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May 2011

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Vol. IV, Issue V

Page 1

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Community Messenger

May 2011

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May 2011

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Community Messenger

May 2011

RBR dance major accepted to Juilliard CONTACT US:  732-739-8689 admin@mycommunitypublications.com

Owned and operated by Direct Development, LLC To contact a specific department, send an email to an address below. _____@mycommunitypublications.com announcements calendar events info pets pressreleases

INDEX

News.......................................4–24 Calendar...............................18-19 Columns..............................32-33 Kid’s Corner..............................30 Our Charity .................................8 Pets.......................................26-27 Where’s Moose?.........................26 Puzzles........................................29 Your Say......................................34 Local Service Listing...................17

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LITTLE SILVER BOROUGH – Every serious performing art student dreams of acceptance to Juilliard, one of the most prestigious conservatory art schools in the world. Red Bank resident and Red Bank Regional Dance major Anthony Tiedeman recently learned that he will be one of only 26 accepted students (13 boys and 13 girls) to Juilliard’s freshman dance class for the fall. Tiedeman competed with 560 student dancers from the United States and throughout the world in a grueling fourhour, three-round elimination audition to win this coveted spot. (Multiple auditions were conducted in locations throughout the United States.) He received a substantial scholarship for each of his four years at Juilliard and will graduate with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance. This is a major feat for any student and more difficult than gaining acceptance to Harvard, Yale or Princeton as Juilliard has an acceptance rate of less than five percent. “I feel this is the perfect school for me and presents the perfect challenge,” Tiedeman said. Tiedeman has been dancing since the age of eight when he liked to mimic his older sister when she practiced her dance lessons; Christine Tiedeman was also an RBR dance major. “Then I thought I would like to be a hip hop dancer and perform in music videos,” Tiedeman said, but once he gave up baseball to take dancing more seriously, he became a big fan of jazz and modern dance. In addition, to the 90 minutes a day he spends in Dorianne Murray’s dance classroom at RBR, he travels after school to Parlin, to the Dance Stop, one of the premier dance studios in New Jersey, practicing his

craft for a total of four to five hours per day. In explaining why he loves dance, he said, “It combines the best of art and athletics and never gets old as there is always something new to try.” Tiedeman has appeared in many community musical productions as an ensemble, featured and solo dancer including Phoenix Productions “Oklahoma,” “Beauty & the Beast,” “High School Musical” and “West Side Story.” Through his private school training, he has competed in many regional and national competitions and conventions, including The New York City Dance Alliance, JUMP, Starbound and the American Dance Awards. He has Red Bank resident Anthony Tiedeman will be one also performed for charity of only 26 accepted students to Juilliard’s freshman shows including “Dancing dance class for the fall.–Photo courtesy RBR Today for Tomorrow’s Cure” (Breast Cancer Benefit) and Dancers ultimately diversifying and strengthening their skills. Responding to AIDS. Of course, Tiedeman has also appeared in “I am so overwhelmingly thrilled for him,” RBR concerts twice each year, usually Murray said. “Juilliard will open so many unbelievable opportunities for him. The sky choreographing his own numbers. He is very close to his classmates who he is the limit in what he can do. This is such calls his family within the high school. The a great venue for him to express his creativdance students also teach and learn from ity and nurture his talent even more.” one another. This happens as students Tiedeman aspires to be a professional choreograph the great majority of the dancer with a traveling troupe in America dances they perform. In addition, the use of or in Europe. He also hopes to return to many guest choreographers (many times re- RBR after college as a guest choreographer turning alumni) give the students a versatil- someday. No doubt his teachers and classity in learning other dance styles and mates will be following his star.

Making the band LITTLE SILVER BOROUGH – Red Bank Regional High School will send four of its performing art students to this year’s All Shore Symphonic Band. Shrewsbury resident and senior Michele Tarnecki plays the flute. Halle Butler, a freshman also plays the flute. Carey Neff, a sophomore placed first chair in the baritone horn. Freshman Matthew Rosen placed first chair in the bass clarinet and also auditioned on alto clarinet where he placed first on alto clarinet in that ensemble as well. Butler, Neff and Rosen are all

Little Silver residents. The students study under the direction of RBR band teacher Kerry McNulty. The students performed in the All-Shore Symphonic Band concert, which took place on Sunday, April 10, at Toms River North High School. Four RBR students made the All-Shore Symphonic Band. They are (bottom row, l-r) Carey Neff and Matthew Rosen; (top row, lr), Halle Butler and Michele Tarnecki.–Photo courtesy RBR


May 2011

Fair Haven celebrates 99 years

Community Messenger

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Members of the Fair Haven Centennial Committee pose during the recent 99th birthday party. Standing, l-r: Christine Burke-Eskqitt, Mayor Michael Halfacre, Erin Gotch, Marie Noglows, Nicole Rice and Theresa Casagrande, the borough administrator. Seated, l-r: Susan O’Brien and Patricia Drummond.—Both photos courtesy Ellie Halfacre By KAITLIN SEVERINI made stops at Fair Haven on its journey Correspondent between New York and Red Bank. “Everyone there was there for Fair HaFAIR HAVEN BOROUGH — On March ven,” Halfacre said. “It wasn’t a Historic 26, Fair Haven celebrated its 99th birthday Association event, a baseball event, a PTA with a cocktail party at the Raven and the event, Yacht Club event. It was a Fair HaPeach restaurant on River Road. ven event. Everyone there is proud to be Fair Haven Mayor Michael Halfacre from Fair Haven.” came up with the idea for the party as a The event was no doubt a great kickoff way to create awareness of the town’s to the centennial celebrations to take place upcoming centennial, raise money for the next year. Centennial events will include a centennial events and recruit volunteers to boat parade and regatta, golf outing, formal help the Centennial Committee. dinner, school poster and recipe contests, “The existing Centennial Committee did events recognizing past elected officials a great job,” Halfacre said. “The night was and a town-wide picnic and parade fola huge success. We had a sellout crowd. I lowed by fireworks. The events will take think it exceeded most expectations. I had place next June. Dates are to come. a great time (I always do at Fair Haven “We plan on having something cenevents) and it really gets me excited for the tennial-related every month [next year],” centennial.” Halfacre said. More than 220 Fair Haven residents atFor more information on the Fair Haven tended the event. A pianist provided the centennial, please visit www.fairhaven.org. entertainment while guests enjoyed dinner, a VIP wine room (where premium wines were for available for purchase) and participated in a silent auction, which included dozens of baskets donated by Fair Haven businesses and families. A highlight of the event was one of the auction items, a scale model of the Albertina, which was donated by resident Jerry Rice. The Albertina was a paddle- Resident Jerry Rice donated this scale model of the wheel steamship that steamship Albertina, which used to serve Fair Haven.

