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Daily Lobo new mexico

Schmidly refuses see page 3

wednesday volume 116

October 26, 2011

issue 46

The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895

Protestors Arrested at yale park, central ave

UNMPD, APD, and state police removed Occupy Albuquerque protesters after UNM refused to grant a new permit

Juan Labreche / Daily Lobo Members of the (un) Occupy Albuquerque who had previously delegated themself “arrestable,” were advanced on and arrested by UNMPD one-by-one as they sat in a circle at Camp Coyote arm in arm.

by Chelsea Erven and Chris Quintana news@dailylobo.com

State police arrested at least 40 Occupy Albuquerque protesters late Tuesday night after UNM administrators refused to renew the protesters’ permit to occupy Yale Park. Protesters who wanted to risk arrest in an act of civil disobedience sat in a circle holding hands in the middle of Yale Park, while nearly 200 supporters stood around them and on the sidewalk across Central Avenue. Protesters sang and chanted, “We are the 99 percent,” “This is what democracy looks like” and “Whose park? Our park.” UNM administrators told protester they must leave campus by 10 p.m. Tuesday. Police blocked traffic on Central from Yale Boulevard to Cornell Drive at 11:20 p.m. Those arrested included former

Daily Lobo reporter and current Alibi reporter Andrew Beale, student Brittany Arneson and Henry Edwards. One protester resisted arrest. Protester James Roach said he blames UNM President David Schmidly for the arrests. “This is a complete infringement on our First Amendment, which is the first right our founding fathers gave us, so to me what’s happening right now is not necessarily the city, but president Schmidly,” he said. Protesters who didn’t want to risk arrest acted as a “support group” to help and encourage those arrested, protester and support group member Sean Miyaki said. “We’re kind of like backup, so they’re not going in alone,” he said. More than 20 police cars, prisoner transport vehicles and riot trucks parked behind Rasoi Indian

Juan Labreche / Daily Lobo After police removed protesters from Yale Park, the remaining occupants moved to the westbound lane of Central Avenue. They continued chanting, “We are the 99 percent, you are the 99 percent.”

Cuisine on Yale before descending on the protest. At least 50 State Police, Albuquerque Police Department and UNM Police Department officers wielding zip-cuffs and riot gear formed a police line to force protesters onto the sidewalk.

“We don’t want to be out here. A lot of us sympathize with them. We’re just doing our jobs. ” ~R. Vigil state police officer State officer R. Vigil told protesters he’s “just like you” and he hoped they would leave peacefully.

Zach Gould/ Daily Lobo Patrolman Mike Timm with APD stands guard as (un)Occupy Albuquerque protesters are arrested at UNM’s Yale Park late Tuesday night. University administration told proters they must leave the campus by 10 p.m. Tuesday night and that those who didn’t would risk arrest.

“We don’t want to be out here,” he said. “A lot of us sympathize with them. We’re just doing our jobs.” Protesters in the arrest group were arrested without resistance. Officers touched each protester’s back, on at a time, and the protester stood to be led away in zip cuffs. The last member of the 22 people voluntarily arrested, Carolyn Hues, an elderly woman, also left without resistance. Protesters asked police to “join us in peace” and one protester thanked the police force for protecting the state’s residents. At 12:30 UNMPD and state police asked the remaining protesters to leave Yale Park, which the protesters did without issue. From there the group sprawled across westbound Central Avenue. Protester Howard Lackey urged protesters, via a megaphone, to remain peaceful. “Let’s keep this movement going,” he said. “Let’s keep the streets

moving. It’s not our job to block them.” APD drove through the street occasionally, asking all protesters on the street to move to the sidewalk or the median. The situation escalated when protester Stephen Williams sat in the streets., and then was drug off by police. He escaped from the officers, and attempted to run away, but he was quickly tackled, maced and zip cuffed. At the same time, a crowd surrounded him as he was being arrested, and the police responded by threatening to mace and or taser anyone who didn’t move back immediately. From this point on, the protest calmed down. At 1:23 a.m. fireworks started going off in the neighborhood near University. UNM representatives could not be reached for comment late Tuesday night.

Adria Malcolm / Daily Lobo Near midnight about 200 protesters flooded onto to Central Avenue. Some members of the crowd sat in the middle of the street, and several protesters were arrested by APD for blocking the road.


PageTwo Wednesday, October 26, 2011

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Career Paths A weekly peek at unique niches

Design Director Jackson Morsey Design Assistants Connor Coleman Jason Gabel Elyse Jalbert Stephanie Kean Sarah Lynas Advertising Manager Shawn Jimenez Sales Manager Nick Parsons Classified Manager Renee Tolson

The New Mexico Daily Lobo is an independent student newspaper published daily except Saturday, Sunday and school holidays during the fall and spring semesters and weekly during the summer session. Subscription rate is $75 per academic year. E-mail accounting@dailylobo.com for more information on subscriptions. The New Mexico Daily Lobo is published by the Board of UNM Student Publications. The editorial opinions expressed in the New Mexico Daily Lobo are those of the respective writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the students, faculty, staff and Printed by regents of the University of New Mexico. Inquiries concerning editorial content Signature should be made to the editor-in-chief. Offset All content appearing in the New Mexico Daily Lobo and the Web site dailylobo. com may not be reproduced without the consent of the editor-in-chief. A single copy of the New Mexico Daily Lobo is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies is considered theft and may be prosecuted. Letter submission policy: The opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. Letters and guest columns must be concisely written, signed by the author and include address and telephone. No names will be withheld.

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Assistant Photo Editor Dylan Smith Culture Editor Alexandra Swanberg Assistant Culture Editor Nicole Perez Sports Editor Nathan Farmer Assistant Sports Editor Cesar Davila Copy Chief Craig Dubyk Multimedia Editor Junfu Han

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issue 46

Telephone: (505) 277-7527 Fax: (505) 277-7530 news@dailylobo.com advertising@dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com

Editor-in-Chief Chris Quintana Managing Editor Elizabeth Cleary News Editor Chelsea Erven Assistant News Editor Luke Holmen Staff Reporter Greer Gesler Charlie Shipley Photo Editor Zach Gould

Courtesy of Aziza Chavez Policy Analyst for Albuquerque City Councilor Trudy Jones

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volume 116

Chair of Land Use, Planning & Zoning Finance and Government Operations Intergovernmental Affairs/ Legislative Relations Internal Operations Albuquerque/ Bernalillo Water Authority Mid-Region Council of Governments

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Trudy Jones’ Committee Appointments:

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Trudy Jones, a Republican city councilor, represents Albuquerque’s District 8, which includes portions of the Northeast Heights and Foothills neighborhoods. She was elected to her second four-year City Council term Oct. 4, following a race against former city council member Greg Payne. Jones said her prior experience in real estate development prepared her for the position. “I worked with a commercial developer,” she said. “I had to design the product, plan the product and then lease the product. It teaches you that everything needs planning and you have to be careful about what you think are good ideas, because sometimes the unintended consequences far outweigh the good that you think you are going to do.” Jones said she sees her position as a public service opportunity. She said those pursuing City Council positions to further their political careers are there for the wrong reasons. “This is not a stepping stone for me, this is public service,” she said. “I have no plans, no desire to run for another office. I would think you were doing this for the wrong reasons if you are using this as a stepping stone rather than doing the best job you can while you are here.” Jones retired from a 30-year career as a commercial real estate broker and director at Maestas & Ward Commercial Real Estate in December 2010, but she said her position with the council keeps her as busy as a full-time job. “It’s a part time-job theoretically, and it’s not really a job,” she said. “It pays $10,800 a year and in fact it takes 35-40 hours a week to do a good job … to study legislation and understand what it means and how it will affect citizens. It’s hours of reading.”

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Jones, who serves on six committees and chairs the Land Use, Planning and Zoning Committee, said councilors serve on multiple committees that require knowledge on a variety of issues ranging from zoning to finance. Jones said the City Council is looking at ways to make government more efficient in an economy that has placed strain on citizens and employers. “Employment, jobs, and the budget — those are the primary concerns facing any municipality today, because there is very little money today,” she said. “We have to cut the size of government without harming people, without laying people off; we have to keep the services running when we don’t have any money to do that.” Jones said she hopes to improve volunteerism in museums, libraries and senior centers in Albuquerque. “We can’t keep depending on government to pay for everything,” she said. “It’s now time for those of us who have had reasonable success in our careers … to pay it back … so the next generation can be as lucky as we were.”

