Surface Warfare Magazine - SUMMER 2020

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Surface Warfare Summer 2020 Issue 67


SURFACE WARFARE SUMMER 2020

Authorization

Surface Warfare is published quarterly from appropriated funds by authority of the Chief of Naval Operations in accordance with NPPR P-35. The Secretary of the Navy has determined that this publication is necessary in the transaction of business required by law of the Department of the Navy. Use of funds for printing this publication has been approved by the Navy Publications and Printing Policy Committee. Reproductions are encouraged with proper citation. Controlled circulation. Postmaster: Send address changes to Surface Warfare, SURFPAC Public Affairs Office, 2841 Rendova Road, San Diego, CA 92155. Surface Warfare (USPS 104-170) (ISSN 0145-1073) is published by the Department of the Navy, Commander, Naval Surface Forces, 2841 Rendova Road, San Diego, CA 92155. Periodicals postage paid at San Diego, CA, and additional mailing offices.

Charter

Surface Warfare Magazine is the professional magazine of the surface warfare community. Its purpose is to educate its readers on surface warfare missions and programs, with a particular focus on U.S. surface ships and commands. This journal will also draw upon the Surface Force’s rich historical legacy to instill a sense of pride and professionalism among community members and to enhance reader awareness of the increasing relevance of surface warfare for our nation’s defense. The opinions and assertions herein are the personal views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy.

Surface Warfare Summer 2020 Issue 67

Contact:

Surface Warfare Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs Office, N01P 2841 Rendova Road San Diego, CA 92155 Phone: (619) 437-2735

Contributions and Feedback Welcome

Send articles, photographs (min. 300 dpi electronic) and feedback to: surface_warfare_maga@navy.mil

Commander, Naval Surface Forces Vice Adm. Rich Brown

Deputy Commander, Naval Surface Forces Rear Adm. Joey B. Dodgen Public Affairs Officer Cmdr. Patrick L. Evans Executive Editor MCCS Ahron Arendes Managing Editor Ted Townsend Layout and Design Ted Townsend


SURFACE WARFARE SUMMER 2020

Contents 2. Commander's Corner Surface Force News: 4. USS Roosevelt Departs for First FDNF Patrol

20. DESRON 9 Chaplain Named Navy’s First Joshua Goldberg Award Winner

5. America, Gabrielle Giffords Integrate Operations

22. COMNAVSURFOR and COMNAVSURFLANT Announce Bloodhound Award Winners

6. USS Ramage Returns from Deployment 7. U.S., Japan Operate Together in Andaman Sea 8. USS Roosevelt Arrives in 6th Fleet 9. U.S. Navy, Royal Australian Navy Team Up in South China Sea Response 10. Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training Creates Combat Ready Ships, Battle-Minded Crews 11. Naval Surface Force Atlantic Holds Change of Command 12. USS Zumwalt Completes First Live Fire Test 13. USS Pinckney Takes Down Drug Vessel, Seizes Over $28M of Cocaine 14. Navy Littoral Combat Ship USS Kansas City Joins the Fleet 15. USS Kidd Departs on Deployment 16. U.S. Navy Maintains Persistent Presence Near West Capella 17. Sailors Say Versatility, Training, Crucial to Success in Different World of Littoral Combat Ship Feature Stories: 18. Surface Warfare Award Winners

24. Engineers for Future USS Tripoli Take Control 26. U.S. 6th Fleet: Ready, Vigilant, On Watch 28. The Future of Mine Warfare: A Hail and Farewell Cover Stories: 30. COMNAVSURFOR Announces Battle “E” Winners 32. Naval Surface Force Pacific and Atlantic Name Sea, Shore Sailors of the Year 34. Naval Surface Force Pacific and Atlantic Announce FY19 Civilian of the Year Award Winners 38. Voices From the Fleet Life Lessons from the Sea 40. History and Heritage: Uncommon Valor was a Common Virtue 42. Faces of Surface Warfare

Cover: Seaman Matthew Luera, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), prepares for well deck operations. Bataan, the flagship for the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and with the embarked 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alan L. Robertson


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SURFACE WARFARE SUMMER 2020

Commander's Corner

Our priorities remain the health of our force, building and maintaining combat effectiveness, and protecting the health of our families and communities. As we confront today’s challenges, we cannot lose sight of our mission to man, train, and equip the force and our goal to deploy combat ready ships and battle-minded crews. In this issue of Surface Warfare Magazine, we recognize our Sailors, ships, and support commands who have supported our mission, helped us reach our goal, and embodied a culture of excellence. We highlight award winners, Sailors of the Year, civilians of the year, Battle “E” winners, and many more. These individuals and crews are the best of the best, and I encourage each of you to take note of their accomplishments and expertise. Keep up the good work. These winners represent what we are – the premier surface force in the world – second to none – that controls the seas and provides the nation with combat naval power when and where needed. With the renewed Great Power Competition upon us, we are required to always be ready, and in doing that, we will continue to own tomorrow’s fight today. Congratulations shipmates, and continue to OWN THE FIGHT! *


SURFACE WARFARE SUMMER 2020

Vice Adm. Richard Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, shared the stage at WEST 2020, a naval conference and exposition at the San Diego Convention Center. Brown was among several top military leaders in a panel discussion on manning, training, and equipping during Great Power Competition. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex Millar

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Surface Force News

USS Roosevelt Departs for First FDNF Patrol The Arleigh Burke-class guidedStory by missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG Mass Communication 80) departed its new homeport of Rota, Specialist SN Austin Spain, to execute its first ForwardCollins, U.S. Naval Forces Deployed Naval Forces-Europe Europe and Africa/U.S. 6th (FDNF-E) patrol, June 23. Fleet Public Affairs Roosevelt, named after the 32nd President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife Eleanor, is replacing USS Carney (DDG 64) in the first of several scheduled homeport shifts to occur in support of the U.S. Navy’s long-range plan to gradually rotate the four Rota-based destroyers. “This is Roosevelt’s inaugural patrol as a member of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 60 and 6th Fleet,” said Cmdr. Ryan R. Kendall, commanding officer aboard Roosevelt. “We are eager to operate alongside our NATO allies and regional partners to enhance interoperability and build a deeper partnership in operations at sea.” For the past two weeks, the crew has been working diligently to prepare for the patrol, focusing on maintenance and training. “I am proud of all the hard work and preparation the officers, chiefs, and

crew have put into getting ready for this patrol,” said Kendall. “I believe Team Roosevelt will demonstrate our combat-ready professionalism that strengthens our allies and deters our competitors.” Roosevelt is scheduled to conduct operations and exercises as directed by U.S. European Command (EUCOM) and C6F, including working directly alongside allies and partners throughout the Mediterranean Sea and Eastern Atlantic Ocean. “Roosevelt is the first DDG Flight IIA, AEGIS Baseline 9 ship to arrive in 6th Fleet, and we bring additional high-end capabilities and capacities that we hope to demonstrate in a dynamic and changing security environment,” said Kendall. The ship completed a regional patrol in the C6F area of operations and arrived at its new homeport in May. Prior to arriving in Rota, Roosevelt conducted Surface Action Group operations with USS Donald Cook (DDG 75), USS Porter (DDG 78), USNS Supply (T-AOE-6), and Royal Navy frigate HMS Kent (F78) above the Arctic Circle and in the Barents Sea. C6F, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa. *


SURFACE WARFARE SUMMER 2020

NAVAL BASE ROTA, Spain (June 23, 2020) Operations Specialist Seaman Recruit Mateo C. Betancourt heaves around a line on the foc's'le aboard the Arleigh Burkeclass guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80), June 23, 2020. Roosevelt, forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, is on its first patrol in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of regional allies and partners and U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Austin G. Collins.

