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NOVEMBER 2015 competitor

competitor |

Do you need waterproof shoes?

How to thrive in bad weather

Page 22

Page 47

NOVEMBER 2015

HOLIDAY GEAR GUIDE FOR RUNNERS

Click here to read about the best running movies of all-time.

66 OF THE BEST GIFT IDEAS FOR RUNNERS

| HOW TO RUN IN WINTER WEATHER

PLUS:

|

Jump-start your training for a fast, healthy 2016

3 KEY DRILLS FOR RUNNERS

SNEAK PEEK: Fast, new training shoes

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Captured 2

Running the Rut Runners looking for an extreme challenge headed to Big Sky, Mont., on Sept. 5–7 to take part in The Rut Mountain Runs. Part of the Skyrunner World Series and the U.S. Skyrunner Series, the weekend of events included a vertical kilometer uphill race, and 11K, 25K and 50K mountain races. All of the courses were technically daunting, but the 50K race might be the most difficult one in the U.S. Held on the rocky terrain of Big Sky ski resort between 7,500 and 11,166 feet above sea level, the route was crazy steep (up and down), with 20,000 feet of vertical gain and loss, and plenty of exposure above tree line, plus off-trail sections, loose rocks and rockfall danger. “From mile 12.5 to 22.5 of the 50K, it is so, so, so steep, technical and hard,” says co-race director Mike Foote. “Good or bad, people are going to remember it.” Italy’s Franco Collé was the toughest of the tough, winning in 5:16:58, while Sweden’s Emelie Forsberg won the women’s race in 6:25:44. The 25K course wasn’t exactly a walk in the park. At right, Paul Terranova of Austin, Texas, runs along a rocky ridge on the southwestern flank of Lone Mountain en route to finishing 32nd in the 25K race in 4:28:10.

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Photo: Myke Hermsmeyer

Click here for more images from The Rut Mountain Runs.

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Captured 4

A Bullish U p h i l l R ace More than 400 athletes and weekend warriors took on the excruciating challenge of running 400 meters up an Olympic ski jump on Sept. 26 at the Utah Olympic Park in Park City, Utah. Sound hard? Damn straight the Red Bull 400 was hard! The races, co-sponsored by Under Armour, started at 6,870 feet above sea level, which only added to the lung and leg burn as competitors ran, crawled and struggled up the 134-meter ski jump landing hill and in-run ramp. Ahmet Arslan of Turkey was the fastest of the day, winning the elite heat in 4:05.8—just two seconds ahead of John Tribbia of Salt Lake City. U.S. Olympic cross country skier Liz Stephens (4:39.2) was the first woman to the top, holding off the hard-charging Austrian cross country skier Veronika Mayerhofer. “It’s steeper than you can imagine,” says Tribbia, a member of the Salomon/ Backcountry.com running team and a former member of the U.S. Mountain Running Team. “There are places you think you might fall off if you’re not careful. I don’t know how skiers willingly jump off those things. Running up that was insane.” There was a means to the madness, as proceeds from the event benefitted the local ski jumping and cross country ski programs of the Park City Nordic Ski Club.

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PhotoS: David Martinez Moreno, Susan Lacke Manville

Click here for more images from the Red Bull 400.

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Contents

n ove m be r 2 0 1 5

Features

Departments

Training

Community

27 Gotta-Have-It Holiday Gear Guide

13 Starting Lines

47 Coach Culpepper

Run It

This holiday season, use your wish list to gear up for 2016 with the coolest running items around. This is all of our musthave equipment for training, racing, traveling, rehabbing and relaxing in the new year. By the editors

42 5 Ways to Jump-Start Your Training Before 2016 ’Tis the season for dreaming big. As winter fast approaches, here’s how to make plans for fast and healthy running next year. By Kelly O’Mara

A rundown of amazing new trail records set in 2015. Plus: the hottest gear on running-shop shelves this holiday season.

Gear

Don’t fight the weather—deal with it

48 Strength The renegade row

50 Prehab Foam roll the right way

20 Toe to Toe Two new lightweight cushioned trainers

22 Shoe Talk The pros and cons of waterproof running shoes

24 Pro Kit Marathoner Tyler McCandless’ favorite gear

52 Form Drill

Our picks for a variety of upcoming races

Back Page Last Lap Top U.S. marathoner Ryan Hall shares why he runs, his biggest challenges, and his personal mantra.

Bounding

54 Workout of the Month Coordination Fartlek

56 Training Plan 6-week base building plan

ON THE COV ER: Adidas Ultra Boost shoes, Julbo Aero sunglasses, Polar M400 smartwatch, Trigger Point GRID Mini foam rollers Photos: Scott Draper B E LOW: One of the many scenic vistas on the Rodeo Beach Trail Run, which takes place on Dec. 12 in Sausalito, Calif. Photo: Lets Wander Photography

Click here for ways to treat common injuries.

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thank you running You make connecting with nature a messy good time. And with the Brooks PureGrit 4 you’ll get secure grip that’s comfortable and lightweight, making your off-road running adventure the best road. Time to hit the shower. Learn more at brooksrunning.com

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Contributors

Writers, Designers & Photographers J e f f B a n o w e tz

Editorial editor-in-chief Brian Metzler

Mario Fraioli managing editor Adam Elder web editor Ryan Wood associate editor Emily Polachek senior editor

Jeff Banowetz has been writing about running and ART

endurance sports for more than 20 years. He is the Midwest editor at RootsRated.com, where he covers outdoor pursuits in the region. He’s completed two Ironman triathlons, several marathons, and more 5Ks and 10Ks than he’d like to admit. He lives in Naperville, Ill., with his wife and three kids, at least one of whom is now faster than him, with the other

graphic designer

Valerie Brugos

contributing design / photography

James Carney, Scott Draper, Myke Hermsmeyer, Andrea Schwoebel, Aric Van Halen

senior contributing editors

Alan Culpepper, Meb Keflezighi, Jason Devaney, Allison Pattillo contributing writers

Erin Beresini, Adam Chase, Jay Dicharry, Dan England, Matt Hart, Meghan Hicks, Lisa Jhung, Max King, Greg McMillan, Kelly O’Mara, Mary Pilon, Bryon Powell, Sam Winebaum editorial intern Olivia Litsey

C i rc u l at i o n , m ar k et i n g & P r o d u ct i o n

two close behind. He writes the monthly Run It

production manager

section in the back of the magazine.

Meghan McElravy advertising production manager

Gia Hawkins

K e lly O ’ M a ra

director, digital media & strategy

Aaron Hersh audience development manager

Kristy Buescher manager, media marketing

Nicole Christenson

Kelly O’Mara is a freelance writer in Northern California’s Marin County whose work has appeared

d i g i ta l s er v i ce s

online for Outside, Bicycling, espnW and Universal

director, web development

Sports. She recently completed an Annenberg

Scott Kirkowski

fellowship in sports reporting at the University of

director, seo/analytics

web developers

Joseph Hernandez, Miguel A. Estrada web director James Longhini

Southern California, where she also raced for the

Johnny Yeip

school’s triathlon team. Her best athletic moment

director, creative services

ever was crossing the finish line this year as the

Matthew McAlexander

Thomas Phan

second woman at Ironman Wisconsin. She writes

system administrator

video producer

Bruno Breve

Steve Godwin

about that and other stuff at Sunnyrunning.com. Her story “5 Ways to Jump Start Your Training Before 2016,” is on page 42.

associate creative director

A d v ert i s i n g

Jason Johnson 858-768-6824, jjohnson@competitorgroup.com vp, media sales Ian Sinclair 860-673-6830, isinclair@competitorgroup.com vp, media sales Gordon Selkirk 858-768-6767, gselkirk@competitorgroup.com vp, media sales Todd Wienke 414-517-7457, tawienke@competitorgroup.com manager, media sales Jeff McDowell 858-768-6794, jmcdowell@competitorgroup.com manager, media sales Jenn Schuette 858-228-3761, jschuette@competitorgroup.com vp, media sales

M y k e H e rm s m e y e r Myke Hermsmeyer is a Montana-based photographer focused on mountain ultra events. In

February of 2015 he set out on his own to spend a year living on the road and shooting endurance

part n er s h i p

events around the country. Trail running events

d e v e lo p m e n t a n d

that he’s covered include The Rut, The North Face

Trail 100, Red Hot 55K, Mount Marathon and many races around Montana. He frequently contributes to Competitor, including this month on pages 2 and 3.

finance director

Gretchen Alt

Acc o u n t m a n ag e m e n t

Endurance Challenge Series, Western States, Hardrock 100, Lake Sonoma 50, Bear 100, Tahoe Rim

F i n a n ce

managers

director Erin Ream Liz Centeno-Vera, Renee Kerouac

digital ad operations

Carson McGrath a publication of

A nd re a S ch wo e b el

Paul F. Walsh president Josh Furlow

executive chairman

Andrea Schwoebel is a freelance graphic designer

chief administrative officer and

and illustrator from Portland, Ore., who collabo-

chief financial officer

rates with Nemo Design. She specializes in brand

Wendy Godoy

design, which translates naturally to storytelling

chief marketing officer

through illustration. She ran cross country and track collegiately—now she runs on trails, in road races and after her kids. In addition to a lifetime love of running, Andrea enjoys road biking and cheering on her husband in cyclocross and running races. She illustrated “5 Ways to Jump Start Your Training

Keith S. Kendrick senior vice president, events

Tracy Sundlun Molly Quinn senior vice president John Smith

senior vice president

9477 Waples Street, Suite 150, San Diego, CA 92121 • 858-450-6510 For distribution inquiries: 858-768-6493 Digital Issue support: support@zinio.com Distribution management: TGS Media Inc. • tgsmedia.com, 877-847-4621 No part of this issue may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. Competitor is a registered trademark of Competitor Group Inc.

official magazine

Before 2016,” on page 42.

