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The cover 1. Pencil thumbnail sketches working from a photo of scale, mock-up model. 2. Full-size pencil layout and chalk color comp worked out a little further in de tail, making minor changes from the original idea to show the satellite at its best functional angle. 3. Accurate pencil drawing for final art, one-half up. 4. First stage of the rendering. Moon and satellite have been masked off and background painting started. 5. Second stage. Most of the area has been covered and the painting proceeds, working back and forth from satellite to background to solve lights and darks. The last stage will be the painting of the smaller details.

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One of the many factors in producing industrial art is a sound knowledge of the technical aspects of the subject matter. This can be attained only by working closely with the engineers and scientists on various projects, and by keeping up -to-date with the ever-changing missile and space scene. 6. George Akimoto in his studio, CA's cover art on the board. 34

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2

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SAM CALDER

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CA, Ortober '61


Exhibit In Phoenix ... This baby's footprint was planted on all of the collateral material proclaiming the First Annual Exhibition of Advertising and Editorial Art by the Art Directors Club of Phoenix. Award winners (five of them shown here) were printed in a 16-page exhibition brochure designed by Lou Doerzbacher, exhibition chairman. Entries were limited to work produced in 1960 by artists, agencies and organizations in the State of Arizona. The Art Directors Club of Denver judged the exhibition.

We've always been fascinated by graphic use of technical patterns. Above: a moire pattern used as a background for the title slides of filmstrips. Bradley Stevens designed, William Ditzel photographed, George W. Houk art directed for L. E. O'Neil & Associates, Inc. Dayton, Ohio. 40

Below: a symbolic use of a pattern by NBC TV Sales Planning. The stress pattern, by polarized light, is by W. M. Murray, M.I.T. Stan Stubenberg was the designer, Bob Greenwall the art director.

First Place: Photography Art Director : James ]. Barrett Photographer: Herb McLaughlin Client: Motorola, Inc.

CA. October '61


Quick identifw:adon mnket caahint.t checka 10 muc:h--euier. qukker. more pleuanL Enjoy the convenience and prestip of Pt•n«urahml. Clw!clt.. Your name and addrP.Ia imprinted in dicnified, euy·to ·read type . Available l n rive attractive atylea. Aak your tell er.

Help mend a broken life

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First Place : Poster Art and Design Art Director: John Fondrisi Artist : Design Associates Client : Th·e Arizona Bank Agency: The Curran-Morton Co. 41 First Place: Newspaper Advertising Art Director: Ernest Cabat Agency: Cabat-Gill Advertising Client: United Community First Place: Letterheads & Trademarks Art Director: Elmo Sears Artist : Elmo Sears Client: Graphic Group, Inc.

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First Place : Corporate Image Art Director : E. Willis Jones Artist: E. Willis Jones Client: Arizona Brewing Co.

CA, October '61


Cheltenham Bold 1) Plain, strong, dark, simple, masculine, usual, rugged

2) Active, honest 3) Imperfect, hard, constrained, old, ugly, old-fashioned, cheap

Garamond

G

Tempo Bold 1) Hard, plain, good, strong, dark, simple, masculine, rugged, honest

2)-

3) New, modern

1) Perfect, good, clean , harmonious, honest 2) Plain

3) Light, rich , beautiful, rounded, expensive , meaningful, delicate, graceful, formal

Garamond Italic

G

1) Soft, light, expensive, feminine, delicate , graceful, clean 2) Ornate, weak

3) Rich, beautiful , rounded, meaningful , harmonious, honest

Garamond Bold

1) Light, delicate

1) Perfect, strong, dark, masculine, clean , harmonious, honest

2) Soft, feminine

2) Hard, plain, usual, rugged

3) New, active, modern, informal

3) Old, meaningful

Bodoni Book 1) Soft, ornate , light, complex, rich, rounded, expensive, feminine , delicate, graceful, clean , harmonious, formal