America, Gabrielle Giffords Integrate Operations Amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), flagship of Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 7, conducted operations with littoral combat ship USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), March 13. America, the Navy’s newest amphibious assault ship and Gabrielle Giffords, the fifth Independence-class littoral combat ship, joined forces while operating in the South China Sea. The two warships operated together exercising command and control and executing tactical maneuver. This is the first time the two ships have worked together. “Integrating Gabrielle Giffords into the Story by America Expeditionary Strike Group for Petty Officer 1st Class this underway period adds to one of the Taylor Jackson ESG's greatest strengths - our versatility,” said Rear Adm. Fred Kacher, commander, ESG 7. “By combining America's lethality provided by the Navy-Marine Corps Team with the speed and maneuverability of a littoral combat ship, we're forging new ways to operate together in one of the most important regions in the world.” America, with the embarked 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced) is conducting operations in the South China Sea after completing Exercise Cobra Gold in the Kingdom of Thailand, Mar. 7. Gabrielle Giffords is on rotational deployment in the U.S. IndoPacific Command. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary strike Group 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit team, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. *

SOUTH CHINA SEA (March 13, 2020) Amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) sails alongside littoral combat ship USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10). Photo By Seaman Theodore Lee.

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Surface Force News USS Ramage Returns from Deployment The guided-missile destroyer USS Ramage (DDG 61) returned to Norfolk Naval Station Mar. 26, marking the end of a deployment to the U.S. 2nd, 5th, and 6th fleet areas of operation. Ramage deployed Aug. 20, 2019, to conduct maritime security operations and provide ballistic missile defense for U.S. Navy fleet and combatant commanders. “I could not be prouder of Team Ramage,” said Cmdr. Jack Benfield, commanding officer Story by of USS Ramage. “They represented our Navy Commander, U.S. 2nd and our nation extremely well; working with Fleet Public Affairs partner nations to strengthen regional ties, promote stability, and facilitate the free flow of commerce. "While in U.S. 5th Fleet, Ramage supported Coalition Task Force (CTF) Sentinel, maintaining domain awareness through surveillance in the heavily transited Strait of Hormuz," Benfiled continued. "These operations were instrumental in maintaining freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce throughout the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, and Arabian Sea." Throughout the deployment, Ramage performed numerous training exercises to develop tactical competencies. From carrier strike force operations to coalition exercises with the UK, France, Egypt, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, the ship

developed key skillsets to maintain readiness and interoperability, further strengthening strategic bonds and cooperation with maritime partners. Their historic visit to Beirut, Lebanon, was the first time a U.S. Navy ship had visited the country in over 36 years and demonstrated the Navy's continuing regional commitment to EUCOM and CENTCOM areas of responsibility by hosting a reception for over 80 guests and foreign media outlets, including political and military leaders from eight ally and partner nations. While in 6th Fleet, Ramage also represented the United States at the 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of the Netherlands, sailing in the naval parade and hosting a reception on board attended by Commander, U.S. Marine Forces Europe, as well as senior Dutch naval officials. The ship sailed over 55,000 nautical miles and completed multiple strait and choke point transits, to include the Strait of Gibraltar, the Suez Canal, the Bab-el Mandeb, and the Strait of Hormuz. “I’m excited to be home to see my family, my wife,” said Gas Turbine Technician Mechanic 2nd Class Richard Senior. “It was nice to see other countries, but I’m glad to be back home.” The ship was commissioned on Jul. 22, 1995, and is named for Vice Adm. Lawson P. Ramage, who received the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry while in command of the submarine USS Parche (SSN 683) during World War II. Ramage is homeported at Naval Station Norfolk. *

NORFOLK, Va. (March 26, 2020) – Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Ramage (DDG 61) handle mooring lines as the ship returns from deployment. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joshua D. Sheppard


SURFACE WARFARE SUMMER 2020

U.S., Japan Operate Together in Andaman Sea ANDAMAN SEA (NNS) -- The Independence-variant littoral combat ship USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Akizuki-class destroyer JS Teruzuki (DD 116) conducted operations together, while sailing through the Andaman Sea, April 2. While transiting, Gabrielle Giffords and Teruzuki conducted bilateral communications exercises, division tactics, and photo exercise, all designed to enhance interoperability between the two navies and emphasize the importance of communications and coordination while operating underway together. “When the U.S. Navy and JMSDF ships meet at sea and are able to quickly develop plans and operate together, Story by it reflects the strong friendship and Lt. Lauren Chatmas, maritime professionalism that our Destroyer Squadron nations share,” said Rear Adm. Fred Seven Public Affairs Kacher, Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 7. “Exercises like these strengthen our mutual commitment to the security, stability and prosperity of this vital region, as we work together to protect a free and open Indo-Pacific.” Coming together with partners and allies at sea allows the U.S. Navy to operate closely with other navies and in ways shore exercises do not allow. It further provides the crews with real-life situations to practice their everyday watchstanding and communication skills with foreign vessels.

Teruzuki is currently underway in the Indo-Pacific in support of regional security and stability. During this time, she also supports training for officer trainees. “It was a really good opportunity for us and officer trainees to conduct cooperative deployment with USS Gabrielle Giffords,” said Captain Masafumi Kadota, Commander, Escort Division (CCD) 11, JMSDF. “We could show them strong Japan-U.S. ties and mutual relationship through this exercise.” On her maiden rotational deployment to the IndoPacific, this exercise marks the first time Gabrielle Giffords has operated with JMSDF. “Joining our JMSDF friends at sea allowed the Gabrielle Giffords crew to operate and sail side-byside with a skilled ship from a very professional and capable naval force,” said Cmdr. Dustin T. Lonero, commanding officer, Gabrielle Giffords blue crew. “Both of our ships executed flawless maneuvering while sailing in near proximity, showing that our naval partnerships can work professionally anywhere.” Attached to Destroyer Squadron SEVEN, Gabrielle Giffords is on her rotational deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific. U.S. 7th Fleet conducts forward-deployed naval operations in support of U.S. national interests in the Indo-Pacific area of operations. As the U.S. Navy’s largest numbered fleet, 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that foster maritime security, promote stability, and prevent conflict. *

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Surface Force News USS Roosevelt Arrives in 6th Fleet NAPLES, Italy (NNS) -- Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) is conducting operations in U.S. 6th Fleet in support of maritime security operations. Roosevelt, named after the 32nd President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife Eleanor, is the first Flight IIA Forward Deployed Naval ForcesEurope (FDNF-E) destroyer and, following a regional patrol, will complete her homeport shift to Rota, Spain. “Roosevelt is trained and ready to execute the FDNF-E mission set and shift homeports Story by to Rota,” said Cmdr. Matthew Molmer, Commander, U.S. 2nd Roosevelt’s commanding officer. “Our Fleet Public Affairs professional crew will continue the legacy of ships assigned to 6th Fleet.” Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM 48) Detachment 7 ‘Mayport Mules’ embarked on Roosevelt, which is the first FDNF-E destroyer capable of deploying with organic Lamps MK III MH-60 helicopters. Roosevelt will replace USS Carney (DDG 64) in the first of several scheduled homeport shifts to occur in support of the U.S. Navy’s longrange plan to gradually rotate the four Rota-based destroyers. “The arrival of Roosevelt is a tangible demonstration of our continued commitment to operate forward in support of our national security interests,” said Vice Adm. Lisa Franchetti, commander, U.S. 6th Fleet. “Our forward deployed destroyers out of Rota, Spain conduct the full range of maritime operations and provide unwavering support to our allies and partners across the region.”