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Compared to native curcumin extract.

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T u r k e y T r ot s

Connect With Us

Thanksgiving means running! Learn all there is to know about the biggest running day of the year at Competitor.com/turkeytrots

Join the conversation

Facebook.com/ competitor. running

Follow us

@runcompetitor

Video

See what we share

See our latest videos, from training tips to shoe reviews and

Top 25 Running Books

Strength Training

We came up with our own list

Stronger bodies make for stronger

of the greatest running books

running. Learn how to make strength

ever written. Check it out at Competitor.com/top25books

training work for you at Competitor.com/strengthtraining

Shoe of the Week We review a new running shoe every week. See the latest at Competitor.com/shoeoftheweek

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@runcompetitor

Photo: Rich Cruse

much more, at Video.competitor.com

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Some watches are made for everything. Forerunner was made for your thing.

Your thing makes a 4:30 a.m. alarm seem normal. Your thing turns your insides into a knot as you wait for the gun to go off. We get it. So we make Forerunner watches with smart technology1 designed for runners. Not watches designed for, well, everybody. Find yours at Garmin.com/forerunner

FORERUNNER 230 | 235 | 630

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Forerunner. For Runners.

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When paired with compatible phone; see Garmin.com/ble

Š 2015 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries

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news s ta r t i n g l i n e s

13

Summer of Speed More long-distance trail records fall. B y A l l i son Patti l lo

While trail racing is booming throughout the U.S.—many of the most well-known races now sell out immediately—some top-tier runners have taken to recording fast feats outside of the racing world. The pursuit of setting records on iconic running trails—both in the U.S. and around the world—has gained fervor in recent years.

photo: Luis Escobar

Click here for more 2015 trail records.

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Known as a “fastest known time” (or FKT) for a particular trail, they require plenty of training, planning, luck and, in some cases, help from support crew. “What makes it unique is that it’s all about pushing yourself against the constraints of the course, not against the competition of a race,” says veteran trail runner and

adventurer Peter Bakwin, who started and maintains the website that serves as the unofficial record-keeper of FKTs around the world (Fastestknowntime.proboards.com). “I think what’s different now is that anyone in the world can easily find out who has been fastest on many of these routes, since it’s all posted on the Internet.”

Appalachian Trail, Georgia to Maine Length: 2,189 miles New FKTs: - 46 days, 8 hours, 7 minutes (overall supported FKT), Scott Jurek, 41, Boulder, Colo. - 54 days, 7 hours, 48 minutes (self-supported FKT), Heather Anderson, 37, Seattle Most people explore the Appalachian Trail by reading books about it and possibly hiking short sections of it during day trips or weekends. Others thru-hike the entire thing over several months during the summer and their journeys become the stuff of legends. But between late May and early July, champion ultrarunner Scott Jurek ran and hiked the entire route, from south to north, three hours faster than former record holder Jennifer Pharr Davis. Three hours over 46 days doesn’t leave much room for error, and Jurek had to contend with injuries, sickness, sleep deprivation and bad weather to make it happen. In the end, he covered about 47 miles a day. Two months later, on Sept. 24, Heather Anderson arrived at Springer Mountain, Ga., 54 days, 7 hours and 48 minutes after she left Mount Katahdin in Maine, setting a new solo, self-supported northto-south record for completing the Appalachian Trail by taking more than four days off of Matt Kirk’s overall self-supported FKT set in 2013, and 26 days off the previous women’s mark set by Liz Thomas in 2011. In 2013, Anderson set the solo record for the Pacific Crest Trail with a time of 60 days, 17 hours and 12 minutes.

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news 14

s ta r t i n g l i n e s

Length: 27.1 miles New FKT: 6 hours, 2 minutes, 35 seconds (women’s FKT), Megan Lizotte, 31, Del Mar, Calif. At 27.1 miles in length, this singletrack, high-alpine loop is only slightly longer than a marathon. But the distance is about the only similarity this burly route over four mountain passes above 12,000 feet in Colorado’s Elk Mountains and the Snowmass Wilderness has to a road marathon. With total climbing (and descending) of more than 7,700 feet, legs and lungs are constantly battered. Yet the sheer beauty is enough to make the pain worth it, especially for the new women’s FKT holder, Megan Lizotte. “I’ve wanted to run this loop for a long time. I grew up hiking around this area,” says Lizotte, 31, who now lives near San Diego. “The hardest part of running the Four Pass Loop is trying to keep on pushing and not to take so many pictures—it’s just so incredibly beautiful.”

Tahoe Rim Trail, California and Nevada Length: 165 miles New FKTs: - 51 hours, 45 minutes (unsupported FKT), Sean Ranney, 37, Sacramento, Calif. - 47 hours, 29 minutes (women’s supported FKT), Krissy Moehl, 37, Bellingham, Wash. In its circumnavigation of Lake Tahoe, the 165-mile singletrack Tahoe Rim Trail winds up and over the peaks and ridges, across high-alpine meadows and through densely wooded forests, with roughly 30,000 feet of elevation gain and loss between altitudes of 6,240 feet to 10,338 feet. This past July, Sean Ranney ran strong on his own for an unsupported FKT of 51 hours, 45 minutes. He beat Mike Tebbutt’s mark, just set in June, by two and a half hours. On Sept. 30, Krissy Moehl, 37, set the new women’s supported record of 47:29, besting the 49:17 set by Amber Monforte in 2014. Moehl was hoping to finish in about 48 hours and managed to break the record even after being stopped in her tracks on the second night by a mother bear and her two cubs hanging out on the trail.

58 Fourteeners, Colorado Length: Approximately 265 miles New FKT: 9 days, 21 hours, 51 minutes (supported FKT), Andrew Hamilton, 40, Denver It’s hard to fathom how physically demanding it is to climb a single 14,000-plus-foot peak unless you’ve done it. Imagine thin air, steep climbs, punishing descents, exposed terrain and wildly unpredictable weather. Then take into account just how punishing it is to make your way up and down one such peak in a day. Between June 29 and July 8 of this year, Andrew Hamilton, a Denver resident and father of four, climbed all 58 fourteeners in Colorado, summiting five to seven peaks daily and covering a cumulative 265 miles with more than 139,000 feet of elevation gain. His extended grind earned the 40-year-old a new FKT, one almost 24 hours faster than the previous record. Hamilton’s crew not only provided food, medical attention and encouragement, they drove him from trailhead to trailhead—of note because in 2003 he completed all of the 14ers by riding his bike between trailheads.

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Wonderland Trail, Washington Length: 93 miles New FKTs: - 18 hours, 52 minutes (overall supported FKT), Gary Robbins, 38, North Vancouver, B.C., Canada - 22 hours, 4 minutes (women’s supported FKT), Jenn Shelton, 31, Durango, Colo. Gary Robbins broke Kyle Skaggs’ seemingly untouchable 2008 time of 20 hours, 53 minutes by more than 2 hours for this 93-mile journey around the base of Mount Rainier in Mount Rainier National Park. A few scouting trips, including a three-day hike on the Wonderland Trail last fall, helped get him comfortable with the route and prepare him for the incessant peaks and valleys. (The daunting profile includes a low point of 2,300 feet and a high point of 6,400 feet.) Robbins considered running the loop in 2013 until the government shutdown closed national parks, and finally got around to doing it this year after not getting into the Hardrock 100 in Colorado. Meanwhile, Jenn Shelton set the women’s FKT mark on the Wonderland Trail on Aug. 31 on somewhat of a whim. She felt strong and, despite some rainy weather, managed to best the previous women’s FKT (Krissy Moehl and Darcy Africa, 2013) by 18 minutes.