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New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, October 26, 2011 / Page 3

Cancer’s a Beach Be a Lifesaver When: Friday, October 28, 2011, 7-11 PM Where: SUB Ballrooms A and B Come help address pre-written letters and envelopes to raise money for St. Jude’s Children Hospital. Fun Activities Henna Tattoos Music/Band Games And more!! Free Food & Drinks Free Shirts & Sunglasses Prizes $200 Visa Gift Card $50 iTunes Gift Card Contact us at uptildwn@unm.edu for more info!

Juan Labreche / Daily Lobo Protesters, UNMPD and members of the media gathered in Scholes Hall Tuesday during an Occupy Albuquerque protest. Protesters demanded to be let into UNM President David Schmidly’s office.

Scholes Hall occupied by Luke Holmen holmen@unm.edu

Nearly 30 Occupy Albuquerque protesters converged on UNM President David Schmidly’s office Tuesday morning, demanding to meet with the president after University administration said it wouldn’t renew the protesters’ permit to occupy Yale Park. After meeting with the protesters, Schmidly upheld the decision not to renew the permit. “This afternoon I had the privilege of meeting with two representatives of the (un)Occupy Albuquerque protest group to discuss the University’s decision to not approve their permit after 25 continuous days of occupancy on UNM campus,” he said in an official statement.

“We have been in contact with the University, but apparently they chose to lock us out.” ~Desi Brown protester Protesters waited outside Schmidly’s locked office doors as administrators rescheduled multiple tentative meetings. “Some of us have been waiting outside of the locked doors of President Schmidly’s office since 9 a.m.,” Peace Studies professor and protester Desi Brown said. “We have been in contact with the University, but apparently they chose to lock us out. He has locked himself and his administration in the UNM office.” Brown said he and other protesters contacted the administration late Tuesday night hoping to arrange a meeting. “Earlier this morning, before 8 a.m., we were told by (University spokeswoman) Cinnamon Blair of the president’s office that a meeting would be arranged to address specific issues that the administration had with the (un) Occupy Albuquerque Movement, as well as issues that movement members had with disingenuous efforts by the administration to discredit the movement itself,” he said.

Blair scheduled a meeting between protesters and Schmidly at 10:30 a.m. and rescheduled for 11 a.m. before allowing protesters Jason Bohonnon and Rhadona Stark speak privately with President Schmidly in his office at 12:15 p.m. Stark said one of the administration’s main concerns, the homeless population they say the protest has attracted to campus, is not the protesters’ responsibility. “This is Central and Cornell, this is where the homeless congregate,” she said. “Homelessness is a UNM issue, not an Occupy Albuquerque issue … I came to school here from 2000 to 2002. There wasn’t a time when I wasn’t bombarded by homeless people. This problem has been going on a long time.” Stark said UNM administration blames the death of a homeless woman on Occupy Albuquerque. “How can we be responsible for an overdose? We’re not doctors, we’re not police,” she said. The administration refused to allow media into the meeting. Schmidly said he understands the frustration of protesters, but that doesn’t outweigh the safety concerns of the administration. “I wholeheartedly support their rights to freely express themselves and peacefully assemble,” he said. “I also must ensure the safety of the entire University and uphold the University’s policy regarding freedom of expression and dissent, which articulates the University’s commitment to tolerate all peaceful speech activities carried out upon the campus unless those activities destroy or materially damage property, materially disrupt other legitimate University activities or create a substantial health or safety hazard.” He said UNM can no longer ensure the safety of protesters and students. “While there has been dialogue and a willingness from many protesters to comply with various aspects of their permits, the prolonged and unique nature of this protest and continuous encampment have evolved beyond the capacity for either the protesters or the University to ensure the safety of the participants as well as our students, employees and visitors,” he said. Brian Egolf, a Democratic New Mexico state representative, sent

Schmidly a letter Tuesday afternoon asking him to renew the protesters’ permit. “There are important and compelling First Amendment issues involved that bear serious consideration by you and your staff,” he wrote. “As you know, the University occupies a special place in Albuquerque — both literally and figuratively. By forcing the protesters out, you are preventing them from making their views known to a large audience.”

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Wednesday October 26, 2011

The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895

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Letters

Monday’s photo mix-up dishonors victims’ families Editor’s note: Monday’s paper contained serious factual error on the part of staff reporter Charlie Shipley and photo editor Zach Gould. The photo was taken at the sentencing of former UNM student Stefania Gray and UNM professor Hector Torres’ suspected murderer, Ralph Montoya. The caption misidentified Ralph Montoya’s family as Hector Torres’ family. Readers, It’s one thing to be given the responsibility of covering such an important story to the UNM community as the loss of two of our own due to a hideous act. It’s another thing to dishonor the families grieving by failing to get my facts right, and that’s what I’ve done. In the Oct. 21 issue of the Daily Lobo, a story ran under my byline about Ralph Montoya entering a guilty plea for the murders of Hector Torres and Stefania Gray. An accompanying photo was captioned as featuring the family and friends of Torres and Gray, when in fact it was of Montoya’s family. This was an insensitive and regrettable error for which there is no excuse, and I wish to take this opportunity to offer an apology to the families of Mr. Torres and Ms. Gray. As a cub reporter for the Lobo, this was my first assignment dealing with something as serious as murder. In my excitement and efforts to make sure I could hear everything said and get it all down accurately, I failed to perform the simple task of finding out who was sitting where. That I failed to do so didn’t live up to the standards I set for myself as a journalist, or to the standards of the Daily Lobo. I had the privilege of speaking with Ms. Gray’s mother and Mr. Torres’ sister after the proceeding. The courage and resolve they showed both during their statements and in our conversations was truly inspiring. I have nothing but the utmost admiration and respect for them and their families; that my mistake conveys otherwise is dreadful to me. To the families of Mr. Torres and Ms. Gray, their friends and colleagues, I offer my sincerest apologies for my error. To my colleagues at the Lobo, I apologize for bringing this kind of attention to the paper, and will do my absolute best to ensure this does not happen again. Charlie Shipley Daily Lobo staff reporter Readers, Last Friday, the story “Hector Torres’ murderer receives 25 years” had two photos accompanying the article. In one of the photos’ captions, the family members of Ralph Montoya were confused as the friends and family of Hector Torres and Stefania Gray. As the hearing ended, I was in a rush to get back to campus, and instead of taking the time to ask the people I had photographed for their identities, I asked the reporter for the story to identify who was in the photo. This is how mistakes are made. Mistakes are how we as an organization, and I as a photojournalist, lose credibility. Not only has our mistake caused stress over an already tumultuous topic, but in the future our word is not as strong as it had been. I apologize for this. Looking to the future, I have implemented a rule that no photo will be published unless the photographer has personally spoken to the subject, written the subject’s name down, and shown the subject his or her name written. I hope that this, along with some intense vigilance, will keep the paper error-free from now on. Zach Gould Daily Lobo photo editor

