Surface Warfare Magazine - Fall 2019

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Surface Warfare FALL 2019 Issue 64


SURFACE WARFARE FALL 2019

Authorization

Surface Warfare is published quarterly from appropriated funds by authority of the Chief of Naval Operations in accordance with NPPR P-35. The Secretary of the Navy has determined that this publication is necessary in the transaction of business required by law of the Department of the Navy. Use of funds for printing this publication has been approved by the Navy Publications and Printing Policy Committee. Reproductions are encouraged with proper citation. Controlled circulation.

Postmaster: Send address changes to Surface Warfare, SURFPAC Public Affairs Office, 2841 Rendova Road, San Diego, CA 92155. Surface Warfare (USPS 104170) (ISSN 0145-1073) is published by the Department of the Navy, Commander, Naval Surface Forces, 2841 Rendova Road, San Diego, CA 92155. Periodicals postage paid at San Diego, CA, and additional mailing offices.

Charter

Surface Warfare Magazine is the professional magazine of the surface warfare community. Its purpose is to educate its readers on surface warfare missions and programs, with a particular focus on U.S. surface ships and commands. This journal will also draw upon the Surface Force’s rich historical legacy to instill a sense of pride and professionalism among community members and to enhance reader awareness of the increasing relevance of surface warfare for our nation’s defense. The opinions and assertions herein are the personal views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy.

Surface Warfare FALL 2019 Issue 64

Contact:

Surface Warfare Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs Office, N01P 2841 Rendova Road San Diego, CA 92155 Phone: (619) 437-2735

Contributions and Feedback Welcome

Send articles, photographs (min. 300 dpi electronic) and feedback to: surface_warfare_maga@navy.mil

Commander, Naval Surface Forces Vice Adm. Rich Brown

Deputy Commander, Naval Surface Forces Rear Adm. Joey B. Dodgen Public Affairs Officer Cmdr. Patrick L. Evans Executive Editor MCCS Ahron Arendes Managing Editor Ted Townsend Layout and Design Ted Townsend


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Contents

2. Commander's Corner Surface Force News: 4. US, Malaysia Kick-Off Maritime Training Activity 2019 6. Bunker Hill Leads the Way, Earns Battle “E”

22. Welcome To The Goat Locker Cover Stories: 26. 2019 SWFOTS Combat Ready Ships and Battle-Minded Crews

8. Advanced Training: Bataan Amphibious Ready Group Completes SWATT

30. CNSF Rallies Surface Community Behind World’s Smartest, Best-Trained Surface Force at SNA West

10. USS O’Kane (DDG 77) is Overall Winner of 2019 Surface Line Week Pacific

34. Surface Forces Host Staff Talks to Increase Readiness

11. Surface Force Commander Encourages Continued Excellence to USS Benfold Crew 12. SURFLANT Holds Change of Command 13. CNSF Celebrates Surface Force| Accomplishments, Touts Battle Mindedness During Surface Warrior Ball

36. Voices From the Fleet Shiphandling Efforts Inside NSST from a QMC’s Perspective 38.. History and Heritage: Building Battle-Minded Crews: Remembering Ernest Evans 40. Virginia-Based Sailors, Marines Return After Supporting Relief to Bahamas

Feature Stories: 14. Inaugural Junior Officer of the Deck Course 18. Training for the High-End Fight with the Naval Strike Missile 20. SWO Jackets Authorized for Exclusive Wear by Surface Warfare Officers to Mark Professional Achievement

Cover: Sailors aboard the Harpers Ferry-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) heave on mooring line to secure the ship to the pier in New York City.


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Commander's Corner

The theme of this edition of Surface Warfare Magazine is “Lethal and Tough in Today’s Fight.” This is more than just a “bumper sticker” for the magazine. It is our concerted effort to prepare Combat Ready Ships and Battle-Minded Crews for the High-End Fight. But what does it mean to have Combat Ready Ships and Battle-Minded Crews? Here’s how I define it. “Combat Ready Ships” means ships deploy and leave no redundancy at the pier. Everything works on that ship the moment they depart. Our goal is clear. We will deploy ships fully-certified, fully-manned at 92/95 (fit/fill) and CASREP-free. As for creating “Battle-Minded Crews,” we need to talk to our Sailors about what war at sea will be like in the era of Renewed Great Power Competition. It will not be antiseptic. It will be horrendous, but we expect them to fight like the crews of the Leyte Gulf campaign of World War II. We talked about this at the 2019 Surface Warfare Flag Officer Training Symposium (SWFOTS) in August. We also discussed three main “takeaways” to ensure the Surface Force is aligned as we prepare for the high-end fight. You can read about those “takeaways” later in the magazine. We built on the momentum from SWFOTS and took it a step further during the Surface Navy Association’s (SNA) 21st annual West Coast symposium at Naval Base San Diego. At that event, we focused on preparing our crews to be lethal and tough in today's fight. As you’ll read later in these pages, at SNA West, we discussed building the readiness of our surface force, and, when required, go forward, fight our Nation’s wars, win, and come home. We will drive home that point at the SNA National symposium in January 2020.

Leading up to that, it is important to highlight what the Surface Community has accomplished recently. Be proud of the impressive accomplishments. For example, as of this writing, we deployed two Littoral Combat Ships – USS Montgomery (LCS 8) and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10). In addition we have conducted 62 Bridge Resource Management Workshops (BRMW). Under this program, Commanding Officer advisors and Strategic Sealift Officers (SSOs) get underway with ships, observe bridge and CIC watch teams for their use of resources and safety of navigation, look at operations through the lens of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification, and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) standards, and provide feedback that remains within the lifelines of the ship. This is one of our many efforts to build Combat Ready Ships and Battle-Minded Crews. But we can’t stop there. We need to know and share stories of our great legacy of being lethal, tough and battle-minded like the crew of USS Johnston (DD 557) and their fighting captain, Lt. Cmdr. Ernie Evans during the Battle off Samar Island during the Leyte Gulf campaign of World War II. That engagement destroyed the combat power of the Japanese fleet and ultimately led to the Japanese surrender. Ernie Evans was a fighting captain who prepared his ship and his crew for the fight. They owned it. If you don’t know the story of Ernie Evans, we’ve included an excerpt about him from the Navy History and Heritage Command. We need to carry this torch and tell this story, so our Surface Force can continue to Own The Fight! *

