melvin and Greg Keller

The Associated Press BRUSSELS — Eurozone ministers threw a lifeline to Greece on Tuesday as they scrambled to prevent financial chaos from spreading further and driving Europe’s common currency into a catastrophic breakup. The monthly meeting of 17 nations was dominated by attempts to keep Greece afloat and find enough money to coat a veneer of credibility over Europe’s rescue fund. It came on the third straight day that Italy has taken a beating in the bond markets, with investors growing increasingly wary of the country’s chances of avoiding default. Markets rose for the second day Tuesday in hopes that the enormous pressures on the ministers would produce some results. The finance ministers approved the next installment of Greece’s bailout loan — €8 billion ($10.7 billion). Without that money, Greece would have run out of cash before Christmas, unable to pay employees or provide services. Two officials in Brussels reported the development, speaking on condition of anonymity while the meeting was still going on. The installment is part of a €110 billion ($150 billion) bailout from eurozone nations and the International Monetary Fund that Greece has been dependent on since May 2010. The new cash came after the EU demanded, and received, letters from top Greek political leaders pledging their support for tough new austerity measures. In the latest sign of trouble, Italy was forced to pay an excruciatingly high interest rate on an auction of three-year debt Tuesday. Demand was strong, but the 7.89 percent rate was nearly three percentage points higher than last month, an enormous increase. The auction raised €7.49 billion ($10 billion). “But it’s still worrisome that those yields are past the point which a week ago would have terrified global markets,” said Quincy Krosby, market strategist for Prudential Financial. Italy is too big for Europe to rescue. If Italy were to default on its €1.9 trillion ($2.5 trillion) debt, the fallout could break up the currency used by 322 million people and send shock waves throughout the global economy. At the meeting, the finance ministers were discussing ideas that until recently would have been taboo: countries ceding additional budgetary sovereignty to a central authority — EU headquarters in Brussels. Strengthening financial governance is being touted as one way the eurozone can escape its debt crisis, which has already forced Greece,

Ireland and Portugal into international bailouts and is threatening to engulf Italy, the eurozone’s thirdlargest economy. Aside from the money for Greece, some ministers acknowledged Tuesday they probably wouldn’t reach their more important goal of increasing the leverage power of the European Financial Stability Facility. The fund, which is supposed to be a “firewall” against financial contagion swallowing up nation after nation, needs to be expanded from €440 billion ($587 billion) to something near €1 trillion ($1.3 trillion). “It will be very difficult to reach something in the region of a trillion,” said Dutch Finance Minister Jan Kees de Jager. “Maybe half of that.” And the task of agreeing on grand changes that might save the eurozone from splitting up will likely fall to the European presidents and prime ministers attending a Dec. 9 summit in Brussels. German Chancellor Angela Merkel reiterated her support for changes to Europe’s current treaties in order to create a fiscal union with stronger binding commitments by all euro countries. “Our priority is to have the whole of the eurozone to be placed on a stronger treaty basis,” Merkel said Tuesday. “This is what we have devoted all of our efforts to; this is what I’m concentrating on in all of the talks with my counterparts.” Merkel acknowledged that changing the treaties — usually a lengthy procedure — won’t be easy because not all of the European Union’s 27 nations are enthusiastic about it. But she dismissed reports that the eurozone, or smaller groups of nations, might go ahead with their own swifter treaty. Countries outside the eurozone heaped on the pressure, fearing drastic consequences if the euro were to fail. Bank lending would freeze worldwide, stock markets would likely crash, European economies would go into a freefall and the United States and Asia would take a big hit as their exports to Europe collapsed. “I will probably be the first Polish foreign minister in history to say so, but here it is,” Radek Sikorski said in Berlin. “I fear German power less than I am beginning to fear German inactivity … the biggest threat to the security and prosperity of Poland would be the collapse of the eurozone.” Eurozone countries have enormous debts that must be refinanced — with €638 billion ($852 billion) coming due in 2012, 40 percent of which needs to be refinanced in the first four months alone, according to Barclays Capital. The 17 ministers are also discussing jointly issuing so-called “eurobonds” — an all-for-one, one-for-all

way of having the different countries guaranteeing one another’s debts. Right now each nation issues its own bonds, meaning that while Italy pays above 7 percent, Germany pays about 2 percent. Having stronger countries like Germany stand behind the general European debt would lower Italy’s borrowing rates and perhaps help it avoid a debt spiral toward bankruptcy. At the same time, it would raise Germany’s borrowing costs. An even more radical solution was proposed Tuesday by the head of Germany’s exporters association: urging Greece and Portugal to leave the eurozone. BGA President Anton Boerner told The Associated Press that it is the only way those two nations can spur the growth needed to overcome their crippling debts.

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sports

Page 6 / Wednesday, November 30, 2011

New Mexico Daily Lobo

men’s basketball

Shot at third victory of season not a shoo-in by Nathan Farmer

sports@dailylobo.com

The sins of the past don’t need to weigh the men’s basketball team down any longer. For the first time this season, the team has a chance to win three games in a row. UNM takes on Idaho State tonight at The Pit and is now 4-2 coming out of the 76 Classic Tournament, which took place last weekend and in which it beat Washington State and Boston College. Idaho State comes into the game 1-4, but head coach Steve Alford said the team is much better than its record shows. “College basketball has so much parity in it now,� he said. “If we play well we will take care of business, if we don’t play well we are going to have a long night. They are a scary team because they have a lot of guys that can and will shoot the 3-point shot.� Freshman guard Dominique Dunning said Idaho State can’t be overlooked because many of its games have been close this season. “All their losses are on the road against really good teams,� he said. “We are hoping to come out and get better as a team and take the win.� Alford has yet to set a starting five this year, having played with three different starting lineups already this season. Sophomore guard Tony Snell and senior forward A.J. Hardeman have been the only two Lobos to start all six games this season. Snell is the leading scorer for UNM so far this season, averaging 15.2 points per game, and has been the leading scorer in half of the games. “Guys know that if you are not playing well, or not up to 100 percent, then you are probably going to lose those minutes,� Alford said. “That’s the versatility that we have on this team.� Freshman guard Hugh Greenwood has started the last four games for UNM, and has yet to turn the ball over in those starts. In those games the Lobos are 3-1. “Getting close to over 100 minutes of play without a turnover against the people we