Editorial Board Chris Quintana Editor-in-chief

Elizabeth Cleary Managing editor

Chelsea Erven News editor

Column

Civility in grad school beats the odds by Carrie Cutler

Daily Lobo Columnist Despite the fact that graduate students are in competition with each other, and despite the fact that funding sources at the public level are disappearing, in some departments a curious phenomenon occurs: We manage to be courteous, kind and helpful to one another. In my current department, we have to take a one-credit seminar where we meet and talk to one another about our interests. We’re strongly encouraged (grad school code for ‘if you don’t, you’ll regret it’) to attend this seminar in our first semester. The first day, first topic was collegiality. Collegiality is a catch-all term for the atmosphere in a department or working space. The miracle, in my experience of graduate school, is that we have many reasons to compete, yet we manage to have empathy with one another after all and manage to help each other and maintain courtesy. Setting aside, for a moment, the point that those intragroup alignments tend to occur along shared interests and along groups that have similar demographics in many departments, the fact that it occurs at all is something of a minor miracle. It is not a matter of divine intervention (though it sometimes feels that way, when I compare my experiences in different departments), but a matter of deliberate choices made by the professors, and to a lesser degree the graduate students, in a department. Having been in departments with collegiality and those without, I have discovered that collegiality is essentially an investment in the ability of the department to get anything done. People who aren’t talking to one another have trouble getting paperwork filed, getting committees assembled

and doing the everyday work of teaching, research and administration. All of these things rely on cooperation, and a lack of cooperation manifests itself pretty plainly in breakdowns of work. Academic departments can be a pressure cooker: exams designed to fail you (in some graduate math and science courses, the highest grade on an exam will be a 65), homework assignments designed not to be finished, very few feedback mechanisms to tell you if you’re passing, extraordinary work load and fierce competition for the attention of professors and funding. It is not uncommon for students of the sciences to spend their first years sure that they will fail out and that they are too stupid to be in graduate school. Graduate students were the “A” students in undergraduate classes, and a failing grade comes as a real shock to them, as does the idea that they are presented with scenarios in which it is impossible to pass. Their capabilities are being stresstested: What kind of person are you under pressure? What do you prioritize? With all this pressure, it would not be hard to disintegrate into bickering, gossip and back-stabbing, looking for any competitive advantage in a playing field you cannot even see. Despite this, some departments still choose to foster a culture of cooperation. Because collegiality is something of a group effort, all it takes is one or two assholes to ruin the atmosphere in pockets or to ruin the whole thing: A professor who assumes that he or she can load graduate students or junior colleagues with more work than they are paid for, demanding that they surrender holidays, sleep or breaks to complete a workload that doesn’t belong to them; a graduate student who expects that

being snide and abusive should be something other students should just put up with. However, there is something resilient about certain kinds of cooperation. That culture appears to start with a decision to teach the culture as an action required of students. The decision to keep going goes back to the idea that your project is more important than you — a scholar, in the older sense, is someone who serves the cause of knowledge. Sometimes, this means more public service, like volunteering to teach a course for the general public, or volunteering to tutor. Sometimes, to serve the cause of knowledge means to work together toward a solution or a new idea. It has been my experience that there are situations where, for various reasons, you can’t work with someone. There are times when the other person has made it clear that they will not allow you to help or to work with them, and will not allow you to be a part of the work that they do. Many times, that goes back to alignments along shared interests or demographics — a group of people to whom you cannot belong because of something you don’t have. In those cases, it is all the more important that collegiality be a discussion and a conscious decision, even though it sometimes is not. Collegiality is not a demand to make an artificial peace, or to make people talk who cannot. Collegiality should not be a strain only on the offended party, though the effort to maintain collegiality is itself a strain. It comes down to basic politeness. But that burden is on not just the offended, who are so often assumed to be sensitive or trouble-making, but on everyone. Collegiality is a group project.

Letter submission policy n Letters can be submitted to the Daily Lobo office in Marron Hall or online at DailyLobo.com. The Lobo reserves the right to edit letters for content and length. A name and phone number must accompany all letters. Anonymous letters or those with pseudonyms will not be published. Opinions expressed solely reflect the views of the author and do not reflect the opinions of Lobo employees.


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New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, October 26, 2011 / Page 5

Gadhafi buried in secret site The Associated Press

MISRATA, Libya — Moammar Gadhafi, the dictator who ruled Libya for 42 years, was buried early Tuesday in an unmarked grave with only a few people allowed to attend. The modest Islamic ceremony closed the book on the 8-month civil war that ousted him and ended in the gruesome spectacle of people lining up for days to view his decomposing corpse on display in a cold storage unit. One of Gadhafi’s nephews read a prayer for the dead before the body — along with those of Gadhafi’s son Muatassim and former defense minister Abu Bakr Younis — were handed over for burial, said Ibrahim Beitalmal, a spokesman for the military council in the port city of Misrata. Libya’s new leaders have said they would not reveal the location of the grave, fearing it could be vandalized or turned into a shrine for die-hard supporters. Gadhafi was captured alive on Thursday as he tried to flee his hometown of Sirte, where he had been hiding since revolutionary forces swept into the capital, Tripoli, two months earlier. He died later that day in un-

clear circumstances, and Libyan leaders have promised an investigation in response to international pressure to look into how he was killed. Video has emerged showing Gadhafi being beaten and abused by a mob after his capture, and researchers for the New York-based Human Rights Watch have said there are strong indications he was killed in custody. Human rights activists have warned that the new Libya could get off on the wrong foot if vigilante justice is condoned. However, many Libyans appeared relieved that Gadhafi is dead, saying a long trial for the former dictator would have been disruptive and made it harder on the country to get a fresh start. Earlier this week, interim leader Mustafa Abdul-Jalil formally declared an end to the civil war, starting the clock on what is to be a two-year transition to democracy. The bodies of Gadhafi, Muatassim and Younis had been kept in a refrigerated produce locker in a warehouse area of Misrata for the past four days. Hundreds lined up every day to view the corpses, some coming from hundreds of miles away. Visitors donned surgical masks, and at times guards arranged separate lines for men and

women. Late Monday, the bodies were taken to a local school in Misrata where suspected Gadhafi loyalists are being held, said Mohammed al-Madani, a Muslim cleric and one of the detainees. At about 1:30 a.m. Tuesday, al-Madani and another detained cleric were ordered to pray over the three bodies, which had been wrapped with faces covered. AlMadani told The Associated Press that he initially refused, but felt he had no choice and sped through the required Muslim prayers. Beitalmal said a Gadhafi nephew and two sons of Abu Bakr also participated in the prayer. The nephew was later identified as Abdel Rahman Abdel Hamid, son of a Gadhafi sister and in detention since trying to escape from Sirte in September. The bodies were taken under cover of darkness to the burial site, which Beitalmal said was “not far” from the city. As part of the ceremony, the bodies were washed in line with Islamic tradition. A Muslim cleric, a nephew of Gadhafi and sons of Abu Bakr then recited prayers before handing the bodies over for burial, which took place at 5 a.m. International organizations asking to see the burial site would be given access, Beitalmal said.

have the ability to raise big sums of money,” said Lucas County GOP Chairman Jon Stainbrook. He will appeal to people who are tired of politics as usual, Stainbrook said. “He’s tapped into this sentiment that things in Washington are screwed up.” Cuyahoga County Republican Chairman Rob Frost, who had announced he would seek the GOP nomination, dropped out last week, clearing the way for Wurzelbacher. Wurzelbacher, 37, went from toiling as a plumber in suburban Toledo three years ago to media sensation in a matter of days. After questioning candidate Obama about his economic policies, Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain repeatedly cited “Joe the plumber” in a presidential debate. Wurzelbacher campaigned with McCain and his running mate, Sarah Palin, but he criticized McCain in his book and said he did not want him as the GOP presidential nominee. Since then, he has written a book, worked with a veterans’ organization that provides outdoor programs for wounded soldiers and traveled the country speaking at tea party rallies and conservative gatherings. He has shown a disdain for politicians, both Democrat and Republican.

“Being a politician is as good as being a weatherman,” Wurzelbacher said at a tea party rally last year in Nevada. “You don’t have to be right, you don’t have to do your job well, but you’ll still have a job.”

‘Joe’ plunges into politics by John Seewer

The Associated Press

TOLEDO, Ohio — Joe the Plumber is launching his bid for Congress in Ohio. Samuel “Joe” Wurzelbacher, who became a household name after questioning Barack Obama about his economic policies during the 2008 presidential campaign, will make his announcement Tuesday night, a county Republican official told The Associated Press. Wurzelbacher already filed the paperwork to run as a Republican in Ohio’s 9th U.S. House district, and he has set up a website to raise money. The seat is now held by Marcy Kaptur, the longest-serving Democratic woman in the House. She is expected to face a primary challenge from Rep. Dennis Kucinich after Ohio’s redrawn congressional map combined their two districts into one that appears heavily tilted toward Democrats. Wurzelbacher has become an icon for many anti-establishment conservatives and has traveled the country speaking at tea party rallies and conservative gatherings. Republicans in northern Ohio recruited him to run and think he’ll be able to bring in enough money to make a serious challenge. “When you’re relevant and have friends in high places, you

Good news scarce in ongoing drought by Susan Montoya Bryan The Associated Press

Forecasters with the National Weather Service have a bit of good news for drought-stricken New Mexico: Some parts of the state got more precipitation in the first 10 days of October than they would normally get. The bad news: New Mexico is still very much in the grip of a severe to exceptional drought, and not much relief is expected as winter approaches.