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Community Messenger

May 2011

Fair Haven PTA hosts ‘Welcome

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(l-r) Class Basket Chair Arline LoGioco, Co-Chair Britt Garrison, PTA President Cathy Alescio and Co-Chair Patty Coughlin pose during the “Welcome to the Boardwalk” luncheon.–Photo courtesy Fair Haven PTA

By KAITLIN SEVERINI Correspondent FAIR HAVEN BOROUGH — On Saturday, March 12, the Fair Haven PTA hosted its annual luncheon (this year’s theme was “Welcome to the Boardwalk”) at Branches reception hall in West Long Branch. “Inspiration for the ‘Welcome to the Boardwalk’ theme came from where we live,” Britt Garrison, Event Chair for the PTA, said. “Fair Haven is ten minutes from the beach, and we thought we could do a lot of creative things working around the boardwalk and beach.” After choosing a theme, the committee members, led by Decorations Chair Maureen Schmid, turned Branches into a virtual boardwalk, complete with a lifeguard stand, traditional boardwalk games and of course, classic boardwalk fare like popcorn and cotton candy. The luncheon is one of the PTA’s biggest fundraisers, and this year was no exception: the committee raised more than $18,000. The money raised will go toward the PTA’s extensive list of contributions, including cultural enrichment programs, classroom and school libraries and equipment for the schools. “This year’s luncheon was a huge success,” Garrison said. A silent auction, games and a super 50/50 (all firsts for the event) facilitated the overwhelming financial success. Silent auction items (including a trip to

Disney World) were contributed by Fair Haven families and local businesses, and more than half of the items were original works of art created by students from Sickles and Knollwood Schools. “We had items ranging from a collapsible lemonade stand to ‘Mayor for a Day,’” Garrison said. “Each silent auction item was very well received.” This year, instead of calling each winner individually, eighth grade students from Knollwood volunteered as “runners” and distributed lists of the winners while everyone enjoyed lunch. “Everyone was able to socialize while they ate and there were many happy winners,” Garrison said. Notable attendees at the luncheon included Kathi Cronin, superintendent of schools; Marion Carolan, principal of Sickles School; Thomas Famulary, principal of Knollwood School; and many other teachers and staff from the school district. In addition to the PTA’s annual luncheon, the committee holds other fundraisers throughout the year, including the Harvest Fest in October, the Fair Haven First Floors Holiday House Tour every other December, family portraits, KidStuff coupon books, book fairs, a super 50/50 and the Holiday Gift Show. For more information on the Fair Haven PTA, upcoming events or to learn how you can volunteer with the PTA, please visit www.fairhavenpta.com or send an email to info@fairhavenPTA.com.

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May 2011

Community Messenger

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Community Messenger

May 2011

OUR CHARIT Y For seniors, Meals on Wheels

is more than just a hot meal MIDDLETOWN TOWNSHIP – More than just a hot meal for senior citizens, Meals on Wheels has assisted numerous people get back on their feet in their most dire time of need.. “I have been volunteering for about fourteen years, and it’s an excellent program,” MaryBeth Anthopulos, volunteer, said. “Interfaith Neighbors runs the organization for Meals on Wheels and they help so many homebound seniors with meals. People coming out of the hospital that can’t cook for themselves, we give them a hot nutritional meal Monday through Friday.” Run solely on volunteer time, the different groups of volunteers dedicate their time in the kitchen to prepare the meals and then time on the road delivering them. On average, the Middletown program makes about

45 to 50 meals a day. “It makes you feel good because you are actually doing something good for somebody,” Peace Fenter, volunteer, said. According to Anthopulos, the homebound program is for seniors that were hospitalized and are just coming home and just need a little help getting back on their feet. There are also other programs for people that just need help, and have no one else. “Volunteers are really hard to come by. We try to post things on church bulletins. If people could just take a half hour or one hour a day to help a fellow senior, it’s just amazing and rewarding,” Anthopulos said. For more information visit www.interfaithneighbors.org or call 732-775-5155 x 212.

BBBS PROFILE

Bruce Pattineo and Chanze Big Brother Bruce and his Little Brother Brother or Sister and it only requires a few Chanze have been matched for a year and hours of your time each month. The agency Chanze just celebrated his 10th birthday. has over 40 children waiting for a mentor The Brothers have gone to movies, for a so call 732-544-2224 or visit www.bbbhike, played pinball and like to go out to smmc.org today to find out more about eat. Bruce, of Red Bank, takes every oppor- being a Big! tunity to support Chanze by attending his Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth soccer games and other sports or concerts and Middlesex Counties is a donor suphe’s involved in at school. ported volunteer agency. BBBSMMC Bruce became a Big Brother because his serves children ages 6 to 17 years through son is now grown and he still wanted to one-to-one mentoring and expect to serve enjoy the activities that come along with at least 550 kids in 2011. spending time with a child and watching them experience new things. “What I enjoy most about having Chanze as my Little Brother is his friendship,” Bruce said. “My favorite thing about Bruce is that we are best friends,” Chanze said. He said that it is hard to pick a favorite activity they have done because they have shared so many and he’s enjoyed them all. Now is a perfect time to consider making a Big difference in the life of a child. Talking, playing games, participating in a community event, riding bikes, helping with homework or baking a cake are some of the ways to spend time with a Little Bruce Pattineo and Chanze


May 2011

Community Messenger

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May 2011

Fifth annual Student Art Show spotlights young artists By KAITLIN SEVERINI Correspondent FAIR HAVEN BOROUGH — On Tuesday, April 5, the fifth annual Student Art Show, sponsored by the Fair Haven PTA, exhibited artwork created by more than 900 students from both Sickles and Knollwood schools. The event was free and open to the public. The schools’ art teachers, Michelle DePuma, Roseann LaBrocca and Rob Zupko, worked with their students on their projects throughout the year. The students looked to famous artists and illustrators, including Marc Chagall, Jasper Johns and Eric Carle, for inspiration. Subjects ranged from mobiles made from recycled plastic bottles (inspired by Dale Chihuly) to acrylic paintings of “Desserts” (inspired by Wayne Thiebaud). “All of these experiences invited critical thinking, problem solving and higher level thinking skills,” Labrocca said. “This year’s focus in the Sickles Art Room was to have the children develop creative voices by having them tell stories through their art.” Each art teacher worked with the students to select artwork for submission in the show, according to the show’s co-

chairs, Christine Hearn and Kirsten Ward. Once the pieces were selected, they were tagged and prepared for display. Then, parent volunteers and staff transformed Knollwood into an art gallery. “The show succeeds in presenting a variety of mediums, but perhaps just as importantly, the cultural influences of different artists and their impact on society,” LaBrocca said. “Art education also provides a perspective on knowledge unavailable in other subjects; one that allows students to understand human experience and make informed judgments about their own cultures and lives through critical reflection,” Zupko added. Members of the school’s eighth grade student government, supervised by Byron Williams, greeted guests and handed out programs. Attendees also enjoyed live, student-performed music, under the supervision of music teacher, Sara Marino. “We were very proud to be a part of this wonderful event that showcased our children’s art,” Hearn said. For more information about the annual Student Art Show, please contact Christine Hearn at 732-219-6653 or cjc209@hotmail.com or Kirsten Ward at 732-936-1247 or marinsmommy@aol.com.

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t n H (above and below) Some of the many pieces of art on display during the Student Art Show.–Photos courtesy Christine Hearn

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May 2011

Community Messenger

Annual RFH Run celebrates 20 years By SUSAN MURPHY Correspondent

RUMSON BOROUGH — On Mother’s Day, May 8, the Rumson-Fair Haven Run will celebrate 20 years of bringing family, friends and neighboring communities together to participate in their annual event. Proceeds from the race will go towards the local EMS departments and for scholarships awarded to high school seniors. One of the criteria is having shown exceptional efforts in volunteerism throughout their high school years. Race Director Kevin Hill explained that last year was the first year the RumsonFair Haven Run was held on Mother’s Day, and there was tremendous participation by local moms. “Our goal this year is to have our largest turnout yet. This is a really nice community event and it’s for two great causes,” Hill said. This is Hill’s first year as race director although he has participated in the race for many years. “We want to thank all of the community sponsors who have been very generous to us,” he said. Howley Financial Group and Gloria Nilson GMAC Real Estate are two major sponsors of the run. The Rumson-Fair Haven Run will begin on the track at Rumson-Fair Haven Re-

gional High School, located at 74 Ridge Road, Rumson. It will follow a scenic loop course that goes along the Navesink River and ends back on the high school track. There will be ten-year age group awards for the top three winners and separate awards for the top three overall finishers. The first 500 runners will receive a moisture-wicking t-shirt and a souvenir pint glass. The Rumson-Fair Haven Run is held in cooperation with the Jersey Shore Running Club, which is a strong supporter of events such as this one. Race times and specific categories are: A.J. Bruder 5 Mile Run begins at 9:30 a.m.; the Rumson-Fair Haven 3K Community Fun Run/Walk begins at 11 a.m.; and the Kiddie Dashes begin at 11:15 a.m. A post race party will be held at Val’s, 123 East River Road, Rumson. If you have any questions regarding the Rumson-Fair Haven Run, they can be emailed to RFHRun@gmail.com. For directions or schedules, visit www. rumson-fairhavenrun.org. Online registration can be done at www.RaceForum. com/Rumson. This event offers an opportunity to run with Mom, run for Mom, or run for the causes.