Juan Labreche / Daily Lobo UNM’s Phillip McDonald keeps the ball from NMSU’s Christian Kabongo on Nov. 16 at The Pit. The Lobos take on Idaho State tonight in an attempt to win their third game in a row. play, and all of those games being away from home, that’s pretty impressive for anybody, let alone a freshman,� Alford said. Alford said even though Greenwood is doing great at running the offense, no one has a guaranteed starting spot. “You have to produce, and you have to play each and every week.� Senior forward Drew Gordon and sophomore guard Kendall Williams have had inconsistent

starts to the season, but are now second and third on the team in scoring, respectively. Alford said with the loss of Dairese Gary to graduation, Williams and Gordon are now the main focus of the other teams’ scouting reports. “Now you (Williams) are the focal point of the scouting report, and that’s the same with Drew,� Alford said. “Right now they are the first two that come up on the opponents’ board, so with that comes a lot of pressure.�

MEN’S

BASKETBALL VS.

IDAHO STATE TONIGHT, 7 P.M.

THE PIT



            





               

     

        


sports

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 / Page 7

ncaa football

Coach promises not to overdo it

Terry Gilliam / AP Photo Urban Meyer listens as Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith introduces him as the university’s new football coach during a news conference Monday in Columbus, Ohio.

by Rusty Miller Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Before Urban Meyer could agree to a contract as Ohio State’s new football coach, he had to sign something provided by his two college-age daughters and his young son. It was a piece of pink paper on which he promised that he won’t overdo it, that he won’t work too hard and that he’ll take care of himself this time. “This is a contract that my kids made me sign before I was allowed to sign a real contract,” he said. “It’s tougher than any other contract I’ve signed in my life.” With that out of the way, Meyer was free to sign a six-year deal that pays him about $4.4 million a year, not counting bonuses and incentives. A winner of two national championships during his glittering six-year tenure at Florida, he’ll be expected to bring some luster back to a football program that has been tainted by 12 months of NCAA violations, suspensions and a 6-6 record. Meyer resigned as UF Gators coach after last season, citing health concerns and a desire to spend more time with his family. “A year ago, in my mind I was convinced I was done coaching,” the 47year-old Meyer said. Now he’s convinced he can balance a healthy life and a highpressure job. “I had a health scare a couple of years ago that made me sit back, reflect,” he said of his heart and stress problems. “I didn’t feel right. But I feel fantastic now.” He also yearned to be back on the sideline at the Horseshoe, Ohio’s football stadium. “If not for the coaching position at Ohio State, I would not have coached this year,” said Meyer,

who grew up in Ashtabula, Ohio, about 200 miles from campus. Interim coach Luke Fickell, who took over when Jim Tressel was forced out for breaking NCAA rules, will coach the Buckeyes in their bowl game. Meyer will keep him on as an assistant but declined to say in what capacity. Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said his first conversation with Meyer about the coaching job was by phone on Nov. 20. The two met faceto-face three days later, and things moved quickly from there. “We’re blessed to have him as our football coach,” said Smith, who said it was luck that he was able to find a candidate with such a sterling resume. Meyer spent six years at Florida, winning national titles in 2006 and 2008. He spent his year away from coaching working as a college football analyst for ESPN and watching his two daughters play volleyball for their college teams. Meyer met with the team on Monday before the news conference and said he was impressed with the players’ enthusiasm. He takes over a program that could face additional NCAA sanctions and was crippled by Tressel’s forced resignation. The Buckeyes completed their only season under Fickell with a 4034 loss to Michigan on Saturday that snapped a seven-game winning streak against their rivals. Tressel was forced out for knowing but not telling his superiors that Buckeyes players likely broke NCAA rules by taking cash and free or discounted tattoos from the subject of a federal drug-trafficking investigation. In 10 seasons as a head coach — two at Bowling Green, two at Utah and six at Florida — Meyer has a 104-23 record. His teams are 7-1 in bowl games, including the Gators’ 41-14 victory over unbeaten and top-ranked Ohio State in the 2007 Bowl Championship

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Page 8 / Wednesday, November 30, 2011

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Young co-ed team needs funds by Cesar Davila

hendrix@unm.edu It may not be well known on campus, but UNM has a bowling team. In 2008, head coach Johnny Martinez began the UNM bowling club with five members. Since then, with recruiting and promoting, Martinez has created a 20-student bowling squad that is ranked 63rd in the country out of 150 schools, according to CollegeBowling.com. For the last three years, the Lobos, a member of the Southwest Intercollegiate Bowling Conference, have competed against schools across the nation. Last year, UNM finished 144th. Last season the Lobos had a men’s and women’s team, but Martinez merged the two teams this season due to the lack of female players. The team plays against other co-ed teams, but sometimes has to play a starting five consisting of only males. “Some people look at it as a weakness, going against five guys,” Martinez said. “But our ladies bowl pretty good, so it’s not bad at all.” One of the females on the Lobos is senior team captain Erin Kathmann. She joined the bowling team in 2008 after reading

