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FREE MAGAZINE

TTh hee Roar ooff tthhee RRiin inngg

Vol. 2 - ISSUE 10 - OCTOBER 2013

Roar hee Ring Book Club

Anne Lazurko

Dress Up to Dream Come True Ashley Kilback

SEE PAGE 17

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10 questions with

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Danielle de Graauw

October is Women's Cancer Awareness Month. There are 4 com be detected early by screening tests or by having signs and sy breast, cervical, colorectal and skin.

Fashion column by Riley Lawson | beauty column by Sara Lindsay | Hair column BY Joy Amistad

For more information call the Canadian Cancer Society's cancer 1 888 939-3333 or visit www.cancer.ca/sk www.womenshealthforlife.ca


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Features Vol. 2 - Issue 10 - October 2013

8 4 |

Cover Story The Roar of the Ring

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013

37

Book Club Anne Lazurko

14

10 Questions with Danielle de Graauw


In this Issue

Our Team Publisher Compass Advertising Ltd. info@getcompass.ca ART DIRECTOR & Managing Editor Mustapha Itani moe@getcompass.ca GUEST Editor Jenn Smith Nelson jennsn@myaccess.ca WRITERS Melissa Fiacco mbfiacco@gmail.com Lee Parent shayneandlee@yahoo.com Jessica Reimer jrwritesthings@gmail.com Gail Jansen-Kesslar gjansen@sasktel.net Cheryl Kirkness cheryl@momsandmunchkins.ca Sara Lindsay info@saralindsay.ca Riley Lawson style@rileylawson.com Joy Amistad carmeljoyamistad@gmail.com

Kim Keller kim@farmathand.com Ashley Kilback ashkilback@gmail.com Graphic Designer Courtney Larson courtney@getcompass.ca Photographer Cover Story: Darrol Hofmeister Sharpshooter Photography (306) 949 9113 Office Manager Debra Glettler info@getcompass.ca Account Executives Don Hahn (306) 536 8478 don@getcompass.ca

18 SHINE ON

Beauty Column by Sara Lindsay

19 BOOT BLISS

Fashion Column by Riley Lawson

20 HEALTHY HAIR STRATEGIES 101

Hair Column by Joy Amistad

22 RETURNING TO THE FARM

By Kim Keller

23 REAL ESTATE 101

By CharMaine Luscombe

24 Cancer Awareness

Dr. Vicki Holmes

26 Freaky Food

Halloween Recipes

28 dress up to dream come true

By Ashley Kilback

James Huber (306) 536 1995 james@getcompass.ca

30 Sask Breast Cancer Connect

James Morrow (306) 502 0927 jmorrow@getcompass.ca

35 top ten list for financial well-being

Ferhat Saglam (306) 501 3191 ferhat@getcompass.ca

40 Safe TravelS

Dale Strawford streeha@gmail.com

Copyright 2013: PINK Magazine for Saskatchewan Women is a Compass Advertising Ltd. publication, published monthly and distributed free on stands across Saskatchewan. All rights reserved by Compass Advertising Ltd. Reproduction in any form of any material in PINK Magazine is strictly prohibited without written consent. Any requests for duplication of any content should be sent to Compass Advertising Ltd.. Compass Advertising Ltd. makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all of the information and ads that we publish. However, mistakes can happen and Compass Advertising Ltd., along with any affiliates, cannot be held responsible for any consequences arising from any errors or omissions other than the cost of the ad. Compass Advertising Ltd. reserves the right to refuse ads if deemed inappropriate.

Information to breast cancer patients

By Gisele Gherasim

By Dale Strawford

42 MOMS & MUNCHKINS

By Cheryl Kirkness

1816 9th Avenue North, Regina, SK. S4R 7T4 Tel: (306) 585 2064 • Toll Free 1 (888) 717 6655 Fax: (306) 585 2080 • Email: pink@getcompass.ca Website: pinkmagazine.ca facebook.com/pinkmagsask twitter.com/pinkmagsask

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 5


Note from our Guest Editor

With fall officially upon us the season marking the return to routine is back. As much as I like to think of myself as someone who likes to buck routine and live spontaneously, I have to admit that I often find comfort within it. Knowing what to expect simply makes life easier and that is what routine can offer. And speaking of routine, it is Cancer Awareness Month, so be sure to know what tests you should be receiving for screening. There is a lot of great information within this issue to help you.

Pink Magazine Winners of the S3 Show First Prize Winner

While routine can certainly be good, helpful and live saving, there is something to be said for breaking free from the mundane. So why not try the donair shop around the corner? Maybe take that Spanish lesson. It can be so enjoyable and healthy to insert doses of spontaneity into your everyday routine. Think about what you like to do for fun. Just because the season has changed doesn’t mean you have to succumb to the norm. Instead use the season change as inspiration for a new challenge or undertaking. In every issue of PINK magazine, you will find little nuggets that serve as ideas to try something new. Within this month’s issue, I really appreciated the idea of making Halloween a day beyond the candy from Moms & Munchkins. Advice for how to avoid children’s sugar highs is always highly appreciated! So what are you waiting for? Go ahead and spice up the season!

Jenn Smith Nelson Zina Scott

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FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013


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TTh hee Roar ooff tthhee RRiin inngg By Melissa Fiacco

“Life is like a boxing match. You win and you lose, but how you recover from those losses and improve yourself is what is important.”

8 |

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013


In July 1991, female boxer Jennifer Reid stepped into the boxing ring against contender, Therese Robitaille. This was Reid`s first boxing match but Robitaille was not her first contender. In a decision that would empower women globally, Reid victoriously challenged Boxing Canada to sanction women’s amateur boxing. Canada became the first country in the world to sanction competitive female amateur boxing and Reid VS. Robitaille would be the first Olympic style female boxing match in Canadian history. From October 22-26, more than 200 amateur boxers will assemble in Regina to compete at the 2014 Elite Men’s & Women’s Canadian Boxing Championships in pursuit of a gold medal and the opportunity to join the 2014 Canadian National Men’s and Women’s Teams. These athletes will also endeavour to compete at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games in Scotland. The emergence of women’s boxing in Saskatchewan started in Regina, at the iconic Regina Boxing Club. The Regina Boxing Club has been fostering excellence in amateur boxing, developing athletes into elite competitors, and providing youth mentorship since 1949. It was founded by Ken Goff with the goal of, “helping our community to create better citizens.” In 1992, it began accepting female athletes. The Club’s owner and coach, George Goff (Ken’s son), purchased an advertisement in the Regina Leader Post announcing the Regina Boxing Club was accepting female athletes after Boxing Canada announced its decision to recognize women as amateur boxers. This is the story of three Saskatchewan women who are the past, present and future of women’s amateur boxing. Tammy de Laforest experienced the emergence and growth of women in competitive amateur boxing. She entered the sport when she saw the Regina Boxing Club advertisement in the newspaper and went on to become one of the first competitive female boxers the Regina Boxing Club produced. In 1996, she represented Team Canada at the first international boxing competition Canadian female boxers competed in. In 1997, the same year de Laforest earned her second national championship title, the International Boxing Association invited the Canadian Women’s National Team to participate in discussions about the inclusion of female boxers in the Olympic Games. This was where de Laforest learned that introducing Women’s Boxing into the Olympic programme relied on the growth of female competitors globally. Twelve years later in 2009, for the first time in the history of women and sport, the International Olympic Committee announced women’s boxing would be recognized in the Olympic programme. Thirty-six female boxers would compete at the 2012 London Olympic Games, including Canadian boxer Mary Spencer, making it the first Olympic Games that women competed in every sport in the Olympic programme.