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12 Community Messenger

May 2011

Fair Haven’s Be a Good Neighbor helps seniors in need By KAITLIN SEVERINI Correspondent

FAIR HAVEN BOROUGH — This winter, after each of the season’s many snowstorms, a host of good neighbors set out to shovel the driveways, walkways and sidewalks of Fair Haven senior citizens and shut-ins, free of charge. These dedicated shovelers are members of the Be a Good Neighbor committee (BAGN, for short), an organization made up of sixth, seventh and eighth grade students from Knollwood School who volunteer each winter to give neighbors in need of safe passage in and out of their homes. “They’re pretty terrific, these kids,” Arlene LaMarca, chairwoman of BAGN, said. “They really take the program to heart.” On March 11, BAGN hosted an endof-season lunch at Knollwood to honor the 90 students who participated in the program and to allow the students, seniors and others involved with the committee to socialize and celebrate after a long, hard winter. Pizza, sandwiches and cookies were served. The seniors welcomed the students to the luncheon in a special way. Forming two lines beginning at the door of the gym-

nasium, they clapped, shouted and raised their arms in appreciation as the students walked in between them. A large banner thanking the students was also created and hung in the gym. “I had tears in my eyes and I suspect others did too,” Mary Matus, a Fair Haven senior and volunteer with BAGN, said. “Each child reacted differently as they entered, but as they walked, they became very proud. Some acted like they had just won the Olympics. In our minds, each one of them did.” A microphone was brought in, and many of the seniors got up to personally thank the students and tell them how much they appreciated their actions. “We think the kids felt pretty special, which is what our goal was,” LaMarca said. Through talking and playing intergenerational games, the lunch allowed the students, seniors and others to connect, share stories and learn from each other. “The seating arrangements had seniors and students mixed throughout,” Matus said. “We were very comfortable mixing conversation with each other. I found it amazing to see how interested the students were in our lives of years gone by. We also were interested in their lives.” Now in its ninth year, BAGN was started

Bathing Suit Season is Just Around the Corner

The banner thanking the members of the Be a Good Neighbor committee was displayed at thei end-of-the-year lunch. by Fair Haven residents Brian Croak and Donna Steiner, and is coordinated at Knollwood by health teacher Byron Williams. Each fall, Williams explains the program to his students, encourages them to volunteer and coordinates permission slips and other details.

“We all shared special moments,” Matus said in summary of the event. “When it is your turn to be a senior, you will then appreciate [the kids].” For more information on the Be a Good Neighbor committee, visit www.fairhavennj.org.

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May 2011

Community Messenger

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MTC Photography: Within the lens of a detective By ROSA DAVIS Correspondent ABERDEEN TOWNSHIP — Inside every person, in one place or the other, burn our passions, our dreams, the stuff our lives should be made of. From the modest yearnings of normal people spawn sometimes intrepid metamorphoses that others only wish they could find tangible. For these people who have the guts and talent to make their passions a reality, they undoubtedly have found within themselves certain indelible qualities that they could not live without, powerful but latent traits that once uncovered from the attics of their hearts gripped them in a way nothing else could. In this case, keep in mind that the next time someone takes your picture, it could be Manny T. Carabel, founder of MTC Photography. A police officer since 1993, and a detective in Aberdeen since 2001, Carabel’s keen, detailed eye for crime shines through in his crossover ability to genuinely capture the most precious moments of our lives, as he has used the mechanics and discipline from his successful career in law enforcement as the building blocks for a new business founded upon a passion for photography he has had since childhood. Carabel explained there are two things he focuses on most, meticulous attention to detail, but more importantly getting to know the people he takes pictures of. Be it a wedding, bar mitzvah, or even the moment you propose to your loved one in the

Manny T. Carabel

middle of Central Park, Carabel discreetly captures your finest moments both through skill with the camera and understanding the people he photographs. Perhaps it was the intimacy brought on by a fascination with taking family photos with his Vivitar 110 film camera as a youngster that made Carabel pay attention to his clients on a personal level. Maybe it was while in the Navy, as he captured riveting landscapes and met with diverse people all across the world. Perhaps it is his detective work that inspires close interpersonal relations as he runs his fine-toothed comb across the events and people he researches while he helps keep us safe. Whatever the original impetus may have been, Carabel takes pride in a personal connection with his clients. “I think what best describes us being unique in comparison to others is that we get to know our clients on a personal level,” Carabel said. It is this personal connection that Carabel feels has accounted most for his success as a photographer as it has enabled him to use his understanding of each person to capture the elements of a scene that hold the essence of the people in the moment, hence the acronym of his business MTC, “Moments to Capture.” As the nature of his police work is inherently hazardous, his enthusiasm for fighting crime has helped shape the emergence of his much less dangerous professional photography entrepreneurship. Trained in Digital Forensic Photography at the University of Tennessee and in Professional Digital Photography at the New York Institute of Photography, Carabel has also studied Wedding and Portrait Photography and lighting techniques and is a member of the WPPI and the DWF (Wedding Portrait and Professional Photographers International and the Digital Wedding Forum).   Among MTC’s most notable clients are Maureen “The Real Million Dollar Baby” Shea (NABF Featherweight Champion), A.Lewins (Red Bank resident and up-and-coming recording artist), Kim Granatell (“Real Housewives of NJ”), Tom Murro (founder of CelebrityMagnet.com) and Donnella Tilery (founder of New Jersey Fashion Week). While not necessarily clients, MTC’s reach has extended as far as photographing presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, includ-

ing Air Force One arrivals and departures. Founded in 2008, MTC Photography has been bringing in clients by giving them what they ask for, great pictures that reflect who they are and how they want to remember their lives. Captured in a moment’s imprint by the detailed eye of a detective, your photo will be captured within the lens of a professional who understands who you are and what you are looking for. While so many of us procrastinate and wait for tomorrow to fully delve into the things that truly make us happy, it is with great appreciation that MTC Photography’s clients thank Carabel for taking the plunge in 2008 and bringing to them the venerable fruit of his photographic passions. For more information about Carabel or MTC Photography, contact him at 732-450-0119 and visit his website www. A sample image from a MTC Photography wedding shoot.–Courtesy MTC Photography mcarabelphotography.com.

