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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities:

SOCIETY AND POLICY WITHOUT BOUNDARIES

To get involved or find out more about the Centre and the regular lectures, seminars and workshops we run, contact us at JPhoenix.csgs@durham.ac.uk or visit the website at www.durham.ac.uk/csgs

Shape. Inform. Influence. www.durham.ac.uk/csgs

Shape. Inform. Influence. www.durham.ac.uk/csgs

Shape. Inform. Influence. www.durham.ac.uk/csgs To get involved or find out more about the Centre and the regular lectures, seminars and workshops we run, contact us at JPhoenix.csgs@durham.ac.uk or visit the website at www.durham.ac.uk/csgs


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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

A UNIQUE RESEARCH CENTRE The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities has evolved from the highly successful Gender and Sexuality Research Network based at Durham University. With an active network of scholars comprised of over 50 academic and postgraduate research members of Durham University, the Centre is unique in that its members span the arts, social sciences, health and sciences and takes as its core interest the complex and diverse interrelationships between sex as well as gender and sexualities. Addressing worldwide issues relating to all three themes, the Centre positions Durham as a leader in this field, with the capacity to shape future gender and sexuality, equality and diversity research agendas.

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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

WORKING TO UNDERSTAND LIVES Societies and cultures across the world have experienced large scale social changes as new definitions of femininities, masculinities and even heterosexuality (now as metrosexuality and cybersexualities) are emerging. In the last few decades, there have been seismic changes across a range of countries in the ways that sex, sexualities and gender are expressed, regulated and understood. These changes have affected the ways in which we all experience the world around us. Yet, despite our advances in understanding and the changes that many societies have experienced with regard to increasing tolerance of diversity, commitment to gender equality and Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Queer and Transgender (LGBQT) rights, there is still much more work to be done.

The study of sex, gender and sexualities is an intellectually vibrant, broad reaching and critical area of research. At the heart of the Centre is its robust academic research work. The Centre seeks also to maximise the impact of its research by acting as a bridge between researchers and other stakeholders, such as policy makers, lawyers, educationalists, social and community workers, and corporate and social enterprises, to deliver research which has tangible public benefit and impact. Tackling global issues The Centre seeks to understand the ways that sex, gender and sexualities shape, inform and influence national and global social and political issues including security, economy, justice, democracy, ethics, conflict and welfare provision. Operating without intellectual or academic borders, the Centre explores how historical, artistic and philosophical insight shapes and regulates issues of equality and diversity in these three domains.

More needs to be done to understand better the conditions of existence for men, women, LGBQT populations across the world. It is known that outcomes for LGBQT people in relation to mental health, education and income remain low. Young LGBQT people face higher rates of suicide than other groups, and discrimination and violence based on gender and sexuality mark the lives of many LGBQT people and women. Research has confirmed that in terms of gender, women still earn less than 75% of men’s income and gender diversity and equality in senior leadership have been identified as real and pertinent challenges for many organisations. We will explore the vital questions of equality and diversity in societies across the world to inform practices and policies.


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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

Gender, gay and lesbian sexualities as well as sex itself are becoming increasingly discussed in public debate. Gender, sex and sexual identities are arguably three of the few aspects of social, political and cultural life that impact upon everyone. Research with impact The Centre will develop engaging, and at times, provocative research themes and questions which draw in a broad range of researchers and deliver tangible public benefit and impact. There are a variety of key questions that the Centre seeks to address: • How might we maximize the economic impact on organisations committed to sexuality and gender diversity of working with organisations or nations that are not? • How do issues of sex, gender and sexualities shape and impact upon the provision of security, justice and democracy in a global context or within and across populations in conflict? • How can the ideals of equality and diversity, along with the social cohesion they enhance, be promoted in practice?

• What can the study of sex, gender and sexualities bring to our understanding of specific areas of national and international policy (i.e. education, housing, pensions, welfare)? • How does the study of sex, gender and sexualities impact upon, contribute to or otherwise shape the core and parent disciplines in the sciences, social sciences and arts and humanities, if at all – and if it does not, should it? • What is the provision of sexual health and well-being in the context of incarcerated populations, and how might it be improved? Our vision is to have a multidisciplinary leading research institute which acts as a hub for staff and students working in or concerned with LGBQT issues, sex, sexuality and gender diversity.

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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

KEY PEOPLE There are over 50 Durham University staff involved in the Centre. A few key people are mentioned here to give a sense of the interdisciplinary nature of the Centre. They are taken from the faculties of Science, Arts & Humanities and Social Sciences & Health.