Prior to transiting the Atlantic, Roosevelt took a variety of coronavirus-related precautions to ensure the crew arrived in the European theater safe and healthy. With a newly configured baseline 9 Aegis weapon system, Roosevelt brings the U.S. Navy’s top-of-the-line capabilities to the U.S. European Phased Adaptive Approach and NATO’s robust integrated air missile defense (IAMD) architecture. Roosevelt will support these missions, while patrolling the waters surrounding Europe and Africa, ensuring freedom of navigation in critical waterways. Roosevelt will seamlessly integrate into the U.S. 6th Fleet mission, as the ship and crew are already familiar with our regional partners and allies. In 2019, Roosevelt participated in Exercise Formidable Shield, conducting an SM-3 engagement with a simulated ballistic missile target, while concurrently engaging ‘Firejet’ test targets with SM-2 missiles. Last June, the ship also visited Chebourg, France to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day landings in Normandy. The success of D-Day demonstrated the impact a strong unified alliance can have; Roosevelt is forward deployed to reinforce that strong alliance, supporting maritime security and stability. Commander Task Force (CTF) 65 and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 60, headquartered in Rota, Spain, oversee the forward-deployed ships in U.S. 6th Fleet’s area of operation in support of regional allies and partners, as well as U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa. *


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U.S. Navy, Royal Australian Navy Team Up in South China Sea Response The U.S. Navy and Royal Australian Navy came together for operations in the South China Sea starting April 13. HMAS Parramatta (FFG 154) began sailing with Ticonderogaclass guided missile-cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) then rendezvoused with amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) and Arleigh-Burke class guided missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG 52) April 18. Their combined operations started with force integration training and maneuvering exercises between Parramatta and Bunker Hill. Story by “It is great to be operating with the Petty Officer 1st Class Australians again,” said Capt. Kurt Taylor Jackson Sellerberg, commanding officer of USS Bunker Hill. “Every time I have deployed to this region, and to the Middle East, I have had the good fortune to operate with the Royal Australian Navy.” Operations with USS America started with a precision maneuvers that included Barry in the South China Sea. “We look forward to every opportunity we get to work with our stalwart Australian allies at sea,” said Rear Adm. Fred Kacher, commander of the America Expeditionary Strike Group. “To bring this much combat capability together here in the South China Sea truly signals to our allies and partners in the region that we are deeply committed to a free and open Indo-Pacific.” Operations with Parramatta have included integrated live fire exercises, coordinated helicopter operations, small boat force protection drills, command and control integration, and maneuvering interoperability.

“San Diego [HM-60] ‘Romeo’ pilots have a long flying history with Australian pilots,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jacob “Shaky” Norgaard, “it’s a great opportunity to strengthen our relationship and practice joint tactics, techniques and procedures.” The events gave both navies the opportunity to integrate all warfare areas, and further strengthen the bond between both countries. "I was super pumped to participate in crossdeck operations with the Royal Australian Navy,” said Lt. Rachael “Janet” Davis. “We are stronger together, and this type of integration promotes our commitment to maritime security as well as increases our presence here.” The U.S. and Australia share a long history of integrated military exercises. Over 3,000 U.S. Sailors and Marines had the opportunity to observe or participate in the combined exercise. “They have the same interest in ensuring freedom of navigation and observance of internationally accepted norms and customs pertaining to the law of the sea,” said Sellerberg. “The Aussies are true professionals in every sense of the word, and our current combined deployment exemplifies a shared commitment to our historically strong and enduring relationship.” U.S. 7th Fleet conducts forward-deployed naval operations in support of U.S. national interests in the Indo-Pacific area of operations. As the U.S. Navy’s largest numbered fleet, 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that foster maritime security, promote stability, and prevent conflict. *

SOUTH CHINA SEA (April 18, 2020) The Royal Australian Navy guidedmissile frigate HMAS Parramatta (FFH 154), left, is underway with the U.S. Navy amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) and the Arleigh-Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG 52). Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas Huynh

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Surface Force News Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training Creates Combat Ready Ships, Battle-Minded Crews SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC) led U.S. Navy warships through Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) exercise, March 30 through April 17, in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Units included in the training were the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8), amphibious transport docks ships USS Somerset (LPD 25) and USS San Diego (LPD 22), and the Story by littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1). Naval Surface and “This advanced tactical exercise was the Mine Warfighting most demanding we’ve had to date for the Development Center Surface Force as we navigated being able to Public Affairs safely execute this critical training amidst the challenges presented by COVID-19,” said Rear Adm. Scott Robertson, commander, Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center. “The ultimate intent was to increase the lethality and combat power of naval surface forces by preparing our units to do what warships are designed to do-fight and win at sea- and that’s exactly what was accomplished here.” SMWDC facilitated the advanced level training to increase the tactical proficiency, lethality, and interoperability of amphibious and littoral combat ships within U.S. Third Fleet.

“It was exciting to witness the strength of our ships and Warfare Tactics Instructors (WTI) during the SWATT exercise. The team was united, maximized force readiness, and minimized exposure to the harmful conditions the world is experiencing. They were ready and leaned forward into SWATT, which is an exercise dedicated to improved warfighting skills, increased lethality, and overall tactical proficiency across multiple warfare disciplines” said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Downing, SMWDC lead SWATT planner. “During this unprecedented time the ships, with embarked WTIs and supporting teams, employed their combat and weapon systems across several live-fire and complex training events during the at-sea period. The result was as expected, a sharpened and more lethal ARG and LCS force.” The warships conducted several training exercises, including anti-submarine warfare, surface warfare, air defense and amphibious warfare. Complex live-fire events included missile exercises, torpedo exercises and gunnery exercises. The Navy evaluates all exercises and operations on a case-by-case basis during the coronavirus pandemic. Prior to ordering crews to sequester on board and continuing with a planned evolution, commanders of all our units, and at all levels, carefully balanced the need to maintain unit readiness and the health of the force with the impact to families and the Sailors. SMWDC and each ship followed all CDC and Navy guidelines regarding COVID-19 during the evolution. The training provided essential and vital tactical training and proficiency to the operational fleet, in order to ensure that units remain lethal and ready. *


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Naval Surface Force Atlantic Holds Change of Command NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT), held a change of command ceremony aboard the amphibious transport dock USS Arlington (LPD 24), June 19. Rear Adm. Brad Cooper relieved Rear Adm. Roy Kitchener during the time honored ceremony. Adm. Christopher W. Grady, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces served as the presiding officer witnessing the ceremonial Story by transfer of command leadership Naval Surface Force from Kitchener to Cooper. Atlantic Public Affairs The change of command ceremony draws its origins from tradition. It serves as a passing of command from one naval officer to another with all hands present to be witnesses. During Grady’s remarks, he emphasized the positive impact Kitchener had during his time commanding SURFLANT. “Roy, you refocused the force on the basics – so crucial to what we do,” said Grady. “You very clearly and consistently reminded the entire team of the things that make us successful in the long-run – ownership, accountability, preservation, selfsufficiency, and basic watch standing principles. You reminded everyone that, in order to live and breathe excellence, we must first master the basics." Kitchener served as commander since August 2019 and is responsible for ensuring the Atlantic Surface Force is manned, trained, equipped and ready to fight and win. “Combat ready, battle-minded” the command’s motto, Kitchener highlighted

the hard work and dedication of his headquarters’ team, waterfront leadership and the 27,000 personnel across the Atlantic Force. “Thank you for your daily commitment in enabling our ships across the world,” said Kitchener. “Rear Adm. Brad Cooper I really look forward to teaming up with you in leading our Surface Force to new heights.” Kitchener and the entire SURFLANT team were responsible for ensuring the readiness of all force commands. Kitchener’s next assignment is Commander, Naval Surface Forces and Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. Cooper previously served as Chief of Legislative Affairs for the Secretary of the Navy from May 2019 to June 2020. Cooper’s previous sea duty commands include USS Thomas S. Gates (CG 51); Cruiser-Destroyer Group 8 staff embarked on board the Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), Fitzgerald (DDG 62), Anzio (CG 68) and Vicksburg (CG 69). He commanded USS Russell (DDG 59) and Gettysburg (CG 64). He deployed nine times and participated in 13 operations around the world. “I get excited before every tour, but I am particularly excited for this one,” said Cooper. “I love Sailors and I love ships. I believe the Surface Force has strong momentum. I am thrilled and optimistic for our future and I am excited to share that future with the 27,000 men and women of the Surface Force.” Cooper takes command of SURFLANT as the force operates within COVID-19 guidelines and precautionary measures, while preparing for Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA) missions during the hurricane season. SURFLANT mans, trains, and equips assigned surface forces and shore activities, ensuring a capable force for conducting prompt and sustained operations in support of United States national interests. The SURFLANT force is composed of 77 ships and 31 shore commands. *

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Surface Force News

USS Zumwalt Completes First Live Fire Test Story by U.S. 3rd Fleet Public Affairs