“Scary” Investment Moves to Avoid If you have young children or grandchildren, you know what’s really important. Yes, it’s Halloween time again, which means you’ll see plenty of witches and vampires scurrying around. You’ll no doubt find these characters more amusing than frightening, but you don’t have to look far to find things that are a bit more alarming — such as these scary investment moves: • Paying too much attention to the headlines — Some headlines may seem unnerving, but don’t abandon your investment strategy just because the news of the day appears grim. • Chasing “hot” investments — You can get “hot” investment tips from the talking heads on television, your next-door neighbour or just about anybody. But even if the tip was accurate at one point, by the time you get to a “hot” investment, it may already be cooling down. And, even more importantly, it simply may not be appropriate for your individual risk tolerance and goals. • Ignoring different types of investment risk — Most investors are aware of the risk of losing principal when investing in stocks. But if you shun stocks totally in favour of perceived “risk-free” investments, you’d be making a mistake because all investments carry some type of risk. For example, with fixed-income investments, including GICs and bonds, one risk you may encounter is inflation risk — the risk that your investment will provide you with returns that won’t even keep up with inflation and will, therefore, result in a loss of purchasing power over time. Another risk you can incur is interest-rate risk — the risk that new bonds will be issued at higher rates, driving down the price of your bonds. Bonds also carry the risk of default, though you can reduce this risk by sticking with bonds that receive the highest ratings from independent rating agencies. • Failing to diversify — If you only own one type of investment, and a market downturn affects that particular asset class, your portfolio could take a big hit. But by spreading your dollars among an array of vehicles, such as stocks, bonds and government securities, you can reduce the effects of volatility on your holdings. (Keep in mind, though, that PMS diversification 5535 cannot guarantee profits or protect against loss.) • Focusing on the short term — If you concentrate too much on short-term results, you may react to a piece of bad news, or to a period of extreme price volatility, by making investment moves that are counterproductive to your goals. Furthermore, if you’re constantly seeking to instantaneously turn around losses, you’ll likely rack up fees, commissions and possibly taxes. Avoid all these hassles by keeping your eyes on the future and sticking to a long-term, personalized strategy. You can’t always make the perfect investment choices. But by steering clear of the “scary” moves described above, you can work toward your long-term goals and Black hopefully avoid some of the more fearsome results.

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By 2001, de Laforest was a six-time provincial champion and twotime national champion. The same year, female competitors assembled in Scranton, USA to compete in the first ever Women’s World Boxing Championship. de Laforest represented Team CanFOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 9


““Boxing has taught me loyalty, dedication, hard work. It taught me life skills and respect...it’s changed my life” ada and earned a silver medal in the 51kg weight category. Remembering the experience, de Laforest said, “The energy there was electrifying. It was a pivotal point for female boxing. It had finally grown to a point where there were enough female competitors to have a Women’s World Championship.” When asking de Laforest what motivated her athletic discipline she responded, “I just wanted to be better than I was the day before, to improve who I was, and boxing and the Regina Boxing Club created the venue for me to achieve that ... my experience in the sport has empowered my confidence, its made me tenacious.” “Life is like a boxing match. You win and you lose, but how you recover from those losses and improve yourself is what is important. There are challenges in life that make you feel defeated but you dare yourself to find your strength and realize you become stronger than you were before you confronted the challenge.”

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These are lessons de Laforest is passing along to her ten year old son, Teekin. “As a parent, I want my son to have the confidence to follow his dreams – whatever they may be. I want him to know he can do whatever he wants.” After retiring from boxing, de Laforest became a Muay Thai competitor, and now she is a Muay Thai coach, fitness instructor and personal trainer in Regina. Twenty-one year old Jayde Hayden was born the year that de La10 |

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013

SEARS outLEt StoRE | 1908 7tH AvE. REGINA Sk.


forest embarked on her career as an amateur boxer. Hayden joined the Regina Boxing Club when she was nine years old and started competing in the boxing ring when she was 11 years old. Today, at age 21, she has been a boxing athlete for more than half her life.

Jayde Hayden

Hayden is a reigning provincial champion, a two-time junior Canadian champion and earned the silver medal at the 2011 Elite Men’s & Women’s Canadian Championships. Like de Laforest, Hayden is also a Ringside World Boxing Champion, something she considers to be her greatest achievement. It is the largest amateur boxing competition in the world with more than 1,500 boxers. Her ultimate goal is to represent Canada at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Summer Games. This has been her dream since she was 9 years old. Her pursuit to become an Olympian will begin at the 2014 Elite Men’s & Women’s Canadian Championships in Regina, where she is determined to win the gold medal and join Team Canada. In preparation for the Elite Canadian Championships, she will train three times daily, six days per week with one day of rest, and follow a strict food and nutrition plan to ensure she maintains her competitive weight. Competitive amateur boxing is a lifestyle. It is as challenging and exhausting as it is rewarding and empowering. “You have to live it, breath it, dream it,” said Hayden. “I believe women work a lot harder in this sport to compete, to earn respect, and to earn equality.”

Tammy de Laforest

The sport of boxing produces elite competitors, world champions and Olympians, but it’s most valuable influence is the way it mentors youth and develops character. “Boxing has taught me loyalty, dedication, hard work. It taught me life skills and respect ... it’s changed my life. It’s kept me out of a lot of bad situations. It’s been my life and the love of my life. It really has changed my life,” said Hayden. Hayden attributes her achievements and character to her parents, Clint and Sherry, and to her coach, George Goff. “George has done things for me to get me where I am that I don’t believe any other coach in any other province has done. He is truly committed to his athletes. He really has been a major part of my boxing career, physically and mentally. He’s been a father figure in my life. He takes that role on with every athlete at the Boxing Club.”

Erica Ravelo

“I remember when I was training for a competition, I kept having problems at school with some girls who kept trying to fight me, but competitors aren’t allowed to fight outside the boxing ring. I got to the boxing club and I was so distraught and I felt so helpless and George could see this. I didn’t know this until a few years later but George went to my school and talked to the principal. He told the principal that he had two pairs of boxing gloves in his car and they could put these two girls in a room and let them fight it out. The principal wouldn’t allow it, and George knew he wouldn’t allow it and he said, ‘Well then I need them to leave my athlete alone,’ and they never bothered me after that.” Ken Goff’s dream to “help our community to create better citizens,” stays alive, 64 years after he opened the Regina Boxing Club.

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 11


“I make time for everything and make sure it all gets done well. I have to make sure I do my best at everything or else I feel unsatisfied” “Eventually after I retire from competing, my dream is to have a boxing club, become a coach and be a positive influence in young men’s and women’s lives. Even if they don’t want to be Olympians, but to teach them life skills, like respect and determination, and loyalty and honesty. That is something I believe every child should learn that will help them become positive contributors to our society,” said Hayden. Erica Ravelo joined the Regina Boxing Club in 2010. Her brother and reigning provincial champion, Joshua, started training there, so she followed along. “It’s the boxing club that offers the best fitness sessions, the best coaching and the most competitions,” said Ravelo. Only two years after entering the sport, Ravelo is a provincial champion and competed at the 2013 Canadian Golden Gloves in Cornwall, ON, losing to the reigning 2012 Gold Gloves Champion. Despite a loss, Ravelo’s determination hasn’t been defeated. Her goal is to compete at the Ringside World Boxing Championships, like de Laforest and Hayden. Since joining the Regina Boxing Club, Ravelo says she feels happier and less stressed. Boxing has taught her to manage time more effectively, which is important for the high school student. Ravelo is in grade eleven and sits as the female sports director on the Student Representative Council. She is also on the high school wrestling team and is a cross-country runner. She maintains a 90 per cent class average and plays the piano. The effects of boxing has improved her overall athletic ability. Ravelo placed fourth in city junior high school cross-country track and field meet in September, competing with students from 13 high schools in Regina. Ravelo says that before she joined the Regina 12 |

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013

Boxing Club, she was placing in the thirtieth and fortieth rankings. “I make time for everything and make sure it all gets done well. I have to make sure I do my best at everything or else I feel unsatisfied,” says Ravelo. The popularity of boxing in Saskatchewan is growing. There are 20 boxing clubs in Saskatchewan that are affiliated with Boxing Saskatchewan. The Regina Boxing Club offers three types of fitness programs: Fitness Boxing, Olympic Style Boxing and Children in Sport. The Fitness Boxing program (Monday-Friday, 5:30-6:30 p.m.) was developed with de Laforest’s direction in 1997. The program was designed to provide the same health benefits as the Olympic Style Boxing program, without the risk of contact injuries. More information about the Regina Boxing Club’s fitness programs, schedules and fees can be viewed on reginaboxingclub.ca. As women continue to change the identity of boxing, the opportunity to celebrate and recognize their commitment to athletic excellence will happen at the 2014 Elite Men’s & Women’s Boxing Championship in Regina, October 22-26, 2013, at the Orr Centre. Visit reginaboxingclub.ca to purchase tickets and experience the thrill of Olympic style boxing. Hair styling & makeup artistry provided by Richards Beauty College.