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May 2011

Andrei Provini: A snapshot in the life of a whiz kid By ROSA DAVIS Correspondent

MIDDLETOWN TOWNSHIP — The synapses fire, the eyes open wide, the smile widens, the eyebrows move up and then down, soon the hands start to do the talking, and just like that Andrei Provini starts building a new invention. Through the delicate strands of time, only few minds can light their own way to harness the boundless might of this physical world. Andrei Provini is one of these people. Initially pushed by an admittedly overzealous desire for things to play with, young Provini decided he would overcome his parents’ decision not to spoil him with toys by building his own things. As destiny would have it, at the age of five, Provini realized his gift of invention when he created his first pragmatic tool, a magnetic stud finder in the form of a toy shaped like a boy. From this moment on he identified with the idea of invention as much as the inventions themselves, and as his creative gift brought forth a verifiably altruistic side of him as people’s eyes lit up with each new thoughtful gadget, so did he begin the process of inventing the inventor within. Provini’s progression within the art of invention was a quick one. By six, he discovered that screws were superior to duct tape and by eight, he found the excitement only electricity and batteries can provide, leading him to invent unique go-carts with the use of screws and later, other inventions with wooden and metal body frames that required being plugged in or were battery operated. The most significant part of Provini’s

young career was undoubtedly his transition into saving his inventions instead of taking them apart. He then began transcribing each piece into a blueprint for future reference. This transition became a turning point for the young whiz kid from someone who built things for fun to someone who took each creation seriously and strived to build upon previous experience and incorporate multiple inventive ideas into new and improved creations. “This process is still going on with much success with each new invention being more powerful and advanced than the previous one,” Provini said. Perhaps the most notable and mysterious of his inventions would be Provini’s construction of a “tree house”, if you can call it that. More of an amalgamation of nature with technology, this “thing,” for lack of a better word, incorporates the following into three separate floors: A Volkswagen (2nd floor), a slide, a fire pole, a bridge, a tire swing, a “defense system,” a front door, a zip line, and best of all, the power source is derived from solar energy. This tree house is actually not an invention, but a silhouette of Provini’s mind in a physical form, wrought by the intrinsic capacity he so gladly fondles at his fingertips when the moment and inspiration grabs him. Now 19, Provini is at a crossroads between youth and adulthood, a time when he is starting to realize that the value of his inventive abilities transcends entertainment or amusement and extends to more broadly useful and essential functions in a world he feels is in need of change. It is now that the altruism spawned in him at a young age is beginning to come to fruition, and he is humbly becoming aware that he may be one of the lucky ones whose career could

Middletown’s Andrei Provini shows off some of his inventions.—Photo courtesy Sasaki Photography LLC

Andrei Provini and his bag of inventions not only be doing something he loves, but something that benefits the world on a grander scale. Perhaps the first time Provini used his inventions to tackle a problem in the heat of the moment was when he came to the aid of a woman in distress. Yes, this is a cliché. Nevertheless, when a woman came into his college classroom and asked if anyone had some jumper cables to jump her car, Provini quickly arose and followed her outside. The woman led him out to her car and then, puzzled, asked Provini where his car was, to which he responded, “My car is in a tree.” Amidst the curious glances and confused expressions of passersby, Provini took off his backpack, which of course had no books in it but instead contained a self-sustaining power cell capable of converting a 12-volt lithium battery into enough energy to jump-start a car. Recharged by solar panels and decked out with an inverter to run your laptop, your fan, or any other household device you choose, Provini used his power-cell-backpack to charge the woman’s car within five minutes. It is unknown whether Provini used his prowess to get the woman’s number, however. Whether it is the electronic disruptor (which he made to stop his parents’ cell phones from working), his universal charger (a charger that charges things with no need for a power outlet), his night vision scope, his bouncing bubbles, or his retro specs (glasses that activate an LED light through body heat such as the movement of one’s brow), Provini’s remarkable gift

still has not been fully realized. It is his moment, however, within the next few years, to take his inventive life to a whole new level as his insatiable mind finds new connections between his inventions and practical applications in this world so badly in need of minds like his. “I have learned that I want to change the world, one invention at a time,” Provini said. As the opportunities will indisputably arise for Provini to do his part, there is little doubt that this inventor will continue to invent himself into someone we will read about in magazines and thank for his inextricable contribution to our world at large. Currently, Provini is involved in a new project called “Creative Minds Journey,” in which he and his partners are spreading awareness about health issues like schizophrenia while helping to network businesses across the country. Of course Provini’s contribution to the team is the integration of his latest invention, the “Perpetual Engine,” which uses magnets to continually spin an alternator-like engine to create a continuous power source without the use of fuel. While the Creative Minds Journey travels across the country gathering logos to stick to its stretch limousine, there is one thing we can be sure of: it is likely that Provini will find the means to power the limo without gasoline by the time they reach California. Make sure to strap into a seat in front of your TV in May and grab hold as Provini makes his television debut on the History Channel as part of the “Mature Inventor” series.

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May 2011

‘Race to Nowhere’ screening at

Rumson Country Day School RUMSON BOROUGH — The Rumson Country Day School will host a screening of “Race to Nowhere,” a documentary showcasing the importance of critical thinking in the classroom rather than memorization for standardized testing, at RCDS on Wednesday, May 4, at 7 p.m. for parents and the general public. A discussion will be held after the screening with Thomas Pearson, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Monmouth University, and Pete Righi, Superintendent of Rumson-Fair Haven High School. The documentary is the result of several wake-up calls of mother of three, Vicki Abeles, seeing her children struggle with school work and balancing both school and extracurricular activities. The toll taken on her children included panic attacks, lack of sleep, and stress, forcing her to rush her 12-year-old daughter to the hospital one day for a stress related illness.

Abeles then took it upon herself to reveal a problem occurring in many school districts, young children becoming stressed by school work but not retaining the information. Instead of learning the curriculum, students are pressured to perform well on standardized tests causing them to only regurgitate information rather than critically learn the material. RCDS has chosen to host a screening of this film to encourage all parents to become actively involved in their children’s educational experience. The documentary provides beneficial information for parents of any student in public or private schools, emphasizing the need for critical thinking skills in the classroom. Tickets for the screening can be purchased at the documentary’s website www.racetonowhere.com or at www.rcds. org under Quicklinks. For further information please visit www.rcds.org.

RBCS teacher receives ‘HEROES’ grant RED BANK BOROUGH – Ann Gradman, the seventh grade teacher at Red Bank Charter School (RBCS), was recently awarded a UnitedHealth HEROES Grant from Youth Service America (YSA) and UnitedHealth Group, which supports youth-led service-learning initiatives addressing childhood obesity and healthy lifestyles. Receiving one of 333 grants awarded nationwide, Gradman’s 7th grade childhood obesity project encompasses videos and presentations to younger students. A highlight of the project was a health fair on April 15 at RBCS. The semesterlong initiative culminated with Global Youth Service Day, the world’s largest and longest-running youth-led service campaign. “These grants were extremely competitive, but Ms. Gradman’s exemplified service-learning and the UnitedHealth HEROES program,” Steve Culbertson, President and CEO of YSA said. “Young people in Red Bank want to make a difference, and UnitedHealth Group, in conjunction with YSA, offers them resources to make a positive, measurable impact on their community.” In its 23rd year, Global Youth Service Day (GYSD) engages millions of young people via partnerships with schools and community and faith-based organizations. This April 15 through 17, events took place in more than 100 countries and all 50 states addressing the most

challenging local, national and global issues facing the world including health, literacy, childhood hunger and the environment. “With UnitedHealth HEROES, we are helping young people take action to improve their overall health and quality of life in a way that’s not only educational, but beneficial for their communities. As people become more aware of health issues through health literacy and advocacy initiatives they will make positive changes to live better lives,” Kate Rubin, UnitedHealth Group vice president of Social Responsibility, said. “We believe these grants will empower teams of students to collaborate with teachers and community leaders to develop their own awareness of how to make their schools and neighborhoods healthier. In reviewing the grant applications, we were inspired by the creative ideas young people came up with to help fight obesity and encourage healthier living,” Rubin said. “The UnitedHealth HEROES grants are part of UnitedHealth Group’s overall commitment to help stem the rising tide of obesity, and related chronic health conditions like diabetes.” For more information about this project and the overall Wellness Initiative at RBCS, please visit http://redbankcharterschool.com. For more information about Youth Service America and Global Youth Service Day, visit www.YSA.org.