PACIFIC OCEAN (NNS) -- Sailors aboard USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), working with engineers and technicians from Navy Surface Warfare Centers, successfully executed a “structural test fire” of the Mark 46 MOD 2 Gun Weapon System (GWS) on the Naval Air Weapons Center Weapons Division Sea Test Range, Point Mugu, May 16. “The privilege of being a ‘first-in-class’ ship includes having the opportunity to systematically conduct testing across the breadth of systems installed onboard the ship,” said Capt. Andrew Carlson, Zumwalt’s commanding officer. “The real plus is conducting those tests, such as today’s live fire with the Mark 46 GWS, which provide tangible evidence of combat capability maturation.” The Mark 46 GWS is a remotely operated naval gun system that uses a 30 mm high velocity cannon, a forward looking infrared sensor, a low light television camera, and a laser rangefinder for shipboard self-defense against small, high speed surface targets. It is a program of record already successfully installed and operated on LPD-17 and LCS class ships. The test firing on board Zumwalt was the first large caliber weapons firing event for the Zumwalt Class Destroyer Program and occurred only three weeks after the Navy officially accepted delivery of the Combat System. Structural test fires assess structural and electrical components of the ship against shock and vibration of the weapon firing, as well as measuring any potential hazards to personnel or degradations to adjacent equipment as a result of firing live

PACIFIC OCEAN (May 16, 2020) Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) conducts a live-fire of the Mark 46 MOD 2 Gun Weapon System during a combat systems testing trial at sea May 16. Zumwalt is conducting operations in the eastern Pacific. Photo by Chief Warrant Officer Cameron Chadd

ordnance. The tests are a coordinated effort between the Zumwalt Class Destroyer Program Office, the U.S. 3rd Fleet, Commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) Surface Warfare Centers located in Dahlgren, Virginia, Port Hueneme, California, and Indian Head, Maryland. “Today's event is the first in a chapter of live fire test events over the next year that will prove the lethal capability that these ships will bring to the fight,” remarked Lt. Cmdr. Tim Kubisak, the Zumwalt Test Officer for the Program Executive Office for Integrated Warfare Systems, embarked on Zumwalt. The Zumwalt-class destroyer is designed and built to execute multiple maritime missions including deterrence and power projection. The ships’ stealth and ability to operate in both the open ocean and near-shore environments creates a new level of battlespace complexity for potential adversaries. Zumwalt is 100 feet longer and 13 feet wider than the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer at 610 feet long, providing the space required to execute a wider array of surface, undersea, and aviation missions. *


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USS Pinckney Takes Down Drug Vessel, Seizes Over $28M of Cocaine EASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN (NNS) -- The Arleigh Burke-Class Destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team seized 1,400 kilograms (over 3,000 pounds) of cocaine May 14. A U.S. Navy maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), assigned to the “Tridents” of Story by Patrol Squadron (VP) 26, first spotted U.S. Fourth Fleet/U.S. the low profile vessel (LPV). Pinckney, Naval Forces Southern with her embarked helicopters assigned to Command Public the “Wolf Pack” of Helicopter Maritime Affairs Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 and the embarked LEDET, moved into position to intercept the LPV. Pinckney and the embarked LEDET recovered a total of 70 bales of cocaine totaling an estimated 1,400 kilograms, worth over $28 million wholesale value. “This was truly a team effort,” said Cmdr. Andrew Roy, USS Pinckney Commanding Officer. “The air support we received was first class. We were able to safely and successfully conduct this operation due to the outstanding professionalism of the Navy-Coast Guard team.”

USS Pinckney is deployed to the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of operations conducting U.S Southern Command and Joint Interagency Task Force South’s enhanced counter drug operations missions in the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific. On April 1, U.S. Southern Command began enhanced counter-narcotics operations in the Western Hemisphere to disrupt the flow of drugs in support of Presidential National Security Objectives. Numerous U.S. agencies from the Departments of Defense, Justice and Homeland Security cooperated in the effort to combat transnational organized crime. The Coast Guard, U.S. Navy, Customs and Border Protection, FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, along with allied and international partner agencies, play a role in counter-drug operations. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command’s joint and combined military operations by employing maritime forces in cooperative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American region. *

EASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN- The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) with embarked U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) team conducts enhanced counter narcotics operations May 14.

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Surface Force News

Navy Littoral Combat Ship USS Kansas City Joins the Fleet SAN DIEGO – The U.S. Navy commissioned Independencevariant littoral combat ship USS Kansas City (LCS 22), June 20. The Navy commissioned Kansas City administratively via naval message due to public health safety and restrictions of large public gatherings related to the coronavirus pandemic and transitioned the ship Story by to normal operations. The Navy is Littoral Combat Ship looking at a future opportunity to Squadron One Public commemorate the special event Affairs with the ship’s sponsor, crew, and commissioning committee. “This Independence-variant littoral combat ship will continue our proud naval legacy and embody the spirit of the people of Kansas City,” said Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite. "I am confident the crew of the USS Kansas City will extend the reach and capability of our force and confront the challenges of today's complex world with our core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment.” Vice Adm. Richard A. Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, welcomed the ship that brings capabilities to counter diesel submarine, mines, and fast surface craft threats to the premier Surface Force in the world. “Like other littoral combat ships, Kansas City brings speed and agility to the fleet,” said Brown via naval message. “Congratulations to Kansas City’s Captain and crew for all of your hard work to reach this milestone. You join a proud Surface Force that controls the seas and provides the Nation with combat naval power when and where needed.” Mrs. Tracy Davidson, the ship’s sponsor, offered congratulations

to everyone who played a role in delivering USS Kansas City to service. “I am so proud of USS Kansas City and her crew, and everyone involved, for all the tremendous work they’ve done to bring this ship to life. Their dedication to our nation and the Navy is very much appreciated,” said Davidson. “I am privileged to be a part of this ship honoring Kansas City and look forward to remaining connected to USS Kansas City as her legacy grows, wherever she may sail.” Kansas City’s commanding officer, Cmdr. R.J. Zamberlan, reported the ship ready. “The caliber of crew required to prepare a warship entering the fleet is second to none,” said Zamberlan. “This is even more impressive aboard an LCS, where every member of the minimally manned team is required to fulfill multiple roles and excel at all of them to get the job done. This crew has exceeded expectations in unprecedented times and I could not be prouder to be their captain.” Kansas City is the 11th of the Independence-variant to join the fleet and second ship to be named for Kansas City. The name Kansas City was assigned to a heavy cruiser during World War II. However, construction was canceled after one month due to the end of the war. The name Kansas City was also assigned to the Wichita-class replenishment oiler AOR-3 in 1967. This ship saw service in the Vietnam War and Operation Desert Storm and was decommissioned in 1994. The littoral combat ship is a fast, agile and networked surface combatant, and the primary mission for the LCS includes countering diesel submarine threats, littoral mine threats and surface threats to assure maritime access for joint forces. The underlying strength of the LCS lies in its innovative design approach, applying modularity for operational flexibility. Fundamental to this approach is the capability to rapidly install interchangeable mission packages (MPs) onto the seaframe to fulfill a specific mission and then be uninstalled, maintained and upgraded at the Mission Package Support Facility (MPSF) for future use aboard any LCS seaframe. *


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USS Kidd Departs on Deployment By U.S. Third Fleet Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO – Arleigh Burke-class guidedmissile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100) departed San Diego to continue her scheduled deployment, June 10. Kidd is scheduled to return to the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility to continue its mission in support of SOUTHCOM Enhanced Counter Narcotics Operations in the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific. “I am extremely proud of my crew and their coordination with Navy Region Southwest, U.S. Surface Forces Pacific and U.S. Third Fleet as we navigated through our COVID-19 outbreak on board,” said Cmdr. Nathan Wemett, Kidd’s commanding officer. “The strength of the bond throughout the Navy communities ensured we safely and effectively disembarked the crew, disinfected the ship, re-embarked the crew, and will be able to continue our mission out at sea.” As part of the Navy’s aggressive response to the COVID-19 outbreak on board the guided-missile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100), the ship arrived at Naval Base San Diego April 28 to provide medical care, quarantine, monitoring for its Sailors, and to clean and disinfect the ship. The ship’s crew had begun a strategic deep-cleaning regimen while still underway that balanced decontamination with preventing damage to the ship’s critical systems. USS Kidd is assigned to U.S. 3rd Fleet, which leads naval forces in the Pacific and provides the realistic, relevant training necessary for an effective global Navy. U.S. 3rd Fleet constantly coordinates with U.S. 7th Fleet to plan and execute missions based on their complementary strengths to promote ongoing peace, security, and stability throughout the entire Pacific theater of operations. *

