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7, Grocer: ''BUT THE LAUGH'S ON :tOU .... HA-HA~HA- HA . "

18

Cardboard and foil m.allet and 10-inch record, two ofthe pieces presented to the grocers by Kaiser salesmen. Art Directors: Dick Snider and Vern Liebrandt of Young and Rubicam.

CA, March '60

17 . (Truck back as woman enters) Woman: "YOU DID HAVE IT BUT NOT ANY MORE."


1

pure white

11

11 parts white 1 part black

2

60 parts white 1 part gray

12

19 parts white 2 parts bl,ack

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29 parts white 1 part gray

13

34 ~ parts white 4 parts black

Gray equivalents; live television.

32

4

16 parts white 1 part gray

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9 parts white 2 parts black

5

10 parts white 1 part¡gray

15

4 parts white 1 part black

6

6 parts white 1 part gray

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3 parts white 1 part black

7

7 parts white 2 parts gray

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2 parts white 1 part black

8

4 parts white 2 parts gray

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15 parts white 8 parts black

9

11 parts white 7 parts gray

19

5 parts white 4 parts black

5 parts white 10 parts gray

20

pure black

10

Gray equivalents; photographed with Eastman Color Negative Film, Type 5248, printed on Eastman Color Print Film, Type 5382.

The ChromaCHron Gray Scale All colors and their mixtures have a gray equivalent corresponding to one of these 20 grays. The range is divided into 19 equal parts in terms of reflection density. Grays #2 through # 10 are achieved by mixing an auxiliary gray that is made up of one part black to nine parts white. Grays# 11 through #20 are achieved by mixtures of white and black; auxiliary gray is no longer used. Luminal! black and white casein paints were diluted with an equal amount of water and applied on white illustration board.

Gray equivalents; photographed with Eastman Color Negative Film, Type 5248 and printed on Eastman Panchromatic Separation Film, Type 5235.

CA, March '60


T.

he eyes have it . .. a n ew (and d ifferent) look for

all shimmer and iridescence .. . magnificent In moon-

Nighttime eye shadow 5 .00, eye accent crayon

day and night . . . color schemed by Princess

light; gleaming gold, sliver or platinum . It's a whole

or Mascarola 3 .50. Prices plus tax . Only at N - M ,

arcella Borghese . By day eyes are bright and

new art of eye makeup most elegantly encased

Preston Center, or To il etries

beautiful, vibrant and violet ... looking stunning in

in richly brushed jeweler's metal. Dayt i me eye

downtown

sun, staying wonderful in water. By night eyes are

shadow or eye accent crayon 2 .50, Mascarola 2.75.

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36 4) Best Design of Complete Unit

Art Directors Club Medal A ward of Distinctive Merit

Art Director: Art Shipman Designer: David Renning City: Dallas Client: Neima n-Marcus

5) Best Outdoor Poster in Show Foster & Kleiser Medal A ward of Distin ctive Merit

Art Director: John Flack Artist: Lowell Herrero City : San Francisco Client : California Dairy Industry Agency: Cunningham & Walsh Inc.

5 CA, March '60


14

APAID TESTIMONIAL FROM CASEY STENGEL FOR SKIPPY PEANUT BUTTER

Actually, it's fairly simple to get famous personalities to say something about your product in an ad. ALL YOU NEED IS MONEY We went right up to Casey Stengel and handed him some money and a jar of Skippy Peanut Butter. Then we asked him to say something pleasant about Skippy. "Let me sa11 at tu offset," said Casey, "That's the wa11 I ful and for another thing the whole busine81 of peanut butter is 11ot built 011 a firm foundation. Or in otur word8, it's just as I said. You see? Peanut butter is for kids." Well, we weren't going to take no for an answer. So

we coaxed Mr. Stengel into trying some Skippy. (Here's how we coaxed him-more money.) "Needless to say," he said, "And l'U tak~ a stand 011 that any time or to whoever should make any kind of stand like that. Skippy is not just for kid8. I t's great. It tastes just like peanuts."