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Live Met Opera Broadcast - Monmouth University

Calendar Events Legend

Matawan

Holmdel

Parlin

Keyport

Long Branch

West Long Branch

Little Silver

Red Bank

Asbury Park

Eatontown

Middletown

Aberdeen

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RED BANK Free Film - Count Basie Count Basie Theatre; 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM 99 Monmouth Street, Red Bank Contact: 732-842-9000 Tickets: Free must be obtained through box office. Location: On The Waterfront

ASBURY PARK US Air Force Band Concert Paramount Theatre; 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM 1300 Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park Free Tickets available at Monmouth Mall

Monday, May 2

MATAWAN Spring Concert Matawan First Presbyterian Church ; 7:00 PM 883 Highway 34, Matawan Contact: 732-566-2663

ASBURY PARK Tribute to Phil Ochs Stephen Crane House; 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM 508 4th Avenue, Asbury Park Contact: 732-807-4052 Donation: $5 can be more or less Remembering Phil Ochs

RED BANK Free Film-Count Basie Performing Art Centers; 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM 99 Monmouth Street, Red Bank Contact: 732-842-9000 Tickets: Free Finding Nemo www.bizeturtle.com/performingartcenters.htm

WEST LONG BRANCH Opening Reception - Art Show Monmouth University: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM 400 Cedar Avenue, West Long Branch Contact: 732-263-6889 Annual Student Show

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Reckless Steamy Night

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Center A La Carte

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Little Silver PTO Kitchen Tour

Cinco De Mayo Fundraiser

PARLIN Networking Luncheon Robert Wood Johnson Fitness and Wellness Center; 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM 1044 Hwy 9, Parlin Contact: 732-290-1125 Members (in advance) - $10, Members (at the door) - $12, Non-Members - $15

MATAWAN Cinco De Mayo Fundraiser La Riviera Restaurant & Lounge; 8:00 PM 11:55 PM 113 Main Street, Matawan Tickets: $10 Contact: 732-583-7950 Includes complimentary beverage

EATONTOWN Black & White Gala Sheraton Hotel; 7:00 PM - 11:55 PM 6 Industrial Way East, Eatontown Tickets: $65 Contact: 732-774-3282 Dinner, Dancing, Cash Bar. Presented by Hispanic Affairs and Resource Center

Friday, May 6

MIDDLETOWN Middletown Neighborhood Meetings Thorne Middle School; 7:00 PM 70 Murphy Road, Gym For more information contact Cindy Herrschaft; 732-615-2287

Thursday, May 5

WEST LONG BRANCH Benefit Concert Count Basie Theatre; 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM 99 Monmouth Street, Red Bank Contact: 732-842-9000 Tickets: $52.50, $42.50, $32.50, and $18.00 A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Light of Day Foundation,www.lightofday.org and Joan Dancy and PALS

Wednesday, May 4

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Garage Sale Fundraiser

Spring Dance Performance

Flea Market

2nd Annual Kids’ Day

Night at the Carousel

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One Night Only Fundraiser

Live Met Opera Broadcast - Monmouth University

Spaghetti Dinner

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Women Who Cook II in Concert

Community Day Fair

Saturday

ASBURY PARK One Night Only Fundraiser Paramount Theatre; 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM 1300 Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park Contact: 732-455-3059 Tickets: $20 - $100 Dreamgirls

ASBURY PARK Spaghetti Dinner Trinity Church; 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM 503 Asbury Avenue, Asbury Park Contact: 732-775-5084 Tickets: Adults: $10 Children: $5 Includes salad, spaghetti and meatball dinner, dessert and entertainment

WEST LONG BRANCH Live Met Opera Broadcast Monmouth University, Pollak Theatre; 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM 400 Cedar Avenue, West Long Branch Contact:732-263-6889 Tickets: $21/$23. Die Walklure 7:00 PM - 11:00 PM

Saturday, May 14

LITTLE SILVER Little Silver PTO Kitchen Tour Little Silver Woman’s Club; 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM 111 Church Street, Little Silver Contact: 732-768-3457 Tickets: $40 in advance; $45 day of event This self-guided tour allows visitors a rare opportunity to experience ten of Little Silver’s finest kitchens Tour participants will be treated to culinary delights in each home prepared by some of Monmouth County’s finest chefs.

Friday, May 13

MIDDLETOWN Women Who Cook II in Concert Middletown Arts Center; 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM 36 Church Street, Middletown Contact: 732-577-1416 Tickets: $30 The Box Office, 732-706-4100

HOLMDEL Community Day Fair PNC Bank Arts Center; 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM Exit 116 GSP, Holmdel Family-oriented activites, geared to children. Free soda and some free food. CPC Behavioral Healthcare, www.cpcbehavioral.org

Saturday, May 7

Community Events Calendar

Send the date and information to: calendar@mycommunitypublications.com

Tuesday, May 3

6 Black & White Gala

Friday

Please feel free to contribute to our community events calendar.

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Middletown Neighborhood Meetings

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KEYPORT Annual Chicken Fry Town and Country Inn; 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM Hwy. 35 and Broadway, Keyport, NJ Tickets: $10 For information or tickets: contact Dick @ 732-241-9212, Judy @ 732-264-6048 or chickenfry@keyportkiwanis.org.

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ASBURY PARK Vintage Home Tour Langosta Lounge; 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM 1000 Ocean Ave. at 2nd Ave, Asbury Park Contact: 732-610-5470 Tickets: $20 Includes shuttle bus ride. Tickets may be purchased at Langosta Lounge or online at http://aphomeowners.org.

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Business After Hours: Salsa Latina

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Bobfest

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Networking Luncheon

Annual Chicken Fry

Free Film-Count Basie

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Art in the Park

2 US Air Force Band Concert

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Happy Mother’s Day

Spring Concert

Tribute to Phil Ochs

Opening Reception - Art Show Free Film-Count Basie

Vintage Home Tour

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Calendar Event Listing cont. Sunday, May 15 RED BANK Giant Craft & Flea Market Fundraiser Red Bank Women’s Club; 11:00 AM - 3:30 PM 164 Broad Street, Red Bank Presented by The Youth Project of Jersey Shore Jazz & Blues Foundation

Tuesday, May 17 MATAWAN Business After Hours: Salsa Latina Salsa Latina; 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM 343 New Jersey, Matawan Members (in advance) - $12, Members (at the door) - $13, Non-Members - $17 Contact: 732-290-1125

Friday, May 20 ASBURY PARK Center A La Carte Convention Hall on the Boardwalk; 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM 1401 Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park Contact: 732-221-8997 Tickets: $100 each A La Carte will feature over 30 restaurants and beverage vendors

Saturday, May 21 ASBURY PARK Night at the Carousel Asbury Park Carousel; 7:00 PM - 11:00 PM Ocean Avenue & The Boardwalk, Asbury Park Contact: 732-774-9397 x 14 Tickets: $125 Benefit Mercy Center’s Sisters Academy MATAWAN 2nd Annual Kids’ Day McGuire Chiropractic: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 740 State Rt 34, Matawan Free for everyone. Activites will include the Fun Bus from 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Contact: 732-583-7799 ABERDEEN Flea Market Matawan United Methodist Church; 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 478 Atlantic Avenue, Aberdeen Contact: 732-566-2996

Sunday, May 22

WEST LONG BRANCH Encore Live Met Opera Broadcast Monmouth University Pollak Theatre; 7:00 PM - 11:00 PM 400 Cedar Avenue West Long Branch Contact: 732-263-6889 Tickets: $21/$23 II Trovatore

Monday, May 23 RED BANK Bobfest Two River Theatre; 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM; Also Tuesday, May 24 21 Bridge Avenue Red Bank Contact: 732-345-1400 Tickets: $35 Pat Guadagno & Tired Horses celebrate Bob Dylan’s 70th Birthday with 70 songs

Friday, May 27 RED BANK Reckless Steamy Night Woman’s Club Red Bank; 8:30-11:00 PM 164 Broad Street, Red Bank Tickets: $10 suggested donation Goldenseal “Unplugged”

Saturday, May 28 LONG BRANCH Spring Dance Performance Shore Institute of Contemporary Arts 20 Third Avenue, Long Branch Admission: $5 for members, $7 for nonmembers. Enjoy an exhibition of various dancers, dance groups or companies ASBURY PARK Garage Sale Fundraiser 705 Second Ave; 9:00 AM-12:00PM Contact: Djar 732-682-1245 English, Oscar 732-576-3330 Spanish

Sunday, May 29 WEST LONG BRANCH Art in the Park West End Park; 10:00 AM - 5:30 PM Ocean and Brighton Aves, Long Branch Contact: 732-542-1307

Customized Apparel Embroidery, Screen Printed, Direct to Garment Put your picture on a shirt!