SAN DIEGO (June 10, 2020) The guided-missile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100) departs San Diego following the Navy's aggressive response to a COVID-19 outbreak aboard the ship. Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kevin C. Leitner

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Surface Force News U.S. Navy Maintains Persistent Presence Near West Capella Story by Lt. Lauren Chatmas, Command Destroyer Squadron 7 SOUTH CHINA SEA – A U.S. Navy ship conducted presence operations near Panamanian flagged drillship, West Capella, May 12. The Independence-variant littoral combat ship USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) operated in the southern South China Sea marking the second time that an LCS patrolled there since USS Montgomery (LCS 8) sailed with USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14), May 7, supporting freedom of navigation and overflight. “The versatility and flexibility of Independence-variant littoral combat ships rotationally deployed to Southeast Asia is a game changer,” said Rear Adm. Fred Kacher, commander of Expeditionary Strike Group 7. “Like Montgomery's previous operations, Gabrielle Giffords' operations near West Capella demonstrate the depth of capability the U.S. Navy has available in the region.” “There is no better signal of our support for a free and open Indo-Pacific than positive and persistent U.S. Naval engagement in this region.” Kacher added. Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet, Vice Adm. Bill Merz reaffirmed that the U.S. Navy will fly, sail and operate in the South China Sea wherever international law permits at any time. “Routine presence operations, like Gabrielle Giffords, reaffirms the U.S. will continue to fly and sail freely, in accordance with international law and maritime norms, regardless of excessive claims or current events,” said Merz. “The U.S. supports the efforts of our allies and partners in the lawful pursuit of their economic interests.”

The U.S. Navy remains vigilant, is committed to a rulesbased order in the South China Sea, and will continue to champion freedom of the seas and rule of law while opposing the Chinese Communist Party’s coercive and unlawful actions. In late-April, USS America (LHA 6), USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) and USS Barry (DDG 52) sailed together with the Royal Australian Navy frigate HMAS Parramatta (FFH 154), signaling U.S. commitment to a free and open IndoPacific to allies and partners in the region. Attached to Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7, Gabrielle Giffords is on a rotational deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific. U.S. 7th Fleet conducts forward-deployed naval operations in support of U.S. national interests in the Indo-Pacific area of operations. As the U.S. Navy’s largest numbered fleet, 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that foster maritime security, promote stability, and prevent conflict. *


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Sailors Say Versatility, Training Crucial to Success in Different World of Littoral Combat Ship South China Sea (NNS) -- “It’s literally a place where everybody knows your name,” said Engineman 2nd Class Eric A. Torres, assigned to the Independence-class littoral combat ship USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10). “Working on a littoral combat ship is similar to working with family; we all become so close that we see each other as brothers and sisters, instead of Story by co-workers.” Mass Communications Manning aboard an LCS consists of a crew Specialist 2nd Class of 70 Sailors. Each ship has an assigned Blue Brenton Poyser, crew and Gold crew, and these two crews Commander, Destroyer Squadron SEVEN rotate on- and off-hull in increments that can Public Affairs range from four to six months while deployed. “Everyone is highly skilled aboard an LCS,” said Chief Quartermaster Jarrod Collins, also serving aboard Gabrielle Giffords. “We get put through a rigorous training cycle before getting assigned to an LCS command, and that training ensures when Sailors get to the command, they can hit the ground running.” The LCS training pipeline for each Sailor lasts between three and 18 months. This training guarantees Sailors understand every detail of their job requirements on this newer ship class. “Versatility is the key to being successful aboard an LCS,” said Collins. “Everyone on the ship, from the most senior to most junior Sailor, pitches in daily to pick up the extra slack to make every day aboard run smoothly.” Unlike their larger-deck counterparts, minimal manning aboard an

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Roys

LCS requires Sailors to facilitate multiple collateral duty responsibilities for the command. Sailors, especially senior, sometimes have two or three collateral duties, said Collins. “One minute I could be handling my primary duties and the next, I am being pulled into engineering or deck to help out because they need more bodies to perform a task. Once again, that’s where being flexible and versatile is key aboard an LCS.” “Working on an LCS definitely challenges you day in and day out,” said Torres. “We have to be missionready at all times, which makes communication up and down the chain of command that much more important, ensuring everyone is always on the same page.” Although working aboard an LCS can be challenging, it encourages Sailors to reach beyond their normal scope of responsibility, enabling them to become more adept at handling a wider array of tasking aboard the ship and throughout their careers. “It's definitely worth it; just the leadership opportunities alone have helped me become a better Sailor,” said Collins. “I would encourage any Sailor looking to challenge themselves to become a better Sailor to look into serving aboard an LCS.” Attached to Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7, Gabrielle Giffords is on her rotational deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific. U.S. 7th Fleet conducts forward-deployed naval operations in support of U.S. national interests in the Indo-Pacific area of operations. As the U.S. Navy’s largest numbered fleet, 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that foster maritime security, promote stability, and prevent conflict. *

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Story by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Brenton Poyser, Commander, Destroyer Squadron SEVEN Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO – The deputy chaplain for Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) Nine was awarded the Navy’s first Joshua Goldberg Award, May 18. Lt. Emily Rosenzweig won the award based on her work with chaplains of all faiths to develop and support programs, activities, and budgeting initiatives while showing true concern for the spiritual development of Sailors and Marines. The Joshua Goldberg Award was created by the Jewish Welfare Board (JWB) Jewish Chaplains Council to recognize chaplains that emulate Rabbi Goldberg's passion for ministry to people of all faiths. “I am honored to be chosen as the first ever winner of the Goldberg award,” said Rosenzweig. “To know that the work I’ve done to take care of my Sailors hasn’t gone unnoticed by my supervising chaplains is gratifying in itself.” Rosenzweig was underway aboard the guided missile

destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) when she was notified of her selection by a congratulatory email from Capt. Michael Williams, the U.S. Pacific Fleet chaplain, Rabbi Irv Elson, director of the Jewish Chaplains Council, and Capt. Charles E. Varsogea, executive assistant to the Chief of Navy Chaplains. “This award and others like it celebrate the work of chaplains who expertly manage to embrace both their own religious convictions and the sometimes very different needs of the people they serve,” said Varsogea. “I am grateful to all the chaplains, the JWB and the leaders of the Chaplain Corps who chose to highlight the legacy of Chaplain Goldberg through the establishment of this award,” said Rosenzweig. *


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COMNAVSURFOR and COMNAVSURFLANT Announce Bloodhound Award Winners SAN DIEGO (NNS) – Commander, Naval Surface Forces announced that the 2019 Bloodhound Award was given to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Milius (DDG 69) in the Pacific Fleet and USS Mason (DDG 87) in the Atlantic Fleet. The Bloodhound award is presented to one Pacific Fleet and one Atlantic Fleet ship annually for exceptional performance in the area of anti-submarine warfare (ASW) proficiency, preparedness, and training. “I'm utterly humbled to receive the Bloodhound Award in 2019 after achieving runner-up in 2018,” said Lt. Mark Choi, Milius’ ASW Officer. “The award is a testament to the effort my Sailors and I put forth through two years of unpredictable patrol schedules in which we partook in numerous multilateral ASW exercises as well as direct encounters with real submarines.” The criteria for winning this award spans the entire warfare area from the technical proficiency of Milius’ watchstanders to the readiness of equipment and operators throughout the ship. “It’s an honor serving with the amazing Sailors in the Sonar Division and the rest of the Mason team,” said Lt. Robert Stankewitz, Mason’s anti-submarine warfare officer. “Everyone played an integral part in earning this award.” During Mason’s 2019 deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation, the crew successfully conducted multi-warfare missions under heightened regional tensions while enhancing maritime security and freedom of navigation in those regions of the world. Despite the arduous nature of the ship’s operations, the