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FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 13


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10 Questions with Danielle de Graauw by Lee Parent

newspaper and didn’t think much about who was paying attention. Then, at a student leadership conference, I directed a question to a member of the media panel; anchor Ken Shaw of CTV News in Toronto. When I stood up to ask my question, he asked me to repeat my name, paused and asked ”Do you write for the Oshawa Times?” I said yes. He told me he read my stuff and thought I was doing a great job. At this point if my pants were around my ankles I wouldn’t have noticed because I was in shock that someone like him noticed my work. This was the moment I knew I was on the right track.

2

Did you ever dream of doing something else?

3

What facets of the job do you find especially enjoyable?

Not really. At one point in university, I thought I would like to be a profiler or criminologist like on the show “Criminal Minds”. But I believe my skills for reading people and thinking on my feet are better served in my current profession.

I love that I can be myself. I have worked in many mediums but my personality comes out in television. When I’m onlocation or in studio, I’m having a conversation with my friends in southern Saskatchewan. We’re just hanging out but the camera separates us. You know when you excitedly tell your best friend about an event and she says keep me posted? It’s that kind of relationship.

4

Do you have a favourite moment in your career?

I am a reporter, an anchor and a producer, so there have been many special moments. I have had the privilege of interviewing some really cool people from Herb Grey, former Deputy Prime Minister of Canada to the great Darryl Sittler when he was in Regina a little while back.

1

When did you know you wanted to be a Journalist?

I always loved to write. In grade school, I wrote a lot of song lyrics. I still have them actually. If my vocal stylings were more musical, perhaps we would be having this conversation in a recording studio. But I digress. I love listening to people’s stories and asking questions. My mom once told me, “Everyone has a good story to tell, you just have to listen.” In high school, I wrote a weekly article for a community 14 |

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013

One part of my job I love is producing CTV’s Hometown Tour. For five days we are on location in a southern Saskatchewan community. I am always floored by the quality of the nominations and the reaction of each town when we arrive. Sometimes we take for granted the impact we have on people’s lives but it’s pretty special when you see hundreds of people turn up for a live broadcast because they care so much about their community and support the work you are doing.

5

What do you consider the most important role of a person in your position?

Across all mediums, journalists need to be accurate and


do their research. But when you have a job that is high profile, in the public eye, you need to be a good role model and hold yourself to a higher standard.You represent your employer as well as yourself. For me, being in television is like being a parent where my kids are the audience. If I am not a good example, by not following through with what I say or neglecting to tell the truth, how are they going to trust me as their main source of information? People look up to you. You are in their homes everyday and that comes with a lot of responsibility. That’s not to say you can’t be yourself or have fun. The camera doesn’t lie; you can usually tell when someone is being fake.

6

The fun continues for young Rider fans with the release of the third book in the series.

Did you have particular mentors along the way?

The one person that has always been there for me throughout my career, pushing me to be better in everything I do is my very talented husband Johnny. We met in college - both enrolled in television production, me in front of the camera, him behind it. He knows his way around a camera and every facet of television, so when he gives me his opinion on something, I can trust it’s coming from a good place.

7

What was a defining moment in your life?

8

Is there something you can tell us that not everyone knows about you?

9

You are a very busy person; how do you relax and relieve stress?

My father was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Like most kids, I thought my dad was Superman. I had heard of other people getting cancer but my dadno way! His diagnosis didn’t give him much time and when we were told he wouldn’t be around at the end of the summer, that’s when the light bulb went off. Life really is too short. In the blink of an eye, your life can change for the better or worse. It’s been two years since he passed away and not a day goes by that I don’t think about him. He saw the good in everything, even the Toronto Maple Leafs. Clearly, he was delusional but he was one of a handful of people in my life that no matter what I did he accepted me as I am. For that, I am eternally grateful.

The ALWAYS Team The Search for Rider Nation Written by Holly Preston Available at: Rider Stores, Chapters, McNally Robinson, Gift Shops, and CAA Locations

I have a picture of Ray Lewis, former Baltimore Raven in my room, and a two-page spread from Sports Illustrated of just his face. If you have ever seen him play, you know he had a unique way of keeping his team motivated. And who could forget the game day dance coming out of the tunnel? On days when I feel I’m climbing a mountain with the amount of things on my to-do list, that photo is a reminder to stay positive and keep my game face on.

If you follow me on twitter (@ddgctv), you know I like to do a little thing called “The 5 o’clock dance party”. I will post a song that gets me going and dance around the living room or kitchen, usually with my daughters. As kids, my sister and I once found my dad down in the basement, strutting like a maniac to James Brown, just letting off steam from a long day at work. I laughed so hard I cried. So, I guess I inherited that from him.

10

What advice would you give Saskatchewan women if they are intrigued by your career?

Be flexible and don’t be afraid to try something new. I was a news, sports and weather anchor early on in my career when presenting weather was just talking over pictures. Now, it’s in front of the green screen and the graphics are more involved. The first time I did it I wanted to throw up I was so nervous. But the more I did it, the more I fell in love with it. I wouldn’t have known that had I not given it a try.

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 15


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things a girl ought to know about her health

1. The left is usually larger. No two

breasts are exactly the same size. What ever your size you should know what's normal for you. Many women are alive and well today because their breast cancer was detected and treated early.

2. Cervix means neck in Latin.

Save your neck, save your life. Cervical cancer screening is as simple as a Pap test every 1 to 3 years.

3. All multicellular animals pass waste.

Don't be embarrassed to talk about it. Each week over 400 Canadians will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer. If you are age 50 or over have a colonversation with your doctor.

4. Frogs’ skin can change color, absorb water and

oxygen, and secrete mucous to protect itself. Since we’re not built the same, hop to it and remember to seek shade, cover up, and apply sunscreen when outside.

October is Women's Cancer Awareness Month. There are 4 common cancers in women that can be detected early by screening tests or by having signs and symptoms checked by your doctor: breast, cervical, colorectal and skin. For more information call the Canadian Cancer Society's cancer information service at 1 888 939-3333 or visit www.cancer.ca/sk www.womenshealthforlife.ca FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 17


shine on TiTle dedicaTed To The brave & beauTiful chanTelle desmarais By Sara Lindsay

For cancer patients and women and men alike, it’s becoming more and more apparent that what we put in our bodies is important for cancer prevention. We also now know that what we put on our skin is equally as important. Our largest organ is our skin and it needs to be treated with special care. Makeup, nail polish, hair, body and skin care products are part of our daily routines, be aware of what ingredients they contain. This is important, as over a lifetime some ingredients can have devastating effects. Also, be mindful of sun exposure and what you use to protect your skin from its harmful effects. With October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I would like to share some of my favourite products which do not contain parabens or other nasty ingredients and of course they are all PINK!