VADM Brown


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Vice Adm. Rich Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Force U.S. Pacific Fleet, addresses Sailors assigned to USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) during an all hands call. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex Millar

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Surface Force News US, Malaysia Kick-Off Maritime Training Activity 2019 Story and photos by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tristin Barth, Commander, Logistics Group Western Pacific Public Affairs

LUMUT NAVAL BASE, Malaysia (Aug. 15, 2019) -- The U.S. Navy and Coast Guard along with the Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) conducted Maritime Training Activity (MTA) Malaysia 2019, marked by an opening ceremony at Lumut Naval Base, Aug. 14. MTA Malaysia 2019 is a continuation of 25 years of maritime engagements between the U.S. Navy and Royal Malaysian Navy. The engagements enhance mutual capabilities and ensure maritime security and stability. The Pacific Area Commander for the U.S. Coast Guard, Vice Adm. Linda Fagan, said that working alongside the U.S. Navy and international partners in this exercise is an important part of the Coast Guard’s mission in the Indo-Pacific. “We are proud to operate with our Malaysian partners, and together we are dedicated to strengthening maritime governance and security in support of peace and prosperity throughout the region.” This year also marks 62 years of diplomatic partnership between the U.S. and Malaysia. Vice Admiral Dato’ Aris Adi Tan Bin Abdullah, Commander of Royal

Malaysian Navy Western Fleet, said this MTA is significant because it is the first time this exercise has involved the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency and the U.S. Coast Guard. “It also provides better opportunity for both navies and coast guards to exchange knowledge and thoughts while developing a mutual understanding,” he said. This year’s exercise featured hundreds of Sailors and Coast Guardsmen from both nations for five-days of at-sea and onshore training designed to enhance naval interoperability. Rear Adm. Joey Tynch, Commander, Task Force 73, who oversees theater security cooperation for the U.S. Navy in Southeast Asia, said this exercise with Malaysia is another layer to the strong and enduring Navy-toNavy relationships in the Indo-Pacific. “This is partnership in action,” said Tynch. “The skills


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“This is partnership in action, the skills and trust built while working together at sea are at the heart of maritime security.”

and trust built while working together at sea are at the heart of maritime security.” At-sea, participants engaged in hands-on training in visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS), mobile dive and salvage, a gunnery exercise, maritime patrol operations and replenishment at-sea. Onshore, participants exchanged ideas related to aviation, woman’s leadership, damage control, military law, public affairs, and medicine. U.S. assets involved in MTA Malaysia were the Independence-variant littoral combat ship USS Montgomery (LCS 8), U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton (WMSL 752), Safeguard-class salvage ship USNS Salvor (ARS 52), expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Millinocket (T-EPF 3), Mobile Dive and Salvage Unit 1, an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter and an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter.

Royal Malaysian Navy assets included Lekiu-class frigate KD Lekiu (F30) and Kasturi-class corvette KD Kasturi (FSG 25), RMN Diving Unit, CB90 fast assault craft, a Super Lynx helicopter and Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) vessel KM Marlin. Maritime Training Activity Malaysia builds upon a quarter century of maritime engagement between the U.S. and Malaysia. Other exercises in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands include Pacific Partnership, the largest annual multilateral humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission; Maritime Training Activity Sama with the Philippines; Pacific Griffin with Singapore; and Southeast Asia Cooperation and Training (SEACAT), which involves nearly a dozen partner nations. These engagements bring like-minded naval forces together routinely based on shared values and maritime security interests. As U.S. 7th Fleet's executive agent for theater security cooperation in South and Southeast Asia, Commander, Task Force 73 and Destroyer Squadron 7 conduct advanced planning, organize resources, and directly support the execution of CARAT and other engagements in the region. *

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Surface Force News Bunker Hill Leads the Way, Earns Battle “E” By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

Vice Adm. Richard Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, presented the Battle Effectiveness (Battle “E”) award to the crew of the guidedmissile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), July 31, while the ship was underway conducting operations in the eastern Pacific Ocean. During the ship visit, Brown held an All Hands Call and told the crew the story of USS Johnston (DD 557) and of their fighting captain, Lt. Cmdr. Ernie Evans. He told the Bunker Hill crew that they too, have a fighting captain, and that he expected them to fight just like the crew of Johnston during the Battle of Samar Island during the Leyte Gulf campaign of World War II. “You are getting the ship ready to fight. The goal is to fight, win, and come home,” Brown told the crew. The Battle “E” demonstrates that Bunker Hill is not satisfied with merely meeting baseline standards. The crew exceeded the standard as they prepare the ship for service in the world’s most agile, effective, and lethal global maneuver force. "We set high personal and professional goals and aim to achieve them as a matter of routine, and onboard Bunker Hill, team success is of more importance than individual success,” said Capt. Kurt Sellerberg, Bunker Hill’s Commanding Officer. “We have a winning attitude, and this award recognizes the crew's day-to-day efforts to execute our mission with class and distinction. I'm proud of the crew for this achievement” In addition to earning the Battle “E,” Bunker Hill embodies a culture of excellence

Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Janine F. Jones


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by taking advantage of changes to the Surface Force Training and Readiness Manual (SFTRM). It was one of the first ships to go through the revised SFTRM, which, among other things, changed the delivery strategy of Basic Phase Training, allowing ships that demonstrate proficiency during Certification Events (CEs) to certify early. In turn, Bunker Hill built and executed complex integrated training team scenarios as part of a three-day battle problem in order to turn their training into lethality "Competition between ships has long been recognized as a powerful stimulus for achievement of wartime readiness in times of peace, and with the Battle Efficiency award we will proudly display the ‘meatball’ pennant as recognition of the crew's outstanding performance,”

said Cmdr. David Sandomir, Bunker Hill’s Executive Officer. The Battle “E” pennant is called the meatball because of its design: a solid black circle set in a red field. It is a triangular-shaped pennant that the winning ship may fly. Every Bunker Hill Sailor attached to the ship during the award year is eligible to wear a Battle “E” ribbon to signify their contribution to exemplifying Bunker Hill’s qualities of toughness, readiness, and combat capability in all warfare areas. To be considered for the Battle “E,” surface ships must demonstrate excellence in a minimum of four out of five command-measured criteria: maritime warfare, engineering and survivability, command and control, logistics management, and ship safety. The award symbolizes the ship’s overall readiness to carry out its assigned wartime tasks. *