Purchase from us or bring your own. Starting at $8.

Signs, Banners, Decals, Magnets Many sizes and materials to choose from.

Vinyl Lettering Trucks, Cars, Boats, Windows and Doors.

Business Printing—Competitive Pricing Business Cards … 500 Cards $34.95 Flyers, Invitations, Forms, Envelopes and more ...

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$5 OFF any purchase of $20 or more! T his MarketME Coupon is valid until 7/4/11. Cannot be combined with other discounts.


May 2011

Community Messenger

OPEN 25 HOURS 106 Route 36 (by Stop & Shop) Keyport, NJ—732-264-2390 Call-Ahead-Seating

Join us for Mother’s Day! Call-Ahead-Seating Available We accept other IHOP, Diner, and competitors coupons for similar menu items

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In 1978 Victor V. Scudiery was commissioned to produce a perfect Easter gift. Today this

Commemorative Record Album and the Papal Review is available in limited quantities.

Pope John Paul II is on his way to sainthood. It has been announced that Pope John Paul II will be beatiďŹ ed on May 1, 2011. This puts him just one step away from canonization as a saint. In 1978 the election of a Polish Pope came as a surprise to the entire world. It meant a break with tradition and the begnning of a new era in Rome. Not only has Cardinal Karol Wojtya become the ďŹ rst non-Italian Pope in 455 years, but also the youngest elected Pontiff in 132 years.

This album, therefore, is presented as a Commemorative Tribute to John Paul II, The Pope.

Also available with this Commemorative record Album is the Papal Review, which is a compilation in book form of all of the Popes, beginning with St. Peter, up to, and including Pope John Paul II, with history and pictures.

AVAILABLE NOW-

COMMEMORATIVE record ALBUM & THE PAPAL REVIEW FOR ONLY

$19.95

Make checks payable to:

Interstate Electronics, Inc. Airport Plaza 1394 State Route 36 Hazlet, NJ 07730 732-264-3900 You can save shipping charges by picking up the Commemorative record Album and Papal Review at the above location.

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THEATER REVIEW The Demon Barber sets up shop at RFH High School By MICHELLE TUCHOL Correspondent RUMSON BOROUGH – In 1800 London, revenge can be sweet. But for Sweeney Todd, revenge comes at a high price. Springtime for students at Rumson-Fair Haven High School was spent travelling back to a time where London was not as posh as present. “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” is a chilling story of a man banished from London for a bogus crime and taken away from his wife and child. When he returns 25 years later, he finds that his wife is gone and the seedy Judge Turpin holds his daughter captive. Todd, played by Austin Dornan Ryan, meets the sweet, but quirky Mrs. Lovett (Emma Loughran). She tells the tale of Benjamin Barker through “Poor Thing”, a sad song about a renowned barber with a similar fate as Todd’s. When the scene is over, Mrs. Lovett realizes that Benjamin Barker is in fact Sweeney Todd, and agrees to help find his daughter and retaliate against Judge Turpin (Kevin Karol). “Sweeney Todd” is chock-full of coincidences, but there is no small task for any of the characters. Todd opens a barbershop above Mrs. Lovett’s dreary pie shop where he tries to avenge his dark past. While promising to give the closest shave in town and crooning his customers in the process, he slits their throats with his trusty razor before the job is done. The goal of this gruesome plan is to get the judge in the barber chair for a shave he won’t forget. The judge’s cohort, Beadle Bamford (Bradley J. Carter), leads him to the shop, suggesting a shave improves a man’s look. Todd will get his chance! But as Anthony Hope (Harry Best), a friend of Todd enters the shop right before the deed is done, the arrangement is foiled and all is hopeless again. Although Anthony may have thwarted the scheme, he succeeds in finding Todd’s daughter, Johanna, played by Gabriella M. Kenny. He falls in love with her and the two have hopes to marry at once. Anthony and Todd devise a plan to free Johanna and get rid of Judge Turpin altogether. Mrs. Lovett, who also has an “Epiphany,” explains to Todd that using the bodies as an extra ingredient in her pies will make the most of the situation. While Todd continues his seemingly lucrative business, Mrs. Lovett must keep up

with the demand for her wildly popular pies. The need for extra help falls upon Jack Newsome, who plays the role of Tobias; a young boy left waiting at the pie shop after his boss, Adolfo Pirelli (Jeffrey Capanelli), is led to the barber’s chair. In Act II, Tobias plays a key role in creating suspense that leads to the inevitable downfall of Sweeney Todd, Mrs. Lovett and the world of destruction they’ve created between one another. In the final minutes of the Second Act, everything does seem to work itself out. Judge Turpin comes back for a shave (and never returns) and Johanna is free. But after the truth about why London’s meat pies are so scrumptious and what really happened to Todd’s wife, the story lends realization that retaliation can be a set up for defeat. In most musicals, the catchy tunes drive audiences to sing their own renditions of the production afterward. “Sweeney Todd” cannot promise these effects. However, the repetition of “The Ballad of Sweeney Todd” performed by the ensemble of cast members throughout the musical was one of the most enjoyable scenes to watch and listen to. The ensemble diverted the audience’s attention to a brief description of the plot in a fluid movement while the set crew (all dressed in appropriate garb) changed from murky London streets to Todd’s barbershop and Mrs. Lovett’s pie shop. Both the orchestra and the ensemble offered an impressive range of octaves that were a pleasure to listen to. Equally impressing were the cast members’ ability to keep clear and concise dialogue despite the quick speaking English slang that was used. Director Suzanne Sweeney must be given credit as well as technical director Dino Pagano for ingenious set design, and Bill Grillo and Vince Mottern for impeccable musical direction. Carole Malik, costume and props designer, did a wonderful job at establishing elegance and spunk to the cast’s wardrobe. From the preview of the musical to the final collaboration, it’s clear that the Rumson-Fair Haven’s Tower Players are student driven. RFH’s edition of “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” captured what director Tim Burton achieved in the 2007 film in terms of casting and gained notoriety for the music in Stephen Sondheim’s 1979 musical thriller.

(l-r) Sweeney Todd (Austin Dornan Ryan) and Mrs. Lovett (Emma Loughran) share the stage during a performance of “Sweeney Todd” at Rumson-Fair Haven High School.–Michelle Tuchol


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May 2011

You still have time to get in shape for summer, but hurry By REBECCA KOPP Special to the Community Messenger It’s hard to believe with the lingering cold weather around here that bathing suit season is right around the corner. But believe it, it is! Sooner than you think you’ll be complaining about the heat, humidity and crowded beaches but hopefully not about a flabby body. Maybe you meant to start getting in shape sooner (like back in January) but it didn’t happen. So now you’re wondering how to get results — and fast. The good news is you still have time to slim down and get in shape so you’ll look great in shorts, tank tops, sun dresses and yes, bikinis and bathing suits. But hurry! Get your body ready for summer now at Eastpointe Health & Fitness by signing up for their Beach Body Fitness Program. In six to eight weeks, you can lose weight, get stronger and tone your muscles so you look great in your summer gear. Plus, not only will you look good, but you’ll be in better shape to participate in all your favorite summertime activities like surfing, swimming, biking, kayaking, hiking and playing

with the kids. “In six to eight weeks you can really start to make some noticeable changes,” EPH&F Trainer Grace Lang said. “If you commit to our program and stick with it, you will definitely see and feel results.” EPH&F’s Beach Body Fitness Program includes a two-month full gym membership, three one-on-one personal training sessions, nutritional consultation with a meal plan provided and access to an online meal planning system. “In conjunction with your workouts, it is really important to look at your eating habits and make the kind of changes that will help you get results,” EPH&F Nutritionist Kim Garrity said. “We’ll sit down and discuss your goals realistically and design a meal plan accordingly.” So get a jump on summer fitness. Don’t miss your chance to wow your friends and family this with the new slimmed down, shaped up beach body ready version of you. Sign up for EPH&F’s Beach Body Fitness Program today. For more information call 732-872-6595 or visit our website at www.EastpointeHealthandFitness.com.