Ellis Faas Creamy Lip in L104

My young cousin is battling a tremendously aggressive breast cancer as I write this article and I send her all my love. I would also like to acknowledge everyone who has been touched by cancer in any way. To all of you who are in the fight of your lives, I wish you strength, hope, light and power. Saskatchewan is such a huge supporter of breast cancer charities and these are just a few that you may want to support. CIBC - Run For The Cure THE RUNNING ROOM - Get Your Glow On PAM KLEIN - The Power Of Pink

Butter London ‘3 Free’ Nail Lacquer in SNOG

Beauty Blender latexfree foundation sponge

For more in depth information, I offer private makeup lessons at my studio. Sara Lindsay Makeup Studio is now open at 3420 Hill Avenue in Regina. Hair Director Melissa Mark offers full Aveda hair services in studio to complement all makeup services. www.saralindsay.ca info@saralindsay.ca (306) 347-7829

Dayna Decker Body Moisturizer in ELLA Kjaer Weis Organic Cream Blush in LOVELY Aveda Limited Edition Hand Relief ($4 from every sale goes to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation)

About the artist... Originally from Canada, and having spent many years of her career in the United Kingdom, Sara Lindsay is a professional makeup artist, with training from some of London’s top fashion academies. Having had the opportunity to work with some of Britain’s top artists, Sara brings an edge to her hometown of Regina. Sara’s professional experience includes runway work, editorial spreads, compelling commercial campaigns, weddings and special event clients. London Fashion Week and The London Clothes Show are just some of the highlights of her career. Sara was named Canadian Makeup Artist of the Year at The Mirror Awards 2011 and most recently was named a finalist for 2012. Sara’s successful freelance career, which complimented her time as a regional associate with MAC COSMETICS UK, gave her valuable experience in working closely with clientele to consult and direct their transformation to the extraordinary. In a consultative style, Sara works to achieve a look that is uniquely your own. 18 |

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boot bliss by Riley lAW son

style@rileylawson.com |w w w . r i l e y l a w s o n . c o m ladies! it’s time to chat about what’s going on south of your knees this fall. As the weather cools and the leaves begin to fall we all know what’s to come – winter. Part of living in saskatchewan is being prepared for anything! so, let’s chat boots. There are some considerations to be made when choosing the right boot so that you achieve the balance between fashion and function, while also complimenting your body shape.

The “Just Under The Knee style” This is a great style to balance out the upper half of the body. if you’re a pear shape that carries weight through the hip/bum area this is a great way for you to pull off the leggings/skinny jeans look. Go for black or cognac for versatility.

The “Casual Ankle boot” This style is so great for comfort as well as a touch of sass. i chose to show you a fairly fashion forward type of this boot but there are more subdued versions out there. Wear this with your denim or leggings and some thicker socks – maybe even pair it with an oversized sweater/top and a scarf.

The “Dressed up bootie” if you’re wearing dresses with tights often in the cooler months you don’t want anything too chunky on your feet or it can look misplaced. instead, opt for more refined and sleek styles. i suggest a heel,as a flat can be slightly casual for the dressed up vibe of the outfit. However, that doesn’t mean you have to go for a higher heel than you’re comfortable with – there are varying heights out there to choose from.

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Healthy Hair Strategies 101 By Joy Amistad from Visions Salon and Spa, Saskatoon Having voluminous sexy hair can sometimes be a catch-22. You assault your hair with blow driers, brushes and styling tools to make it look big and beautiful. But over time, all the grooming can leave your hair brittle and dull. What’s a girl to do? Here are a few tips to avoid damage and to keep your hair stunning and healthy.

achieve your goals. The same goes with your hair; you cannot just do one treatment and expect healthy, beautiful long hair. You need to take care of it every day, and get into good habits of using proper products and tools that will rejuvenate and maintain the health and integrity of your hair. Happy hair days!

Try not washing it every day. Instead, wash your mane every two days with a gentle sulphate free shampoo. Shampooing your hair with store bought shampoo can strip your hair of its natural oils and color and leave it feeling dehydrated and frazzled. Your hair is at its most delicate state when wet; it has up to 30% more elasticity which means most breakage happens when it is wet or damp. Remember not to be too rough when detangling your hair. If you wash your hair every day not only are you pulling and tugging on it more than necessary, you also are using hot tools twice as much. If you feel that your hair needs to be washed because it looks greasy, a great alternative is a dry shampoo. Dry shampoo can come in a spray or powder form. It works by soaking up excess oils, deodorizing your hair and giving it more volume. Remember to condition with care. Daily wear and tear leaves your hair craving moisture. In addition tousing regular conditioner, treat your locks (especially the ends, which are the driest) with a weekly intensive mask/treatment. If you find your hair is breaking, make sure you are using a protein rich treatment. You need to add protein back into your hair to make it strong and luscious again. Look for words like “keratin” or “reconstruct”. These proteins will rebuild your hair. If you feel like your hair is dry and brittle, use a moisture rich, hydrating mask. These masks will soften your hair cuticle leaving it shiny and defrizzed. Remember ladies, your hair is like your body. You can’t expect all of a sudden to be healthy and fit by eating one salad. You need to feed your body good nutrients and take care of it every day to

Joy Amistad is a passionate hairstylist who originated in Vancouver and has continued to develop her talent by further training not only in Vancouver, but as well as Las Vegas, New York, Orlando, Miami and is now residing in Saskatoon. Her extended training has furthered her knowledge in precision cuts, hair colours and up styling. Hair is a fashion industry that is continually changing and growing; she truly values the importance of continually upgrading and enhancing her skills. She doesn’t believe hair dressing is just a job, it’s her passion. Joy is a stylist at Visions Salon and Spa in Saskatoon.

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y unique n a m rs e ff o a in g e R The University of individual r u o y t e e m to s e vic programs and ser pus tour. m a c a k o o b r o e n onli interests. Visit us restudents tu u /f a .c a in g re .u www


Returning to the Farm by Kim Keller – Farmer and Co Founder of Farm At Hand

Recently I made the decision to leave the corporate world of insurance to head back to the family farm. Boy, have things changed from when I left 10 years ago. Equipment, inputs, acres, employees, practices – this is no longer the farm from my younger years. Along with myself, others who had previously moved away to pursue other careers are starting to come back. What is it about farming that is bringing us all back to our futures?

twice as many good. This is what sets farmers apart; their determination, perseverance and at times, down right craziness to go another round.

When I left, I couldn’t wait to get off the farm and get to the city, go to University, meet new people, and see the bigger and better world that I thought existed outside our farmyard and small town. Over the last 10 years I went through University, met new people, and started my climb on the corporate ladder, so to speak. As much as I thought I was on the right path, something just didn’t quite fit. It turns out; the right path was leading me right back to the same farmyard I couldn’t wait to leave 10 years prior.

I read an article in the Globe and Mail “Many Young People are Taking Another Look at the Family Farm” recently that explained young people are considering and moving back to the farm. It goes on to say that us young people are seeing the huge potential in agriculture despite rising debt loads and threats such as the weather increasing in severity; we can also see that revenues are increasing. It also indicates we are coming to appreciate and respect what our parents and grandparents had been working so hard to create – so true. After reading that article, I realized it was completely right. Agriculture has undergone some major changes over the last few years, and I do not think those changes, nor the potential are going to stop anytime soon.

As I’ve returned as more than just help for the harvest, I am realizing why something in my previous path didn’t feel right. I love farming; the work, the long hours, seeing results and knowing I am working toward something more than just a pay cheque every 2 weeks. Isn’t this what every career is suppose to feel like? Now, don’t get me wrong, I know farming isn’t all big bushels and high prices, and the hard times will be hard, but for each of those hard times I am willing to bet almost every farmer has been through

So today, with the windblowing and rain falling, keeping us out of the field, I keep that in mind. While the risks associated with farming will never change, my chance to prosper in this industry has never been better. Not only do I have an opportunity to succeed, but I also have this opportunity while working with my family doing something I love (I just never realized it before). I’m not sure about all those other young people, but for me that’s reason enough to return to the farm.