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Surface Force News Advanced Training: Bataan Amphibious Ready Group Completes SWATT By USS Bataan Public Affairs Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Lyle Wilkie

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anna E. Van Nuys

Photo by Mass Communication Sp 2nd Class Brenton Poyser


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The USS Bataan (LHD 5) Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) completed its first Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) exercise, Aug. 5. For the Bataan ARG, SWATT provided an important transition from single ship operations to multi-ship, aircraft, and landing craft operations in scenarios that spanned multiple warfare areas. SWATTs are a relatively new construct in the Surface Fleet that deliver advanced tactical training to increase surface force lethality and tactical proficiency by providing warfare commander and unit level training beyond the basic phase. As a result, ARGs and other warfare commander teams are more ready to receive operational tasking or deploy following a SWATT. “SWATTs prepare individuals, watch teams, ships and staffs to be more capable, ready and lethal to ‘Own the Fight,’” said Capt. Lance Lesher, commodore of Amphibious Squadron 8. “It’s crucial that ships’ crews are prepared to work together, communicate and face all varieties of challenges at sea. That need is amplified when you have multiple ships conducting coordinated operations as a group.” SWATT exercises are conducted in two phases. The first phase of the Bataan ARG SWATT — like similar SWATTs — was an in-port academic session where Warfare Tactics Instructors (WTI) from Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC) provided training to shipboard teams that directly led into the development of warfighting capacity during the second phase of training. After the in-port phase, underway training commenced when all the ships, aircraft and landing craft that make up the Bataan ARG — including USS Bataan (LHD 5), USS New York (LPD 21), USS Oak Hill (LSD 51), and embarked Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 (HSC 28) and Naval Beach Group 2 assets — completed training events to sharpen their warfighting skills. These events included conducting integrated air and missile defense (IAMD), anti-submarine / surface warfare (ASW/SUW), amphibious warfare (AMW), information warfare (IW), mine warfare (MIW), ship maneuvering, and live-fire events designed to tactically prepare surface forces for maritime warfare missions. SMWDC led the SWATT exercise with 18 WTIs, senior mentors, and subject matter experts embarked aboard each ship. These onboard trainers provided overthe-shoulder mentoring for watchstanders and commanding officer and warfare commander level guidance from senior mentors. Subject matter experts and onboard technical community personnel delivered rapid replay capability from scheduled training exercises that provided immediate feedback for watchstanders

to help them rapidly learn from challenges they experienced during training. The SWATT culminated in a Live Fire With a Purpose (LFWAP) exercise with rolling airframe missiles. Lt. Bobby Chamberlain, an ASW/SUW WTI, explained that SWATT allows each ship and the ARG as a whole an opportunity to train in realistic underway scenarios to focus the development of warfare capability and less on receipt of a certification – a luxury for warfighters that SWATT and LFWAP provide. “We are solely here for the purpose of providing training,” said Chamberlain. “That gives a lot of flexibility in how we execute and how we deliver training. SWATT enables the ship to focus on their operations rather than worrying about a grade. We provide the goods and feedback on how they can improve going forward through the Amphibious Ready Group Marine Expeditionary Unit exercise, composite training unit exercise and deployment and how to sustain combat operations.” The amphibious warfare (AMW) WTI, Lt. Audrey Collier, the lead AMW WTI for the ARG SWATT, noted that being able to exercise landing craft utility and landing craft air cushion movements and practicing primary and secondary ship control duties for ship-to-shore movements was key to increasing the ARG’s mission readiness. “Once they come out of the basic phase we want them to be tactically sound and able to conduct warfare doctrinally prior to them going into their integrated phase,” said Collier. Since 2016, there have been 11 SWATT exercises completed by carrier strike group cruiser-destroyer units and ARGs. SMWDC is a subordinate command of Commander, U.S. Naval Surface Forces, and is headquartered at Naval Base San Diego with four divisions in Virginia and California focused on IAMD, ASW/SUW, AMW, and Mine Warfare. *

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zachary A. Anderson

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Surface Force News USS O’Kane (DDG 77) is Overall Winner of 2019 Surface Line Week Pacific By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Woody S. Paschall

The 38th Surface Line Week (SLW) competition came to an end with an award ceremony, Aug. 23. The two-week competition highlighted professional and athletic skills of members of the Surface Warfare community in San Diego while enhancing comradery and team building. The overall winner of Surface Line Week 2019 was USS O’Kane (DDG 77). As part of the honor, the O’Kane team can proudly display the 2019 Surface Line Week banner on the ship’s brow until the 2020 winner is selected. “This friendly competition is fun, but it has important elements of training and readiness,” said Lt. Cmdr. Lionel Wesley, SLW Coordinator. “In an era of renewed Great Power Competition, we need Sailors who embody excellence in all they do. Continue to build on the professional skills you displayed during Surface Line Week so we can build combat ready ships and battle-minded crews.” * For the full list of award recipients, please visit https://www.dvidshub.net/news/337906/uss-okane-ddg77-overall-winner-2019-surface-line-week-pacific


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Surface Force Commander Encourages Continued Excellence to USS Benfold Crew By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William McCann