Professor Jo Phoenix – Director Faculty of Social Sciences & Health Prof Jo Phoenix holds a Chair in Criminology in the School of Applied Social Sciences. She completed a BSc in Sociology at Bristol University in 1988 and an MSc in Gender and Social Policy at Bristol University in 1991. In 1993, she was awarded a scholarship to undertake a PhD in the Department of Criminology, Keele University. Her first lectureship was at Middlesex University in 1997. In 2000, she was appointed as a Lecturer in the Department of Social and Policy Sciences at Bath University.

She took up her position at Durham University in 2007 and was Chair, Board of Examiners before becoming Deputy Head of Faculty, Social Sciences and Health in 2009 and Dean for Queen's Campus in 2011. She is also a fellow of the Wolfson Research Institute. Research interests • Gender and Crime • Gender and Victimisation • Sex and Sexual Regulation • Prostitution • Comparative Prostitution Policy Research • Human Trafficking • Sexual Exploitation of Young People • Youth Penalty • Youth Justice • Understanding the ways that 'sex', as a social phenomena, has fundamentally changed in the 21st century • Understanding the experiences of vulnerable and marginalised groups in the context of social policy and criminal justice.

Professor Jo Phoenix on... ‘Prostitution’ “Involvement in prostitution is made possible for some women because, put simply, such involvement comes to ‘make sense’ because of the social and material conditions in which they live. A specific ‘prostitute identity’ is composed of three contingent and contradictory pairs of identifications: prostitutes as workers and as commodified bodies; prostitutes as businesswomen and as loving partners; and prostitutes as victims and as survivors.”


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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

Dr Sylvie Gambaudo – Deputy Director Faculty of Arts & Humanities

Anne Campbell Faculty of Science

Dr Sylvie Gambaudo has been a member of the Philosophy department since 2003. She was awarded a PhD at Durham in 2004 on ‘Subjectivity in the Work of Julia Kristeva: The Crisis of Identity in Contemporary Society’. Her interest in Kristeva’s work on subjectivity is still strong but she has also since turned her attention to issues of gender, madness and narrative. She is currently focusing on the work of New Zealand writer Janet Frame, in particular her use of citation and melancholia in narratives of self. In 2010, Professor Sylvie Gambaudo founded the Gender and Sexuality Research Network at Durham.

Anne Campbell obtained her DPhil in psychology from Oxford University. She taught at Rutgers and Temple Universities in the USA, before coming to Durham.

Research Interests • Gender, theories of sexual difference, narcissism (especially primary narcissism) • Narratives of madness, melancholia • Subjectivity in the work of Julia Kristeva • The work of writer Janet Frame.

Research Interests Anne Campbell’s initial interest was in aggression among teenage girls which she studied in Britain and in New York where she performed participant observation with girl gangs. She currently takes an evolutionary approach to sex differences in aggression. She is investigating the rewards and costs of aggression for men and women toward different targets, emphasising the psychological mediators of these differences especially fear, inhibition and risk-taking. She is also working on the neuropeptide oxytocin.

Anne Campbell on… ‘The role of women’ Anne Campbell challenges the passive role of women in evolutionary theory and proposes that women have forged their own strategic way forward, acting through their own forms of competition, rivalry, aggression, and sexuality to shape their own destiny. (From the cover of A Mind of her Own).

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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

Research interests • Feminist legal studies • Legal regulation of pornography • Gender and crime • Women and the legal profession • Rape law and policy. Professor Clare McGlynn Faculty of Social Sciences & Health

Clare McGlynn on... ‘the regulation of pornography’ Clare McGlynn is a feminist legal scholar “A society which condones the with particular expertise in the fields of depiction of sexual violence for sexual rape law and policy, the legal regulation gratification is not one which truly of pornography and the representation values the human rights of women of women in the legal profession. to gender equality, bodily integrity and a life free from gendered harms. Following qualification as a solicitor with In other words, regulation of violent City firm Herbert Smith, she took up a pornographic material is permitted lectureship in law at the University of since it ‘directly conflicts with basic Newcastle upon Tyne, before moving to ideals of equal worth and equal a Readership at Durham University in protection that are basic to a liberal 1999 and being appointed to a Chair social order’, as liberal philosopher in Law in 2004. Martha Nussbaum has argued.” She co-founded the research group Gender & Law at Durham (GLAD) in 2007 which acts as a catalyst for gender-related research and teaching, and from 2007-2009 she was Deputy Head of the Law School.