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REAL ESTATE 101 age near McLean, SK. She was very determined and her life was taken too soon. So I ask, “Are you living your dream? “ Real Estate has been my dream. I love what I do and therefore, when I was approached to do an educational column for PINK magazine I was thrilled, as it has always been my passion to educate people on real estate. A little about myself. I started in real estate as an investor, and I had rental properties. This led me to taking classes in appraising and working as an appraiser, which led to my career in sales.

W

hat will you be remembered for? Today, I went to the funeral of my 45 year old friend who died of cancer. Funerals often make us reflect, and ask ourselves, “Are we being a good person? Have we got the balance between family/work working for us? What are our priorities?” My friend, Deb, was very special and I regret not spending more time with her. She was more my daughter’s friend, Mick. They would spend time in her barn with her horses. Deb didn’t have

I truly believe every woman should have a rental house. What is a rental house? A house that you own, that you rent out so that someone else makes the payments. Well, doesn’t this sound like a “no brainer”? It really is, and when you buy a rental house or investment property, it usually goes up in value over the time of the mortgage, which is called appreciation. We all know what depreciation is … things go down in value. Real Estate usually appreciates in value … which means it goes up in value. However, most of us have our homes as our only piece of real estate. I’m encouraging women to get smart and invest in a rental property. This can enhance your retirement plan, offer you leverage when you need it and help you if you cannot work any longer. It is just a really smart economical investment.

“This can enhance your retirement plan, offer you leverage when you need it and help you if you cannot work any longer. It is just a really smart economical investment.” her driver’s license. So, for someone like me, who grew up in small town Saskatchewan and had my license booked a few days after turning 16, this would have changed my life significantly. My license to drive has been my freedom. I have a special admiration for Deb, who never asked for anything, was always happy, always giving to others and in the end, which was just the beginning for her, was living her dream. She ran kids horse camps, a 4-H club and a riding arena on her acre-

One of my favorite books is Rich Dad Poor Dad, by Robert Kiyosaki, and I always figured we needed a Rich Mom, Poor Mom book. If you have invested in real estate and want me to tell your story, send me an email so we can share successes and empower each other. On a closing note, I want to encourage you all to live your dream in remembrance of my friend, Deb Dahl.

By CharMaine Luscombe, B.A, B.Ed Broker, Commercial, Farm, Residential Agent

Homelife Prairie Realty CharmaineRegina@gmail.com www.CharmaineRealty.com FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 23


Cancer Awareness Champion of the Month: Dr. Vicki Holmes Cancer screening and early detection are two of the most powerful tools you have to fight back against cancer. In most cases, catching cancer in its early stages is the key to successfully beating it. “It’s a framework for people,” Dr. Holmes, who is serving as the Canadian Cancer Society’s ambassador for Women’s Cancer Awareness Month this October, says about the Reminder for Life program. “It’s a good tool for bringing questions up with your doctor. It’s a good reminder that it’s time to have your annual checkup. People become busy and don’t remember when they had their last checkup. This is a heads-up.” Dr. Holmes, 64, signed up for her Reminder for Life earlier this year. “Your lifestyle can influence whether you develop cancer.” Along with cancer screening and early detection, you can fight back against cancer with your lifestyle choices. About one-third of all cancers can be prevented by eating well, being active and maintaining a healthy body weight. At the Women’s Mid-Life Health Program, where she has worked for the past 12 years, Dr. Holmes sees a lot of women who are obese, physically inactive or don’t eat right. “They don’t truly get that how we care for ourselves has an impact on our future health. Your lifestyle can influence whether you develop cancer,” Dr. Holmes says. “There are so many things in life we can’t control but we can control our behaviour.” As a physician at the Women’s Mid-Life Health Program in Saskatoon, Dr. Vicki Holmes sees first-hand how important it is for women to take care of themselves. That’s why she is encouraging women to sign up for the Canadian Cancer Society’s Reminder for Life program. The Canadian Cancer Society will send you a reminder every year about the things you need to discuss with your doctor regarding cancer screening and early detection of cancer based on your age and gender. You can choose to receive your free reminder in your mailbox or in your email inbox during the month of your birthday or the month of your annual checkup. 24 |

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Motivation plays a large part. “You are the only one who can control your activity,” Dr. Holmes says. “If you constantly put yourself at the bottom of the list, you’re not going to take action. Once women understand the importance their lifestyle plays in helping prevent cancer, they will be motivated to take action.” And that’s part of her job, providing women with the information they need to make healthy lifestyle choices to reduce their risk of cancer. If you’re obese, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) greater than 30, you need to lose weight and keep it under control. If you’re not exercising enough, increase your level of physical activity. If you don’t exercise, become physically active. If you’re not eating healthy, improve your eating habits.


“Your lifestyle can influence whether you develop cancer.” Cancer Statistics In 2013, an estimated 975 women in Saskatchewan are expected to be diagnosed with breast, cervical, ovarian or uterine cancer. Add three other cancers that are common in women (colorectal, lung and melanoma) and another estimated 780 women will hear the words “you have cancer” this year as well. Like so many of us, Dr. Holmes has seen loved ones affected by cancer. A cousin battled breast cancer, an aunt battled ovarian cancer, a sister battled uterine cancer. Her brother is fighting multiple myeloma. Her husband faced stage 4 bowel cancer. He is 64 and doing well. Dr. Holmes also has a family history of osteoporosis. That’s why she is dedicated to being physically active. For 14 years, she awoke at 5:30 a.m. three times a week and was at the gym at 6:30 a.m., working out with her trainer for an hour. Retiring this summer from private practice after 40 years means she gets to go to the gym later. “I made a personal decision,” Dr. Holmes says. “It’s not an option for me not to exercise.”

We know that making time for yourself isn’t always easy but spending a few minutes talking to your doctor or getting screened could save your life. Canadian Cancer Society Recommendations Many women are alive and well today because their breast cancer was detected early. Mammograms are the best tool we have for early detection of breast cancer. If you’re sexually active, you should start having regular Pap tests by the time you’re 21. The Pap test looks at cervical cells to see if there are precancerous changes or abnormalities that could lead to cervical cancer. Women age 50 and over should have a stool test (guaiac-based fecal occult blood test or fecal immunochemical test) at least every two years. There is convincing evidence that stool tests with appropriate follow-up can significantly reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Check your skin regularly for changes that might indicate skin cancer. Make sure that you or someone else checks “hard-toget-at” places, such as your back, the back of your neck and ears and the backs of your legs.

Knowing Your Body Knowing your body also helps reduce your cancer risk. “It’s important to know what’s normal for you, what’s abnormal and to mention anything that’s abnormal to your doctor,” Dr. Holmes says. “Women see their doctors immediately when they find a lump in a breast, but they don’t always pay attention to, for example, abdominal pain, bloating, feeling tired or unwell, because they’re busy,” she says. While not unusual in mid-life, it doesn’t mean that these symptoms are not a sign of something serious. “It’s important to keep on top of what happens with ourselves,” Dr. Holmes says, “and to do everything you can to keep well.” That includes being aware of your family history. “Knowing your family history helps you to take steps to rewrite your future,” says Dr. Holmes If there’s a history of cancer in your family, your annual checkup is the time to remind your doctor of the details, which alert your doctor to the kind of tests that you need. October is Women’s Cancer Awareness Month October is Women’s Cancer Awareness Month and the Canadian Cancer Society encourages you to take an active role in maintaining your health to reduce your risk of cancer. There are four common cancers in women that can be detected early by screening tests or by having signs and symptoms checked by your doctor: breast, cervical, colorectal and skin.