“Bowling is a very competitive sport, and with a lot of dedication and a lot of motivation to do well, we can succeed.” ~Erin Kathmann senior team captain

about the club inside Johnson Center. Kathmann said she has no problems playing against men. “It’s a bit more challenging, which I really enjoy,” Kathmann said. “It’s more competitive.” The team gets anywhere from $2,000 to $3,000 each season from the University to pay for trips to competitions and uniforms, but Martinez said it’s not enough. “To go through the current schedule that we’re on, we have to pay around $11,000,” Martinez said. “So we have to do a lot of fundraising.” Martinez organizes bake sales, raffles and bowl-a-thons and is looking for sponsors to cover the costs. Martinez said if his team keeps winning, money shouldn’t

be a problem. “Now that we’re getting more competitive, some businesses are taking notice,” he said. The team takes a bowling theory class taught by Martinez every Monday in the SUB. It practices every Tuesday at different locations around the city. The team also plays in a league at Holiday Bowl with gamelike conditions on Wednesdays to avoid getting rusty. In competition, the lanes are oiled down and have a harder surface than bowling lanes in non-competitive situations. Martinez said the difference between the two types of lanes is similar to comparing putt-putt golf courses and a PGA golf course. “People don’t really see how physics and angling is in bowling,” Kathmann said. For now, the Lobos travel to compete in tournaments and will travel to Baton Rouge, La., in January to compete in their last regional competition. Next year UNM will host its first event early in the season. The season goes from late September to May with a national championship tournament at the end. “Bowling is a very competitive sport,” Kathmann said. “And with a lot of dedication and a lot of motivation to do well, we can succeed.”

ncaa basketball

Syracuse sticks by head coach by John Kekis and Michael Gormley The Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Syracuse University Chancellor Nancy Cantor gave men’s basketball coach Jim Boeheim a vote of confidence Tuesday amid an investigation of child molestation allegations against his former longtime assistant coach. Some commentators and sex abuse victims’ advocates had said Boeheim should resign or be fired after three men, including two former Syracuse ball boys, accused former assistant coach Bernie Fine of molesting them and Boeheim verbally attacked the accusers. “Coach Boeheim is our coach; he’s getting the team ready tonight,” Cantor said after an economic development conference with state officials in Albany. “We’re very pleased with what he said Sunday night, and we stand by him.” In his 36th season at his alma mater, Hall of Famer Boeheim ranks fifth all-time in wins in Division I and has a record 33 20win seasons. Boeheim received a standing ovation as he walked onto the court that bears his name on Tuesday night for the game against Eastern Michigan. Fine’s seat on the bench was not left vacant Tuesday as it had been for the last home game 10 days ago. After initially saying Fine’s first two accusers were lying to make money in the wake of the Penn State University sexual abuse scandal, Boeheim backed

off those comments in a statement Sunday. “What is most important is that this matter be fully investigated and that anyone with information be supported to come forward so that the truth can be found,” he said after the firing of Fine, who has denied the allegations. “I deeply regret any statements I made that might have inhibited that from occurring or been insensitive to victims of abuse.” Bobby Davis first contacted Syracuse police in 2002 about Fine, but there was no investigation because the statute of limitations had passed. Kevin Quinn, a spokesman for the university, said police did not inform the university of Davis’ allegations then. On Tuesday, Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler said Dennis DuVal, who was police chief in 2002 and who played for the Orange from 1972-74, was aware of Davis’ accusations in 2002 that Fine sexually abused him. Because Davis said the abuse stopped 12 years earlier, Syracuse Det. Doug Fox told him the statute of limitations had passed, meaning an arrest was not possible. Fox advised his supervisor in the abused persons unit but didn’t file a formal report. The detective is still with the department but not in the same unit. A phone message left with DuVal was not immediately returned. On Nov. 17, Davis’ allegations resurfaced. Davis, now 39, told ESPN that Fine molested him beginning in 1984 and that the sexual contact continued until he was about 27. A ball boy for six years, Davis

said the abuse occurred at Fine’s home, at Syracuse basketball facilities and on team road trips, including the 1987 Final Four. Davis’ stepbrother, Mike Lang, 45, who also was a ball boy, also told ESPN that Fine began molesting him while he was in fifth or sixth grade. A third man, Zach Tomaselli, who faces sexual assault charges in Maine involving a 14-yearold boy, said Sunday he told police last week that Fine molested him in 2002 in a Pittsburgh hotel room. Also on Sunday, ESPN played an audiotape, obtained and recorded by Davis, of an October 2002 telephone conversation between him and Fine’s wife, Laurie. ESPN said it hired a voice recognition expert to verify the voice on the tape and the network said it was determined to be that of Laurie Fine. During the call to the woman, Davis repeatedly asks her what she knew about the alleged molestation and she says she knew “everything that went on.” “My heart goes out to the families; I have no comment about the Fine situation or the Boeheim situation,” former Syracuse star Carmelo Anthony said. “That’s a sensitive situation, a sensitive topic right now that I don’t even want to go into.” Cantor stressed that the university is working with authorities. “We’ve been very straightforward and candid about this whole process,” she said. “We’ve gone through our due diligence when things came up, and we felt it was important both for Bernie Fine and for the university to move forward.”