Vice Adm. Richard Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet presented the Battle Effectiveness (Battle “E”) award to the crew of the guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG 65) as part of a visit to local Forward Deployed Naval Force- Japan (FDNF-J) ships and commands, June 13. The Battle "E" competition is conducted to strengthen individual command performance, improve overall force readiness, and to recognize outstanding performance. The award symbolizes the ship’s overall readiness to carry out its assigned wartime tasks. While aboard, Brown took the opportunity to congratulate and pin Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Brandon Wells of Oklahoma City, as an Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist. Brown also awarded Navy Achievement Medals to Lt. Azariah Lindsey of Houston, and Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class Lianamarie Quevedo of San Francisco. Following the presentations, Brown spoke to the crew about his priorities, explained his philosophy and vision for the Surface Fleet, and engaged in a question and answer session. He focused his discussion on the elevated naval capabilities within the region and the increased necessity for warfighting

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readiness as ships in their areas of operation confront great power competition in the region. “It’s déjà vu all over again,” said Brown during his remarks. “I joined the Navy during the Cold War and until now, there have not been any other world powers who could combat the U.S. Navy. We still have an unmatched Surface Force, but we need to work harder than ever before to keep it that way.” Brown stressed the importance of setting a baseline and encouraged the crew to continue to go above and beyond with training saying, “focus on excellence, not compliance.” The crew asked several questions about new initiatives that are being put in place to ensure that ships and crews will be prepared for combat. On the subject of Ready Relevant Learning, Brown went into detail about the importance of preparing Sailors for the job that they are actually going to do. Operations Specialist Seaman Loni Harrison of Jacksonville, North Carolina, who asked a question, was very excited about the initiative and the changes. “It makes sense and saves time and money,” she noted. “The way the system is now, by the time Sailors actually start doing their jobs aboard the ship, most of the information you learned [in pipeline courses] isn’t being applied and is gone.” While in Yokosuka, Brown also conducted a region all Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) call to discuss the current and future status of the Surface Force, in an effort to continue the shift from a culture of compliance to a culture of excellence and produce crews ready for the high-end fight. *


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Surface Force News SURFLANT Holds Change of Command By Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic Public Affairs NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Rear Adm. Roy Kitchener relieved Rear Adm. Jesse A. Wilson Jr., as commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT), during a change of command ceremony at the Joint Forces Staff College MacArthur auditorium, Aug. 9. The ceremony was also an opportunity to recognize Wilson’s retirement after 33-years of naval service. As commander since July 2017, Wilson credits the headquarters team, waterfront leadership and the 27,000 personnel across the Atlantic Force for adopting and executing the command’s motto "Ready Ships, Ready Sailors, and Ready Civilians." "You significantly increased the readiness of the Atlantic Force by prioritizing readiness and overcoming all challenges…together we properly manned, tactically trained, and effectively equipped a force that is competent, confident, proficient, and ready to fight and win today and tomorrow," said Wilson. Wilson and the entire SURFLANT team were responsible for ensuring the readiness of 75 ships and more than 25 shore commands. Significant changes were implemented to ensure the force was trained for the high-end fight and building a culture of excellence. These changes included a revision of the Surface Force Training and Readiness Manual, as well as the establishment of Mariner Skills Week; Bridge Resource Management Workshops; Navigation Councils; Type Commander-level Planning Board for Maintenance

and Modernization; Crew Endurance and Fatigue Policy; and Force Preservation Councils. The ruthless execution of generating ships ready for operational tasking yielded increased readiness and proficiency. SURFLANT ensured the readiness and ability of the Atlantic Force to provide maritime security, ballistic missile defense, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, anti-submarine warfare, and the precise, overwhelming and effective employment of missiles that struck targets in Syria in support of national objectives to deter the future use of chemical weapons. Wilson’s relief, Kitchener most recently served as the U.S. Deputy Military Representative for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Military Committee. "I am humbled and honored to be a part of this team… together we will guarantee the surface force, our ships and our warfighters, are ready to fight and win, wherever and whenever needed," said Kitchener. SURFLANT is a U.S. naval type command that provides combat-ready surface forces for U.S. Fleet Forces Command and combatant commanders that are capable of conducting prompt, sustained naval, joint, and combined operations in support of United States national interests. Established in 1975, SURFLANT is responsible for manning, training and equipping the Atlantic force, which includes ships stationed stateside on the east coast, as well as forward deployed in Bahrain; Rota, Spain; and the Aegis Ashore Missile Defense System in Romania and Poland. "To go in harm's way" in defense of the principles of freedom and democracy has been the rally call of surface force Sailors for more than 200 years. *


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CNSF Celebrates Surface Force Accomplishments, Touts BattleMindedness During Surface Warrior Ball By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

An enthusiastic crowd celebrated the accomplishments of Surface Warfare during the 2019 Surface Warrior Ball at the Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Aug. 24. Total attendance of the 2019 Surface Warrior Ball was 518 members of the Surface community, their families, and supporters. Additionally, more attendees from the enlisted ranks were at this year’s Warrior Ball than in any year past. “It reaffirms something I know deep down in my heart that we are the premier Surface Force, second to none, that controls the sea and provides credible combat naval power to our Nation when and where needed. You should be incredibly proud,” said the keynote speaker Vice Adm. Richard Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Forces (CNSF). Throughout the evening, attendees saluted and recognized examples of how Surface Warfare has impacted the world over the past year. “Every day, our deployed ships provide security, stability, and goodwill that the global environment seeks. And every day that global presence is underwritten by the combat readiness of those units. They’re ready to control the sea they are expected to control, to project power to places they are tasked to protect, and to defeat adversaries and protect self and Allies, when required,” said the event Master of Ceremony, Capt. Bill Daly, Chief of Staff, Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CNSP). During the ball, attendees remembered Surface Force Sailors who were deployed, defending freedom and democracy worldwide and across a wide range of operations. In addition, they honored the families of those deployed, as well as recognized recently returned deployers, including USS Mobile Bay, USS Spruance, USS Stockdale, and USS Chung-Hoon. They also recognized the accomplishments of Surface Force Pacific ships over the past year. In his keynote address, Brown told the story of USS Johnston (DD 557), its crew, and their fighting captain,