Members of New Mexico’s Drought Working Group met Tuesday to talk about conditions across the state, including low reservoir levels and effects on farmers and ranchers. Meteorologist Ed Polasko says statewide precipitation rankings for the first nine months of the year were 60 percent that of normal. He says this year’s dry conditions are on par with those experienced during 1956, which marked the peak of the state’s worst recorded mega-drought.

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news

Page 6 / Wednesday, October 26, 2011

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Quake-stricken Turkey opens up to foreign aid by Selcan Hacaoglu and Suzan Fraser The Associated Press

ERCIS, Turkey — After 48 hours, a miracle emerged from a narrow slit in rubble of a Turkish apartment building: a 2-week-old baby girl, half-naked but still breathing. Stoic rescue workers erupted in cheers and applause at her arrival — and later for her mother’s and grandmother’s rescues — a ray of uplifting news on otherwise grim day. The bad news just kept on coming Tuesday: The death toll from Sunday’s 7.2-magnitude earthquake climbed to at least 459, desperate survivors fought over aid and blocked aid shipments, and a powerful aftershock ignited wide-

spread panic that turned into a prison riot in the provincial city of Van. With thousands of quake survivors facing a third night out in the open in near-freezing temperatures, Turkey set aside its national pride and said it would accept international aid offers, even from Israel, with which it has had strained relations of late. The dramatic operation to save three generations of one family was all the more remarkable because the infant, Azra Karaduman, was later declared healthy after being flown to a hospital in Ankara, the Turkish capital. “Bringing them out is such happiness. I wouldn’t be happier if they gave me tons of money,” said rescuer Oytun Gulpinar.

Television footage showed rescuer Kadir Direk in an orange jumpsuit wriggling into a pile of broken concrete and warped metal — what was left of a five-story apartment building — and then wriggling out with tiny Azra, clad only in a T-shirt. Praise be!” someone shouted. “Get out of the way!” another person yelled as the aid team cleared a path to a waiting ambulance. In a separate rescue, 10-yearold Serhat Gur was pulled from the rubble of another building after being trapped for 54 hours, but he died later at a hospital, staterun TRT television reported. The pockets of jubilation were tempered by many more discoveries of bodies in the worst-hit town of Ercis and other commu-

nities in eastern Turkey devastated by Sunday’s earthquake. Some 2,000 buildings collapsed, but the fact that the tremor hit in daytime, when many people were out of their homes, averted an even worse disaster. Over 500 aftershocks have since rattled the area, according to Turkey’s Kandilli seismology center. A strong one on Tuesday sent residents rushing into the streets in panic while sparking a riot by prisoners in Van, 55 miles south of Ercis. The U.S. Geological Survey put that temblor at a magnitude of 5.7. Some prisoners in Van demanded to be let out while others set bedding on fire, the private Dogan news agency reported. The revolt then spread inside the 1,000-bed prison and security forces surrounded it to keep inmates from escaping. Turkish military vehicles shot water cannon at crowds in the streets of Van to try to calm the situation. There is still no power or running water in the region, and desperate people stopped aid trucks even before they entered Ercis, grabbing tents and other supplies. Kanal D television showed people fighting over tents and blankets. Aid workers said they were able to find emergency housing for only about half the thousands of people who needed it. Turkey decided to accept offers of assistance after its emergency management authorities decided that thousands of survivors would need prefabricated homes to get through the winter in the mountainous region, said a Turkish foreign ministry official who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with ministry rules. Israel offered assistance despite a rift between the two countries over last year’s Israeli raid on a Gaza-bound flotilla that killed nine Turkish activists. At least 1,352 people were in-

jured in the quake, TRT television said late Tuesday. At least nine people were rescued Tuesday, although many more bodies were discovered. The rescued baby’s mother, Semiha, and grandmother, Gulsaadet, were huddled together, with the baby clinging to her mother’s shoulder when rescuers found them, Direk told The Associated Press. Hours after the infant was freed, the two others were pulled from the large, halfflattened building and rushed to ambulances to new cheers. The mother had been semiconscious, but woke up when rescuers arrived, Direk said. Firefighters and rescuers ordered silence while they listened for noise from other possible survivors in the collapsed apartment block, parts of which were being supported by a crane. But workers could not find the baby’s father and there were no other signs of life, Direk said. Gerald Rockenschaub, disaster response manager at the World Health Organization, said the first 48 to 72 hours are crucial for rescues and the chances of finding survivors decreases significantly after that. People can survive without food for a week or so but having access to water was critical, he said. Turkey lies in one of the world’s most active seismic zones and is crossed by numerous fault lines. In 1999, two earthquakes with a magnitude of higher than 7 struck northwestern Turkey, killing about 18,000 people. Istanbul, the country’s largest city with more than 12 million people, lies in northwestern Turkey near a major fault line, and experts say tens of thousands could be killed if a major quake struck there. __ Associated Press writer Christopher Torchia in Istanbul contributed to this report.

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culture

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, October 26, 2011 / Page 7

Dr. Faustus’ vice is timeless by Nicole Perez

nicole11@unm.edu

If any of you are debating selling your soul to the devil this Halloween, Christopher Marlowe’s play “Dr. Faustus” may convince you otherwise. The 407-year-old play is being produced by the UNM Department of Theatre and Dance and SCRAP productions at the UNM Experimental Theatre this week. The performance deviates from the original setting at the University of Wittenberg: the story leaps a few hundred years forward to take place at present-day UNM. Surprisingly, the modern costuming and set do not clash with the dated language. The play encroaches into the audience space, immersing viewers in the action. As Dr. Faustus summons spirits, sells his soul to the devil and conjures beings, whispering voices surround the audience from

all sides. The audience feels as if it is unwillingly pulled into Dr. Faustus’ demonic greed and lust for knowledge through Justino Brokaw’s creative direction. Dr. Faustus is not inhuman — Nick Salyer’s riveting performance paints the portrait of a conflicted man, torn between good and evil, a quintessential human. He asks Mephistopheles, Lucifer’s messenger, about the nature of hell, and is told hell is everything that heaven is not — the human condition itself is hell. This conclusion is one of the most profound statements the play makes. While many aspects of production are strong, the highlight is the comic relief provided by Van Hollenbeck and Michael Ray Carter, who play Faustus’ assistants Robin and Rafe, respectively. Carter has the comic timing down to a tee and is the perfect counterpoint to Salyer’s serious and tormented character.

The production had a few technical mishaps, including the shattering of a china dish across the stage floor, but the bulk of it was solid. In the grand scheme of things, that’s the best problem for which Brokaw could have hoped. The play certainly gets its message about sin across, but it is not black and white. The audience leaves mulling over fate, free will, knowledge and redemption.

Dr. Faustus

by Christopher Marlowe UNM Experimental Theatre Oct. 21, 22, 27-29 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23, 30 2 p.m.