John Muir Trail, California Length: 223 miles New FKT: 5 days, 37 minutes (women’s self-supported FKT), Amber Monforte, 37, South Lake Tahoe, Calif. Amber Monforte had been considering a fast run on the John Muir Trail for a while. She put her name in the permit lottery for 2015 and the luck of the draw meant this year was her time to try it. The John Muir Trail FKT route starts at Whitney Portal, summits the 14,505-foot Mount Whitney (the highest peak in the contiguous U.S.) and passes through rugged, remote terrain on the way to the Happy Isles Trailhead in Yosemite National Park. Monforte set the new women’s FKT solo entirely unsupported. She carried everything she needed, including a bear canister with her food. The previous women’s record was 6 days, 11 hours, 35 minutes.

photo: Gina Lucrezi, Brian Metzler, Jason Kedrowski

Four Pass Loop, Colorado

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NEWS 16

S TA R T I N G L I N E S

M O R E FA S T F E AT S O F 2015 BY THE NUMBERS

New U.S. 40-and-older marathon record set by two-time Olympian Deena Kastor, 42, at the Oct. 11 Chicago Marathon.

Consecutive days (and counting) run by Jon Sutherland, 65, of West Hills, Calif., through Oct. 15. (The streak, the longest in U.S. history, dates back to May 26, 1969, and is believed to be the second longest active streak in the world to the 18,563 days of running by England’s Ron Hill since 1964.)

Time of 80-year-old Chicagoan Frank Abramic while finishing his 17th consecutive Chicago Marathon on Oct. 11.

SECONDS IT TOOK 100-YEAR-OLD DON PELLMANN OF SANTA CLARA, CALIF., TO RUN A NEW AGE-GROUP WORLD RECORD IN THE 100 METERS ON SEPT. 21 IN SAN DIEGO.

MARATHON SPLIT RUN BY FOUR-TIME OLYMPIC RUNNER COLLEEN DE REUCK, 51, EN ROUTE TO WINNING THE 50–54 AGE GROUP AT THE 2015 IRONMAN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP IN 10:30:41 ON OCT. 10 IN KAILUA-KONA, HAWAII.

Seconds it took 105-year-old Japanese runner Hidekichi Miyazaki to run a new age-group world record in the 100 meters on Sept. 23 in Kyoto, Japan.

N ew Beer M i l e w o rl d rec o rd s e t by Can ad i an mai l c arri er Co re y G al l ag h er o n O c t. 1 0 at th e U n i versi ty o f M an i to ba i n Cana da .

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m a r k e t w atc h 18

s ta r t i n g l i n e s

W h at h o l i d ay g i f t i d e a s w o u l d you recommend for a runner?

Click here for 10 reasons to shop at a running specialty shop.

Megan DiGregorio, Manager

Kim AuBuchon, Chief Operating Officer

Ron French, Manager

Laurie O’Hanlon, Assistant Manager

Falls Road Running Baltimore “The New Balance Tri-Viz hat is a great gift for those who run in the dark. With the light setting built into the hat, it’s easy to see everything in front of you and for people to see you.”

Big River Running Company St. Louis “The best gifts are things you normally wouldn’t splurge on for yourself and also have that wow-factor. As a runner, I would be thrilled to receive a new GPS watch like the Garmin Forerunner 25 or a great outer layer like the Saucony Nomad Jacket.”

Runner’s Den Phoenix “Fall apparel is a great holiday gift idea. The weather finally cools off here in Phoenix, so it’s the perfect opportunity to check out the new cool-weather apparel arrivals. Also, gift cards. They’re always the correct size and color.”

Super Runners Shop Huntington, N.Y. “The best item to give a runner for the holidays is a headlamp. It’s an easy purchase as it does not need sizing, is not footwear nor body size specific. Being able to see is a profound motivator for any runner who wants to continue running outside during the ‘dark months.’”

Bill Davison, Owner

Cheryl Brand, Manager

Mike Shuman, Owner

Fritz Fitzer, Manager

The Running Center Tampa, Fla. “The best gift we can offer our customers is our time and experience. We do not charge for our gait analysis and want to ensure that each guest is wearing a great-fitting shoe.”

On the Run Houston “The best gift to give a runner for the holidays is a pair of running shoes or a GPS watch. Proper running shoes are necessary, and getting fit at a specialty running store is essential. GPS watches are multifunctional and will help keep your training in check.”

Shu’s Idaho Running Company Boise, Idaho “The Garmin Forerunner 25 makes a great gift for any runner. It’s a great watch for tracking your miles, paces, heart rate and calories with a long-lasting battery. Even non-techy runners would appreciate the options on this watch as well as the price.”

Foot Traffic Portland, Ore. “My go-to holiday gift for runners is a Smartwool beanie. The merino wool is non-scratchy and is perfect for temperature regulation during the ever-shifting weather of fall, winter and spring.”

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Toe To Toe 20

GEAR

Click here to see our fall trail running shoe reviews.

N e w L i g htw e i g ht C u s h i on e d T r a i n e r s A l tra

Nike

Impulse

Free RN Distance

This über-flexible training/racing flat serves up a soft, smooth and surprisingly stable ride. In addition to Altra’s zero-drop geometry, the shoe incorporates three firmer foam pods spread across the midsole/outsole, which, combined with a cantilevered varus wedge built into the midsole and a wide footprint, help offset overpronation. The roomy forefoot also gives toes the ability to splay. The midsole incorporates a more responsive foam Altra calls A-Bound, which creates a springy sensation in every step. (It is lighter, softer and slightly lower than Altra’s Provision 2.0 stability shoe.) Our weartesters liked the asymmetrical lacing pattern for its locked-down fit, as well as the excellent feel for the road this model affords. If you’re conditioned to run in shoes with a low drop or flat profile, this performance-oriented stability shoe might be an ideal race-day tool.

V s

$120 Weights: 7.8 oz. (men’s size 9); 6.6 oz. (women’s size 7) Heel-Toe Offset: 4mm; 20mm (heel), 16mm (forefoot) The amply cushioned Free RN Distance shares similarities to Nike’s erstwhile Free 7.0 and Free Everyday models. It’s a very lightweight shoe with a snug, sock-like fit, amazing flexibility and a smooth, natural ride. Despite the thicker midsole, the Free RN Distance offers unparalleled agility for an everyday trainer. However, there’s only a little bit of inherent structure from the Flywire support system that locks down the foot at the arch/midfoot. Our wear-testers found it best for short- to medium-length runs, long intervals, fartleks, shorter tempo runs and races up to 10K. (One tester raved about it as a shoe for treadmill running.) As with other Free models, we found it took some adjustment time—and considerable lower-leg and foot strength—to be able to run for more than an hour in this shoe. But the extra cushioning allows it to run longer than other Free models.

Photo: John david Becker

$120 Weights: 8.6 oz. (men’s size 9); 7.0 oz. (women’s size 7) Heel-Toe Offset: 0mm; 23mm (heel), 23mm (forefoot)

For more shoe reviews, go to Competitor.com/shoes

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S h o e Ta l k 22

Gear

D o y o u n e e d w at e r p r o o f r u n n i n g s h o e s ?

Click here to read about new rain jackets.

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Here are some pros and cons of waterproof shoes: Pro s • Feet generally stay warm and dry • They allow for uninhibited running in inclement weather conditions

Co n s • Feet can get hot in mild or warm weather • They’re typically not as flexible as traditional models • They often cost $15–$20 more

•Less chance of getting cold feet or even frostbite

• They’re usually slightly heavier than non-waterproof shoes

• They remove excuses for not running in bad weather

• Feet are still vulnerable to getting wet from moisture that enters at the sock

photo: istockphoto.com

Depending on where you live, running from November to April might mean slogging through wet, slushy, snowy or muddy conditions with a chill in the air. Do you need a pair of waterproof running shoes? Ultimately, the answer comes down to the conditions you regularly run in and your personal preference. Waterproof technology from Gore-Tex, eVent and Polartech has improved considerably in recent years, allowing waterproof shoes to be more flexible and breathable than those sold five to 10 years ago. Consider, too, that many water-resistant shoes (which offer more breathability but less weather protection than waterproof models) might suffice.

10/21/15 11:02 AM


© 2015 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Westin and its logo are the trademarks of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates. 

W E S TAY R U N N I N G 24 HOURS SO YO U C AN TO O

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Traveling can throw off your workout routine. That’s why our health club inspired WestinWORKOUT® fitness studios stay open 24/7. With plenty of treadmills in our facilities, you can get your run in while you’re on the road. Learn more at westin.com/movewell

10/15/15 10:30 AM


PRO KIT 24

GEAR

TYLER MCCANDLESS Tyler McCandless, 29, has lowered his marathon PR three times since 2011 while training under former marathon world record-holder Steve Jones in Boulder, Colo. His personal best of 2:15:26 should make him a contender at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon in February. Not bad for a guy who holds three degrees from Penn State University, including a Ph.D. in meteorology. [1] OAKLEY FLAK JACKET SUNGLASSES, $150 “Not only do they look cool, it feels great to represent a product that a good friend of mine works on.” [2] NEWTON RUNNING SUGOI PACE SHIRT, $45 “A great performance-fit running T-shirt with exceptional comfort and maximum breathability.” [3] NIKE PENN STATE DRIFIT RUNNING HAT, $28 “I like wearing a hat backward when I’m working out. This was part of our team gear when I was in college in 2008, and I have a lot of memories and miles with this hat.”