Professor Lucille Cairns Faculty of Arts & Humanities Professor Lucille Cairns is the sole author of five monographs, as well as of numerous articles/ chapters on male and female homosexuality in French literature and film, on French women's writing generally, and on French Jewish women's writing in particular. She is sole editor of Gay and Lesbian Cultures in France (2002). She has been editor of Stirling French Publications (1997-2005), and specialist reader for many academic journals. She was President of AUPHF (Association of University Professors and Heads of French) from 20072010, and is currently the national representative for French studies on the Executive Committee of UCML (University Council of Modern Languages). She has been advisor on a number of senior promotions in UK universities, external panel member for the Independent Evaluation of


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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

Simon has supported medical students who initiated their own programme of peer-led community-based sexual health promotion and was involved in establishing a similar programme at St George’s Medical School.

Teaching in the French Department, University of Sheffield (2006), and external member of the panel for the review of the School of Modern Languages, University of Bristol (2009). In 2009, she was made a Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Académiques by the French government. Research Interests • Corporeal configurations in French literature and film • French women's writing • Jewish women's writing • Literary, cinematic and wider cultural mediations of homosexuality in the French language • Member of the Culture and Difference research group in MLAC. All of her publications are relevant to this group • Professor Cairns is happy to supervise postgraduate students in most areas of 20th- and 21stcentury French studies, and especially those areas listed • Queer theory.

Simon Forrest Faculty of Social Sciences & Health Simon joined the School of Medicine and Health in 2009. Early in his career he taught in secondary and further education before getting involved in health promotion with young people in the mid 1980s. His developing interest in the social aspects of adolescent health was reflected in his Masters degree which involved empirical research into the dance and drug cultures of the period, HIV/Aids prevention for young people and gender, sexuality and health. Subsequently he moved into academic research working on a number of studies and evaluations focusing on various aspects of young people’s sexual attitudes and lifestyles before becoming a Research Fellow in the Department of Sexually Transmitted Diseases at University College London and working on the RIPPLE study – an RCT assessing the impact of peer-led sex education targeting young people.

Simon’s PhD in sociology and doctoral research explored teenagers’ experiences of being in love. Throughout his career Simon has contributed to under- and postgraduate teaching as well as training programmes for professionals in health, welfare and education. He has also contributed to a variety of national and international expert groups, advisory committees and conferences. Research Interests • The sexual attitudes and behaviour of young people • Sexual health promotion and education • Sexuality and gender, especially young masculinities • The social and cultural context of emotional experience.

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The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities

PUBLICATIONS Books Cairns, Lucille. 2011. Post-War Jewish Women's Writing in French, Legenda, 264 pp. Hunter, Rosemary. McGlynn, Clare. & Rackley, Erika. 2010. Feminist Judgments: From Theory to Practice. Oxford: Hart Publishing. McGlynn, Clare. and & Munro, Vanessa. 2010. Rethinking Rape Law: international and comparative perspectives. London: Routledge. Book chapters Phoenix, J. 2009. Regulating Sex for Sale: Prostitution, Policy Reform and the UK. Bristol: Policy Press. Books: sections Phoenix, J. 2009. Beyond Risk Assessment: The Return of Repressive Welfarism. In Youth Offending and Youth Justice (Research Highlights in Social Work). McNeil, F. & Barry, M. London: Jessica Kingsley. Phoenix, J. 2009. Frameworks for Understanding. In Regulating Sex for Sale: Prostitution, policy reform and the UK. Phoenix, J. Bristol: Policy Press. 1-28. Phoenix, J. 2009. Whose Account Counts? Politics and Research in Youth Justice. In Youth Justice Handbook: Theory, Policy and Practice. Taylor, W., Earle, R. & Hester, R. Collumpton, Devon: Willan Publishing. 73-82. Phoenix, J. 2008. Be helped or else! Economic exploitation, male violence and prostitution policy in the UK. In Demanding Sex: Critical Reflections on the Regulation of Prostitution. Munro, F. & Della Giusta, M. London: Ashgate. Phoenix, J. 2008. Reinventing the Wheel: Contemporary Contours of Prostitution Regulation. In Sex as Crime. Letherby, G., Williams, J., Birch, P. & Cain, M. Collumpton, Devon: Willan Publishing. 27-46. Forrest, Simon. 2011. A public health approach to sex education. In Sexual health: A Public Health Approach. Mitchell, K., Wellings, K. & Collumbien, M. Open University Press/McGraw Hill. Forrest, Simon. 2011. Straight Talking: Challenges in teaching and learning about sexuality and homophobia in schools. In Education, Equality and Human Rights. Cole, M. Routledge. Forrest, S. & Ellis, V. 2011. The making of sexualities: Sexuality, identity and equality. In Education, Equality and Human Rights. Cole, M. Routledge. Forrest, S.P. & Kanabus, A. 2009. Sex Education That Works. In Issues: Sexual Health. Firth, L. Cambridge: Independence. 173: 31-34.