$15 general, $12 faculty, seniors,$10 staff & students

It’s party time for pop-punk bands by Antonio Sanchez

sanchezantonio24@gmail.com The Gasworks ignited this July, and has continued glowing with a burning passion for the local music scene. Owner and musician Jason Lang started the music venue, and named it after a music venue featured in the movie “Wayne’s World.” Since it began, Lang said he has booked shows with local pop-punk and hardcore punk bands. The Gasworks is supported by Albuquerque bands and relies on volunteers for everything from security to management. As the number of booked shows increased, so did attendance, Lang said. “It exceeded my expectations within the first month,” Lang said. “My only real goal, honestly, was to be able to pay rent, and see the bands people want to see. We accomplished that goal almost immediately, which was really cool to see, so now it’s just working to make it be the coolest place to hang out.” Lang, 22, said he is no stranger to Albuquerque’s music scene, and he was surrounded by art growing up. His father loved music and his mother suggested Lang play the drums in his middle school band. Lang started his own band with a few middle school friends, and soon he was booking shows at the age of 13. “I knew of some other friends that I grew up with that started a band and wanted to play, so I set up a show in my back yard. That was the beginning of it,” Lang said. “After that, I started meeting a bunch of people and started booking a ton of shows. Can’t get away from it now.”  The termination of his last project, a small house that local musicians dubbed “Gold Manor,” sparked the

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idea for The Gasworks. “I started looking around, humoring the idea of starting a venue even though I had no idea how to do what I was doing,” Lang said. “One day I just found a spot on Craigslist that wasn’t that expensive and I just kind of went for it.” Adam Abeyta, Lang’s “right-hand man,” has helped run shows at The Gasworks. As the lead singer for local pop-punk band Zagadka, Abeyta said he relies on his past experience to help run shows. “It’s run by guys who know how things should be done, not how they want things to be done,” Abeyta said. “I think a lot of venues go into it thinking they know what bands want, what the fans want, but they don’t have any idea. We’ve been a part of the Albuquerque music scene for a while now.” Abeyta has been a part of The Gasworks since its opening, and said the venue is open to entertainment of all kinds. He is interested in booking a variety of groups, like indie bands, hip-hop groups, and even stand-up comedy acts. Abeyta said The Gasworks is open to anything as long as the shows remain geared towards all age groups. “It’s one of the only spots that’s all ages and where kids can go and hang out and have fun and not have to worry about sketchy people or bad security,” Abeyta said. “We opened it for the kids. Having all-age shows is probably one of the most important things you can do.”

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culture

Page 8 / Wednesday, October 26, 2011

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Day of the Dead celebration expands in US Russell Contreras Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE — Growing up in South Texas, Kiko Torres saw the Day of the Dead as an obscure holiday celebrated in southern Mexico. Few people dared to discuss it in his small but strong Mexican-American Catholic community. Still, Torres said he became fascinated with Day of the Dead folk art and ceremonies he saw during his father’s research trips to Mexico. Those images of dancing skeleton figurines and the event’s spiritual messages of honoring the dead, he said, were misunderstood in the United States. “People here thought it was something to be scared of,” said Torres. But that’s changing. In the last decade or so, this traditional Latin American holiday with indigenous roots has spread throughout the United States along with migration from Mexico and other countries where it is observed. Not only are U.S.-born Latinos adopting the Day of the Dead, but various artistic nonLatino groups have begun to mark the Nov. 1-2 holidays through colorful celebrations, parades, exhibits and even bike rides and mixed martial arts fights. In Houston, artists hold a “Day of the Dead Rock Stars” where they pay homage to departed singers like Joey

Ramone, Johnny Cash and even “El Marvin Gaye.” Community centers in Los Angeles build altars for rapper Tupac Shakur and Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. “It’s everywhere now,” said Carlos Hernandez, 49, a Houston-based artist who launched the “Day of the Dead Rock Stars” event. “You can even get Dia de los Muertos stuff at Walmart.” The Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, honors departed souls of loved ones who are welcomed back for a few intimate hours. At burial sites or intricately built altars, photos of loved ones are centered on skeleton figurines, bright decorations, candles, candy and other offerings such as the favorite foods of the departed. Pre-Columbian in origin, many of the themes and rituals now are mixtures of indigenous practices and Roman Catholicism. The holiday is celebrated in Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil and parts of Ecuador. Leading up to the day, bakers make sugar skulls and sweet “bread of the dead,” and artists create elaborate paper cut-out designs that can be hung on altars. Some families keep private night-long vigils at burial sites. In North America, decorations often center on images of La Calavera Catrina, a skeleton of an upper-class

woman whose image was made popular by the late Mexican printmaker Jose Guadalupe Posada. She is typically seen in photos or through papier-mache statues alongside other skeletal figures in everyday situations like playing soccer, dancing or getting married. La Catrina is the most popular recreated figure related to the holiday.

“We have people come into the shop and ask if this about the occult or devil worshipping,” ~Kenny Chavez Masks y Mas employee “She is our best-selling item,” said Torres, 35, who owns Masks y Mas in Albuquerque, a shop that sells Day of the Dead art and clothing yearround. “I have artists sending me their Catrina pieces from all over.” Albuquerque’s National Hispanic Cultural Center hosts an annual “Dia de los Muertos Community Gathering,” featuring many of the artists from Masks y Mas. The community “ofrenda” — the term

for a Day of the Dead offering or homemade altar — features blessings, live music and poetry from Oct. 17 through Nov. 8. The center also is exhibiting an altar by MexicanAmerican novelist Sandra Cisneros dedicated to her mother. Albuquerque also hosts an annual parade where marchers dress in Day of the Dead gear and makeup, and it organizes a bike and marathon race. The exhibits and events are not limited to the Southwest. Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology has a Day of the Dead altar on permanent display and offers Day of the Dead art classes to students from second to eighth grade. In New York City, the Brooklyn Arts Council recently initiated a yearlong Day of the Dead education project to heighten public awareness “on mourning and remembrance.” The growing Latin American population in the United States and the increased influence of Hispanic culture here in everything from food to TV programming are obviously major factors in the growth of Day of the Dead celebrations. But the holiday’s increased popularity may also coincide with evolving attitudes toward death, including a move away from private mourning to more public ways of honoring departed loved ones, whether through online tributes or

sidewalk memorials. “I think it has to do with September 11th,” said Albuquerquebased artist Kenny Chavez. “We’re all looking at death differently, and the Day of the Dead allows us to talk about it.” For some in the United States, the Day of the Dead remains personal as they use the occasion to remember close loved ones. But for others, it’s a chance to honor late celebrities or just an opportunity to dress up as a favorite Day of the Dead character. Chavez said those unfamiliar with the event sometimes freeze when they first see Day of the Dead images. “We have people come into the shop and ask if this about the occult or devil worshipping,” said Chavez, who works at Masks y Mas. “They get all weirded out until you explain what this is.” It has also become a business outside of the holiday period. Torres said part of his business out of Masks y Mas was embroidering muerta images on the shorts and gloves of mixed martial arts fighters. “They can’t get enough of it,” he said. Torres said white and Native American artists are also creating artwork around Day of the Dead themes. “It all about understanding the meaning of the day,” he said. “They can take chances with the art.”


culture

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, October 26, 2011 / Page 9

Albuquerque’s ‘haunted’ buildings Stack of Pancakes 2 for $1.25 Bring in this ad. Show Student ID

Free wi-fi

Expires November 11, 2011

2608 CENTRAL SE

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo These are some of the 300-year-old objects found outside the Church Street Café in Old Town when owners did construction on the pipes. The café was owned by the Ruiz family from 1706 to 1991, and the staff greets Sarah Ruiz every time they pass the room under which she is allegedly buried.

by Nicole Perez

nicole11@unm.edu Editor’s note: If you’re looking for heightened spookiness this Halloween, the Daily Lobo searched long and hard for some of the most haunted buildings in Albuquerque. Some people were glad to talk to us; others weren’t. But because we would do anything for our readers, we persevered, possibly risking our lives or at least our mortal souls. If so, watch out, for the blood is on your hands.

Hotel Parq Central 806 Central Ave. S.E.

According to a KOB news report, before it was remodeled and opened as a hotel in 2010, this 85-year-old building was a tuberculosis sanitarium. When contacted, a hotel receptionist denied the building was haunted and that the hotel was formerly a sanitarium. Fishy? That’s what we thought. Regardless, if the place is haunted the conflicting stories certainly add intrigue.

Church Street Café 2111 Church St. N.W.

One of the oldest building in Albuquerque, the Church Street Café in Old Town is home to

objects that date back 300 years, employee Minika Estrada said. The body of Sarah Ruiz, a member of the Ruiz family who owned the restaurant from approximately 1706 to 1991, is supposedly buried under the “Sarah Room” in the café, she said. Staff members always says a prayer, hello and goodbye to Ruiz as they pass by to maintain her good will, she said. Estrada said there is certainly an aura, but nothing especially spooky has happened to her personally. “It’s what you believe in, too, you know,” she said. “You put good energy out there, she (Sarah) takes care of you. … We believe in it. You got to believe in it, you know? You can imagine all the other, older souls and beings here.”