7723 Venture Road • Regina, SK • S4Y 1C2

• Headwear is hand sewn and unique. • Produces many types of headwear for women. • Offers custom service for fitting and sewing of headwear for special occasions or everyday needs. • Hats 4 Comfort offers online shopping at www.hats4comfort.com

Rita Grant P: 306-543-8068 • C: 306-537-4973 rfgrant@hats4comfort.com www.hats4comfort.com

Business Hours

Monday-Friday: 9:00am - 5:00pm Saturdays By Appointment

Look Good on the Outside, Feel Great on the Inside FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 25


roasted pumpkin seeds

Makes 1 1/2 cups 1 1/2 cups raw whole pumpkin seeds 2 tsp butter, melted 1 pinch salt Directions 1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). 2. Toss seeds in a bowl with the melted butter and salt. Spread the seeds in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for about 45 minutes or until golden brown; stir occasionally.

Freaky Foods Delicious Recipes Just in Time for Halloween!

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pond scum

Makes 1 gallon 1 (2 liter) bottle 1 (2 liter) bottle 1 quart

grape soda orange soda lime sherbet

Directions 1. Pour grape and orange soda into a punch bowl. Scoop small portions of lime sherbet into the soda mixture. Let the sherbet melt into a foamy green layer on top.


Candy Corn Cupcakes

witch fingers

Makes 2 Dozen Cupcakes 1 (18.25 oz) pkg white cake mix 1 cup water 1/3 cup vegetable oil 3 eggs 14 drops red food coloring 22 drops yellow food 6 drops green food coloring 2 cups prepared white frosting 24 pieces candy corn

Makes 60 Cookies 1 cup 1 cup 1 1 tsp 1 tsp 2 2/3 cups 1 tsp 1 tsp 3/4 cup

Directions

Directions 1. Combine the butter, sugar, egg, almond extract, and vanilla extract in a mixing bowl. Beat together with an electric mixer; gradually add the flour, baking powder, and salt, continually beating; refrigerate 20 to 30 minutes. 2. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Lightly grease baking sheets. 3. Remove dough from refrigerator in small amounts. Scoop 1 heaping teaspoon at a time onto a piece of waxed paper. Use the waxed paper to roll the dough into a thin fingershaped cookie. Press one almond into one end of each cookie to give the appearance of a long fingernail. Squeeze cookie near the tip and again near the center of each to give the impression of knuckles. You can also cut into the dough with a sharp knife at the same points to help give a more finger-like appearance. Arrange the shaped cookies on the baking sheets. 4. Bake in the preheated oven until the cookies are slightly golden in color, 20 to 25 minutes.

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line 24 cupcake cups with paper liners. 2. Place cake mix in a bowl, and pour in water and vegetable oil; add 3 eggs. With electric mixer on low speed, beat the cake mix with water, oil, and eggs until thoroughly combined, about 2 minutes. Pour half the cake mix into a second bowl; divide the remaining cake mix in half, and place into 2 separate small bowls. 3. Color the largest portion of the cake mix orange by mixing in 4 drops of red food coloring and 6 drops of yellow food coloring. Into a second, smaller bowl of cake mix, mix in 10 drops of red food coloring, 12 drops of yellow food coloring, and 6 drops of green food coloring, to color that bowl brown. Into the last remaining small bowl of cake mix, stir in 5 drops of yellow food coloring to color that bowl yellow. 4. Spoon yellow cake batter into the bottoms of 12 prepared cupcake cups, filling them about 1/3 full. Spoon the brown batter into the bottoms of the remaining 12 prepared cupcake cups, filling them about 1/3 full. Spoon orange cupcake mix over the yellow and brown layers, filling the cupcakes about 2/3 full. Try not to jar or shake the filled cupcakes, to avoid mixing layers. 5. Carefully place cupcakes into the preheated oven, and bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of a cupcake comes out clean, 18 to 22 minutes. Allow to cool. 6. Frost each cooled cupcake with the white frosting; place a piece of candy corn on each cupcake.

butter, softened icing sugar egg almond extract vanilla extract all-purpose flour baking powder salt whole almonds

caramel apples

Makes 6 Caramel Apples 6 apples 1 (14 oz) pkg individually wrapped caramels, unwrapped 2 tbsp milk Directions 1. Remove the stem from each apple and press a craft stick into the top. Butter a baking sheet. 2. Place caramels and milk in a microwave safe bowl, and microwave 2 minutes, stirring once. Allow to cool briefly. 3. Roll each apple quickly in caramel sauce until well coated. Place on prepared sheet to set.

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Dress Up to Dream Come True

“From my perspective, fashion is a closet full of opportunities. It gives me the ability to constantly re-invent myself while simultaneously embracing who I truly am.” Most people would think I grew up as a city girl but a surprising and unknown fact is that I’m originally a small town girl that spent my childhood on a farm just outside of Whitewood, Saskatchewan. In high school, I was always the chameleon in the crowd seizing every opportunity I could to raid my mother’s closet or strut around in a pair of heels. At the time, playing dress up was just something I loved to do for fun. I would often daydream about being an ultra-cool fashion guru living in a big city but I never thought it would later become my passion in life. Maybe I should have taken things a bit more seriously when I was nominated as the Paris Hilton of Whitewood School in my high school yearbook. To this day, I still wish they would have come up with someone a little more reputable to compare me too, like Anna Wintour. I experienced a bit of a mid-teenage crisis when my parents decided to move our family closer to the city, shortly before I was about to graduate high school. I did what any enraged teenage daughter would do and proceeded to give them the silent treatment for being life-ruiners. Thinking back on it now, I shamefully regret my prolonged temper tantrum because now I realize my parents were opening doors of opportunity for my future. 28 |

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After high school, I continued down the educational path and started my four-year journey to receive my Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing at the University of Regina. I continued to play dress up in my daily life and still had an undeniable love for the fashion world. I just didn’t know where to start, so I decided to give writing a try. It all began when I started a fashion column called Haute Topic for the Carillon that focused on basic trends and styling tips for students. I was later given an opportunity to interview the founders of Sask Fashion Week (SFW) and write an article about its first annual debut. After writing this article, the doors of opportunity began to open, one after another. I participated in the first SFW as a volunteer and then later joined as a member of the executive committee as a street style contributor. Little did I know that being involved with such a tight-knit fashion community like SFW would set me up for my dream job of being a fashion guru in the big city. This past summer I accepted a blogging internship with The Fashion Society, a merchandising company based out of Toronto and Montreal, whom I met at SFW. Amidst the influx of opportunities, I also launched my own independent blog, Closet Space, in November 2012. Closet Space became a hanger for creativity, a place where I could unleash my inner fashion junkie and share my perspectives with the outside world.


often get asked the question, “why fashion”? From my perspective, fashion is a closet full of opportunities. It allows me the ability to constantly re-invent myself while simultaneously embracing who I truly am. Fashion gives me the creative freedom to dress in a conservative manner one day and then maybe a little more outrageous the next. It’s always a changing continuum, so I can always find ways to change and evolve my wardrobe. However, it’s not just the components of my wardrobe that make fashion so important to me; it’s more about how I wear them. I find an empowering confidence within myself when I’m wearing something that I love. I’m not afraid to try things that are out of the ordinary; I’ve become accustomed to being someone that stands out in a crowd and that’s what I continue to strive for. If I wear something that doesn’t make a statement, then it isn’t a success. I want to be fun, outrageous and sometimes unexpected. It’s not always your personality that defines who you are; sometimes you just have to let the clothes do the talking for you. As per my duties as a fashion blogger, it wouldn’t be right of me to finish this article without giving you the rundown of what’s hot on the trend radar for this fall. Here’s a list of five trends that I’ve developed a slight obsession for:

Neutrals The neutral family has spent the duration of its existence on the popularity meter by building a withstanding reputation as the peanut butter and jelly of any outfit collaboration. This fall’s trend radar encourages excessive amounts of black, white and grey in the form of committing solely to one color tone or marrying a variety of colors together. The little black dress has reinforced its ‘worthy-for-anyoccasion status’, so this fall you can invest in it as an item you can over-wear again and again.

Leather It’s a common assumption that every trend that runs its course will eventually come back around again in some way, shape or form. Leather, a former representative of the 80’s wardrobe, has made a reappearance on the list of things that used to be cool then subsequently refreshed their cool status one more time. If you’re in the mood to relive the days of your rebellious youth or pretend that you are in fact a rebellious youth, this fall season is your chance to do so.