[4] NEWTON RUNNING SUGOI RSR SPLIT SHORT, $50 “One day while running someone drove by and yelled out, ‘Hey naked man!’ I like short shorts that elicit that response from passersby and make you feel free.” [5] NEWTON BLACK LOW-CUT SOCKS, $10 “I like classic low-cut black socks that are lightweight and thin. I’ve been wearing the same sock style for nearly three years and never get blisters.” [6] NEWTON GRAVITY V, $175 “The updated Gravity is the perfect everyday trainer for me. It’s light enough to feel good while turning an easy run into a tempo session.”

Click here to read more about Boulder, Colo.

KAUAI COFFEE VANILLA MACADAMIA NUT, $11 (10 OZ.) “The rich flavor of this vanilla mac nut coffee is outrageous. I don’t feel normal if I haven’t started my day without having a cup of Kauai Coffee first.” BRU OBITUS AMERICAN BROWN ALE, $8 (22 OZ.) “Training is hard. Drinking beer is easy. This one has a great nutty flavor, has 7.6 percent alcohol by volume and is easy to enjoy after a hard training day.”

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TEXT BY BRIAN METZLER; PHOTO BY ARIC VAN HALEN

RED ACE ORGANICS BEET JUICE, $4 (2 OZ.) “There’s been very few real nutritional breakthroughs in running recently, but I’m a firm believer in both the research and the experience of running after drinking beet juice.”

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66 OF THE BEST GIFT IDEAS FOR RUNNERS By the Editors Photography by Scott Draper

This holiday season, use your wish list to gear up for 2016 with the coolest running items around. This is all of our must-have equipment for training, racing, traveling, rehabbing and relaxing in the new year.

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2 8 - H O L I D AY GE A R GUIDE

FOR HIM: PERFORMANCE GEAR Gone are the days of split shorts and singlets. Instead, we now have technical gear that’s functional, comfortable and fashionforward. Any runner with these six items in their gear chest is sure to look good and feel good on—or after—the run.

1 Brooks Dash Half-Zip, $75 2 Lululemon Metal Vent Tech Short Sleeve Shirt, $64 3 2XU Men’s Pace Compression Short, $80 4 CEP Dynamic+ Short Socks, $23 5 Montrail Molokai II Sandals, $60 6 Pearl Izumi Thermal Conductive Gloves, $30

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5 Click here for 17 cool trucker hats for runners.

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FOR HIM: LIFESTYLE GEAR Performance gear is great when you’re out on the run. But split shorts and running caps only go so far when you’re meeting for coffee or grabbing a beer post-run. Here are six items that will remind the world you’re a runner and fitness is cool.

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1 Boom Running BR72 Zip Hoodie, $44 2 Zoot Run 101 8” Short 2.0, $50 3 Ultimate Direction Trucker Hat, $20 4 Stance Fusion Run Cadence Crew Socks, $18 5 New Balance Fresh Foam Zante “Sweatshirt” Lifestyle Shoes, $120 6 Nike Unrest Sunglasses, $79

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3 0 - H O L I D AY GE A R GUIDE

FOR HER: PERFORMANCE GEAR

Whether she’s your wife, daughter, mother, girlfriend, sister or friend, she’ll appreciate a new gear upgrade that’ll keep her looking stylish yet fast on the roads. The latest fall/winter updates focus on trapping heat without feeling bulky, and wicking sweat—for sleek, lightweight comfort throughout the holiday months.

1 Oiselle Bolt Seamless Long Sleeve, $66 2 Saucony Breeze Vest, $75 3 Prana Ergo Legging, $89 4 Adidas Ultra Boost Wool, $180 5 Under Armour Cozy Headband, $18 6 The North Face ETip Glove, $45

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Click here to see gear that raises money for breast cancer research.

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FOR HER: LIFESTYLE GEAR

Your runner gal will also appreciate lounging in post-run apparel and accessories. Trade a performance shirt for a soft casual cotton T-shirt, or running shoes for vintage-styled everyday sneakers. Or pair the two gifts for a complete sweat-to-street look.

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1 Athleta Upside Jacket, $138 2 Territory Run Co. Run Wild Run Free T-shirt, $29 3 CALIA Contour Waist Sweatpants, $68 4 Buff Microfiber Cap, $22 5 Brooks Vanguard Heritage, $85 6 “Believe Training Journal,” $19

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3 2 - H O L I D AY GE A R GUIDE Click here to read about the shoes Ironman triathletes wear.

2

1

RACE GEAR: 5K–MARATHON When you step to the starting line on race day you want to look fast, feel fast and run fast. We’ve got you covered from head-to-toe with everything you need to rock your next race in style. These essential items will serve you well, regardless of your race distance or pace.

1 Julbo Aero Sunglasses, $190 2 Garmin Forerunner 225, $300 3 Patagonia Strider Pro 5” Short, $59 4 Nike Dri-Fit Knit Tank, $70 5 Saucony Kinvara 6, $100 6 Swiftwick Aspire 2 Socks, $15

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1 Ultimate Direction Scott Jurek Ultra Vest 2.0, $130

TRAIL RUNNING GEAR

2 Smartwool PhD Run Ultra Light Mid Crew Socks, $19

Trail running means different things to different runners, but the underlying spirit is about getting away from where you normally run and exploring what’s beyond. These trail essentials will keep you safe, hydrated and inspired out in the wild.

3 Princeton Tec Sync Headlamp, $30 4 Lifestraw Personal Water Filter, $20 5 RinseKit Pressurized Portable Shower, $90 6 “Trailhead: The Dirt on All Things Trail Running,” $19

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Click here to read a trail runner’s guide for the Grand Canyon.

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3 4 - H O L I D AY GE A R GUIDE

2

1

CROSS-TRAINING GEAR

Work on your running even when you’re not running. But don’t bother with a gym membership—here’s an array of cool items for the home that can boost strength, speed and agility, as well as help prevent injury.

1 Pure Fitness Multipurpose Workout Bar, $30 2 SPRI Kettlebells, $23–$126 3 TRX Home Suspension Training Kit, $200 4 RPM Speed 2.0 Jump Rope, $50 5 Gaiam Total Body Balance Ball Kit, $22 6 Stamina X Adjustable Height Plyometric Box, $250

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TRAVEL GEAR

2 Brooks Dash Arm Warmers, $25

Destination races demand packing just the right gear. Luckily there are some handy items that fit in the smallest luggage that will keep you comfortable before or on race day, alleviate your pain afterward, and also get you to the start line in style.

3 SPI Belt with Waterproof LOKSAK, $20 (Belt), $13 (LOKSAK) 4 The Stick Travel Stick, $28 5 Ogio X Train 2 Backpack, $90 6 Trigger Point GRID Mini Foam Roller, $25

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3 6 - H O L I D AY GE A R GUIDE

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WEARABLE TECH

The modern running boom is all about measuring and analyzing your body’s every move. Here are six of the latestand-greatest technological training aids.

3

1 Soleus One, $80 2 Polar M400, $180; $230 With HR Strap Click here for an introduction to Strava

3 Mio Alpha2, $199 4 GoPro Hero 4 Session, $400 5 TomTom Runner Cardio, $230 6 Fitbit ChargeHR, $150

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Click here to read how music can help your running.

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1 Nathan SonicGrip, $18

MUSIC

2 Sony Smart B-Trainer, $249

Running with music is a personal thing. Some runners never do it, some runners always do it. If you do it, you’ve gotta have gear that doesn’t get in the way or complicate the way you run. These six items will keep you in harmony with the soundtrack of your run.

3 Yurbuds Inspire 200 Earphones, $30 4 Jabra Sport Coach Wireless Earbuds, $150 5 JayBird X2 Wireless Buds, $180 6 Apple iPod Shuffle, $49

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3 8 - H O L I D AY GE A R GUIDE

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RECOVERY GEAR The real gains of training happen in recovery. Make sure yours is as beneficial as it can be. From compression to nutrition to selfmassage, these ideas will have you feeling great even after the hardest of workouts.

1 Moji Foot PRO Massager, $39 2 CEP Progressive + Ultralight Compression Calf Sleeves, $40 3 2XU Hyoptik Compression Socks, $55 4 Skratch Labs Rescue Hydration Mix, $15 (8-pack) 5 RAD Helix Recovery Roller, $49 6 RecoFit Compression Tights, $145

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VARIDESK® is an affordable way to convert your current desk into a height-adjustable desk, so you can switch easily between sitting and standing. It ships fully assembled and ready-to-use, so you’re up and working in minutes. Models start at just $175. Order online or call 800-933-4798.

US Patent #8671853 | US & Foreign Patents Pending. ©2015 VARIDESK®. All Rights Reserved.