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May 2011

When When leaving leaving itit all behind, behind, all start with with start your your limitations. limitations.

Community Messenger

Improve Your Vertical. ABANDON THE STRAIGHT AND NARROW. Conceived, forged and stitched with pride and passion because Grand is a title earned. 2010 IIHS 'Top Safety Pick' "highest standard for crash test performance" www.iihs.com

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May 2011

PET CORNER Where’s Moose?

Adorable Adoptables LADY GREY is a beautiful and sweet 8 year old kitty. She has lived in two homes-her first owner passed away and her last owner became ill and could no longer care for her. Lady Grey is a very loving and affectionate cat and loves tuna fish! Do you have room in your heart for this lovely lady?

BAILEY is an easygoing, low-maintainance dog. He is a 9 year old beagle. Bailey is very loving and likes to sleep in bed with you. He is good with children, dogs and cats. Bailey came to the MCSPCA because his owner had to move and could no longer care for him.Do you have a home and a hug for this sweet gentleman?

Moose Moore has gotten free and is roaming around the Navesink River area. Do you recognize where Moose is? Help us find Moose by emailing his location to pets@mycommunitypublications.com. Please put “Where’s Moose?” in the subject line.

Everyone who responds will receive a “Where’s Moose Moore?” Tshirt, courtesy of Community Publications and Market ME Printing in Hazlet. One random correct response will also receive a special prize. This month, the prize is a free massage from A Kneaded Vacation. Clues can be found on the Facebook pages of Community Publications and Moose Moore.

Last month:

The grand prize winner, RJ McCormack, knew that Moose was standing outside the Fair Haven Municipal Building.

AMY is a very sweet kitty with speckled ears. She is very upset and frightened in the shelter environment and needs to find a loving and patient forever home. Amy is snuggly and feels safest when she is wrapped up in a blanket.

CHRISTOPHER is a 2 1/2 year old Chihuahua. He was rescued from a puppy mill, where he spent his life in a cage with little human contact. He is looking for a gentle, patient human who can teach him the joys of being a dog! Christopher is learning how to play with toys and enjoys being held.

If you are interested in adopting any of our adorable animals, please call the Homeward Bound Adoption Center at 732-542-5962. Adopters can also choose to email our new, direct adoption email at adoptions@monmouthcountyspca.org.


May 2011

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May 2011

Monmouth County’s Best Kept Secret Scudiery Enterprises 1390 State Route 36 Suite 103 • Hazlet, NJ 732•739•3010 www.airportplazashopping.com

Airport Plaza

“Something for Everyone” Atlantic Wireless 732-335-0999

Abs o l u t e G u i t a r & Mu s i c 732-888-4404

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Airport Plaza Bar & Liquors

732-264-2080

Di Giacomo, Daniel DDS 732-739-1111

732-739-3100

Oceans 150 Marina 732-739-3010

Coconut Forest Asian Cuisine 732-264-8768

Oceans 150 Residential Rentals 732-739-3010

732-739-3232

www.northernmonmouthchamber.com

Nor ther n Monmouth Chamber of Commerce 732-203-0340

Essar Fr eight Systems, Inc.

IEI

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Interstate Electronics Inc. Est. 1968

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McCauley Construction 732-888-4429

Discount V a732-264-4317 cuum H&R BLOCK Tax Service

732-264-6966

732-264-4307 Lane Engineering Consulting, P.C.

Retail Space and 2nd Floor Office Space Available 732-739-3010

Brooklyn Bagels & Gourmet Deli

732-888-8118

A tlantic Restoration

Beltone

Hearing Aid Center 732-888-9000

FORUM Fa l l o n & L a r s e n C PA’ s T U X E D O S 732-888-2070

JAM Apparel (Formerly J&M Apparel)

732-739-0118

M onmouth B roadcasting C orp. 732-739-3010

732-264-8802

Jackson Hewitt Tax Service

Dollar Gallery

732-888-0533

Heinzer, Rosalind N. Tax Ser vice 732-739-3728

mm

Matawan Italian American Assoc.

Frank Giammarino, Pres. 732-739-4600

732-566-0523

732-264-4444

Tu r n o f f & C o m p a n y

CPA’s 732-335-1200

Bianchi & Bianchi, Esq. 732-264-7200

Jewelry 732-264-5861

Carousel of Home Care 732-264-5555

732-264-4100

732-739-3010 Coins 732-264-2531

Kentucky Fried Chicken 732-739-9200

State of New Jersey

888-486-3339

732-888-6047

Law Offices of COMING SOON

732-888-0025

MARC B. SCHRAM P.C. 732-264-3114 732-264-6699

732-888-8400

732-217-3580

732-739-8890

PLAZA

LAUNDRY & CLEANERS 732-335-3737

Laminate-Engineered-Hardwood-Carpet

MarketME

732-264-4200

Monmouth County Democrats Chairman’s Office 732-739-3232 Hazlet Office 732-739-8888

Beltran Flooring Sales & Installation

printing promotions marketing

732-335-1300

732-335-5858

732-739-6232

732-264-2233

732-957-0357

732-739-8689

732-888-1899

Airport Plaza Chiropractic Center

Gold’s Limousine

formerly Monitor Newspapers

Broker of Record 1st Time Homebuyer Specialist “We Open Doors For You”

Retail & Office Center

732-264-7068

732-739-2424

A Professional Corporation 732-888-4400

Mattress & Furniture Factory II 732-217-3580


May 2011

Community Messenger

29

PUZZLES Across

7

5 "Count" Basie's first name. (7)

8

1

6 Where the Rumson Fair Haven Rgional HS is located. (6) 8 __________ Park is one of the many parks in Rumson. (6)

2

Down

3 Fair Have Road was once called __________ Shell Road. (4)

3

6 7

8 6 4 7

5 6

5

7

8 6 4

8

4 There was once a Fishing Village named __________. (6) 7 Sea Bright has ________ MemberOnly Beaches. (5)

BUTTERFLY FLOWERS GARDEN GRASS MAY MEMORIAL MOTHER PLANTS PRESENT RAIN ROBIN SPRING

N H G M R M C K X K R

O H A F T O G Q M R Z

M Y A L G T B R A G A

E S Z O U H O I A Q C

M P B W E E N R N S W

O R M E E R D D S P S

R I Y R L E M X A I E

I N S S N X I A V D Z

Puzzle answers on Page 34

A G B U T T E R F L Y

9

1

1 3

4

1 Red Bank has a "_________ Business District". (8) 2 __________ Cove is located at the foot of _________ Avenue. (5)

3 5 4

2 5

L P L A N T S V V U B

P R E S E N T J A Z L

2


30 Community Messenger

KID’S CORNER

COLOR ME IN

May 2011


May 2011

IEI

Community Messenger

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INTERSTATE ELECTRONICS INC. Store Hours

AIRPORT PLAZA

Mon-Tues1394 State Rte. 36 • HAZLET Thurs-Fri: 10-9 Phone: 732-264-3900 Wed & Sat: 10-6


32 Community Messenger

May 2011

OPINION Annual hoops tournament always thinking of RB kids Recently, the Annual Hoops for Horizons 3-on-3 basketball tournament was held at the host location of Rumson Country Day School. Horizons is a summer enrichment program/camp/school held at RCDS. This award-winning program fights against the educational achievement gap and works! It serves more than 100 children from Red Bank and Long Branch for a fabulous 6week summer season with educational and support services, recreaton and swimming lesson, field trips, transportation and nutri-

tious meals for each child. The two-day Hoops for Horizon 3-on-3 tournament is an important fundraiser for the summer program. In this tournament, each team plays at least five half court games in three age groups: High School age 39, 6th-8th graders and over 40. Pictured above are 5 of Red Bank kids who participated due to generosity of the Ansell family (Albert, Eriq, Khalid, Christian, and Eli). They didn't win any games but sure had a great time. I believe 2007 RBR graduates Shawn Trapp and Quiency Frazier, led their team to the championship of the high school age 39 championship. These 2 guys get better and better every year due to hard work. Many many thanks to all the wonderful folks who run/volunteer at the tournament led by Lore MacDonald, Eileen O'Hern Luby and Paul Campanella plus executive director Carolyn Weaver.