The Embellished Sweater The sweater trend in particular is essential for the erratic weather conditions that we experience from living amidst the prairies’ seasonal dysfunctions. We owe it to the fashion gods for thinking of us during our time of dependence on heavily insulated materials. I hope you’re looking forward to the plethora of embellished wool sweaters that you’ll adopt as your new best friend for the fall season and into the depths of winter.

Oxfords This fall season you’ll see a variety of trends dabbling in the androgynous side of things. The oxford shoe has ventured off into uncharted territory, deeming it acceptable for women to steal wearing rights for a man’s shoe. It’s time to put your sole interest into something of the flat-heeled nature and take a heelcation, if you will, from those platform wedges.

Velvet Velvet, another trend that is worthy of a spot on the aforementioned list of trends that used to be cool then subsequently refreshed their cool status one more time, is also making a re-appearance for the fall season. Quite frankly, I’m rather excited about encompassing my body in something that’s comparable to a plush rug, aren’t you?

Ashley Kilback Marketing Student, Fashion Writer of Closet Space, Energetic fireball with a zest for life Ashley’s sweater dress is from Uforia/Muse, the black and white outfit is from World of Trout. Follow closetspace.ca for more fashionable musings by Ashley Kilback.

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New Saskatchewan Organization Offers Resources and Information to Breast Cancer Patients, Caregivers and Health Professionals “My doctor says I have breast cancer.

Where do I go now? Who is out there to give me the information I need? I don’t even know what information I need. How does my family cope? Does my doctor know what help is out there for me?” “As a health care professional how do I access the resources I need to help those affected by breast cancer?” These questions and many more go through your mind after having been given the devastating diagnosis of breast cancer. We know that every woman has a different experience with her cancer. She often feels isolated, overwhelmed and confused, as does her family. Saskatchewan Breast Cancer Connect Inc., (SBCC) helps patients, health care practitioners and breast cancer related support groups to answer those very questions. Recognizing the existing efforts within our province to fight breast cancer, SBCC helps patients to become knowledgeable about cancer and its treatment. We are mapping the resources, supports and services currently available to breast cancer patients and their families within their home communities and all across Saskatchewan. This includes information and resources for professionals and cancer patients alike. If you are a patient, health care practitioner or a breast cancer related support group in any of the Saskatchewan health regions, we need your help. We need your stories, issues or concerns as patients. We need your input so that our information center contains the necessary information to guide users toward all available resources and support in the Saskatchewan community. This is a chance to be involved in an exciting endeavor, to truly make a difference in lives affected by breast cancer. At the time of this writing this, we are “breast deep” in preparations for our first Annual General Meeting and Education Day scheduled for September 28/13! As a member, you would receive an invitation to events such as this. This year, our Education Day featured extensive lots of networking, a trade show, and some wonderful presentations. These included presenters from ReThink Breast Cancer (an organization helping people under 45 diagnosed with breast cancer), the Manitoba Breast & Women’s Cancer Network, Mindful-based Stress Reduction, Exciting Developments in Lymphedema, and a very inspirational address from our special guest speaker, Dionne Warner – multi cancer survivor, author and public speaker.

Membership in Saskatchewan Breast Cancer Connect Inc. includes the Canadian

Breast Cancer Network’s publication “Network News” and E-letter “Outreach” published quarterly, and information sharing. For more information about how you can become a member of SBCC, contact Anthea Fritz at 306-781-2134 OR write to SBCC, 3750 Salverson Bay, Regina SK S4V 2H1 OR email saskbreastcancerconnect@hotmail.com.

Membership Application:

Membership is $20.00 and expires annually. Please forward this application with your payment to: D. Koptie, SBCC Membership Committee, 42 Riverside Drive, Yorkton SK. S3N 0R3 Name:

Organization (or N/A):

Mailing Address: Town/City: Phone (primary):

Postal Code: Phone (secondary):

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Saskat chewan Breast Cancer Connect Inc. Empowering those affected by breast cancer to access comprehensive information and services 30 |

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013


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FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013


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info@getcompass.ca FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 33


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FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013


Top Ten List for Financial Well-Being By – Gisele Gherasim, CFP, FDS

1.

an enhancement to your pension plan. You realize an immediate benefit as the total amount of your annual contribution can be deducted from your gross income and the growth of the investments in your RRSP are tax sheltered until withdrawn.

Be aware of and assess your current financial situation You cannot plan for or achieve your financial goals if you don’t know how much you spend, what you owe and how much you actually take home. Be honest with yourself: check bank statements, bills, pay stubs. And if you are a couple, both of you should be aware of your financial situation(s).

7. Get advice

2. Live well and well below your means

8. Become more self-sufficient

Life is for living, but that doesn’t mean you should incur debt to enjoy it.

3. Focus on expenses not income Simply put, spend less than you have. It doesn’t matter how much you earn, what matters is how much you spend.

Have a financial plan prepared by a financial planner. Discuss investment options with a professional financial advisor. It’s wise to have a trusted, experienced and knowledgeable expert who keeps up with the financial arena guiding you.

You are responsible for your financial well-being. Don’t rely on your family, friends, an inheritance or the government to help you out.

9. Set up a TFSA

It’s expensive and if you are carrying consumer debt you likely aren’t paying attention to # 2 and # 3.

Any and all earning on money deposited to a TFSA, whether it is interest, dividends or capital gains, is exempt from tax, even on withdrawal. And you can withdraw from a TFSA at any time (assuming that the investments in your TFSA are liquid).

5. Set aside an emergency fund

10. Use life insurance wisely

4. Eliminate consumer debt

Be prepared for the unexpected. An emergency fund will provide reserves for emergencies and eliminate the stress of worrying about how you’re going to manage financially.

6. Contribute to an RRSP

Depending on your situation you may or may not need life insurance, but it is important to buy the right kind of insurance for your needs. In the event of your death life insurance will provide cash to pay down debt, replace income, pay or reduce estate taxes, and cover children’s expenses.

An RRSP is the foundation for your retirement or may be

Gisele Gherasim, CFP, FDS 2300 Smith Street, Regina, SK S4P 2P6 Phone: 306.337.4500 | Toll-Free: 1-866-317-4500 Fax: 306.337.4505 Email: info@brothersandco.ca www.brothersandco.ca

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visitminot.org 36 |

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013


BOOK CLUB anne lazurko: dollybird

by Gail Jansen-kesslar Welcoming your first novel is an exciting time for any author but to receive that first box surrounded by authors you respect and admire would be thrilling. This was the case for new author Anne Lazurko who received the first shipment of her novel Dollybird while at a writer’s retreat at Sage Hill in Lumsden. “To be surrounded by other authors like Helen Humphries, Denise Chong and Lawrence Hill, while uncrating my book, finally in print -- was just an incredible experience,” says Lazurko. Anne’s love for the written word began when she worked as a journalist for a small weekly paper in Edson, Alberta. It would be a love affair she put on hold as she pursued other loves -- first as a wife, then as a farmer, followed by the love and hectic lifestyle of four busy children. But as her children grew older, the flame for writing slowly began to rekindle, first with short fiction, followed by poetry pieces before turning her full attention to writing a novel. “When I started I didn’t know what I was doing,” laughs Lazurko. “But I just kept chugging away at it and eventually had a first draft in about a year and a half.” Lazurko was initially inspired by an innocuous visit to a small-town graveyard. The plethora of marked graves belonging to young children and women from the turn of the century left her wondering what life was like for young mothers during that period of virulence. A term for women, “dollybirds” became her second thread of inspiration. She overheard it used while living on the prairies. Dollybirds has had many layered meanings but when used during that point in history, described a housekeeper or woman of ill repute, sometimes both, that accompanied unmarried homesteaders and helped run their households. Weaving both threads of inspiration together the fictional story of twenty year old Moira soon unfolded. Set in 1906, the novel is the tale of an unwed pregnant woman who is banished to Saskatchewan to serve as a “dollybird” to Irish homesteader Dillan Flaherty. It is only Moira’s medical skills learned from her father, a doctor, that elevates her position in the community from a woman not to be associated with, to a woman the community needed. Less a tale of gloom than a tale that illuminates Moira’s ability to overcome her lowly circumstances and see the joy in the everyday, the story highlights how important the smallest acts of kindness can be to someone and how they can make all the difference in a person’s life. “Moira goes against the norms of her time by her actions and her determination,” says Lazurko. “But I think women like her have existed throughout history and that their lives were not just all about drudgery and hardships.” A fact of life Lazurko has learned firsthand, as a farmer navigating through the hardships that living on the prairies can offer. Equally at home behind the controls of a combine as she is behind a desk and computer, Lazurko says both aspects of her life work to balance her. “I need both equally,” asserts Lazurko. “One feeds the other. When I’m farming I feel more grounded and when my brain is tired from writing, I can head back out to enjoy the physicality that farming brings.” She is now hard at work at her second novel, another period piece inspired by her father’s own stories of life as a Dutch soldier in Indonesia. Lazurko says writing Dollybird was a return to a love nearly forgotten, an exciting process that she’s hoping to enjoy as much the second time around. FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 37