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10/15/15 10:39 AM


GET OUT HERE IN NIKE FLASH PACK

The Nike Flash running shoes and Nike Aeroloft Flash Vest feature reflective materials that deliver visibility in low light, letting you shine bright when you need to. The shoes’ water-resistant materials help keep you dry, and the new vest blends lightweight, lofted insulation and perforated ventilation to keep runners comfortable. So when it gets dark, cold, and nasty, get out in Nike Flash.

B R I A N N E THEISEN-EATON: W O R LD C H AM P IO N SH IP S SILVE R M E D AL IS T, HE PTAT HL ON

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Ways to Jump-Start Your Training Before 2016

By Kelly O’Mara Illustrations by Andrea Schwoebel

’Tis the season for dreaming big. As winter fast approaches, here’s how to make plans for fast and healthy running next year.

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hether your 2015 races went well or not, it’s time to start thinking ahead to new objectives. But before you become too giddy about how fast you’re going to run in 2016, implement some of these strategies to avoid common mistakes, and jump-start your training in the new year.

Click here for a story about simplifying your training.

Review your year, and set new (and appropriate) goals Before you set goals for the year ahead, make sure you’re doing it right. “They need to look into the past before they create this plan for the future,” says Bobby McGee, a longtime running coach and performance adviser for USA Triathlon. To review your year, you have to first know what you did. That’s why the best athletes keep logs, whether it’s an old-fashioned journal or one of the many apps available for mobile devices.

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Look over your past year’s log and ask yourself, “Did I do the things to set myself up for success?” says Steve Magness, author of “The Science of Running.” Be brutally honest with your assessments. Where did you fall short? Where did you excel? Did you achieve what you set out to? Only after answering those questions should you start setting “challenging but realistic” goals, explains Trent Stellingwerff, head of innovation and research for the Canadian Sport Institute.

Stellingwerff makes his athletes create two sets of goals: the ones they could achieve if all the stars align, and then the realistic ones that they hit about 80 percent of the time. He also has them focus on process goals, not results. If you set a goal to win a certain race, but an Olympian shows up, then you may not meet your goal despite doing everything right. Instead, focus on the steps you can take and what you can control. These are what he calls SMART goals: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely.

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Take a break-but not for too long A good time to do this evaluating is when you’re not actually training. Take a two- to four-week break of rest and unstructured active recovery after your last race of the year. If that coincides with the holidays, all the better. “Eat, drink and be merry,” says Malindi Elmore, an Olympian in the 1500 meters for Canada and coach with the Run SMART Project. Enjoy your break and fit in whatever exercise you can, but set a time to get back to a real schedule again. And make sure that deadline isn’t too far away. “The first mistake agegroup athletes make

Take “easy” and “hard” to heart When we first get back into training, there’s a tendency to go too hard and do too much out of the gate. That can lead to burnout or injury, especially during the winter, when stress fractures are common. “Maybe make the first few sessions 25 to 50 percent lighter than what your brain thinks you can do,” Stellingwerff suggests. Most of your base training should be fairly easy, says McGee. He has his athletes do their base training at 60 percent of their heart rate reserve. (Calculate this by subtracting your resting heart

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is they start too late,” McGee says. If you want to run an early-spring marathon, then January 1 is too late to begin base training. Depending on the timing of your last race, your break might end well before the holidays and you might be back to training by early November. Many of McGee’s athletes finish their season in September and, after their break, he has them do eight to 14 weeks of base training. That amount can vary depending on the athlete’s experience level, but four to six weeks is a minimum, he contends. To fit all that in, you may need to get going soon.

Click here to read about 7 habits of successful runners.

rate from your max heart rate, multiplying by 60 percent, and then re-adding your resting heart rate.) That tends to be a much slower pace than people expect. But even if you have to walk or jog to keep your heart rate low, it’s important to go easy on your easy days so you can go truly hard on your hard days. People try to run too hard on their easy days, says Elmore, which means they aren’t rested enough for their hard workouts. A speed workout of 10 x 1 minute at an allout effort with a 60-second rest between each interval should be very, very hard— not kind of hard.

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Mix it up Running easy miles all the time can get boring, though, so don’t be afraid to mix it up. “During that time o f y e a r, y o u ’ r e almost grinding it out,” Magness says. “Introduce something new that hasn’t been there the last few months.” He suggests hill sprints, weightlifting, or maybe even yoga or snowshoeing. Magness often has his athletes do workouts where they need to run 25 minutes at tempo pace, but can fit it in however they want, whether that’s broken up into 5 x 5 minutes, or even 10 minutes and 5 x 3 minutes.

Find new motivation It’s important to mix things up over the winter and to set short-term process goals, but it also helps if you find a way to make it fun. For elite athletes, motivation typically isn’t as big of a problem. Their secret to success isn’t just an innate drive, though; they create a daily training environment that works for them, Stellingwerff says. You can do that too by finding friends to work out with, joining a group to make yourself accountable, hiring a coach, or just changing your schedule. In the winter, when it’s dark and cold outside, Stellingwerff reschedules his workday so

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he can fit in exercise while the sun’s out—even if that means doing it with co-workers.

When we try something new, we work a different part of our fitness and mind. Elmore started swimming a few years ago and, even though she’s running less mileage, she’s still able to hit similar times and has become a better athlete overall. The off-season is also a good time to mix in dynamic strength work with exercises like squats, step-ups, and lunges. That helps strengthen the muscles, tendons, and connective tissue in the lower legs so that when you’re ready to run long you don’t get hurt, McGee says.

Click here to read about 3 things every runner should do.

Get your spouse or significant other to really buy into your goals, Elmore says, then it can be something you’re working at together. She and her husband, who both compete in triathlons now, will go to the pool with their 1-year-old. One person swims with the baby and one swims laps, then they switch. Most importantly, you need to have the right mindset to consistently log the miles. Remember that being able to run is something you like to do. Gratitude can be fuel. “It’s a choice, not a sacrifice,” McGee says.

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RU S A M M Y WA N JI N JE N N Y S IM P S O GREG LEMOND S IR I L IN D L E Y RT W IL L IE S T E WA

S S E N H G U O T Great athletic performances spring from the mind, not the body.

CADEL EVANS

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L L IV A N COHEN AND SU -F R A S E R PA U L A N E W B Y

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COACH CULPEPPER TRAINING

47

D O N ’ T F I G H T T H E W E AT H E R , D E A L W I T H I T B Y A L A N C U L PEPPER

Click here for more Coach Culpepper training wisdom.

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F I G H T I N G I T:

FIG HTIN G IT:

FIG HTIN G IT:

You have planned a long run with a

You have a tempo run planned that you nor-

You wake up on a morning when you

training partner on a standard loop in

mally run at lunchtime, but the weather is much

have a speed workout planned to find

which you know the mile markers. But

warmer than expected. You head out in the heat

that a few inches of snow have fallen

when the time comes to do the run, you

of the day and wind up cooked from your efforts

overnight. You forge ahead with the

find that the wind is blowing at 25 mph

as dehydration and fatigue take their toll over

workout on your normal loop and find

and gusting even harder. Instead of

the next several days.

yourself frustrated by the slow pace due

changing your plans, you forge ahead

to the slippery ground. Not to mention

and get battered by the wind for two

DE A L IN G WITH IT:

putting yourself at greater risk of injury

hours, which crushes your confidence.

Instead of pushing on through the heat, you

from the unstable footing.

consider pushing your workout back a day or D EA LI N G W I T H I T:

shifting the session until later that afternoon,

DE A L IN G WITH IT:

Instead of starting a long run in mis-

when it is cooler. You get the benefits of running

You decide to either simulate the work-

erably windy conditions, you and your

at a sustained tempo pace without the lingering

out on an indoor track or on a treadmill,

training partner delay the run for a few

negative effects brought on by the heat.

or bump the workout to the next day.

hours to see if conditions improve. This doesn’t mean you are weak or lack toughness; it means you’re smart and want to get the benefits of the long run without the detrimental side effects.

Two-time U.S. Olympian Alan Culpepper won national titles from the 5K to the marathon. His first book, “Run Like a Champion,” is available at VeloPress.com.

PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

It’s often said that running in harsh weather conditions makes you tougher. But does it? There are times to break from your routine and times to push onward. If unusual circumstances demand compromise, be creative with your training. By adapting your workouts with small adjustments or schedule changes, you can still maximize your training efforts, avoid injuries and maintain your long-term psychological composure.

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ST R E N GT H 48

TRAINING

RENEGADE ROWS This exercise engages your entire core. B Y D U N CA N L A R K I N

Click here for 4 more great strength exercises.

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H O W TO DO IT: • Place a set of dumbbells on the ground in front of you and get into a plank position, gripping the weights. • Establish a stable plank position while drawing your belly button in and pulling your shoulder blades down and back. • Slightly move your body weight to one side and again find a stable position.