Lt. Cmdr. Ernie Evans during the Battle off Samar Island during the Leyte Gulf campaign of World War II. “The Battle of Leyte Gulf and the Battle off Samar Island destroyed the combat power of the Japanese fleet and ultimately led to the Japanese surrender. Ernie Evans was a fighting captain who prepared his ship and his crew for the fight. And they owned it,” Brown stressed. “This is our history. Ernie Evans demonstrated what toughness, excellence, and victory looks like. We need to carry that torch, and I know that you do every single day.” As part of the ceremony, CNSP announced guidedmissile destroy USS O’Kane (DDG 77) was recognized as the overall winner of Surface Line Week (SLW) 2019. A two-week competition, SLW highlighted professional and athletic skills of members of the Surface Warfare community in San Diego while enhancing comradery and team building. As part of the honor, the O’Kane team may proudly display the 2019 Surface Line Week banner on the ship’s brow until the 2020 winner is selected. SLW and the Surface Warrior Ball were two of several events in August focused aligning processes, increasing readiness and lethality, and enhancing professionalism within the Surface Force. Earlier in August, CNSP and Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (CNSL), at the beginning of the month, participated in Surface Type Commander Staff Talks at Naval Station Norfolk. The staffs shared data and exchanged dialogue to mainstream Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) and ensure "one fight, one Navy.” Additionally, in mid-August, Brown hosted the 2019 Surface Warfare Flag Officers Training Symposium (SWFOTS) and the Surface Navy Association’s (SNA) 21st annual West Coast Symposium. Held in San Diego, both of these events provided a venue to ensure the Surface Community is aligned with and informed about the Navy’s current and future developments *

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The inaugural class of the Junior Officer of the Deck (JOOD) course graduated during a ceremony at Naval Base San Diego, July 17. The four-week course, a new addition to the revised Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) career path, includes training in a broad range of integrated bridge fundamentals. With this course, newly commissioned Ensigns now attend both the Basic Division Officer Course (BDOC) and JOOD to prepare them to drive ships and lead Sailors. "The new JOOD course provides exactly the depth and breadth of shiphandling training I wish I would've received when I graduated from the Naval Academy as an Ensign 27 years ago, said Capt. Chris Alexander, Commanding Officer, Surface Warfare Officers School. "Between the BDOC and JOOD, the Surface Community is giving our newest officers more than 130 hours in the simulators. This translates to tangible experience. That is, these officers will

report to their ships with the equivalent of more than 40 standard watches." Rear Adm. Scott Robertson, Commander, Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC), was the graduation's guest speaker. A former SWOS Commanding Officer, Robertson told the 30 graduates to continuously pursue excellence. "Congratulations on completing the first Junior Officer of the Deck course, but I caution you to remember that just like anything, mariner skills are perishable," said Robertson. "You must continue to dedicate time to studying shiphandling, tactical maneuvering, the rules of the road, and practice frequently in challenging scenarios, in order to grow as both mariners and warfighters. I challenge you to take the jumpstart you have been given and become the best ship driver and Surface Warrior in your wardrooms."


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INAUGURAL JUNIOR OFFICER OF THE DECK COURSE LAYS FOUNDATION FOR JUNIOR OFFICERS TO DRIVE SHIPS, LEAD SAILORS By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Woody S. Paschall

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Many junior officers said the course prepared them to accept that challenge. "At the course, we apply the rules of the road, not just in a book, but in some of the world's busiest shipping lanes and traffic separation schemes in the simulator," said Ensign Ryan Brennan from Sacramento, California. "The course exceeded my expectations, the resources available are impressive, and it felt like the Navy is really focusing on my training." Brennan is assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52). "The best part of the course is that the instructors are really passionate about ship driving," said Ensign Samuel Weitzman, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Milius (DDG 69). "You get to see how the ship moves through the water. Also the ship you are driving [in the simulator] is the actually type of ship you will be serving on."

"In BDOC, we did a lot of individual training, we were often alone in the simulator," said Ensign David Grippin of Burke, Virginia. "At the JOOD course, we worked more as part of a bridge team. Everyone in the simulator sees the same thing. We aren't just learning how to drive the ship but how to run the bridge." Grippin is assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89). Following successful completion of BDOC, JOOD, and the first of 10 assessments along the SWO career path, the Ensigns report to their warship. Once there as a Division Officer, they will focus on qualifying as Officers of the Deck (OOD) and work to obtain their SWO pin. The second JOOD class began July 15. It's all part of an overall process to prepare SWOs from Division Officer to Commanding Officer, ensuring they can drive, fight, and eventually lead combat ready ships to own the fight. *


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“The Surface Community is giving our newest officers more than 130 hours in the simulators. We aren't just learning how to drive the ship but how to run the bridge.”

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By Lt. Georges Banks, Combat Systems Officer USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10)

Recently, four members of the USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) combat systems team and I traveled to Kongsberg, Norway. Konsberg is a beautiful city, but our trip was not a vacation. It was an outstanding opportunity for us to train and sharpen our warfighting skills as we prepare to deploy. In an effort to bring a rapid, enhanced offensive capability to littoral combat ships (yes, it is as cool as it sounds) and work toward training a crew to win the high end fight, our team attended the Theory of Operations Course for the Naval Strike Missile (NSM) pilot course hosted by Kongsberg Defense and Aerospace (KDA).

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony J. Rivera

Here’s what happened. During our visit, we learned about NSM directly from the software engineers, project managers, and mission planners. The KDA team trained us on tactical and technical capabilities of this unique weapon. We learned about various tactics and planning tools that maximize the lethality of the weapon system. The NSM is a game-changer. It adds more punch to our lethal anti-ship capability.


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Here are a few reasons why this trip was important. Achieving High-Velocity Learning One of my favorite aspects of the course was the prioritization of hands-on training. We spent a lot of time planning missions and learning the system inside and out. Of the 10 days we spent in the classroom, seven were spent practicing system operation with a focus on a variety of tactical scenarios.

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zachary D. Bell

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) GOLD crew members. The team participated in training to help build their winning, high-end war fighting crew as the ship prepares for its first deployment this year.