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sports

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 / Page 9

men’s soccer

Tie not a threat to record by Nathan Farmer

sports@dailylobo.com

The men’s soccer team’s season ended undefeated, but head coach Jeremy Fishbein said the record feels wrong. “I wish we were still playing,” he said. “It doesn’t feel like it’s undefeated. It’s pretty incredible that our guys were that focused and disciplined for every match; it’s not something I have ever been a part of.” UNM finished the season 18-0-4 after it lost in a penalty kick shootout on Sunday in the third round of the NCAA tournament to University of South Florida. The game ended scoreless after extra time and went to penalty kicks, and officially goes down as a tie. “It’s a tough way to end the season,” Fishbein said. “I couldn’t be prouder of the team and how they carried themselves through the season.” Junior forward Devon Sandoval said the Lobos should have won the game, but that it just wasn’t their night. “It was a pretty physical game, the emotions were high,” he said. “We were confident going into the game, and I felt like we played well and had the better of the chances, we just didn’t put them away.”

DL

online

We were confident going into the game, and I felt like we played well and had the better of the chances, we just didn’t put them away.” ~Devon Sandoval junior forward

UNM had a handful of chances to score near the end of the game and extra time but failed to find a winner. After extra time, each team converted four of its first five penalty kicks to go to sudden death. Both teams made their sixth shots, and after USF made its seventh, Lobo freshman forward Carson Baldinger stepped up and his spot kick was saved to end the game. Fishbein said he had no regrets about what happened in the game and said a match decided on a penalty shootout is part of the game.

D

“You have 110 minutes to take care of your business, and to be honest we should have,” he said. “We had the run of play at the end of the game and we should have put the game away. You can look back — if we had been on the other side of things we would have said it’s the greatest thing ever.” The Lobos were 10-0 at home and dominated their opponents in nearly every statistical category this season. UNM outscored teams 47-11 and was No. 6 in the country in scoring offense. Junior goalkeeper Victor Rodriguez had 10 shutouts on the season, and the defense was No. 11 in the nation for the least goals allowed. Additionally, UNM only loses two players to graduation next year: senior midfielders Michael Green and Lance Rozeboom. Sandoval said the team accomplished every goal put in front of it except winning a national championship. “Looking back on it, it was definitely a successful season,” he said. “We accomplished almost everything we wanted to. We won conference, the conference tournament, and had a firstround bye and a home game in the NCAA tournament, and that was our goal.”

L

Visit the aily obo on the web!

DAILY LOBO SNOW REPORT new mexico

Wolf Creek 100% Open 42” Base Powder/Packed Powder Red River Opens Dec. 2-4 Powder Durango (Purgatory) 14% Open 24” Base Machine Groomed Taos Open Thurs-Sun 24” Base Packed Powder

Juan Labreche / Daily Lobo Devon Sandoval celebrates after his assist on the game-winning goal during a 2-1 victory over Duke on Nov. 20 at University Stadium. The Lobos’ season ended last Sunday when they were knocked out of the NCAA tournament by the University of South Florida.

Santa Fe Opens Dec. 3 Sandia Peak Opens Dec. 17 Sipapu Opens Dec. 3-4 2 Lifts Open 16-20” Base Machine Groomed Ski Apache 10 % Open 8” Base Packed Powder Angel Fire Opens Dec. 15

Check out the Snow Report every Wednesday to plan your ski trips this season! To advertise in the Daily Lobo Snow Report: call 277-5656! or email at advertising@dailylobo.com

Pajarito Mountain Closed


sports

Page 10 / Wednesday, November 30, 2011

AHL Year Round Garden Supply Indoor Garden Supplies • hydroponics • indoor grow lights • and organics!

1051 San Mateo Blvd SE • 255-3677

NM’s best selection of organic and natural garden supplies!

www.ahlgrows.com

(Off) Campus Bookstore THE Place to sell your books!

Buy Back Starts Now! Get the most back for your books at Campus Bookstore Sell, Rent and Buyback all year round!

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CAMPUS EVENTS

ap sports

Hazing persisted at FAMU by Christine Armario The Associated Press

MIAMI (AP) — Two decades ago, the now-ousted director of the Florida A&M band warned in a letter about the dangers of hazing among the famed “Marching 100” ensemble, saying “it would be very difficult for the university and the band should someone become killed or hurt.” In the following years, however, hazing seemed to become a bigger — if not a more public — problem. Police investigated several serious cases and students were arrested. Anti-hazing workshops were held. Dozens of band members were suspended. University officials and the marching band community were keenly aware of the persistent hazing, yet it continued and is believed to have played a role in the death this month of a 26-year-old drum major, Robert Champion. Champion’s death started a blame game of sorts, with the historically black college in Tallahassee firing its band director, Julian White, accusing him of “misconduct and/or incompetence.” In turn, White released more than 150 pages of documents showing that he warned the university for years about what was going on. The chair of the Board of Governors, which oversees Florida’s public universities, wrote a letter to FAMU trustees Tuesday saying it would investigate whether the university administration took appropriate action to address White’s concerns. A former band member told The Associated Press on Tuesday that White looked for ways to eradicate a culture of hazing that existed in many instrument sections of the band. White invited band members to anonymously report hazing and even had police come along on some away games, former drum major Timothy Barber told AP. In 2001, trumpeter Marcus Parker was paddled so severely that he ended up hospitalized with kidney damage. White had police escort the trumpet section off the field to be interrogated to show he would not tolerate hazing, Barber said. About a dozen people pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and received probation in that case, though it’s not clear what actions, if any, the university took to punish them. After the arrests, White approached Barber for help in getting rid of hazing. One area he focused on: A white wall in the band’s practice field where nicknames for the instrument sections were prominently displayed. Becoming a member of these groups — the clarinets were known as “The Clones” and the tubas were the “White Whales” — meant becoming part of a tradition and a band that has played Super Bowls, the Grammys and presidential inaugurations. But some sections had their own violent initiation rituals. White bought buckets of white paint and

LOBO LIFE

Men’s Basketball: Lobos vs. Aggies Starts at: 8:00pm Location: The Pit Cheer on the Lobos as they compete in the Rio Grande Rivalry against the Aggies of New Mexico State. This game will be broadcast on The Mtn Network.