• Starting with the right side, pull the weight toward your chest. Keep your core tight and back straight. “Move very slowly with this exercise to promote optimal stabilization at all times,” North suggests. Also make sure that you draw your shoulder blades down and back to prevent rotator cuff strain.

• Slowly lower weight back to the ground and then repeat the exercise on the left side. North cautions not to let your lower back sag. “Even a slight pike is better than a sag in this position,” she says. “Aim for an unmovable body. The only things that should be moving are your arms.”

Perform two sets of eight repetitions on each side at first. Progress to three sets of 15 reps as you gain strength and coordination.

PHOTO: JAMES CARNEY

“The renegade row is an amazing functional exercise that requires stabilization of the core,” says Dr. Heather North of Red Hammer Rehab in Louisville, Colo. “It recruits multiple muscle groups the way an athlete would in the real world, and not just isolating one muscle at a time.”

10/21/15 11:39 AM


GET LEAN, GET FASTER THE FASTEST ATHLETES ARE THE LEANEST

RACING WEIGHT 2nd Edition

HOW TO GET LEAN FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE

6-STEP PLAN FOR ENDURANCE ATHLETES

MATT FITZGERALD

Lean athletes waste less energy, dissipate heat faster, and even gain more fitness from every workout. But dieting is dangerous for athletes. You need Racing Weight, the proven weight-management program for runners, cyclists, and triathletes. The new edition of Racing Weight guides you through six simple steps to get leaner and faster.

RACING WEIGHT is available in bookstores; bike, tri, and running shops; and online. See a preview at velopress.com/lean. Retailers, learn how to order at velopress.com/shops.

G E T FA S T E R W I T H RACING WEIGHT. Triathlete_QV.indd 1

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PREHAB 50

TRAINING

ROLL RIGHT Use this sequence to keep your IT band, hamstrings and quads happy. B Y JA SON D EVA N EY

Click here to read about the benefits of foam rolling.

Click here for exercises to treat IT Band Syndrome.

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H O W TO D O I T: I T B A N D:

HA M STRIN G S:

Place the outside of your thigh on the foam roller, using your arms and the other leg for support. “Roll up and down the side of your leg from your hip to your knee, but do not go up too far and roll over your hip bone,” Hantavis says. Roll for 2 minutes before switching sides.

Q UA DS:

Sit on the roller and, using your arms for balance behind you, work the roller up and down from the base of your butt to the back of the knees. Spend 2 minutes rolling on each leg.

Get on your stomach and place your thighs atop the roller, supporting your upper body with the elbows. “Use your arms to pull and push your body, moving the roller from your upper thighs down toward the knees,” Hantavis says. “Be careful not to roll over your kneecaps.”

PHOTO: JAMES CARNEY

“Most runners who deal with IT band syndrome and tight leg muscles typically also have hip weakness, specifically in their glutes,” says Jason Hantavis, MSPT, CSCS, OCS. “Complementing foam rolling with hip abduction and glute-strengthening exercises will assist in rehabilitating an injury, or preventing one in the future.”

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Defining your

FOCUS THIS WEEK'S

DATE

Sometimes what you want is glaringly obvious. You are determined to run the Boston Marathon and you know exactly what splits you need to run in order to get that qualifier. Other times you might feel more ambivalent about what you want. The desire is still there, but it might be time to turn up the volume. Identifying what you truly want is the first step toward a more inspired way of living.

Obstacles:

MON

18

Fuel Persistence with Purpose

WISH believe imagine visualize aspire feel experience conceive

Meaningful goals act as a catalyst, Buddha increasing energy, improving decision making, and strengthening commitment. Most adventures MILEAGE / will include RATING detours or setbacks, so if you’re not truly enthusiastic about your goals, it’s easy to become dejected, lack fortitude, and give up. Your sense of purpose is what keeps you on track. It gives you the persistence to grind, stretch, fall down, stand up, overcome, improve habits, and make better choices.

The Journey Is the Reward The media would have us believe that the outcome determines success. However, the leading sports psychologists, authors, and spiritual gurus

fantasize

express

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agree that it’s more beneficial to focus on the process than on the outcome. When you embrace each step along the way, regardless of the final outcome, you win. While I did make it to the Olympics, in my heart and soul I feel my true success was having lived the athlete’s life. I was able to be a fully committed athlete in the sport I loved, and the lifestyle of traveling, training, and racing will stay with me forever, as will the friends. RMD

aim

TUES

are excited about the possibilities that await you, it results in enthusiasm, motivation, and drive. This is why setting goals is so useful. Are you looking for increased motivation to train? Sign up for some races that excite you, or set some goal times that inspire you. Keep aiming to close the gap. Keep improving. Keep changing. Keep growing. And if you arrive at your goal, aim higher, farther, faster. You’ll reach beyond what you ever thought possible.

desire

powerful creative My Olympic dream began when I was “Yourthe worst enemy cannotintelligence harm you asofmuch as your own thoughts, your feelings and intuition tono guide a child, and it guided my life for almost unguarded. But once mastered, oneyou. can help you as much.” An architect doesn’t begin building 20 years. However, it was the yearly, a skyscraper by thinking about square monthly, weekly, and daily goal-setting footage, electrical wiring, and a that really navigated MILEAGE / my route to the RATING DATE WORKOUT complete list of materials; she starts by Olympics. It was truly an adventure, and along the way I learned some hard FRI envisioning what the finished product will look like, how it will feel inside, and lessons about actualizing my dreams. how it will be used. Once she has a clear I’ve coupled my insights with the latest vision of the final product, she then psychology research to help you set, makes a plan to build it. Give yourself stick to, and accomplish your goals. the freedom to dream without regard for Dare to Dream what is or isn’t possible—there will be There are two sides of the brain SAT time later to sort out the details. competing for attention: the rational Close the Gap mind and the creative mind. Both are useful, but the rational mind often The space between where you now takes over, limiting your horizon. When stand and where you want to be can imagining the future, you must allow create a great force of energy. When you

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FORM DRILL 52

TRAINING

BOUNDING This drill will add explosiveness to your stride. B Y M A R I O FR A I OL I

WH Y: Bounding helps strengthen all

HO W: Exaggerating the running stride, launch yourself forward

the muscles in your lower legs while also improving power and stability.

off your left leg, driving your right knee up to waist level while keeping your back (left) leg straight. Aim for one second of “hang time” before landing softly on the ball of your right foot. When your foot hits the ground, launch yourself forward again in the same manner. The arm opposite your lead leg should swing forward for added momentum. Do two 30-meter reps, progressing to 50-meter reps as you build strength and coordination. For added variety and a greater challenge, do this drill on a gradual incline.

WHEN: Bounding is a great early- season

drill and should be included as part of a comprehensive drill routine following one to two easy runs a week.

CM1115_T_FORM.indd 52

PHOTO: JAMES CARNEY

Click here for essential form drills for runners.

10/21/15 11:49 AM


November is

NATIONALR UNNING SAFETY MONTH

Your local running shop is ready to help you run safe. Visit yours today and See the Light. www.laceuplocal.com Presented by:

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WORKOUT OF THE MONTH 54

TRAINING

C O O R D I N AT I O N FA R T L E K B Y M A R I O FR A I OL I

WHAT: A basic fartlek session consisting of 10

to 15 30-second pickups run slightly faster than your 5K pace with a 2:30 recovery jog between repeats. WHY: This is a great workout to incorporate in

the first few weeks of base training when you’re building your mileage back up and reintroducing some faster running into your weekly routine. The short bursts help improve neuromuscular coordination, explosiveness and basic speed to help you get ready for longer, more intense workouts later in the training cycle.

HO W: Warm up with 15 minutes of easy jogging

before beginning your 30-second pickups. The focus here should be on running fast and relaxed with quick turnover and getting a lot of energy return from the ground. This workout can be done anywhere, but for this last reason it’s best to do it on a firm, trustworthy surface, such as a track, flat road or firm trail. After your final pickup, cool down with 15 minutes of easy jogging. This entire workout should take between 60 and 75 minutes. Do this workout once a week during the first four to six weeks of base phase training, starting at 10 pickups and progressing to 15.

PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

Click here to read about more great workouts.

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TRAINING PLAN 56

TRAINING

6-WEEK BASE BUILDING PLAN The winter months are a great time to back off racing and lay a solid foundation for the spring season ahead. Use this six-week training schedule to safely rebuild your mileage and reintroduce some intensity after a well-deserved break.

Click here to learn why your long runs shouldn’t be slow.