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FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013


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Safe TravelS ONE PART reSearch TWO PARTS common SenSe

By Dale Strawford There are many misconceptions about travelling to foreign countries and one of the biggest is travel safety. Travelling is never as dangerous as you are led to believe; after all, if your travel guidebook was the six o-clock news you’d never go anywhere. From experience, travel safety is one part research and two parts common sense. Naturally you need to put some thought to where you are going. World situations are dynamic and can change quickly. There are elections, uprisings, criminal activities and even natural disasters to take into account for anywhere you plan to go. For a thorough but frightening review of all countries, a solid place to start is the Government of Canada “Country Travel Advice and Advisories” website http://travel.gc.ca/travelling/advisories. It provides a worldwide listing of all countries and known problems for travel within them, and even has a convenient map. At first glance the map appears to severely limit your destination choices but don’t be dismayed, you need to dig deeper and weigh what that risk is. And really, risk can never be eliminated completely; you just want to reduce it to a comfortable level. You put your seatbelt on when your drive in a car to protect yourself from injury but once you do it you have reduced your risk and don’t worry about it further – you still drive your car. The same rational goes for travel. Drill down into advisories to see exactly where the travel concern lies because it may not even impact you or concern you. Research done ahead of time may make you comfortable but it never hurts when you arrive in a new town, city or country to

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FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013

ask your hotel clerks or tour guides to confirm the safety of the area. This is always a nice way to add some piece of mind to your travels. In the end however, your safety mostly depends on your own common sense. The number one thing you can do to ensure your personal safety while travelling is don’t over consume alcohol, especially female travellers. Criminals are opportunistic and being inebriated makes you an easy target to be robbed of your possessions. A close second is outwardly showing wealth in a conspicuous way, such as designer jewellery, expensive cameras or electronics. Being discrete is always your best option because petty crime is common throughout the world. Lastly, let your gut instinct always be your guide. If something doesn’t seem safe or appear to be a good idea, follow that instinct and stay safe. My family of five travelled over 60,000km by air, land and sea through Europe, Africa and South America for six months and we rarely ever felt any concern for safety just by following the simple common sense rules. Wandering the streets of downtown Cairo at night with three small boys was an excellent adventure I will never forget and the only time I ever felt uncomfortable was with strangers touching my children’s blonde hair – something I soon recognized as good intentioned and later understood as cultural. It’s worth reminding that people are the same everywhere – they all have family and the same wishes and dreams for a good life. Travelling with children in some ways made me feel safer; I felt


goodwill from strangers at every turn. And that is critical to remember. People are always going to be there to help you and your common sense should tell you whether it’s genuine. And frankly, 99.99% of the time it is. That is how you make real connections to the places you visit. There is risk in everything you do so don’t let fear guide your travels, simply being informed allows you to reduce any concerns to the point where you can just have fun and enjoy yourself. Safe travels are happy travels. We travel for fun and adventure and until we can comfortably relax and enjoy ourselves, it isn’t a vacation. Top 5 Safety Tips While Travelling 1. Avoid being out at night in strange place unless you know it’s safe to do so. You wouldn’t wander down dark alleys at night in grittier areas of your own towns, ensure you don’t do so in a foreign country. 2. Don’t overindulge in alcohol. A few drinks are always fun but keep your wits about you and you’ll always get home safe. 3. Vaccinations and medicines are important. Do not overlook any required vaccinations for countries you are visiting or may pass through. Certainly make sure you take extras of any prescribed medicines you require, there is no guarantee you will find them while travelling. Language barriers may prove tough to overcome, so get a doctor to prescribe you ‘just in case’ medication for things like traveller’s diarrhea. A good resource for travel health is the Public Health Agency of Canada http:// www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/tmp-pmv/. 4. Informed travelling is safe travelling. It may not always be crime that could get you into trouble. Ensure you know any customs of countries you are visiting to ensure you do not offend the locals. Many countries are much more conservative than Canada and you need to respect that.

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5. Don’t put all your money in one basket. Ensure you keep your

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013 | 41


halloween fun Pretty soon those spooky ghosts and adorable little pumpkins will be going door-to-door collecting candy and showing off fun costumes that they’ve been looking forward to wearing for weeks. In the days leading up to Halloween, there are plenty of ways you can have some Halloween-themed fun at home that doesn’t include tummy aches from too much candy.

with way more candy than they need. Before your kids start collecting, ask them to help you brainstorm ideas for leftover candy like places to donate the extras to. For more fun ideas for Halloween like free printable games and tips for creating your own haunted house at home, visit the Moms & Munchkins page dedicated to Holiday Fun (http://www. momsandmunchkins.ca/holiday-fun/) and scroll down to the Halloween section under the October heading. I hope you all have a happy and safe Halloween season. Don’t forget to brush your teeth after all that candy!

Free Colouring Pages: Does your child have a favourite cartoon character or television network? Visit their website for free Halloween colouring pages, craft ideas and games. Silly Costume Contest: Your child likely already has a Halloween costume picked out but now is a great time to make up some silly costumes for a little contest at home. Using items you have around the house like wigs, old costumes, old clothes and cardboard boxes; you can make some fun costumes, dress up and take some photos. An old box, aluminum foil, empty soup cans and pipe cleaners can turn into a pretty creative robot! Halloween Movie Marathon: Depending on the ages of your children, grab some slightly spooky Halloween cartoons or some PG Halloween movies and create your own spooky theatre at home. A Halloween theatre wouldn’t be complete without spooky snacks so you could serve food like orange (cheddar) popcorn with a few surprise gummy worms mixed in. Halloween Treat Bags: One of my favourite Halloween memories growing up was our annual tradition to make special cupcakes for all our neighbourhood friends. We’d deliver these special Halloween cupcakes in the early afternoon before the excitement of trick-or-treating began. Another delicious idea for special treat bags would be to make homemade caramel apples topped with crushed candy. Halloween Light Show: During the Christmas season, does your family drive around and look at the outdoor decorations and light shows in your neighbourhood? This would be a fun activity for the Halloween season as well. You could even make this into a fun scavenger hunt game by seeing how many ghosts, witches, skeletons or pumpkins you can find. Candy Overload: It happens every year, your kids come home

www.momsandmunchkins.ca 42 |

FOR SASKATCHEWAN WOMEN | VOL. 2 ISSUE 10, OCTOBER 2013

by Cheryl Kirkness


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PINK Magazine - Vol. 2 October 2013  

PINK Magazine features women who are making a difference in the province through academia, sports, business and charity. With Saskatchewan b...