Testing Tactical Scenarios Our team was excited to stress the system, and by the second week, the instructors allowed us to break into teams to build individual scenarios to test against each other. The instructors were open to allowing us to “test” the system and remarked that we were by far the most inquisitive class they had led. Feeding Back for the Future As it was the pilot course, we had the unique opportunity to provide real-time feedback to both the Norwegian instructors and the Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) representatives tasked with building the course objectives for the future NSM training pipeline. It was refreshing to provide meaningful and direct feedback on such an important naval program. Traveling to Norway to work with KDA was truly a career highlight - an amazing experience all-around! By the end of the course, our team had made new friends, established a good working relationship with the KDA team, and enjoyed Norwegian cuisine and the beautiful countryside. Most importantly, though, we became better Warfighters. Now, we’re bringing newly-learned expertise back to our ship. I am confident that our team can effectively employ the NSM weapon system and develop tactics that will carry us through certification and deployment, as well as benefit the future of NSM on U.S. Navy ships. *

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SWO Jackets

Authorized for Exclusive Wear by Surface Warfare Officers to Mark Professional Achievement By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

The U.S. Navy has authorized the Surface Warfare Officer Leather Jackets (SWO Jackets) for exclusive wear by Surface Warfare Officers as a uniform item to mark professional achievement within the community. The Surface Warfare Community has a long-standing history of excellence, and a uniquely identifiable wearable item is one way to signify that excellence. This leather jacket also identifies the outstanding achievement, professionalism, and warrior ethos of the SWO that is wearing it. The Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV N1) has approved the SWO Jacket for incorporation into Navy Uniform Regulations. Uniform Regulations are being updated to reflect this change and to describe the manner of wear. OPNAV N1 designated the SWO Jackets as organizational clothing with exclusive designation for SWOs. Foul Weather jackets will still be issued to ships as organizational clothing for wear. “The shared experiences of SWOs are incredibly unique,” said Vice Adm. Richard Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Forces. “We train together, stand watch together, walk the deck-plates together, and lead an amazing Fleet of Sailors together. But we also walk on the hallowed shoulders of giants who built our warfighting and ship-driving legacy. From the blue-water ships to our amphibious fleet, we bring our fighting spirit to all of our ship classes. I have no doubt SWOs will wear it with pride, as a visual representation of the bond of being underway and out to sea.” OPNAV N1 also approved Commander, Naval Surface Forces’ request to authorize Active, Reserve, and Full Time Support (FTS) Surface Warfare Officers with designators 1110, 1113, 1115, and 1117 who have earned the Surface

Warfare Qualification to wear the SWO Jacket. Surface Warfare Officers with designator 1115 must be actively on orders or in a drilling status to have a jacket issued to them. Currently, there are two wear tests for the prototype SWO Jackets. In coordination with Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility (NCTRF), select SWOs are testing the form, fit, and functionality of the jacket in order to provide user input and feedback prior to final design and acquisition. Specifically, the users are evaluating the quality of the fabric, the design, the look, the feel, and how the jacket performs in different environments. Thus far, officers have provided initial feedback regarding the leather quality of the jacket and the current position of the pockets. Jackets have also recently completed fit-testing in Newport, RI to ensure sizes match body types. Naval Surface Forces in conjunction with the Director, Supply, Ordnance and Logistics Operations Division (OPNAV N41) and other key stakeholders are establishing policy that will govern the inventory, management, and accounting of the SWO Jackets. The SWO Jacket contract is currently out for bid. We expect that contract to award in late FY19 and the goal is to begin distributing the SWO Jacket to all qualified officers as soon as possible in FY20. The jackets will be authorized for wear with a name patch only. Standard Leather name patches and Command specific name patches are permitted. If you have additional questions, contact the Surface Warfare Leather Jacket Manager, Harry Davis at 619-4373519 or Harry.Davis@Navy.mil.


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Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Woody S. Paschall

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Welco The Goa

4,744 Chief’s Selected

Navy-wide

644

Surface Pacific Selected

24,000 Chief Petty Officers Active Duty or FTS

Layout by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joseph Millar

7%


22%

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ome To at Locker

1,042

Naval Surface Forces

Selected

8% 398

Surface Atlantic Selected

8%

NON Surface Forces Advanced

The Pacific and Atlantic fleet naval surface forces welcomed their new chief petty officers into the CPO Mess, Sept. 16, with pinning ceremonies held on surface ships and at shore commands across the globe. Throughout the six weeks of CPO initiation, they were trained and tested by their Chiefs Messes, and then accepted in the Goat Locker, a historical term for the Chiefs Mess. Congratulations to all new COMNAVSURFFOR chief petty officers!

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Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alexander C. Kubitza

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2019 SWFOTS

Combat Ready Ships and Battle-Minded Crews By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

The Surface Force needs to build Combat Ready Ships and Battle-Minded Crews. That was the theme of the Surface Warfare Flag Officer Training Symposium (SWFOTS) 2019, Aug. 15-16. The annual SWFOTS provides Surface Flag officers a venue to ensure the Surface Community is aligned with and informed about the Navy’s current and future developments that support operational commanders, as well as the National Defense and Maritime strategies. Vice Adm. Richard Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Forces, hosted the event. “We have to start talking about Combat Ready Ships and Battle-Minded Crews and tell sea stories about what that means,” Brown told the group of 50 Flag officers and their spouses during the opening session. “We have to go back into our history, learn these sea stories, and talk about them with our ships, our commanding officers, and, more importantly, our Sailors.” To illustrate his point, Brown stressed that the Surface Community must expect our Sailors and Marines to fight just like the crews of the Leyte Gulf campaign of World War II. Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Woody S. Paschall


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Photo by Chief Petty Officer Ace Rheaume

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“We need to continue talking to our crews about the realities of war at sea in World War II to help them recognize what the fight could be like”