B Y M A R I O FR A I OL I

WEEK

M ON DAY

TUES DAY

WE D NESDAY

1

EASY RUN: 30–35 MINUTES + 4 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

STRENGTH TRAINING: SEE COMPETITOR.COM/ STRENGTHCIRCUIT

EASY RUN: 35–45 MINUTES

2

EASY RUN: 30–35 MINUTES + 5 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

STRENGTH TRAINING: SEE COMPETITOR.COM/ STRENGTHCIRCUIT

HILL REPEATS: 8–10 X 20-SECOND HILL REPEATS AT HARD EFFORT W/ 60 SECONDS RECOVERY BETWEEN REPS (45 MINUTES TOTAL)

3

EASY RUN: 35–45 MINUTES + 6 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

STRENGTH TRAINING: SEE COMPETITOR.COM/ STRENGTHCIRCUIT

T HUR SDAY

FRI DAY

SAT URDAY

S U NDAY

REST

EASY RUN: 30–35 MINUTES + 4 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

PROGRESSION RUN: 60 MINUTES W/ FINAL 15 MINUTES AT MARATHON PACE

EASY RUN: 35–45 MINUTES

REST

TEMPO RUN: 45 MINUTES W/ MIDDLE 15 MINUTES AT HALF MARATHON PACE

EASY RUN: 65–70 MINUTES

FARTLEK: 8 X 1:30 HARD/1:30 EASY (50 MINUTES TOTAL)

EASY RUN: 40–50 MINUTES

REST

EASY RUN: 60 MINUTES + 6 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

PROGRESSION RUN: 75 MINUTES W/ FINAL 20 MINUTES AT MARATHON PACE

REST

EASY RUN: 60 MINUTES + 6 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

LONG RUN: 80 MINUTES WITH 6–8 X 2:00 HARD/2:00 EASY MID-RUN

LONG RUN: 85 MINUTES AT EASY TO MODERATE EFFORT + 6 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

LONG RUN: 90 MINUTES W/ FINAL 20–30 MINUTES AT MARATHON PACE

COORDINATION FARTLEK: 40–50 MINUTES *SEE PAGE 54 FOR INSTRUCTIONS

4

EASY RUN: 35–45 MINUTES + 7 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

STRENGTH TRAINING: SEE COMPETITOR.COM/ STRENGTHCIRCUIT

EASY RUN: 40–50 MINUTES

HILL REPEATS: 10 X 30-SECOND HILL REPEATS AT HARD EFFORT W/ 90 SECONDS RECOVERY BETWEEN REPS (50 MINUTES TOTAL)

5

EASY RUN: 35–45 MINUTES + 8 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

STRENGTH TRAINING: SEE COMPETITOR.COM/ STRENGTHCIRCUIT

EASY RUN: 45–55 MINUTES

TEMPO RUN: 60 MINUTES W/ MIDDLE 20 MINUTES AT HALF MARATHON PACE

REST

EASY RUN: 45 MINUTES

6

EASY RUN: 35–45 MINUTES + 8 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

STRENGTH TRAINING: SEE COMPETITOR.COM/ STRENGTHCIRCUIT

FARTLEK: 5 X 3:00 HARD/3:00 EASY (60 MINUTES TOTAL)

EASY RUN: 60 MINUTES

REST

EASY RUN: 45 MINUTES + 6 X 20-SECOND STRIDES

CM1115_T_PLAN.indd 56

10/21/15 11:52 AM


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Less Searching, More Running. Our free e-newsletter, The Run Down, delivers the latest on everything running straight to your inbox!

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RUN IT 60

COMMUNITY

WHERE AND WHEN TO RACE You can find an event pretty much anywhere on the busiest race day on the calendar— Thanksgiving. Yes, turkey trots are everywhere, as people enjoy burning a few calories before hunkering down for a feast. We offer nine of our favorites here, but you can find one close to you at Competitor.com/calendar. Happy racing ... and eating! B Y J EFF B A N OW ETZ

PHOTO: COURTESY OF MILE HIGH UNITED WAY TURKEY TROT

For a complete race calendar, go to Competitor.com/calendar

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Click here for great places to run throughout the U.S.

10/21/15 11:57 AM


RUN IT community

61

5K to 15K Turkey Trots

Dana Point Turkey Trot Nov. 26; Dana Point, Calif.

Mile High United Way Turkey Trot Nov. 26; Denver

Manchester Road Race Nov. 26; Manchester, Conn.

This 38th annual event is a lot more than your traditional neighborhood turkey trot, routinely drawing more than 11,000 runners. The event features a health and wellness expo the day before, then a 10K, 5K, 5K Masters and kids’ run on Thanksgiving Day. There’s even a costume contest for those who want to run as a turkey.

More than 10,000 people make this 4-mile race, starting at South High School and finishing in Washington Park, a part of their holiday festivities. All funds raised go toward supporting programs for childhood literacy and other local United Way programs. The finishers’ village includes plenty of giveaways and a beer garden for adults.

Not very many races date back to 1927, but the Manchester Road Race has been helping runners celebrate Thanksgiving for 88 years. It’s now the largest race in Connecticut, attracting more than 15,000 runners. The 4.748-mile course is a big loop with a climb in the middle and a downhill finish, attracting everyone from Olympic-level athletes to families who make it an annual tradition.

Photo: Courtesy of Dana Point Turkey Trot

Dana Point Turkey Trot

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community

5K to 15K Turkey Trots

New Orleans Athletic Club Turkey Day Race Nov. 26; New Orleans

Feaster Five Thanksgiving Road Race Nov. 26; Andover, Mass.

Naperville Noon Lions Turkey Trot Nov. 26; Naperville, Ill.

Any race that manages to last a double-digit number of years deserves respect, but when you get to triple digits, that’s an institution. The 108th annual Turkey Day Race continues to draw runners to the 5-mile run and half mile youth race in City Park to raise money for Spina Bifida of Greater New Orleans.

You won’t end up saving many calories at the 27th annual Feaster Five, which serves up apple pie to all finishers after the race. The 10,000 participants in this event run either the 5-mile or 5K run, which both feature scenic courses through Andover. The race hosts a free walk-to-5K training program to get anyone up and running by Thanksgiving.

The 18th annual event in this western Chicago suburb has grown to be the biggest turkey trot in the state, with 7,500 participants every year. The neighborhood course starts and finishes at Naperville Central High School and attracts a range of runners, walkers and costumed participants. Spoil your appetite with the post-race pancake breakfast.

Photo: Bob LUssier

Feaster Five Road Race

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RUN IT community

63

5 K t o 1 5 K T u r k e y T r o ts

Silicon Valley Turkey Trot Nov. 26; San Jose, Calif.

Arlington Turkey Trot Nov. 26; Arlington, Texas

Turkey Trot and Paddle Nov. 26; Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

This is one of the largest turkey trot races in the country, offering something for everyone. It features an elite 5K invitational with a $25,000 prize purse for the fastest runners, as well as a 5K and 10K run/walk for those looking to burn Thanksgiving calories. An additional costume contest and plenty of kids’ races make this a family-friendly event in downtown San Jose.

This sixth annual event takes full advantage of Arlington’s big-time sports amenities with a 5K out-and-back course that runs past both the Texas Rangers and Dallas Cowboys home stadiums. A 1-mile fun run is also available, and the event benefits The Shoe Bank, which provides more than 25,000 pairs of shoes each year to those in need.

You can celebrate Thanksgiving with this scenic 5K that takes place on Fort Lauderdale’s A1A Boulevard. Or bring your stand-up paddleboard and take to the water for a 2-mile course just off Fort Lauderdale Beach. Walkers are welcome, and a kids’ dash on the beach will be sure to draw smiles.

Photo: Courtesy of AppLied Materials Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley Turkey Trot

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RUN IT 64

community

M a r at h o n s / H a l f M a r at h o n s

Rock ‘n’ Roll San Antonio Dec. 6; San Antonio

Tucson Marathon Dec. 6; Tucson, Ariz.

Dallas Marathon Dec. 12; Dallas

This marathon, half marathon, 10K and 5K starts and finishes at the Alamodome. You’ll get a scenic tour of this historic city—including a run past the actual Alamo—and live music along the course. After the race, enjoy the beer garden while watching the headlining concert and then dine at a restaurant along the famous San Antonio River Walk.

This popular Boston-qualifier features a downhill, point-to-point course that features an overall loss of 2,200 feet. The race begins in the historic old west town of Oracle and travels through the scenic desert along the Santa Catalina mountain range. Temperatures in the high 30s at the start and high 60s at the end give you every chance to nail that PR or BQ for 2017.

This marathon and half marathon event offers a scenic tour of downtown Dallas, and will be celebrating its 45th running this year. Since 1997 the race has been raising money for the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, donating more than $3.75 million. The marathon course is relatively flat, and the post-race party features beer, food trucks and live music.

Photo: Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon SEries

Rock ‘n’ Roll San Antonio Marathon

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community

65

M a r at h o n s / H a l f M a r at h o n s

Kiawah Island Marathon Dec. 13; Kiawah Island, S.C.

Clearwater Distance Classic Jan. 17; Clearwater, Fla.

Maui Oceanfront Marathon Jan. 17; Maui, Hawaii

If you’re looking for a place to relax after a marathon, you don’t have to go far at the Kiawah Resort, which has been hosting this marathon just south of Charleston for 38 years. The island, which is known for its golf courses and natural settings, features a route that highlights the maritime forests, marshes and ocean views.