technical and tactical proficiency of her crew sustained a high level of combat and material readiness. Following her deployment, the crew continued to build on their exceptional reputation and flawlessly conducted operations and training exercises in the Western Atlantic Ocean while also preparing to enter a Depot Modernization Availability. “The team really came together; ASW is a team effort that spans the entirety of the ship from the sensor operators to the bridge and engineering plant,” said Chief Sonar Technician (SW) Michael DellaPosta. “Mason Sailors have worked cohesively to maintain the highest state of equipment readiness necessary to ensure mission success and flawlessly demonstrated unmatched tactical prowess in anti-submarine warfare tactics. As part of Forward Deployed Naval Forces Japan, Milius’ crew operated exclusively in the 7th Fleet area of operations. They partook in numerous multinational ASW exercises that required coordination with air, surface, and undersea assets in dynamic combat scenarios. Throughout all operations, they executed procedural compliance with standing guidance from their operational commanders. “My Sailors won this award by knowing their job inside and out,” said Chief Sonar Technician (Surface) Bobby Richey Jr. “ASW is a difficult field to be in. Most of the watches take place in classified spaces separate from other watch teams, so they don’t get much attention and recognition from the crew. Additionally, long times spent in port can negatively affect the retention of knowledge required for accurate and effective tracking. One way the team helped to mitigate this was by conducting regular training on specific acoustic attributes in 7th Fleet.” Milius and Mason will continue to fly the ASW Bloodhound pennant until next year. *

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Story by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter Burghart

The engineering department of the future USS Tripoli (LHA 7) began its turnover aboard engineering operations from Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), Mar. 13. The turnover process helps pave the way for Tripoli to become a fully operational Navy warship. “The Navy and HII have different requirements,” said Ensign Michael Salazar, Tripoli’s main engine officer. “Making sure that safeties work and the operational equipment is up to our standards is very important.” The planned turnover process consists of handing off operations of major systems to Tripoli engineers. The ship’s engineers started up major engineering plant equipment for the first time, which takes time because of the numerous shipboard spaces, types of equipment, and variations between Navy and HII processes. Additionally, the Navy has specific procedures required to operate each type of equipment in its inventory and are designed to ensure the safety of personnel and equipment during normal operations and scheduled maintenance. “We have planned maintenance to make sure our equipment operates properly,” said Salazar. “Most equipment needs to be aligned in order to meet Navy engineering standards for operations at sea.”

Salazar also added that the maintenance is important to prevent both injury and damage to equipment. The engineers of the ship’s electrical, repair, auxiliaries, and main propulsion divisions reviewed all engineering assets in their spaces such as fuel, oil, and machinery equipment. For Sailors, these inspections gave them the time and vital training necessary to familiarize themselves with Tripoli’s onboard equipment. “The best part is we get to set the standard,” said Chief Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) Jonathan Burg. “We can show the expectation for our Sailors.” For Tripoli engineers, taking ownership of the spaces is only the beginning. They will continue preparing for inspections and assessments with the goal of becoming a fully operational and qualified engineering department. “The biggest surprise is the passion of our junior Sailors to learn equipment,” said Burg. “They came in hungry to learn every day.” As engineers continue to take over their spaces and establish their rhythm, the Tripoli is one step closer to commissioning and the journey to her homeport in San Diego. *


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U.S. 6th Fleet: Ready, Vigilant, On Watch Story by U.S. 6th Fleet Public Affairs


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Mediterranean Sea (NNS) -- Two U.S. 6th Fleet Forward-Deployed Naval Forces-Europe (FDNF-E) destroyers and a P-8A Poseidon Maritime Patrol Aircraft are operating simultaneously in different major European Seas, Apr. 13. Rota-based Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG 78) and USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) are operating in the Black and Baltic Seas, respectively, while a P-8A Poseidon, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 4 and based out of Sigonella, Italy, is operating in the Mediterranean Sea. These forward-deployed crews have taken appropriate coronavirus-related precautions to ensure they remain healthy throughout their operations in European waters. “U.S. 6th Fleet remains at sea, ensuring maritime security and demonstrating our continued ability to operate in concert with allies and partners across the European theater,” said Vice Adm. Lisa Franchetti,

“CTF 67 aircrews and staff have adjusted to a new normal that balances our operations to conform with physical distancing while remaining vigilant to potential threats across Europe and Africa,” said Capt. Bill Pennington, commander, Task Force 67, based in Sigonella, Italy. While in the Baltic, Donald Cook will participate with European allies in maritime operations, which allow the U.S. Navy to continue refining skills with partner nations while ensuring it keeps crews safe in the face of COVID-19. Porter’s Black Sea operations mark the second time a U.S. Navy warship been in the Black Sea since the beginning of 2020. USS Ross (DDG 71) visited the Black Sea in February, where they operated with Turkey, Romania, and Bulgaria and conducted a port visit in Bulgaria. The U.S. Navy routinely operates in the Black Sea consistent with international law, including the Montreux Convention.

“CTF 67 aircrews and staff have adjusted to a new normal that balances our operations to conform with physical distancing while remaining vigilant to potential threats across Europe and Africa.”

Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet (C6F). Donald Cook entered the Baltic Sea, Apr. 11, after participating in the U.K Submarine Command Course, where their team honed her anti-submarine warfare capabilities in the Atlantic. Porter began its northbound international straits transit to the Black Sea, Apr. 13, to conduct maritime security operations and enhance regional maritime stability, combined readiness, and naval capability with our NATO allies and partners in the region. “It is important during this time, where we take all the necessary precautions to prevent the further spread of the coronavirus, that we also maintain our presence, readiness, training, and interoperability with our partners and allies,” said Capt. Joe Gagliano, commander, Destroyer Squadron 60, from his Rota, Spain headquarters. P-8A Poseidon Maritime Patrol aircraft supported U.S. interests, and our partners and allies through coordinated intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance flights in the Mediterranean, Apr. 13.

The U.S. Navy and partner efforts in the Mediterranean are crucial to maritime security and economic prosperity, with 21 coastal nations bordering the sea. Forces deployed throughout the region, including those assigned to U.S. naval bases in Naples, Souda Bay, Sigonella, and Rota work continuously with partners and allies in support of three combatant commanders to conduct routine and contingency operations. “Ninety percent of the world’s trade volume travels via maritime routes, so it is vitally important that all nations have access to the global commons,” said Franchetti. “The men and women forward deployed in the 6th Fleet area of operations remain ready to ensure security and stability throughout the region.” U.S. 6th Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa. *

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Photos by U.S. Navy


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The Future of Mine Warfare:

A Hail and Farewell Story by Lt. Cmdr. Eric Hernandez and Lt. Katie Labbe, Mine Division TWELVE Public Affairs

The future of mine countermeasures warfare in the U.S. Navy will soon look very different. While eight mine countermeasures ships (MCM) will continue their missions from homeports in Bahrain and Japan, the three San Diego-based Avenger-class MCMs USS Champion (MCM 4), USS Scout (MCM 8), and USS Ardent (MCM 12) will be decommissioned in August 2020. These ships have protected U.S. assets from mine fields across the globe for more than 30 years. They also assisted in operations including, but not limited to, the evacuation of Albanian citizens from a war-torn Kosovo, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and provided humanitarian assistance following Hurricane Katrina. While these MCMs’ time of warfighting comes to a close, the Navy’s newest littoral combat ships (LCS) are in the final stages of development and testing of new mine countermeasures technologies including Unmanned Influence Sweep System (UISS), and the Surface Mine Countermeasure Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (SMCM UUV), commonly known as Knifefish. UISS is employed on an Unmanned Surface Vessel (USV) and provides LCS with a stand-off, long endurance, semi-autonomous minesweeping capability to counter acoustic and/or magnetic influence mine threats in the littoral environment. It affords the ability to clear and secure transit lanes, sea lines of communications, and operations areas for sea-based and amphibious operation forces while taking the Sailor out of the minefield. The Knifefish system provides buried mine detection capability with Low-Frequency Broadband Synthetic