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Hebrew Conversation Class: Beginning Starts at: 5:00pm Location: 1701 Sigma Chi NE Offered every Wednesday by Israel Alliance and Hillel. Phone: 505-269-8876

Future events may be previewed at www.dailylobo.com

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Steve Cannon / AP Photo Julian White, former director of Florida A&M University’s Marching 100 band, speaks with his wife Dennine at his side during a news conference Monday. White, who was fired by the college following the death of drum major Robert Champion, said he was unfairly dismissed. asked Barber to cover up the section nicknames on the wall. “Tim, we have to find a way to eradicate these subsections of the band,” Barber said White told him. “Cover the names so they see this is not something supported by the band staff.” While White documented his efforts to stop the hazing, it’s possible he could’ve done more on the front lines, according to Richard Sigal, a retired sociology professor at County College of Morris in Randolph, N.J., who has studied hazing. “Maybe he just had a problem that was beyond his ability to control it,” Sigal said. But in general, “If the person at the top issued a zero tolerance policy for hazing and oversaw what the people under him were doing, then there was no hazing.” The details of Champion’s death are unclear. Authorities, the school and an attorney for his family said hazing played a role, but no one has been willing to shed any more light on what actually happened Nov. 19 after the football team lost to its rival Bethune-Cookman. Police have said only that Champion started vomiting and complained he couldn’t breathe before he collapsed on a band bus outside their hotel in Orlando. The university has announced an independent review and Gov. Rick Scott has asked state investigators to join the sheriff’s department in its investigation. University officials declined interview requests for this story, but president James Ammons, who earned his bachelor’s and master’s from FAMU, issued a statement late Tuesday. “The university has a zero tolerance policy toward hazing. Period. But it is becoming increasingly clear that hazing continues to exist — at FAMU and across the country at other universities, colleges and other elements — because hazing survives and thrives in a culture of secrecy and a conspiracy of silence. I

am committed to illuminating this dark corner of Florida A&M University and the American culture ... illuminating it and eradicating it.” White is fighting his dismissal, which is why he submitted the documents to the school, including dozens of suspension letters for hazing over the last decade, and communications alerting university police. “Our incidents are few, but nevertheless hazing and harassment continues to be a problem,” White wrote the then director of bands William P. Foster in 1989 after a hazing death involving a fraternity at Morehouse University. “It would be very difficult for the university and the band should someone become killed or hurt because of hazing.” In the weeks before Champion’s death, White suspended 26 band members for hazing. On Nov. 17 — just two days before Champion died — he sent a letter to alumni, saying while most of them were positive and encouraging of former band members, some “return and perpetuate the myth of various sectional names.” “You should not return and look down on people who follow university regulations by not participating in sub-organizations,” White wrote. “This is extremely important and I call on all alumni to assist the band and myself in eradicating all vestiges of hazing in the Marching ‘100’ band.’” Barber, who rose to head drum major and was in the band from 1996 to 2002, said he was never hazed, nor did he participate in it. He said drum majors were like the generals of the band who tried to keep everyone in order, which makes Champion’s death puzzling. At 26, Champion was likely one of the older band members because he didn’t enter college until a year after high school and struggled at times to stay at the university because of his grades.

Event Calendar

for November 30, 2011 Planning your day has never been easier!

Placing an event in the Lobo Life calendar:

1. Go to www.dailylobo.com 2. Click on “Events” link near the top of the page. 3. Click on “Submit an Event Listing” on the right side of the page. 4. Type in the event info and submit!

Please limit your description to 25 words (although you may type in more, your description will be edited to 25 words. To have your event published in the Daily Lobo on the day of the event, submit at least 3 school days prior to the event . Events in the Daily Lobo will appear with the title, time, location and 25 word description! Although events will only publish in the Daily Lobo on the day of the event, events will be on the web once submitted and approved. Events may be edited, and may not publish on the Web or in the Daily Lobo at the discretion of the Daily Lobo.


lobo features

New Mexico Daily Lobo

FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 30, 2011

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 / Page 11

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

dailycrossword Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Dilbert

dailysudoku

Level 1 2 3 4

Solution to yesterday’s problem.

Get your name out there with the Daily Sudoku

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ACROSS 1 Trespass 4 With 36- and 62Across, kids’ ball game, and something this puzzle’s four longest answers have in common 10 Collar or jacket 14 TNT element? 15 Ring of color 16 Powerful TV princess 17 One of the Gershwins 18 Early Mary Tyler Moore role 20 Puts in a fresh pot 22 Habeas corpus et al. 23 Name of three presidents 24 Noodle product? 26 Glacial ridge 27 Horticulturist’s hangout 31 Happy coworker? 33 Some TV screens 34 Go for, as a prize 35 Hogwarts messengers 36 See 4-Across 38 Tower city 39 Bolo, for one 40 Nudge 41 “I’m outta here!” 42 Meeting of Congress 44 “Les Girls” actress Elg 46 Latin word on a cornerstone 47 Getaway 49 Ionian Sea island 52 Place for a bargain? 54 She played Carla Tortelli on “Cheers” 57 Genetic carrier 58 Arena level 59 2009 Ruben Studdard album 60 Held by us 61 Numbers for one 62 See 4-Across 63 Little thing to pick