Featuring a 50K, marathon, half marathon and 5K, this race takes full advantage of the beautiful Clearwater beaches on the Gulf Coast. The race begins just before sunup, resulting in a beautiful view of the sunrise over Clearwater Bay during the race. Enjoy fresh Florida oranges before the start and a mostly flat and fast course.

If you’re looking for a smaller marathon to enjoy during a vacation, it’s hard to think of a better place than Maui. The Maui Oceanfront Marathon is a community event that raises money for local school teams and clubs, with a point-to-point course that offers plenty of jaw-dropping views of both the ocean and mountains.

Kiawah Island Marathon

Photo: Courtesy of Kiawah ISland Resort

Photo: Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon SEries

RUN IT

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RUN IT 66

community

Trail

Santa Barbara Red Rock 50 Nov. 29; Santa Barbara, Calif.

McKinney Roughs 12-Hour Relay Dec. 5; Austin, Texas

Death Valley Trail Marathon Dec. 5; Death Valley, Calif.

This old-fashioned event features a 50-miler, marathon and half marathon on the trails of the Rancho Oso Guest Ranch in Santa Barbara. There’s nothing fancy, just a lot of running on the out-andback course that offers spectacular views of Santa Barbara backcountry. Camping is available on the ranch, and all runners receive custom shirts and finisher medals.

This trail race at McKinney Roughs can be done either as a 12-hour solo or with teams of two, four or six people. The rugged course is demanding, so choose your teammates carefully. Loops of 9, 5 and 3 miles are available, and you can run them in any order—however, a loop must be fully completed for it to count. A 30K individual race is also available.

The 27th annual event takes runners from Beatty, Nev., through Titus Canyon and finishes in Death Valley. The temperatures are relatively mild this time of year, with highs in the low 60s to mid 70s, allowing runners to really enjoy the incredible desert landscape without the stifling heat. The race is limited to 250 participants due to National Park regulations.

Photo: Bryan Toro

Santa Barbara Red Rock 50

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RUN IT community

67

Trail

New York City Trail Festival Dec. 5; Staten Island, N.Y.

Frozen Trail Runfest Dec. 12; Eugene, Ore.

Rodeo Beach Trail Run Dec. 12; Sausalito, Calif.

You don’t expect a hilly ultra trail race in New York City, but that’s just what you’ll find at the fourth annual NYC Trail Festival, which features a 50K, 25K and 10K in the Staten Island Greenbelt. Multiple well-stocked aid stations will be available for 25K and 50K runners. (You won’t need to bring money for the bodegas.)

You have a choice of several races at Buford Park at Mount Pisgah, but you’re going to have to work for all of them. Featuring 50K, 15-mile, 9-mile and 5K runs, the Frozen Trail Runfest features plenty of climbing. According to race organizers, even the 5K goes “straight up the mountain” between miles 1.32 and 1.9.

Runners can choose from 8K, 20K, 30K and 50K distances at this scenic run in Marin County. You’ll enjoy incredible views of the Pacific Coast, San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge as you run through the Marin Headlands. The race starts and finishes at Rodeo Beach, with plenty of aid stations along the course.

Photo: Let’s Wander Photography

Photo: Bryan Toro

Rodeo Beach Trail Run

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RUN IT 68

community

N o v e lt y R u n s

The Color Run Nov. 21; Huntington Beach, Calif.

Christmas in the Caverns Dec. 5; San Antonio

Chasing Santa 5K Dec. 5; Colorado Springs, Colo.

This national series, which dubs itself as the “Happiest 5K on the Planet” brings its bright colors to Huntington Beach this month. Runners start the untimed 5K event wearing all white, and are then doused with a different color at each kilometer. The post-race includes more color throws, music and dancing.

The Natural Bridge Caverns in San Antonio hosts Christmas in the Caverns each year, complete with carolers and a wide variety of other attractions and Christmas displays. This 5K nighttime race (headlamps required) takes runners along the hayride route around the property. After the race, runners have the opportunity to explore the caverns and other activities in the park.

Get into the holiday season this year by dressing up like the big guy himself at this festive 5K in America the Beautiful Park. Each runner will receive a full Santa suit to run in—pants, jacket, belt, hat and beard are all included in the race fee. Afterward enjoy a celebratory hot chocolate.

Photo: Courtesy of the Color Run

The Color Run

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RUN IT community

69

N o v e lt y R u n s

Electric Run Dec. 5; San Diego

Ugly Sweater Run Dec. 12; Chicago

Insane Inflatable 5K Dec. 19; Hialeah, Fla.

This national series brings a rave-like atmosphere to San Diego. The 5K features a variety of illuminated “lands” of light throughout the course, combining light, music and art into unique, glowing settings. Runners also receive LED bracelets and a UV glow body pen to blend into the scenery, and the post-race party features an epic light show set to electronic music.

Put those unappealing old Christmas and Chanukah presents to good use at the Ugly Sweater Run, which comes to Chicago (among other cities) this December. Take that sweater out of the closet and compare with other runners on the course, and finish up with a post-race party that features hot chocolate, a beer garden and other holiday treats.

Although it’s made for adults, the Insane Inflatable 5K series is every kid’s dream. This national series comes to Florida with five races in December (and one in January), including the event at Amelia Earhart Park in Hialeah. The 5K course includes a large number of inflatable obstacles—the kind you might see on the “Wipeout” TV show—making this an event that’s more about the fun than the finish time.

Photo: Courtesy of Ugly Sweater Run

Ugly Sweater Run

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COMMUNITY

I N T E R N AT I O N A L

END OF THE WORLD MARATHON Dec. 6; Placencia, Belize

EGYPTIAN MARATHON Jan. 15; Luxor City, Egypt

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MARATHON Jan. 17; Port of Spain, Trinidad

The first time this race was held in Belize was in December 2012, just before the end of the Mayan calendar. The name stuck, also in part as a tribute to Aldous Huxley, who wrote, “If the world had any ends, British Honduras would certainly be one of them.” This low-key race is certainly a great reason to visit the Central American country for a flat, coastal run.

If you’re going to run through the desert, why not see some of history’s greatest antiquities along the way? The Egyptian Marathon takes runners past the Luxor Temple, the tomb of King Tut, the Valley of the Queens and other monuments you’ve read about in history books, or at least seen on the sliver screen. The race last year attracted nearly 2,000 participants from 38 nations.

Just off the coast of Venezuela on the northern edge of South America, this marathon is on the larger of the two islands, Trinidad, and has been run for the past 33 years with a lot of support from the country’s Olympic committee. Enjoy the calypso music throughout the 26.2-mile course.

Trinidad and Tobago Marathon

PHOTO: COURTESY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INTERNATIONAL MARATHON

Click here to read about epic running adventures around the world.

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LAST LAP 72

E N I G M AT I C M A R AT H O N E R

Click here for an interview with marathon coach Brad Hudson.

Ryan Hall, 33, Redding, Calif. BY MAR IO FR AIO LI

Even though it’s been a few years since he’s shown the form that propelled him to an eye-popping 2:04:58 at the 2011 Boston Marathon and landed him on the past two Olympic teams, Ryan Hall is still one of the fastest and most recognizable marathoners in the United States. A native of Big Bear, Calif., the nomadic Hall—who along with wife Sara recently adopted four Ethiopian sisters— says despite his up-and-down race results, making a third Olympic marathon team at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon on Feb. 13 is high on his priority list.

How long do you plan on competing? As long as my body allows me to. I am always pushing to get to the next level. Sometimes a breakthrough takes a lot of failure to find what works and what doesn’t. I have a mantra that says, “you must fail your way to the top,” similar to how Thomas Edison failed so many times before finally getting the light bulb right.

CM1115_B_LAST.indd 72

How has running evolved for you over the years? When I was a kid, running was an addiction, something I had to do because it was who I was. It was my identity. Over the years, God has taught me how to have a healthier perspective of running. Now, I see running as a way for me to connect with God, much in the same way that we use songs, churches and the Bible. If you could run one race in the world, which one would it be? I’ve always said I’d like to run the 56-mile Comrades Marathon in South Africa—but with my energy problems that probably isn’t a good idea. Maybe I can just do it for fun and not as a serious competition.

For the complete interview, go to Competitor.com/ lastlapryanhall

PHOTO: SCOTT DRAPER

What challenges have you faced since 2012? Injuries have undoubtedly been the biggest challenge. The other has been keeping my energy levels consistent throughout the year. I seem to go through periods of training when I will be feeling great and like my old self, then something shifts and I feel terrible and can barely finish an hour run. This is why my results have been so up and down, and why sometimes I am so hopeful about my running and other times not so much.

10/21/15 12:02 PM


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LET’S GO COMMITMENT

Official Vehicle of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series® Options shown. ©2015 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.

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Competitor November 2015  

Gotta-Have-It Holiday Gear Guide, 66 of the best gift ideas for runners. Jump-start your training for a fast & healthy 2016.

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