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“We need to continue talking to our crews about the realities of war at sea in World War II to help them recognize what the fight could be like,” said Brown. Additionally, Brown offered three main “takeaways” from SWFOTS 2019 to ensure the Surface Force is aligned: What Are We: The U.S. Navy’s Surface Force is second to none, controls the seas, and provides the Nation with naval combat power when and where needed. It is part of the Surface Force’s vision, mission, and ethos. The Surface Force is the best, fastest, toughest, smartest, and the premier Surface Force in the world. What Do We Have: The Surface Force has combat ready ships, battleminded crews, and an unrelenting drive to a culture of excellence. We are already making a difference by working closely with Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), Fleet Commanders, as well as utilizing the Perform to Plan (P2P) process. We are also seeing dividends generated by the new Surface Force Training and Readiness Manual (SFTRM) in terms of Commanding Officers exceeding the standards of compliance and taking every opportunity to make their teams more lethal and ready to fight. What We Will Be: The future of the Surface Force includes the Navy’s next guided-missile frigate (FFG(X)), Flight III Destroyers (FLT III DDG), Medium Displacement Unmanned Surface Vehicle (MDUSV), Large Displacement Unmanned Surface Vessels (LDUSV), Large Surface Combatants (LSC), Naval Operational Architecture, and mainstreamed Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). Within the next five years, the Navy will have 66 LCS crews. By comparison, we have built 68 destroyers over the past 30 years. We are making investments in weapons, sensors, C4I, cyber, people, and readiness for the fight to come. We must condition our officers and crews to have the tactical knowledge and proficiency, initiative, and grit needed to fully use these new capabilities with maximum lethality against any adversary.

SWFOTS 2019 participants toured the Littoral Combat Ship Shore-Based Training Facility (LTF), which provides integrated bridge and combat systems tactical scenario training to LCS Sailors. Participants also toured Independence-class Littoral Combat Ship USS Gabrielle Giffors (LCS 10) and Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001). Guest speakers during SWFOTS 2019 included Adm. Robert Burke, Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), and Adm. Christopher Grady, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFFC). Unclassified briefs presented throughout the symposium are available on the CNSP SharePoint portal at https://cpf.navy.deps.mil/sites/cnsp/swfots/default. aspx. Use the email certification to log in. “SWFOTS 2019 was an outstanding event that aligned our Surface Flag officer wardroom and confirmed we have the most lethal Surface Force in the world,” said Brown. *

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CNSF Rallies Surface Community

Behind World’s Smartest, Best-Trained Surface Force at SNA West By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

Vice Adm. Richard A. Brown, Commander, Naval Surface Forces, delivered the keynote address at the Surface Navy Association’s (SNA) 21st annual West Coast symposium on board Naval Base San Diego, Aug. 22. The theme of the professional development event was “Lethal and Tough in Today’s Fight,” which transitioned well from the focus of the Surface Warfare Flag Officers Training Symposium (SWFOTS) held a week prior. “During SWFOTS, we discussed establishing policies and providing funding to support our Commanding

Officers’ efforts to build combat ready ships and battleminded crews,” Brown told the crowd during his address. “SNA West is taking those combat ready ships and battle-minded crews and talking about being lethal and tough in today's fight. We don't build readiness for readiness sake. We build readiness to get our ships underway, and, when required by our Nation, go forward, fight, win, and come back home. To do that, we have to be lethal. We have to be tough, if we're going to win today's fight.”


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Photo by Lt.j.g. Caleb Swigart

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Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brenton Poyser

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alan L. Robertson


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“There is no other Surface Force like the United States Navy Surface Force. It is time for us to act that way.”

Brown cited real-world examples of why crews need to be ready because of the return of the era of great power competition and similarities to the Cold War. He reminded the audience of last October when a People's Republic of China Luyang destroyer approached the guided-missile destroyer USS Decatur “in an unsafe and unprofessional maneuver in the vicinity of Gaven Reef in the South China Sea," according to a statement issued by U.S. Pacific Fleet. He also noted a June 2019 incident in the Philippine Sea, where “a Russian Destroyer (UDALOY I DD 572) made an unsafe maneuver against the guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), closing to approximately 50-100 feet putting the safety of her crew and ship at risk.”

“So, we have to be lethal,” said Brown. “We have to be tough because we don't know when we're going to go into the fight. The fight could happen tomorrow, next week, or three years from now. But if we're not preparing now, we won't be ready. But I have no doubt that we are ready.” As part of the address, Brown emphasized the U.S. Surface Force is second to none and that we also control the sea and provide credible combat naval power to our nation, when and where needed. “There is no other Surface Force like the United States Navy Surface Force. It is time for us to act that way,” said Brown. *

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Barker

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Surface Forces

Host Staff Talks to Increase Readiness By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CNSP) and Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (CNSL) participated in Surface Type Commander Staff Talks, Aug. 7-8, at Naval Station Norfolk. Pacific and Atlantic personnel shared data, exchanged dialogue, and aligned processes and policies to increase the readiness and lethality of the Surface Force.

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Eduardo Jorge

CNSP and then-CNSL commanders, Vice Adm. Richard Brown and Rear Adm. Jesse A. Wilson Jr., respectively, hosted Staff Talks at the CNSL headquarters. While in Norfolk, Brown also hosted an all-hands call with Norfolk-based Surface Warfare Officers. "Our staffs exist to put our ships to sea, and if required by our Nation, to have them fight, win and come home," said Brown. "To do that, we need combat ready ships with battle-minded crews. Staff Talks ensure we’re aligned to best prepare our crews for the High-End Fight."


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Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Derien Kenney

“Our staffs exist to put our ships to sea, and if required by our Nation, to have them fight, win and come home.�

More than 50 service members and civilians participated in the two-day meeting, which included personnel from CNSP, CNSL, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron (LCSRON) One, LCSRON Two, the Program Executive Office for Unmanned and Small Combatants, Regional Maintenance Center, Afloat Training Group Atlantic, and the Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center. Discussions focused mainly on manning, training and equipping of Littoral Combat Ships. Other topics included recent revision to the Surface Force

Training and Readiness Manual, minimal notice Board of Inspection and Survey, and lessons learned. "Together, we must continue to be ready to fight and win across the range of military operations as we return to Great Power Competition," said Wilson. "We must remain competent, confident, proficient, and continue to harness all of our talents and skills to be the best and finest lethal fighting force while we build the Navy the nation needs." This was the third time CNSP and CNSL held Staff Talks. The previous meeting took place in January in San Diego. *