SPONSOR THIS

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DOWN 1 Recipe direction 2 Discount rack abbr. 3 She played Nicole Chapman on “Fame” 4 Trivia game that involves bluffing 5 Autumn color 6 Neither masculine nor feminine 7 Fashion designer Michael 8 She, in São Paulo 9 Jabber 10 Cast-ofthousands actors 11 Actress Hatcher 12 “Don’t count __!” 13 Rob Roy refusals 19 Washstand vessels 21 Gets the consolation prize 24 Creep 25 Snappy dresser 28 1996 Madonna role 29 Increase 30 Wine bottle datum

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

31 Colon’s pair 32 Abrasion, to a tot 33 Inc. abroad 36 Golfer’s selection 37 Thing to avoid 38 2011 TV show with multiple pilots 40 Calendar girl 41 Traffic cop’s request 43 Jungle journey

11/30/11

44 Working (with) 45 Lash out at 48 World-weariness 49 PC monitors 50 River formed at Pittsburgh 51 Lively dance 52 L.A.’s Sunset, e.g. 53 Bakery offering 55 Stately tree 56 Louis XIV, par exemple

SPONSOR THE DAILY LOBO YOUR BUSINESS CROSSWORD COULD BE HERE! 505.277.5656


classifieds

LASSIFIEDs CCLASSIFIEDS Page 12 / Wednesday, November 30, 2011

DAILY LOBO

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

new mexico

DAILY LOBO new mexico

CLASSIFIED INDEX

Find your way around the Daily Lobo Classifieds

Announcements Announcements Auditions Event Rentals Fun, Food, Music Health and Wellness Looking for You Lost and Found Services Travel Want to Buy Your Space

Housing

For Sale Audio/Video Bikes/Cycles Computer Stuff Dogs, Cats, Pets For Sale Furniture Garage Sales Textbooks Vehicles for Sale

ROOMMATE WANTED. 3BDRM 1.5BA. 1 mile from UNM. Utilities, internet, and cable included. No pets. $435/mo. 505-974-7476.

nd

Dec. 2

5:45pm

LOBO VILLAGE ROOM available for spring semester. Female. Clean and responsible roommates. $500/mo +electric. 575-741-0557 or avigil01@unm.edu

of the Greens

LOOKING FOR A cool guy to move into lobo village asap and take up my lease. If you’re interested contact me at vosburgh@unm.edu or text me at 505-270-6808.

JOIN US FOR UNM’S OLDEST STUDENT RUN TRADITION

LOBO VILLAGE APARTMENT looking for male roommate. Free cable, free internet, pool, jacuzzi, and all utilities included except for electric. $499/mo. Call 505-688-5564.

Meet in front of the UNM Bookstore for hot chocolate & cookies! Families are encouraged to attend!

For Sale

UNM NORTH CAMPUS1BDRM $515/mo. Clean, quiet, remodeled. No pets allowed. Move in special! 573-7839.

WHY RENT? FIRST time home buyers $500 down through MFA call John 450-2878. Thomson Real Estate.

FEMALE WANTED FOR Lobo Village! Free rent for November! Great deal! kwwsld@yahoo.com

Child Care Jobs Jobs off Campus Jobs on Campus Jobs Wanted Volunteers

UNM/CNM STUDIOS, 1BDRM, 2BDRMS, 3BDRMS, and 4BDRMS. William H. Cornelius, Real Estate Consultant: 243-2229.

Announcements School?

Lost and Found FOUND IN LADIES Room in Zimmerman basement. Women’s silver ring. Email busybee@unm.edu to describe ring. PRESCRIPTION GLASSES LOST with transition lenses. Left in Ortega Hall week of 11/7/11. Contact Luis at olay.luis@olay.com.mx

Services ?BACKPACK BUSTED? ABQ Luggage & Zipper Repair. 1405-A San Mateo NE. 256-7220. TUTORING - ALL AGES, most subjects. Experienced Ph.D. 265-7799. PAPER DUE? FORMER UNM instructor, Ph.D., English, published, can help. 254-9615. MasterCard/ VISA. STATE FARM INSURANCE Near UNM. 3712 Central SE. Student Discounts. 232-2886. www.mikevolk.net

1700 COAL SE. 2BDRM, remodeled, wood floors, W/D, $750/mo + utilities, $300dd. No pets please. 453-9745. WWW.UNMRENTALS.COM Awesome university apartments. Unique, hardwood floors, FP’s, courtyards, fenced yards. Houses, cottages, efficiencies, studios, 1, 2 and 3BDRM’s. Garages. 843-9642. Open 7 days/week. STUDIOS 1 BLOCK UNM, Free utilities. $455/mo. 246-2038. Holiday Special. 1515 Copper NE. www.kachinaproperties.com

Duplexes UNM 2 BLOCKS, 1BDRM with: wood floors, fenced yard. $440/mo +utilities, available 12/1, 216 Mesa. Call 720-4926.

Houses For Rent HOUSE FOR RENT 3BDRM 1.75BA. Garage. W/D. Located across the street from UNM, 1629 Roma NE. $1000/mo. 203-1633.

32nd Season

MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS TUTOR. Billy Brown PhD. College and HS. welbert53@aol.com, 401-8139.

FULLY FURNISHED, NEAR north campus. $410/mo +1/4 utilities. High speed Internet. Pictures available. Gated community. Access I-40 & I-25. tkuni@unm.edu 1 BLOCK SOUTH of UNM, $350/month, util. included, WD, for viewing call 261-6102. FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED. 5BDRM, 2BA, $450/mo +1/5 gas +elec. 5 min walk to Zimmerman. House furnished. Free parking. Available immediately. Call/ text 303-587-3453. AZTEC STORAGE ABSOLUTELY the BEST PRICE on storages. All size units. 24 Hour video surveillance. On site manager. 10 minutes from University. 3rd month free. 884-1909. 3201 Aztec Road NE.