The Albuquerque Press Club 201 Highland Park Circle S.E.

This building borders Highland Park on Elm Street and Gold Avenue, and was constructed in 1903 from hand-hewn logs. Mrs. M, the supposed haunter of the private bar, died in the stables in the late 1920s or early 30s, general manager Jonathan Wright said. Wright said the legend is that when the house was first turned

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo The Albuquerque Press Club is allegedly home to Mrs. M, the ghost of a woman who died in the stables behind the building in the late 1920s. One worker refuses to walk through this bathroom hallway because she said she feels threatened by the ghost’s presence.

into a bar, the bartender would leave a shot glass of gin out for Mrs. M. The gin would be gone by the morning. Wright said he doesn’t believe in the supernatural, let alone a ghost that drinks gin, and chalked it up to a cat living there. However, he also told the story to a friend of his who was a bartender a few years ago, and had closed and left the building alone one night. As she was driving away she turned around and saw all the lights had been turned back on. This building is certainly one to check out if you’re brave enough.

Pinpoint the future of your business...

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culture

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Wednesday, October 26, 2011 / Page 9

Albuquerque’s ‘haunted’ buildings Stack of Pancakes 2 for $1.25 Bring in this ad. Show Student ID

Free wi-fi

Expires November 11, 2011

2608 CENTRAL SE

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo These are some of the 300-year-old objects found outside the Church Street Café in Old Town when owners did construction on the pipes. The café was owned by the Ruiz family from 1706 to 1991, and the staff greets Sarah Ruiz every time they pass the room under which she is allegedly buried.

by Nicole Perez

nicole11@unm.edu Editor’s note: If you’re looking for heightened spookiness this Halloween, the Daily Lobo searched long and hard for some of the most haunted buildings in Albuquerque. Some people were glad to talk to us; others weren’t. But because we would do anything for our readers, we persevered, possibly risking our lives or at least our mortal souls. If so, watch out, for the blood is on your hands.

Hotel Parq Central

806 Central Ave. S.E. According to a KOB news report, before it was remodeled and opened as a hotel in 2010, this 85-year-old building was a tuberculosis sanitarium. When contacted, a hotel receptionist denied the building was haunted and that the hotel was formerly a sanitarium. Fishy? That’s what we thought. Regardless, if the place is haunted the conflicting stories certainly add intrigue.

Church Street Café 2111 Church St. N.W.

One of the oldest building in Albuquerque, the Church Street Café in Old Town is home to

objects that date back 300 years, employee Minika Estrada said. The body of Sarah Ruiz, a member of the Ruiz family who owned the restaurant from approximately 1706 to 1991, is supposedly buried under the “Sarah Room” in the café, she said. Staff members always says a prayer, hello and goodbye to Ruiz as they pass by to maintain her good will, she said. Estrada said there is certainly an aura, but nothing especially spooky has happened to her personally. “It’s what you believe in, too, you know,” she said. “You put good energy out there, she (Sarah) takes care of you. … We believe in it. You got to believe in it, you know? You can imagine all the other, older souls and beings here.”

The Albuquerque Press Club 201 Highland Park Circle S.E. This building borders Highland Park on Elm Street and Gold Avenue, and was constructed in 1903 from hand-hewn logs. Mrs. M, the supposed haunter of the private bar, died in the stables in the late 1920s or early 30s, general manager Jonathan Wright said. Wright said the legend is that when the house was first turned

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo The Albuquerque Press Club is allegedly home to Mrs. M, the ghost of a woman who died in the stables behind the building in the late 1920s. One worker refuses to walk through this bathroom hallway because she said she feels threatened by the ghost’s presence.

into a bar, the bartender would leave a shot glass of gin out for Mrs. M. The gin would be gone by the morning. Wright said he doesn’t believe in the supernatural, let alone a ghost that drinks gin, and chalked it up to a cat living there. However, he also told the story to a friend of his who was a bartender a few years ago, and had closed and left the building alone one night. As she was driving away she turned around and saw all the lights had been turned back on. This building is certainly one to check out if you’re brave enough.

Pinpoint the future of your business...

Open 24hrs 266-5113

DAILY LOBO new mexico

DAILY LOBO new mexico

...Daily Lobo Advertising can help get you there, 277-5656 advertising@dailylobo.com


culture

Page 10 / Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Come and kick off the ski season with the new Warren Miller movie

Like There’s No Tomorrow Tickets: $10

New Mexico Daily Lobo

Fashion Q &

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Don’t worry... it kinda looks like you’re taking notes.

daily crossword in the lobo features

DAILY LOBO new mexico

DAILY LOBO new mexico

CAMPUS EVENTS

Sienna Sanchez / sophomore / undeclared

Josh Rodriguez / junior / linguistics and foreign languages

Boots: Walmart, $7 Tights: Urban Outfitters, $14 Dress: Target, $20-$30 Shirt: Target, $20 Sweatshirt: Zumiez, $60

Jacket: Las Vegas thrift store, $30 Vest: Express, $40 Shirt: Buffalo Exchange, $28 Jeans: The Levi Store, $25 Boots: Unsure, $78 Bag: New Orleans thrift store, $25

Some people consider a dressed-up basic outfit to look something like corporate casual. However, Sanchez’s bright hoodie paired with dress, tights and boots resembles a new approach. Some other ways to punctuate a basic outfit Sanchez suggested include heels, an overcoat and/or a tasteful necklace like pearls. Favorite fashion trend: “I really like when girls do things like dressing up, dressing down, that sort of thing, where it’s not like going out and being super fancy, just looking really classy and put together, not just jeans and a T-shirt.” Least favorite fashion trend: “I hate pre-ripped jeans just based on the fact that, what, you can’t rip your own jeans, you have to go buy jeans that are already destroyed? That doesn’t make any sense to me.”

LOBO LIFE

Flu Shot Clinic Starts at: 10:00am Location: UNM SUB Atrium Free flu shots for students, staff and faculty (anyone 18 years old or older). Sponsored by Student Health & Counseling. Information: shac.unm.edu or 277-7925. Etulain Lecture by Dr. David Holtby Starts at: 5:30pm Location: George Pearl Hall, Lecture Hall P104 This lecture titled, “Statehood as Narrative and Theory: The Surprising Case of New Mexico,” contrasts some Centennial of Statehood commemorative activities with events and recollections from 1880 to 1940. Flu Shot Clinic

Starts at: 10:00am Location: UNM SUB Atrium Free flu shots for students, staff and faculty (anyone 18 years old or older). Sponsored by Student Health & Counseling. Information: shac.unm.edu or 277-7925.

COMMUNITY EVENTS Putting a Face on Environmental Health Starts at: 1:00pm Location: Nativo Lodge, 6000 Pan American Freeway learn about environmental health in NM and gain CEUs. Hebrew Conversation Class: Beginning Starts at: 5:00pm Location: 1701 Sigma Chi NE

Offered every Wednesday by Israel Alliance and Hillel. Phone: 505-269-8876. Compassion & Choices Town Hall Meeting Starts at: 6:45pm Location: First Unitarian Church of Albuquerque, 3701 Carlisle Blvd NE Those interested in attending are asked to register by visiting http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NMRSVP

Future events may be previewed at www.dailylobo.com

Rodriguez summarized his style as being cheap and classy at the same time. I don’t know who considers $78 the best deal you can get for boots, but you can’t put a price on a dynamic outfit like this one. Favorite fashion trend: “I like military stuff, obviously, so just kind of re-appropriating military style with something less masculine.” Least favorite fashion trend: “The freaky shoes with the toes; they kind of scare me. That, and the hippie sweaters [drugrugs or Baja hoodies], the woven hippie sweaters, the ones with the hoods.” ~ Alexandra Swanberg

Event Calendar

for October 26, 2011 Planning your day has never been easier!

Placing an event in the Lobo Life calendar: 1. Go to www.dailylobo.com 2. Click on “Events” link near the top of the page. 3. Click on “Submit an Event Listing” on the right side of the page. 4. Type in the event info and submit!