2) Weak, beautiful

G

1) Perfect, good , clean, harmonious, honest

2) Soft

3) Old-fashioned

3) Light, rich, beautiful , expensive , meaningful, graceful, tight, formal

Flash

Bodoni Book Italic

1) Dark, rugged, informal

2)-

1) Good, rich, beautiful, rounded, expensive , graceful, clean, harmonious

3) Free, new, active, strong, rounded, modern, cheap, masculine, relaxed

3) Perfect

COPPERPLATE

Ultra Bodonl

2) Soft, plain, feminine

1) Hard, plain, strong, simple, masculine, clean

2) Honest 3) Constrained, old, dark, rugged, stiff, formal

1) Hard , strong, dark, masculine, rugged 2) Ugly

3) Active


The rough texture of a potato helps make it a masculine article. A tomato, soft and pretty, has become a symbol of femininity. An apple has no sex (it grows on "masculine" trees, but in the Bible it served as a symbol of feminine beguilement. Trees (and wooden textures) reek of masculinity. Delicacy of flowers (and girls' liking for them) assures their place in a woman's domain. Grass, on the other hand, has no claim to any particular gender.

Almost every object has a sex of its own. This fact is impor¡ tant to keep in mind when choosing sym¡ bois or props for an illustration.

Black has strength and opacity, more masculine than feminine. The translucency of white (and its virginal quality) gives it a maidenly appearance. Gray is neuter. A train is ((he." It suggests power, adventure, energy. A ship, sleek, graceful in appearance, is a ((she." The car used to be more masculine than feminine, but in this modern world it is rapidly becoming bisexual. Wool (tweedy textures ) is associated more with men's suits than ladies' dresses. Silk has a different connotation altogether; its softness and pliability make it more ((feminine." Cotton can be either gender. A dog is usually ((he." A cat-characteristically a calculating animal is ((she." A horse can be ((he" or ((she," depending on the anatomy. The harsh, angular edges of square objects suggest masculine temper. A round shape implies the gentleness of a woman. A triangle stands undecided.

MASCULINE

POTATO

0 FEMININE

'

TOMATO

0 NEUTER

APPLE

GRASS

AUTOMOBILE

CA . October '61

LINEN


The sex of a "neuter" (an automobile in this case) can be manipulated. The picture on the left has strong masculine connotations even though a driver is not visible. The vehicle is moving across rough terrain, dominating its environment. l.t suggests (like the car going uphill) a forceful, active personality. The automobile on the right is presented in a more tranquil environment. It is standing still. Both doors are open, implying that the two passengers -presumably a man and a woman-have gone for a walk ; this possibility suggests romance. Here the automobile (like the one going downhill) assumes a quiet, passive disposition.

49 Shapes, too, have definite sexual implications. As a rule, round objects seem more feminine while angular articles suggest masculinity.

DOG

SQUARE

CAT

CIRCLE

HORSE

TRIANGLE

This psychological principle has important commercial applications. A manufacturer must, during the early stages of merchandising, decide upon the "sex" of the package in which his product will be put. Should a man's hat be packed in a round box, for example? (A hexagonal shape is more acceptable .) Should detergents be packaged in square boxes? (Yes. Detergents have been found to move faster if they connote masculinity- power and action-mindedness -even though the buyers are mainly women.)

CA , Octo her "61


Every reader (or television viewer) is sensitive to the ((mood" of pictures. He may not always realize his own feelings; the average respondent is seldom able to be articulate about such a delicate and complex subject as this. He may be intellectually unaware of it. But this does not mean he does not feel its effect.

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An outstanding example of selling with ccmood" is shown on the right-hand page. This color photograph was used in a magazine advertisement for Lucky Strike to suggest the relaxing aspect of smoking. This kind of unobtrusive advertising can carry a tremendous wallop, its quiet, understated quality notwithstanding. The two pictures on this page show how mood of pictures can be manipulated by cropping procedures. The tall, vertical photograph gives an illusion of the car's standing still. The horizontal photograph helps to Create an illusion of the automobile's moving along the road.

CA. October '61


octpreview1961