EARN $1000-$3200 A month to drive our brand new cars with ads. www.FreeCarJobs.com EARN $50-$65 Participate in an insurance research study. Contact DSG Associates, Inc. Sign up online at www.dsgai.com or call 800-462-8765. Free to sign up! !!!BARTENDING!!!: $300/DAY potential. No experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520ext.100. TEACH ENGLISH IN Korea! 2012 Teach and Learn in Korea (TaLK) sponsored by Korean government. ●$1,300/month (15hrs/week) plus airfares, housing, medical insurance Must have completed two years of undergraduate. Last day to apply: 11/30/11 Please visit the website www.talk.go.kr 2011 English Program In Korea (EPIK) ●$1,600-2,500/month plus housing, airfare, medical insurance, paid vacation Must have BA degree Last day to apply: November 11th **this date is tentative and could change depending on circumstances** Please visit the website www.epik.go.kr Jai - (213)386-3112ext.201. jai.kecla@gmail.com

ROOM AT LOBO Village. Female. Sophomore or older. Available for spring semester. $500/mo +electric. Very nice. Call/Text 575-613-5635.

TALIN IS NOW hiring for seafood department, cashier, tea bar, and produce department. Apply online at talinmarket.com or pick up application at 88 Louisiana Blvd SE.

3BDRM HOUSE LOOKING for female roommate. House shared with two other females, shared bathroom, rent is $520, utilities included, plenty of parking. 505-310-1529.

TALIN IS LOOKING for store supervisor. Retail experience and leadership skills required. Please apply at talinmarket.com or pick up application at 88 Louisiana Blvd SE.

PIANO MUSICIAN FOR Lutheran Church. Substitute, could lead to weekly work. Evening auditions 899-3016. PT PROGRAMMER – DRC Solutions, Inc. is hiring a part-time programmer with a background in computer science or related field to develop commodity and stock market price analysis and modeling software. Must have solid foundation in object oriented coding preferably with C++, C#, or Java. Send resume to drcsolutions@gmail.com or call 505-237-1600. VETERINARY ASSISTANT/ RECEPTIONIST/ Kennel help. Pre-veterinary student preferred. Ponderosa Animal Clinic: 881-8990/ 881-8551. !BARTENDER TRAINING! Bartending Academy, 3724 Eubank NE. www.newmexicobartending.com 292-4180.

NEW MEXICO YOUNG ACTORS nmyoungactors.org

General Public November 12 & 13 at 2:00pm

BIRTHRIGHT CARES. FREE pregnancy tests, help. 262-2235.

Adults $12 Children 12 & under $10

Your Space

BLOCK TO UNM. Large. Clean. Gated. 1BDRM. $600/mo. Includes utilities. No pets. Move in special. 255-2685.

ROOMMATE WANTED, PREFERABLY female, for condo close to UNM campus. $400/mo +utilities. Call 915-422-4814 for more info.

Jobs Off Campus

TALIN MARKET IS looking for morning stocker. Hours from 6am- 10am Monday-Friday. Starting pay at $9/hr. Please apply online at talinmarket.com or pick up application at 88 Louisiana Blvd SE.

SANDIA PEAK SKI Area Hiring Fair December 3rd. Service oriented personnel needed for FT and PT seasonal positions for lift operators, snowmaking/ grooming/ mechanic, rental shop, cashiers, food service, retail shop, janitorial, parking lot attendants, & CDL licensed drivers (passenger endorsement) for ski shuttle. Apply in person only at the ski area base lodge. All applicants must bring current driver’s license and social security card. 9am to 3pm, Saturday December 3. PUEBLO OF ISLETA is recruiting for a WORKFORCE PROGRAM COORDINATOR. Responsible for coordinating employment development needs for the Pueblo of Isleta Adult and Youth. For complete position descriptions, log on to www.isletapueblo.com, career section of the home page. Fax to: 505-8692812, or email to poi70103@isleta pueblo.com Closing dates: Until Filled. PUEBLO OF ISLETA IS A DRUG FREE EMPLOYER. Drug Testing and Criminal Background completed prior to employment.

Volunteers UNM IS LOOKING for adult women with asthma for asthma research study. If you are interested in finding out more about this study, please contact Teresa at tarchibeque@salud.unm.edu or 269-1074 (HRRC 09-330).

821-8055 for reservations

.

Health and Wellness

APARTMENT HUNTING? www.keithproperties.com

Rooms For Rent

2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU, 136kmi, CD player, front wheel drive, automatic, cruise control, runs and looks great. $3200. Call or text 505-463-3996.

THE PUEBLO OF Isleta is recruiting for a FITNESS PERFORMANCE NUTRITIONIST: The Fitness Performance Nutritionist is responsible for nutritional needs assessment and nutrition/fitness education and counseling of the clients of the Diabetes Prevention Programs of the Pueblo of Isleta. Life Style Weight Management Consultant (LWMC) Certification A Plus+. For complete position description log on to www.isletapueblo. com Career Section of the Home Page. Fax: 869-2812, or email Application to: poi70103@isletapueblo.com Closing date: Until Filled. The Pueblo of Isleta is a drug-free Employer. Drug Testing and Criminal Background completed prior to employment.