Please limit your description to 25 words (although you may type in more, your description will be edited to 25 words. To have your event published in the Daily Lobo on the day of the event, submit at least 3 school days prior to the event . Events in the Daily Lobo will appear with the title, time, location and 25 word description! Although events will only publish in the Daily Lobo on the day of the event, events will be on the web once submitted and approved. Events may be edited, and may not publish on the Web or in the Daily Lobo at the discretion of the Daily Lobo.


lobo features

New Mexico Daily Lobo

FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 26, 2011

Wednesday, October 26, 2011 / Page 11

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

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ACROSS 1 Finish using TurboTax, say 6 They have scales and keys 10 Avon lady, e.g.? 14 Pitch man? 15 Little bit of everything 16 Tip-top 17 Latitude between the South Frigid Zone and South Temperate Zone 20 Surfboard fin 21 Native of Lima 22 Novelist Kesey 23 Hindquarters 25 Arms treaty subjects, briefly 27 Tried something out 32 Cleaned one’s plate 33 Indian megalopolis 34 Copious 38 Agent under M 40 Highways and byways 42 Chimney sweepings 43 Lipstick mishap 45 Springs, in a way 47 Ref’s decision 48 Test-drove, with “in” 51 Environmental activist Jagger 54 Copyeditor’s catch, hopefully 55 Commentator Coulter 56 16th-century Spanish fleet 60 Science fiction prize 63 Macroeconomic theory to explain inflation 66 Faded in the stretch 67 Dust Bowl migrant 68 Denoting a loss, as on a balance sheet 69 Every twelve mos. 70 Unites 71 Napoleon, ultimately

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LASSIFIEDs CCLASSIFIEDS Page 12 / Wednesday, October 26, 2011

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Announcements Announcements Auditions Event Rentals Fun, Food, Music Health and Wellness Looking for You Lost and Found Services Travel Want to Buy Your Space

Housing Apartments Co-housing Condos Duplexes Houses for Rent Houses for Sale Housing Wanted Property for Sale Rooms for Rent Sublets

MATH/ CHEMISTRY TUTOR. Excellent communicator. K-College. 505-205-9317. ABORTION AND COUNSELING Services. Caring and confidential. FREE PREGNANCY TESTING. Curtis Boyd, MD, PC: 522 Lomas Blvd NE, 242-7512.

Health and Wellness MEDITATION ON THE Chakras with world renowned Dr. Indu Arora. Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011. Crystal Dove Healing Institute 525 Central Av. SE. 6:00 7:30PM. $30 -- 2 for 1 with valid student IDs. www.crystal-dove.com Also Aryurvedic Pulse Diagnosis consultations with Dr. Indu available. Call 425770-8984 for appointment/information. www.yogsadhna.com BIRTHRIGHT CARES. FREE pregnancy tests, help. 262-2235. !FITNESS/WELLNESS COACH! P/T. Not hourly job. Potential to earn $500 to $2500+ per month. Training available. Recruiter: Stella. 505-220-5841. GOOD COFFEE, GOOD health. Organo Gold Coffee. 505-406-7256.

For Sale

Apartments

Audio/Video Bikes/Cycles Computer Stuff Dogs, Cats, Pets For Sale Furniture Garage Sales Textbooks Vehicles for Sale

APARTMENT HUNTING? www.keithproperties.com UNM NORTH CAMPUS- 1BDRM $515. Clean, quiet, remodeled. No pets allowed. Move in special! 573-7839. CLEAN, QUIET, AFFORDABLE, 2BDRM $750/mo utilities included. 3 blocks to UNM, no pets. Move in special. 262-0433.

Employment Child Care Jobs Jobs off Campus Jobs on Campus Jobs Wanted Volunteers

BLOCK TO UNM. Large. Clean. Gated. 1BDRM. $600/mo. Includes utilities. No pets. 255-2685.

Announcements STRATEGIC BOARDGAME UNION Chess, Go, Shogi. www.wix.com/sbuunm/strate gicboardgamesunion

FREE UNM PARKING/ Nob Hill Living. $100 move in discount, 1BDRM, $490/mo. 366-8391. 4125 Lead SE. STUDIOS 1 BLOCK UNM, Free utilities. $455/mo. 246-2038. 1515 Copper NE. www.kachina-properties.com

School?

UNM/CNM STUDIOS, 1BDRM, 2BDRMS, 3BDRMS, and 4BDRMS. William H. Cornelius, Real Estate Consultant: 243-2229.

WARREN MILLER’S...”LIKE THERE’S NO TOMORROW.” Oct. 29, 7PM. La Cueva HS Tickets $10.00. Call 573-2232.

1BR/STUDIO APARTMENT FOR rent. Unique, open layout.1 Block from UNM! Shared back courtyard space $800/mo Includes Utilities. No dogs please Call 246-9196 to see.

STRESSED ABOUT JOB? Life? Call Agora. 277-3013. www.agoracares.com

1 BLOCK UNM. 1BDRM duplex. Skylights, driveway parking. $525/mo includes utilities. 299-7723. 1700 COAL SE. 2BDRM, remodeled, wood floors, W/D, $750/mo + utilities, $300dd. No pets please. 453-9745.

Lobo Hockey vs Air Force

Friday @ 8pm Saturday @ 8pm Outpost Ice Arena For info: (505) 304-3978 Fun Food Music TUESDAY’S OPEN MIC Night at Brickyard Pizza! Acoustic, all styles welcome, spoken word and comedy. 8:3011:30. 2216 Central Ave SE.

Services ?BACKPACK BUSTED? ABQ Luggage & Zipper Repair. 1405-A San Mateo NE. 256-7220. TUTORING - ALL AGES, most subjects. Experienced Ph.D. 265-7799. PAPER DUE? FORMER UNM instructor, Ph.D., English, published, can help. 254-9615. MasterCard/ VISA. TIRED OF EXPENSIVE vehicle repair? Mobile Mechanic will come to you. 30 + yrs bumper to bumper experience. Also buy broken vehicles. 304-4365. MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS TUTOR. Billy Brown PhD. College and HS. welbert53@aol.com, 401-8139.

WWW.UNMRENTALS.COM Awesome university apartments. Unique, hardwood floors, FP’s, courtyards, fenced yards. Houses, cottages, efficiencies, studios, 1, 2 and 3BDRM’s. Garages. 843-9642. Open 7 days/week. LIVE ON THE EDGE... of downtown. 1BDRM all utilities included, parking, laundry, gated. $580/mo. 802 Gold SW. 577-4730. Across from Flying Star.

Houses For Rent WHY RENT? FIRST time home buyers $500 down through MFA call John 4502878. Thomson Real Estate. 3716 MESA VERDE NE. Available 8/1/11 , 4-5BDRM 1.75BA near UNM. $1150/mo obo + deposits. 602-7938666.

Rooms For Rent LOBO VILLAGE ROOM available for immediate move in! Female only. For more information call or text 505-3777653. ROOMMATE WANTED. 3BDRM 1.5BA. 1 mile from UNM. Utilities, internet, and cable included. No pets. $435/mo. 505974-7476. LOBO VILLAGE ROOM available at end of semester. Female only. Sophomore or older. Contact Ally if interested 505-401-7682. LOOKING FOR EASY-going, clean person to share our 4BDRM, 2BA house. $270/mo +1/4utilities +$200deposit. Available November 1st. Monterey/Girard near Walgreen’s and Smiths. japjihundal1@gmail.com

New Mexico Daily Lobo UNM ID ADVANTAGE

CLASSIFIED PAYMENT INFORMATION

Phone: Pre-payment by Visa, Discover, • 30¢ per word per day for five or more Come to to Marron show Pre-payment by Visa or Master •• Come MarronHall, Hall,room room107, 131, show •• Phone: or American is required. consecutive days without changing or your IDID and receive FREE classifieds Card is required. CallExpress 277-5656. yourUNM UNM and receive a special rate MasterCard Call 277-5656 cancelling. inofYour Rooms for Rent, orRooms any For 10¢Space, per word in Personals, • Fax or E-mail: Pre-payment by Visa or • Fax or Email: Pre-payment by Visa, Discover, • 40¢ per word per day for four days or Sale Category. for Rent, or any For Sale category. Master Card is required. Fax ad text, MasterCard or American Express is required. less or non-consecutive days. dates and dates category to 277-7531, or Fax ad text, and catergory to 277-7530 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING • Special effects are charged addtionally: e-mail classads@unm.edu. or email to to classifi eds@dailylobo.com DEADLINE logos, bold, italics, centering, blank lines, person:Pre-payment Pre-pay bybycash, •• In In person: cash, check, money larger font, etc. check, Visa, Discover, MasterCard or • 1 p. m. business day before publication. order, money order, Visa or MasterCard. American Come room 107 Come byExpress. room 131 in by Marron Hallinfrom CLASSIFIEDS ON THE WEB Marron Hall from 8:00am to 5:00pm. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. UNM Student Publications www.dailylobo.com Mail:: Pre-pay money order, in-state check, Pre-paybyby money order, in-state •• Mail MSC03 2230 Visa, Discover, MasterCard or American check, Visa, MasterCard. Mail payment, 1 University of New Mexico • All rates include both print and online Express. Mail payment, ad text, dates and ad text, dates and category. Albuquerque, NM 87131 editions of the Daily Lobo. catergory.