Aperture Sonar (LFBB SAS). It can hunt mines in high clutter and provides improved detection, classification, and identification performance against stealthy mines. Knifefish can also detect volume and bottom mines. To lead these advancements aboard LCS, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One stood up Mine Division Twelve (COMMINEDIV TWELVE), one of two warfare-based divisions, in December 2019. COMMINEDIV TWELVE has been working in close coordination with program offices PMS 420, 406, and 505 to ensure the successful and timely delivery of the new MCM systems to operate aboard USS Manchester (LCS 14), USS Tulsa (LCS 16), USS Charleston (LCS 18) and USS Cincinnati (LCS 20). In addition to decommissioning the three San Diego-based Avenger-class ships and assisting in the delivery of new MCM systems, COMMINEDIV TWELVE is scheduled to receive five additional MCM LCS over the next five years for a total of nine MCM LCS and 17 crews. “Having served aboard minesweepers, part of me will definitely miss the culture of ‘wooden ships and iron Sailors,’” said Capt. Henry Kim, commander of COMMINEDIV TWELVE. “Yet, it’s exciting to be part of a new organization that bridges the next generation of MCM capabilities for the U.S. Navy.” *

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COMNAVSURFOR ANNOUNCES BATTLE “E” WINNERS By Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

U.S. Navy Photo


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Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet announced the 27 winners of the 2019 Battle Efficiency (Battle “E�) awards, March 18. The Battle "E" is presented throughout the Navy to ships whose crews consistently exhibit excellence in wartime capabilities and optimal mission readiness within their hull class and region. The calendar year-long competition involves evaluation by Surface Forces of a ship's abilities in logistics, material, engineering, damage control, navigation, command and control, and air, surface, and subsurface warfare. Even if a ship meets these challenges, it still must

demonstrate to the Immediate Superior in Command sustained superior performance, operational effectiveness, and continuous readiness to be a contender for the Battle "E." Ships and competing for the Battle "E" must attain at least four of the five Command Excellence Awards throughout the competitive period. Makin Island was recognized for excellence in maritime warfare (Black "E"), command and control (Green "E"), logistics management (Blue "E"), and ship safety (Yellow "E"). Crews awarded the Battle "E" may wear the ribbon immediately. *

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SAN DIEGO - Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMNAVSURFPAC) and Naval Surface Force Atlantic (COMNAVSURFLANT), have named their 2019 Shore and Sea Sailors of the Year (SOY). Navy Career Counselor 1st Class Brenda V. Lemas, assigned to Commander, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron (COMLCSRON) 1, was named Shore SOY and Yeoman 1st Class Vinish Nair, assigned to the Arleigh Burkeclass destroyer USS Decatur (DDG 73) was By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex named Sea SOY for CNSP. Millar, Commander, SURFLANT announced Boatswain’s Naval Surface Force, U.S. Mate 1st Class Derek Rish, assigned to the Pacific Fleet Public Affairs Ticonderoga-class guided missile-cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) as the Sea SOY and Information Systems Technician 1st Class Chris Manley, assigned to Naval Surface Force Atlantic as the Shore SOY. Due to social distancing directives during the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the traditional in-person SOY boards were cancelled but were held via phone conference. The winner announcements were made via personal congratulatory e-mails. Lemas, a native of McAllen, Texas, was notified by her commodore and command master chief and couldn’t thank them and her past mentors enough for their relentless leadership. “I would like to thank my leadership for believing in me and providing opportunities to enhance my leadership abilities, said Lemas. “Thank you for trusting me with leading and helping to develop Sailors. Nair, a native of Albany, New York, was notified by a personal congratulatory email from COMNAVSURFPAC Force Master Chief James Osborne. Nair also thanked his command leadership and added some advice for his shipmates. “It is important to remember no matter how high you climb the ladder of success, we have a moral obligation to pay it forward,” said Nair. “Mentor and guide those that are following after you and help them attain the success that they deserve.” Osborne spoke highly of these two Sailors based on their success in the Navy and encouraged them to keep striving for excellence.

“In their selection as the CNSP Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year, they competed and were selected from amongst hundreds if not over a thousand first class petty officers across the TYCOM. That in and of itself is an accomplishment to be proud and humbled to earn,” said Osborne. “[You] are winners at the highest level, continue to do your best in representing your command, your family and yourself.” Rish, a native of Raymore, Missouri, expressed both humility and surprise on the accomplishment. “This is a great accomplishment for myself, but I really wish I could break it up and share the wealth,” Rish said. “From my own mentors to my most junior Sailors, they all deserve recognition too.” Manley is a native of Victorvile, California, shared many of Rish’s feelings after the announcement. “I am surprised to say the least and this is a great recognition of many years of hard work,” Manley said. “I still have to strive for excellence and be the best Sailor and mentor I can be. I will savor this moment though with my peers and Sailors.” COMNAVSURFLANT Force Master Chief Kevin Goodrich explained how Rish and Manley stood out from their competition. “These winners serve as the premiere example of a first class petty officer,” said Goodrich. “All the finalists are fantastic Sailors, but the winners are the best that [COMNAVSURFLANT] have to offer, and I could not be happier with our choices.” SOY is a time-honored tradition introduced in 1972 by Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Elmo Zumwalt and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy John Whittet. This annual competition is held to recognize superior performance of individual Sailors, who best exemplify the ideals of professional Sailor throughout the fleet. *


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“These winners serve as the premiere example of a first class petty officer, All the finalists are fantastic Sailors, but the winners are the best that [COMNAVSURFLANT] have to offer.”

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Shore Sailor of the Year Navy Career Counselor 1st Class Brenda V. Lemas

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Sea Sailor of the Year Yeoman 1st Class Vinish Nair

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet Shore Sailor of the Year Information System Technician 1st Class Chris Manley

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet Sea Sailor of the Year Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Derek Rish

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Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMNAVSURFPAC) and Commander, Naval Surface Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMNAVSURFLANT) announced their 2019 Civilian of the Year (COY) award winners, recognizing their commands’ top civilians who have demonstrated the highest standards of performance and excellence throughout the previous year. COMNAVSURFPACs, Bruce Acton, N7 deputy assistant chief of staff, was named the senior COY and Karen Diaz-Pellot, a paralegal specialist, was named the junior COY. “Bruce and Karen are truly deserving of this recognition, and exemplify all of the civilian workforce accomplishments,” said Jeff Klein, executive director, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. COMNAVSURFLANT named Todd Dirks, comptroller financial management analyst, as their COY. By Mass Communication “Mr. Dirks is a Financial Management Analyst Specialist 2nd Class Alex responsible for providing timely and accurate financial Millar, Commander, budgeting, accounting, allocation, and execution of Naval Surface Force, U.S. resources in support of the Surface Force Atlantic Pacific Fleet Public Affairs (SURFLANT) mission to deliver combat ready ships and crews,” said David Volonino, SURFLANT executive director. “He has been a role model of professionalism by ensuring SURFLANT financial accounting systems were both accurate and available, as he led the command through the Navy’s challenging transition from the Standard Accounting and Reporting System to the Standard Accounting and Budgeting Systems. His hard work and dedication to mission accomplishment were vital to SURFLANT’s ability to sustain continuous financial operations.” The COY award recognizes the accomplishments of civilian employees who have made significant contributions to the overall mission and day-to-day operations that allow the naval surface forces to function at their highest levels while executing the man, train, and equip functions of the surface Navy. “I was extremely surprised and deeply honored to receive such an award,” said Acton. “There are many dedicated, hard-working people that work with me and I was fortunate, and perhaps a little lucky, to be selected from such a distinguished group of professionals.” Acton also said that the award is an acknowledgement of his entire organization and that it offers an opportunity to show how valuable an asset the Naval Surface Forces civilian team can be to the collective. Dirks shared similar sentiments to Acton. “Being chosen as the COMMNAVSURFLANT’s COY is a great honor considering the number of other amazing civilian employees that I have working around me,” said Dirks. Diaz-Pellot provided a unique take on the importance of the relationship between civilian and military personnel and how vital their relationship is to one another. “Civilian personnel are very often the backbone that provide consistency and