Book reviews Gambaudo, S. 2009. Review of ‘Jane M Ussher: Managing the Monstrous Feminine: Regulating the Reproductive Body. Feminism and Psychology 19(3). Articles Cairns, Lucille. 2011. 'Lieux de mémoire juifs: Francine Christophe’s Après les camps, la vie (2001) and Marceline Loridan-Ivens’s La Petite Prairie aux bouleaux (2003)', L'Esprit créateur: Watch This Space: Women's Conceptualizations of Space in Contemporary French Film and Visual Art 51, pp. 139-153 Cairns, Lucille. 2010 ''La Mémoire de la Shoah': the Contentious Case of Soazig Aaron's 'Le Non de Klara'', French Studies LXIV, pp. 438-450 Cairns, Lucille. 2009 'Sapphism in Twentieth- to TwentyFirst Century French Film: Segue or Schism?', Australian Journal of French Studies XLV, pp. 264-276 Cairns, Lucille. 2008 'Hyphenated Identity: Tunisian-FrenchJewish-Female Writers', CELAAN - Revue du Centre d'Etudes des Littératures et des Arts d'Afrique 7, pp. 58-69 Cairns, Lucille. 2008 'Post-War Jewish Women’s Writing in French', Women in French Studies pp. 24-38 Campbell, A. (2008). Attachment, aggression and affiliation: The role of oxytocin in female social behaviour. Biological Psychology, 77, 1-10. Campbell, A. (2008). The morning after the night before: Affective reactions to one-night stands among mated and unmated women and men. Human Nature, 19, 157-173. Campbell, A. (2009). Fatal attraction syndrome: Not a good way to keep your man. (Commentary) Behavioral and Brain Sciences (in press). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32, 24-25. Campbell, A. (2010). Oxytocin and human social behaviour. Personality and Social Psychology Review,14, 281-295. Campbell, A. (2011). Ladies, choose your weapons. The Evolutionary Review. 2. Campbell, A. and Muncer. S. (2009). Can ‘risky’ impulsivity explain sex differences in aggression? Personality and Individual Differences, 47, 402-406. Cross, C., Copping, L. and Campbell, A. (2011). Sex differences in impulsivity: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 97-130. Davidovic, A., Bell, K., Ferguson, C., Gorski, E. and Campbell, A. (2011). Impelling and inhibitory forces in aggression: Sex-of-target and relationship effects. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 26, 308-3126. Cross, C. P., Tee, W., & Campbell, A. (2011). Gender symmetry in intimate aggression: An effect of intimacy or sex? Aggressive Behavior, 37, 268-277.

Campbell, A. (2008). Attachment, aggression and affiliation: The role of oxytocin in female social behaviour. Biological Psychology, 77, 1-10. Forrest, Simon. 2010. Young men in love: the (re)making of heterosexual masculinities through ‘‘serious’’ relationships. Sexual and relationship therapy 25(2): 206-218. Gambaudo, S. 2009. Elizabeth Badinter’s Dead End Feminism. Feminism and Psychology 19(1). McGlynn, C 2011. Feminism, Rape and the Search for Justice. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 31(4). McGlynn, C 2011. Rape, Defendant Anonymity and Human Rights: adopting a "wider perspective". Criminal Law Review (3): 199-215. McGlynn, Clare. & Rackley, Erika. 2009. Criminalising Extreme Pornography: A Lost Opportunity. Criminal Law Review (4): 245-260. McGlynn, Clare. & Ward, Ian. 2009. Pornography, Pragmatism and Proscription. Journal of Law and Society 36(3): 327-351. McGlynn, Clare. 2009. Rape, Torture and the European Convention on Human Rights. International and Comparative Law Quarterly Vol 58(3): 565-595. Phoenix, J. (2010). Punishment & Society Vol 12, No 3, 348-366.


The Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities:

SOCIETY AND POLICY WITHOUT BOUNDARIES

To get involved or find out more about the Centre and the regular lectures, seminars and workshops we run, contact us at JPhoenix.csgs@durham.ac.uk or visit the website at www.durham.ac.uk/csgs

Shape. Inform. Influence. www.durham.ac.uk/csgs

Shape. Inform. Influence. www.durham.ac.uk/csgs

Shape. Inform. Influence. www.durham.ac.uk/csgs To get involved or find out more about the Centre and the regular lectures, seminars and workshops we run, contact us at JPhoenix.csgs@durham.ac.uk or visit the website at www.durham.ac.uk/csgs

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Brochure for the Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexuality

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