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Voices From the Fleet Shiphandling Efforts Inside NSST from a QMC’s Perspective By Lt. James Ballingall Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet

Photos by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Antonio P. Turretto


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Last year, we returned home from deployment and are now in an extended maintenance period. In our time home, the majority of the crew turned over and many of the incoming personnel lacked experience in watch team situations because they’ve never been underway. Because of the NSST, I’ve had the fortune of being in port and still developing my navigation and bridge team. In the trainer, we are able to practice getting underway, open ocean transits, man overboard drills, restricted water transits, strait transits, as well as other special evolutions. With the NSST, we can do all of this training while in port – not burning fuel and without risk. The simulated environment allows watch teams to train to high-risk level scenarios. If they mess up, we pause the simulation, review the lessons learned, teach appropriate tactics that may be applied and reset the scenario. The trainer is a chance for all levels of the team - from a Seaman all the way to the Captain - to improve. The NSST simulates the exact characteristics

of our own ship, so it is as real as possible without putting water under the keel. Junior officers benefit from the NSST because it provides them opportunities to live scenarios that expose them to challenges they will experience underway. This experience also enables them to earn signatures in their personnel qualification standard (PQS) toward qualifications and Surface Warfare Officer logbook entries. NSST allows all bridge watchstanders a chance to get back in the navigation groove prior to the ship getting underway. Bridge watch teams can use it to get in cadence with each other and improve communication between the combat information center and the bridge. Bottom line: The more we practice at the NSST, the better we work as a cohesive navigation team. So when it’s time to get the ship underway for operations, the team has a head start on the larger idea of Bridge Resource Management (BRM). *

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History and Heritage Building Battle-Minded Crews: Remembering Ernest Evans By Naval History and Heritage Command


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“This is going to be a fighting ship. I intend to go in harm’s way, and anyone who doesn’t want to go along had better get off right now.”

Those were the words of Commander Ernest. E. Evans on the day USS Johnston (DD-557) was commissioned, 27 October 1943, at Seattle, Washington. Just three months later, Johnston was bombarding the beaches of Kwajalein and Eniwetok providing direct support to invasion troops on the ground and conducting antisubmarine patrols off Bougainville.

Historical Photos U.S. Navy

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By U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public Affairs

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Katie Cox

NORFOLK, Virginia (NNS) -- Sailors and Marines returned to Norfolk, Virginia, this week after providing unique military capabilities supporting relief to the Bahamas following Hurricane Dorian. The service members came from the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group (ARG); Helicopter Mine Countermeasure Squadron (HM)-14 and HM-15; and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 and HSC-26. Under the direction of U.S. Northern Command, the Bataan ARG provided support to the U.S. Agency for International Development enabling the broader effort to address the acute humanitarian needs of the Bahamian people. The Bataan ARG, comprising amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21), Harpers Ferry-class dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51), and Sailors and Marines of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, operated in international waters off the Bahamas. Meanwhile, four MH-53E Sea Stallion helicopters were forward-staged at Homestead Air Reserve Base in Southern Florida, 25 miles south of Miami. “In the wake of the strongest storm to hit the Bahamas, I am proud of the hard work, dedication and professionalism of our wing,” said Capt. Shawn Bailey, Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic commander. “They rose to the occasion to help those in need.” The Navy and Marine Corps provided a number of aviation and logistics capabilities around the geographically dispersed Bahamian islands:

Medium-lift MH-60 Seahawk and heavy-lift CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopters, along with heavy lift tilt-rotor MV-22B Ospreys, transported humanitarian supplies. In addition, Navy and Marine Corps aircraft transported dozens of military and civilian medical personnel who provided water, food, medical supplies, search-andrescue gear, tarps and solar lights throughout the cities of Eleuthera, Freeport and Marsh Harbour. The aircraft also transported USAID Disaster Assistance Response Team personnel to Marsh Harbour; United Nations Office for Coordination of Human Affairs personnel to Grand Bahamas; Urban Search and Rescue personnel to Marsh Harbour; and a U.S. Air Force Airfield Assessment Team to Marsh Harbour and Sandy Point, to evaluate the Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport. In addition, Marine Corps CH-53Es, as part of joint military support to USAID, provided ground refueling of U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook and UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters. To enable those air operations, Air Traffic Control Sailors aboard New York and Bataan helped monitor airspace safety for military aircraft in critical areas near Marsh Harbour. The Bataan, New York and Oak Hill used their shipboard freshwater-making capability to fill pallets of water transferred by air to Marsh Harbour, Treasure Cay and Moore’s Island. To learn more about the U.S. Department of Defense’s 2019 hurricane season response efforts, please visit https://www.dvidshub.net/feature/19DODHurricane. *


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Command Changes June 2019

Rear Adm. Fred Pyle.........................................................Carrier Strike Group CSG 3 Rear Adm. Dave Welch....................................................Carrier Strike Group CSG 15 Rear Adm. Robert Chadwick II.......................................MIDPAC Change of Command Capt. Colby Howard.....................................................................................CNSGWP

Capt. Allen Johnson.................................................USS Lake Champlain CG-57 Cmdr. Mark W. Lawrence.......................................USS Paul Hamilton DDG 60

July 2019

August 2019

Capt. Jason Burns...............................................................COMPHIBRON FIVE CPR 5 Capt. Henry C. Adams..........................................................................SURFDEVRON 1 Cmdr. Ryan T. Easterday....................................................USS John S. McCain DDG56 Cmdr. Kevin Culver.................................................................................USS Comstock Cmdr. Chad Trubilla.......................................................................USS Rafael Peralta Cmdr. Lawrence Repass..............................................................................USS Freedom

Rear Adm. Roy Kitchener................................................CNSL COMNAVSURFLANT Capt. Stephen Ilteris.................................................................USS Anchorage LPD 23 Cmdr. James Sordi.......................................................................USS Spruance DDG 111 Cmdr. Kevin T. Dean............................................................USS Pearl Harbor LSD-52 Cmdr. Peter Abbott...................................................................USS Anchorage LPD 23

Please submit upcoming Change of Command information to: cnsp.webmaster@navy.mil

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