balance in the work environment since the demands on our military personnel leaves them away from home so often,” said Diaz-Pellot. “Civilian personnel provide critical corporate knowledge and experience, as well as mentorship and guidance to junior civilians and Sailors alike, to ensure mission success.” Karen O’Connor, principal assistant to the executive director and civilian program manager for COMNAVSURFPAC, said that there are hundreds of civilian employees that work throughout the command. The competition was tough to select the winners, but all are true examples of merit. “The COY nomination packages we receive include exceptional performance across the entire year,” said O’Connor. “They include significant impact statements on the employee’s contributions to provide warships ready for tasking.” While the nomination packages demonstrate on paper what these high-performing civilians have accomplished, the work they have put in during the past year is helping make a difference in the daily lives of not just the COMNAVSURFPAC staffs, but in also in the fleet. “Programs such as the Civilian of Quarter and COY highlight the important work our civilians are doing and acknowledging them is a way to thank them for all for their hard work and dedication,” said O’Connor. “Our government civilian employees are an essential piece of surface force readiness and our ability to meet operational tasking.” Many of the civilians that receive these awards are often previous service members themselves who have received good mentorship and pass along that mentorship in their current civilian roles. “There are so many people throughout my career who have helped me earn this recognition, and I have the eternal support and encouragement of my family, especially my remarkable husband, who himself is a retired veteran and now a civil servant,” said Diaz-Pellot. “I’m extremely grateful to the staff I work with, especially my immediate supervisor and the other personnel in the office who allow me to use my experience to contribute to our team’s success. Teamwork and cohesiveness are essential to mission accomplishment.” *


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“Civilian personnel provide critical corporate knowledge and experience, as well as mentorship and guidance to junior civilians and Sailors alike, to ensure mission success.�

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Junior Civilian of the Year Karen Diaz-Pellot, paralegal specialist.

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Civilian of the Year Bruce Acton, N7 deputy assistant chief of staff.

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet Civilian of the Year Todd Dirks, comptroller financial management analyst.

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Voices From the Fleet Life Lessons from the


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History and Heritage Surface Force Sailors Continue to ‘Answer the Call’ By Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

Sailors from USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) and future USS Daniel Inouye shared stories and reflected on the history of their ship’s namesakes during Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month. Celebrated each year in May, AAPI Heritage Month recognizes the selfless service and sacrifice of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the U.S. military. This year’s theme is “We Answered the Call – Honoring the Past, Securing the Future.” Command Master Chief (CMC) Josephine T. Tauoa, USS ChungHoon, is the first CMC Samoan female in the U.S. Navy. “The opportunity to serve my first tour as CMC onboard Chung-Hoon, a ship named after the first Asian American/Pacific Islander flag officer, is one that I will always cherish and remember in days to come,” said Tauoa. Rear Adm. Gordon Pai’ea Chung-Hoon is a recipient of the Navy Cross and Silver Star for his gallantry and heroism as commanding officer of USS Sigsbee (DD 502) from May 1944 to October 1945. He retired as a two-star admiral and was the nation’s first Asian-Pacific American flag officer. “Adm. Chung-Hoon was a true trailblazer, and set the standard for all to emulate, excelling in battle and contributing significantly to his country and community following his retirement. He embodied achievement above and beyond what is required while serving in the United States Navy,” said Tauoa. “I’m proud to celebrate the contribution of those who came before me of the same heritage and provided an example for me and many others to follow. Serving as CMC in Chung-Hoon is a rare opportunity and one that means the world to me.” From Daniel Inouye, Chief Electrician’s Mate Marie Lou Dalby was born and raised in the Philippines, and immigrated to the United States in 2006. “Grateful for what my new life had to offer, I decided to join the United States Navy and became an American citizen in 2008,” said Dalby. She said she is now living the American Dream. A dream that includes

being stationed on a ship whose namesake, like her, has with a connection to Asian American/Pacific Islander heritage and military service. Sen. Daniel Inouye served in the U.S. Army’s 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Composed of soldiers primarily of Japanese descent, the 442nd became one of the most decorated units in U.S. history. Inouye received the Medal of Honor for his combat heroism, which cost him his right arm. Following his service in the Army, Inouye served for 50 years in the Senate. “Daniel Inouye is a true hero and embodies the definition of what honor, courage, selflessness, and patriotism means,” said Dalby. “He answered the call, regardless of barriers and prejudice along his way. I couldn’t be prouder to be a part of the ship named after Daniel Inouye.” Dalby said the Inouye crew honors their ship’s namesake by continuing to answer the call, in ways such as providing support to operational ships on the waterfront in the form of leadership, technical expertise, experience, and watchstanding. “Even during these COVID-19 times, the Daniel Inouye crew never backs down and continues to go above and beyond in delivering support to maintain warfighting readiness while taking care of its crew at the same time,” Dalby said. This year, the U.S. Navy remembers the heritage, contributions, and service of Asian American and Pacific Islanders and celebrates the diversity and strength they bring to the service and to the Nation. *


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“Adm. Chung-Hoon was a true trailblazer, and set the standard for

all to emulate, excelling in battle and contributing significantly to his country and community. He embodied achievement above and beyond what is required while serving in the United States Navy.”

“Daniel Inouye is a true hero and embodies the definition of what

honor, courage, selflessness, and patriotism means. He answered the call, regardless of barriers and prejudice along his way. I couldn’t be prouder to be a part of the ship named after Daniel Inouye.”

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Command Changes March 2020 April 2020

May 2020

June 2020

Rear Adm. Robert Katz............................................Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 2 Capt. Erik R. Nilsson......................................Commander, Naval Beach Group (CNBG) 2 Capt. Andrew D. Bates.................................................................USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) Lt. Cmdr. Meagan Makarenko..........................................................USS Pioneer (MCM 9)

Rear Adm. Phillip Sobeck.........................................Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 3 Capt. Henry Kim........................................................................................Mine Division 12 Capt. Richard M. Meyer.........................Commander, Naval Surface Squadron Fourteen Capt. Marc Crawford...........................................................................Surface Division 11 Cmdr. Kathryn J. Dawley.................................................................USS Hopper (DDG 70) Cmdr. Bryan Schneider..................................................................USS Gridley (DDG 101) Cmdr. Isaac Harris...........................................................................USS Ramage (DDG 61) Cmdr. William A. Fensterer.................................................USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) Cmdr. Shane Dennis.........................................................................USS Chafee (DDG 90) Cmdr. Derek Rader........................................................................USS Decatur (DDG 73) Lt. Cmdr. Franklin Lemene................................................................USS Sentry (MCM 3)

Cmdr. Jeremiah Peterson.............................................................USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) Cmdr. Brian Crosby.....................................................................USS Little Rock (LCS 9) Cmdr. Nicholas Wissel.....................................................................USS Higgins (DDG 76 Capt. Michael C. Mosbruger..................................................USS Lewis B Puller (ESB 3) Capt. Thomas E. Myers.....................................................Destroyer Squadron Four Zero Capt. Robert Thompson.............................................................USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) Capt. Christopher F. Hill............................................................USS Arlington (LPD 24) Capt. Gil Ayan.................................................................................USS Lake Erie (CG 70) Capt. John Fay..............................................Littoral Combat Ship Squadron (LCSRON)1 Cmdr.Jeremy L. Carlson................................................................USS Benfold (DDG 65) Cmdr. Steven C. Puskas......................................................USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) Cmdr. Ryan Kendall...................................................................USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) Cmdr. Christopher Gahl....................................................................USS Barry (DDG 52) Cmdr. Timothy F. Shanley..........................................USS Winston S Churchill (DDG 81) Lt. Cmdr. Steven Terjesen......................................................................USS Zephyr (PC 8) Lt. Cmdr. G. Graham Van Hook.........................................................USS Tornado (PC 14)

Capt. Bill Shaffley....................................................Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 Capt. J. Tate Robinson..................................................................USS Green Bay (LPD 20) Capt. David Loo.................................................................................USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Capt. Jesus Rodriguez..............................................................Amphibious Squadron FIVE Capt. Bryan K. Carmichael................................................................USS Bataan (LHD 5) Capt. Jay Clark.....................................................................Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 1 Cmdr. Samantha Dutily.......................................Naval Surface Squadron (SURFRON) 5 Cmdr. Kelly Mahaffey.............................................................Beachmaster Unit (BMU) 1 Cmdr. Stacy Wuthier..........................................................................USS Jackson (LCS 6) Cmdr. Austin Duff.......................................................................USS Montgomery (LCS 8)

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