RB middle school students shadow professionals in the community Recently, the Red Bank Middle School 8th Graders participated in a day long leadership experience outside of classroom. Students were assigned individually and in groups to shadow and assist at a business, a school dept. even travel to Trenton with the Superintendent to watch her make a public By presentation to DAVID PROWN other superintendents.

Red Bank Blog

Awards and honors Congratulations are in order for the “Teacher of the Year� winners from these

four Red Bank schools: RB Primary - Maria Zuffanti RB Middle - Christopher Ippolito RB Charter - Colleen Shandry RB Regional - Roxanne judice The Red Bank Regional Education Foundation (RBREF) is proud to announce the selection of the honorees who will be inducted into the Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame of Red Bank Regional (RBR) High School and Red Bank High School for 2011. They are: • Jacqueline Caruso-Smith '63 • William J. Galatro '67 • Laurna C. Godwin '77 • Mary Ponturiero Wyman '83 • Christina M. Emrich '87 • Gerald A. Gance (Honored Faculty Alumnus) Subscribe to David Prown’s Red Bank Blog: www.redbank.com/blogs/davidprown. Follow David Prown on Twitter: www.twitter.com/prowns.

Our 86th Year! Year!

7 "7 "7 7-

David Prown 3rd 3r d Generation

:,1'2:6‡'2256‡:,1'2:)$6+,216 : ,1'2:6‡'2256‡:,1'2:)$6+,216

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N TE O R PA NO EST YM EN TS IN


May 2011

Community Messenger

33

OPINION Dealing with divided loyalty when applying for Medicaid For the past several years, I have been of assets from which to pay the nursing home for that two-month pewriting about how the increasing riod of time. complexity of the Medicaid apOnly uncompensated transplication process is going to fers that occur during the lookcause people problems. In 2006, back period are penalized. So, the federal government increased if Mr. Smith transferred the Medicaid lookback period $1,000,000 ten years ago, the from three years to five. Medicaid Office could not inThe “lookback period” is the stitute a penalty period against period of time that the Medicaid him for that very large transOffice looks at to determine if an fer; however, if Mr. Smith applicant for benefits has transtransferred $10,000 two years ferred assets for less than fair before applying for Medicaid market value. When an applicant benefits, the Medicaid Office makes transfers for less than fair could institute a penalty period market value, called an “uncomBy pensated transfers,” the applicant JOHN CALLINAN against him. By the way, most people is ineligible for Medicaid benefits who come to see me think that the Medicaid for a period of time. This period of ineligibility for Medicaid Office asks for the money back. This is unbenefits is called a “penalty period.” If an true. The Medicaid Office merely tells a applicant has a penalty period assessed person “yes, you are eligible for benefits” or against him, he must private-pay the nursing “no, you are not eligible.” The Medicaid Ofhome in which he resides until the penalty fice does not force the recipient of the gift to period has expired. For instance, if Mr. return the gift; Medicaid is more than happy Smith transferred $14,000, he would be in- to simply deny your application for Medieligible for Medicaid benefits for two caid benefits. The Medicaid Office will not institute a months and would have to find some source

Legally Speaking

penalty period until such time as the applicant is eligible for Medicaid benefits but for the penalty period. In other words, Mr. Smith will not have a two-month penalty period assessed against him for his $14,000 uncompensated transfer until such time as he has less than $2,000 in assets. So, here’s the rub for the nursing home in which Mr. Smith resides: If Mr. Smith is ineligible for two months and has less than $2,000 in assets, how is he going to pay the nursing home? You might think, well, the nursing home will just kick Mr. Smith out for non-payment. But you’d be wrong. While, legally speaking, the nursing home could kick Mr. Smith out for non-payment from a practical standpoint, the nursing home cannot discharge Mr. Smith. The nursing home would have to find a place that would accept Mr. Smith because Mr. Smith needs the care that a nursing home provides, and since no other nursing home will accept Mr. Smith, the nursing home in which he resides is stuck with him. Because of these facts, nursing homes are getting more and more aggressive when it comes to Medicaid applications. Many nursing homes are referring families to agen-

cies that process Medicaid application or law firms that also represent the nursing home. Some of the agencies that handle these applications are telling family members that the family must use their services. While referrals are nice, sometimes referrals can mean divided loyalty. For instance, if I am the law firm for the nursing home, the same law firm that makes money suing families that have failed to pay their bills to the nursing home, to whom do you think I’m going to be loyal? If I am a non-attorney agency that processes Medicaid application and receives a substantial amount of my business from nursing home referrals, to whom do you think I’m going to be loyal. Medicaid is complex enough. Families should not have to worry about the loyalty of the advocate they retain to represent them in the process of applying for benefits. John W. Callinan is a certified elder law attorney (as certified by the National Elder Law Foundation, accredited by the American Bar Association). John has offices in Wall Twsp., Middletown, and Jamesburg. He can be reached at 732-706-8008 or johncallinan@ optonline.net.

ParaS, aPY & reiSS a PrOFeSSiOnal COrPOraTiOn FOr

The PraCTiCe OF FaMilY law

BOnnie M.S. reiSS PeTer C. ParaS PaTriCia e. aPY SuSan M. MarkenSTein MiChael J. FlereS

2 Bridge avenue The galleria SuiTe 601 red Bank, nJ 07701

732.219.9000

Fax 732.219.9020


34 Community Messenger

May 2011

YOUR SAY What was the best advice your mother gave you? “To not worry what other people think.” – Carla Cefalo Keyport

“If you have your health you have everything.” – Gifford Bowne II Shrewsbury

“To be careful to never to speak about anybody because you don't know who is around.” – Pat McCarthy Keansburg

“Always do the right thing and be kind to others because it always comes back.” – Bernice Lopez Middletown

“Do unto others that you would have done to you.” – Teri O'Brien Eatontown

“Marry for money.” – Brian Valentino Hazlet

“Always have your own bank account, and put money aside.” – Evelyn Ambrose Keyport

“Learn for life, not for the school or teacher.” – Ted Friedli Long Branch

PUZZLE ANSWERS Puzzles on Page 29-30 N H G M R M C K X K R

O H A F T O G Q M R Z

M Y A L G T B R A G A

E S Z O U H O I A Q C

M P B W E E N R N S W

O R M E E R D D S P S

R I Y R L E M X A I E

I N S S N X I A V D Z

A G B U T T E R F L Y

L P L A N T S V V U B

P R E S E N T J A Z L

4 8 7 2 9 1 6 5 3

2 5 9 8 6 3 1 4 7

6 1 3 5 4 7 8 2 9

1 7 4 3 8 2 5 9 6

8 2 5 6 1 9 3 7 4

9 3 6 7 5 4 2 8 1

7 9 8 1 3 5 4 6 2

3 6 2 4 7 8 9 1 5

5 4 1 9 2 6 7 3 8

D O W N M T A N O P A W I L L I A R U M S O N E V E O V R O G E R S N

C L A M


May 2011

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Navesink Community Messenger - May 2011