PUEBLO OF ISLETA is recruiting for an EHS HOME VISITOR. Responsible for providing comprehensive Early Head Start Services to children and families in a Native American Community, Prenatal to 3 Years through 90- minute home visits. AA in EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION A MUST. For complete position descriptions, log on to www.isletapueblo.com, career section of the home page. Closing dates: Until Filled. PUEBLO OF ISLETA IS A DRUG FREE EMPLOYER. Drug Testing and Criminal Background completed prior to employment. Fax to: 505-869-2812, or email to poi70103@isletapueblo.com

Winner of the National Children’s Theater Festival Award for Best Musical

COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE ON Vermont. Affordable Acupuncture $15-35. 505-266-2606. www.AcupunctureonVermont.org

Apartments

2BDRM 1BA NOB Hill area. W/D, garage, backyard. $850/mo +deposit, +utilities. 804-5093.

Vehicles For Sale

P/T AD SALES representative needed for new publication. Commission based pay. Must be a motivated self-starter. Send resume to sales@danceculturemag.com

Book, Music & Lyrics by Joan Cushing

ABORTION AND COUNSELING Services. Caring and confidential. FREE PREGNANCY TESTING. Curtis Boyd, MD, PC: 522 Lomas Blvd NE, 242-7512.

TYPE 3 PAGES for $5. Call now. 702-7269.

CLASSIFIED PAYMENT INFORMATION

Miss Nelson Is Missing

MATH/ CHEMISTRY TUTOR. Excellent communicator. K-College. 505-205-9317.

LOOKING FOR HARD working, dedicated bassist to add keyboard/ effects, for local rock band currently doing paid gigs, ages 18-25. Must be willing to travel. Call 575-302-1142.

CAP & GOWN (Bachelor). 5’7 to 5’9. $25 cash. Text 505-379-4793.

3BDRM, W/D, BASEMENT, lots of parking. $1000/mo + $400 deposit. Does not include gas or electric. 2 blocks from UNM. 881-3540.

DO YOU HAVE A VACANCY COMING UP THIS DECEMBER??? DAILY LOBO HOUSING GUIDE IS COMING 12/12!!! DEADLINE 12/9 AT 1PM. CALL 277-5656 TO HOLD YOUR SPOT!

Employment

BRADLEY’S BOOKS INSIDE Winning Coffee. MWF, occasionally Saturdays.

CLEAN, QUIET, AFFORDABLE, 2BDRM $750/mo utilities included. 3 blocks to UNM, no pets. Move in special. 262-0433.

FREE UNM PARKING. 1BDRM, clean, quiet. Nob Hill. Starting at $490/mo. No pets. Move-in special. 366-8391.

UNM ID ADVANTAGE

Phone: Pre-payment by Visa, Discover, • 30¢ per word per day for five or more Come to to Marron show Pre-payment by Visa or Master •• Come MarronHall, Hall,room room107, 131, show •• Phone: or American is required. consecutive days without changing or your IDID and receive FREE classifieds Card is required. CallExpress 277-5656. yourUNM UNM and receive a special rate MasterCard Call 277-5656 cancelling. inofYour Rooms for Rent, orRooms any For 10¢Space, per word in Personals, • Fax or E-mail: Pre-payment by Visa or • Fax or Email: Pre-payment by Visa, Discover, • 40¢ per word per day for four days or Sale Category. for Rent, or any For Sale category. Master Card is required. Fax ad text, MasterCard or American Express is required. less or non-consecutive days. dates and dates category to 277-7531, or Fax ad text, and catergory to 277-7530 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING • Special effects are charged addtionally: e-mail classads@unm.edu. or email to to classifi eds@dailylobo.com DEADLINE logos, bold, italics, centering, blank lines, person:Pre-payment Pre-pay bybycash, •• In In person: cash, check, money larger font, etc. check, Visa, Discover, MasterCard or • 1 p. m. business day before publication. order, money order, Visa or MasterCard. American Come room 107 Come byExpress. room 131 in by Marron Hallinfrom CLASSIFIEDS ON THE WEB Marron Hall from 8:00am to 5:00pm. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. UNM Student Publications www.dailylobo.com Mail:: Pre-pay money order, in-state check, Pre-paybyby money order, in-state •• Mail MSC03 2230 Visa, Discover, MasterCard or American check, Visa, MasterCard. Mail payment, 1 University of New Mexico • All rates include both print and online Express. Mail payment, ad text, dates and ad text, dates and category. Albuquerque, NM 87131 editions of the Daily Lobo. catergory.

Questions? Call 277-4706 • People are encouraged to come to campus and pick up luminarias entirely free-of-cost! Please do not drive on sidewalks!

Apartments Co-housing Condos Duplexes Houses for Rent Houses for Sale Housing Wanted Property for Sale Rooms for Rent Sublets

STRESSED ABOUT JOB? Life? Call Agora. 277-3013. www.agoracares.com

Hanging

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Based upon the book MISS NELSON IS MISSING! And MISS NELSON IS BACK! By Harry Allard Adapted by arrangement with Houghton Mifflin Co

KiMo Theater 768-3544 online at www. KiMoTickets.com Or contact: holdmyticket.com/event/30731

Touring to your school December 5, 6, 8 & 9

That depraved human skunk, Pinkham Mudstone III has no socks and he's painting his ankles black. Mudstone knows that under the topsoil there's a rich deposit of copper carbonate and sets out to acquire Belle's homestead. It's up to Tom to save Bisbee and win the schoolmarm. BOO the Villain And CHEER our Hero!

Public Performances

Thursday, December 1st at 6:00 and 7:30pm

Fellowship Hall, Heights Cumberland Church 8600 Academy Rd. NE 821-8055 Free Admission This project is made possible in part by New Mexico Arts, a division of the Dept. of Cultural Affairs, the National Endowment of the Arts, the City of Albuquerque’s Urban Enhancement Trust Fund and PNM.


NM Daily Lobo 113011