HOMESHARE: FULLY FURNISHED. Private Room/ Bath. Use of living, dining, kitchen, patio. Grill/sauna. No smoking/ pets. Includes internet, laundry, utilities, off-street parking. 4 miles from UNM. Walk to busline/shopping. $500/mo. 5508701. FULLY FURNISHED, NEAR north campus. $410/mo. High speed Internet, 1/4 utilities. Pictures available. Gated community. Access I-40&I-25. tkuni@unm.edu

For Sale SEAGATE EXTERNAL DRIVE. 1.0TB. PC compatible Only. Never Used. $100. amalcolm@unm.edu for inquiries. APPLE IMAC G5/2.1 20-Inch (iSight). FinalCut. Mac OS X Snow Leopard. $500. amalcolm@unm.edu for inquiries. 1999 DODGE NEON. 76k Miles Auto. PW AC. Gas saver. New tires,4 doors excellent condition! Runs great. Call or text 505-489-9253. FOOSBALL TABLE FOR sale. $150 OBO. 203-2283.

Property For Sale PAIR OF WOMEN’S NIKE shoes size 5. Black with light pink. Worn once, excellent condition. $20, OBO. Text 505-3071369 for pictures and more information.

Jobs On Campus

UNIV OF 5 x 8” (4c) PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION Services is looking for acb/reh/gl temporary Cashier to assist with business office transactions for the 2011-2012 academic year. This temporary position will last between 3 to 6 months and starts at $9.00/hr. Applicants must be available to work 40hr/week Monday-Friday. If you have previous cash handling and balancing experience, enjoy working with the general public, and want to work in an environment which encourages teamwork and commitment to excellence, come join us! To apply, please visit http://unmjobs.unm.edu posting #0812901.

Jobs Off Campus PARTY TROLLEY IS looking for Responsible, Outgoing and Charismatic tour-guide Thu/F/S with strong work ethic only. Contact Estelle 505-8509980. EARN $$$ SELLING delicious nutritional shakes. 505-250-5807. SEEKING PRE-CALCULUS tutor. Must have own transportation. Send resume, availability & references, plus hourly rate. Prefer female, student: nursing, engineer, computer science, etc. DMD505@yahoo.com EARN $1000-$3200 A month to drive our brand new cars with ads. www.FreeCarJobs.com ALPHABET JUNCTION IS looking for P/T childcare providers. Will work around schedules. Apply in person. 1200C Candelaria NE. BARTENDER THEFT DETECTION Agent (experienced bartenders only). Apply: www.eyespyspotter.com ANDROID/ IPHONE APP developer for contract position. Call Jeremy at 505515-7029 for more info. 4-5 STUDENTS needed for furnituremoving & heavy-duty house-cleaning. Sat 29 Oct, Sun 30 Oct. $12.50/hr. 4 hrs guaranteed. Near campus. 2553365. LOVELACE RESPIRATORY RESEARCH Institute is seeking a Radiological Control Technician I who will support the area of radiological protection ensuring compliance with state & federal regulations by measuring, assessing, & documenting radiological conditions in the workplace. A Bachelor’s degree in health physics or radiological science and 1 year experience or an Associate’s Degree (AAS) with 3 years experience as a radiological control technician highly desired.Training in shipping Class 7 materials under both DOT and IATA is desired. Apply online at www.lrri.org & reference Job #S6911, or Fax 505-348-4966, or mail: HR Office, LRRI, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108. EOE/AA, M/F/D/V.

REGULAR PART-TIME Tutor PoolChemistry Program (0601060) – ACE. Responsibilities: Tutors assist students individually and in small groups in the review of course material, solving of problems, and preparing for tests. Organizing and conducting study groups; introducing study skills strategies; developing and facilitating skills development workshops; researching and selecting learning materials, textbooks, software, and equipment to facilitate tutoring; assisting in maintaining and circulating audio visual and software materials; providing point-of-use guidance to users in selecting materials to fit their individual learning needs. Participating in required tutor training sessions per term or term break and staying current with CNM’s texts, materials, and policies; Team or Task Force participation is encouraged as well as participation in CNM opportunities for professional growth and development. Participation in the New Mexico Education Retirement Act (NMERA) is required of each CNM employee. Salary: $11.18 per hour. Requirements: Successful completion of 30-hours of post-secondary course work from an accredited institution. Coursework must include General Chemistry I & II, Organic, and Biochemistry or equivalent. Transcripts verifying these specific courses are required at time of application. Demonstrated verbal and written communication skills. Ability to relate one-to-one and in small groups utilizing a variety of tutorial methods. Deadline for application: Open Until Filled. Central New Mexico Community College provides an excellent benefit package that includes: a pension plan, health, dental and vision insurance, disNM (DAILY LOBO) ability and life insurance. A complete job announcement detailing required application documents is available at jobs.cnm.edu or at CNM Human Resources 525 Buena Vista SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR NEEDS a P/T person who has a minimum of 1 to 2 years experience with Server 2008/2011 and networking. Must be proficient with MS Office products experience with Sage Masterbuilder a plus, but not required. 20 to 30hrs/wk. With flexible hours. Starting pay: $15/hr. If interested submit resume to pdavis@ecinm.com !!!BARTENDING!!!: $300/DAY potential. No experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520ext.100. NANNY WANTED. RESPONSIBLE woman wanted to help with childcare including transportation in the AM and PM hours. Some help with homework and cooking also needed. Hours would include: 7:15 - 9:00 am and 3:20 - 7:00 pm. 7:45 pm. on Tues. $800 per month. Please call Kelly @ 505-573-9842. WAIT STAFF PT/ FT for busy lunch cafe. Apply at Model Pharmacy, corner of Lomas and Carlisle.

NY021537B

!BARTENDER TRAINING! Bartending Academy, 3724 Eubank NE. www.newmexicobartending.com 292-4180. VETERINARY ASSISTANT/ RECEPTIONIST/ Kennel help. Pre-veterinary student preferred. Ponderosa Animal Clinic: 881-8990/ 881-8551.

Volunteers UNM IS LOOKING for adult women with asthma for asthma research study. If you are interested in finding out more about this study, please contact Teresa at tarchibeque@salud.unm.edu or 2691074 (HRRC 09-330).

LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS? Advertise with the Daily Lobo! Give the Classified Advertising Reps a call today! Our number is 277-5656. Open Monday through Friday 8AM5PM.

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10/26/2011 SLOERA

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LOOKING FOR EMPLOYEES?! Advertise with the Daily Lobo! 277-5656

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Join us for a Career Event! Thursday, November 3, 2011 10am –1pm Verizon Wireless Call Center 7000 Central Ave SW Albuquerque, NM 87121

Opportunities currently exist in Albuquerque for:

Customer Service Representatives Bilingual Retail Sales Representatives College degree or applicable experience preferred. Visit vzwcareers4you.com to apply today. Must apply online within the last 30 days to be considered.

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Verizon Wireless is an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.

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NM Daily Lobo 102611  

NM Daily Lobo 102611

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