We'll just add that we're in agreement with Mr. Stengel. Skippy Peanut Butter is made on purpose for grownups, by an exclusive patented process. It's always easy to digest, easy to spread, and it stays fresh . And, of course, Skippy gives you the true flavor of the U.S. Grade No.1 peanuts it's made from.

If you like peanuts , you 'll like Skippy

12) Award of Distinctive Merit

Art Director: Vance Jonson Designer : Vance Jonson Photographer : Vance Jonson Artist: Vance Jonson City : los Angeles Client: Hap Parakeet Seed 13) A ward of Distinctive Merit

Art Director: lz Liebowitz Artist : lz Liebowitz City: los Angeles Client : George McConnell Agency : Anderson -McConnell Adv . Agency 14) A ward of Distinctive Merit

Art Director: Dan Bonfigli Photographer: Nick Muray Artist: Fenga & Donderi City : San Francisco Client: Best Foods Agency: Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli 15) Award of Distinctive Merit

Art Directors: James Cross/ Robert Mitchell Designer: James Cross Artist: Robert Mitchell City: Santa Monica Client : System Development Corporation

15 CA, March '60

41


Exhibit Design, illustration, layout, copy, typography, printing, stock are all noteworthy. CA reproduced as much as our space allowed ofthis 24 page Annual Report for the Ansul Chemical Company. AD/Designer was Robert E. Vogele of Chicago. Illustrations are woodcuts by Antonio Frasconi, whose work delights the eye in galleries more frequently than on the printed page. The report relays its message in questions put by various business representatives. Answers are by Ansul president, Robert C. Hood. Typography and color emphasize this approach. Questions and answers are in different colors. Type margins add to the pace. The stock used is Lee white Teton Tiara. It was printed by Fey Publishing Co., Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.

CA, March '60


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~ HE use of symbols in their simplest and JTlOSt primitive form, for the purpose of conveying or recording thought, desires, beliefs, superstions, ideas and deeds, is and has been almost as separable to man as his fire and food . From the overies of relics of primitive man w-e find his implements, w-eapon.s--a.nd habitations crudely decorated w-ith devices w-hich w-ere supposed to bring good luck or to -ward off evil. There is no race or tribe in w-hich the use of devices reyeated or used in conjunction w-ith other forms of symbols does not occur, and the mental developments of the human race may frequently be accurately ascertained by studying the crudity or the completeness of the designs. Early man decorated his stone hatchet w-ith an insignia w-hich his superstitious beliefs led him to believe w-ould mean "killer," and his arrow- w-as often embellished w-ith a crude symbol which meant to" shoot true," and these same thoughts are still held by numbers of ignorant peoJ?le and gamblers, w-ho w-ear charms and make certain sounds or go through certain motions so luck may favor them. The Chinese have retained many of these old- fashioned beliefs and have carried out these superstitious thoughts in most of their,ornamentations. In many instances dragons and other imaginary beasts are evolved and arranged to keep aw-ay the evil spirits, and it is no doubt the greatest exemplification of the mental state of a race carried out in ornamental and decorative form. man's progress tow-ard civilization the ever-present desire for beauty and for an orderly and progressive arrangement of the symbols, omens and tokens constantly asserted itself, and there .sradually develped in the different peoples of the w-orld a scheme of arrangement w-hich became more satisfying to the eye; the meaning of the pictures,writings and symbols being carried out in perhaps the most complete manner by the early Egyptians. It-was also at this period that beauty of form, color and arrangement came to predominate the meaning of the unit in the design or decoration. We continue to ' trace the progress of devices arranged in an orderly and rhythmical manner to the Corinthians, from whom is handed dow-n the Corinthian column, -with its beautiful capital. The Greeks and Romans, w-hile stJl clinging closely to their J?agan beliefs and gods for motifs for the ornamentation of their temples and other buildings, permitted beauty of design to take the predominant place in the scheme, and the meaning of the unit in the decoration to becomesecondary.With the Greeks and Romans many new- units or motifs were added, such as the egg-and-dart and the rosette; also flow-ers and leaves,mostlyin conventional form, were introduced, and it -would appear that the aypre~iationfor the est~etic had at a? out that time re~ched the y01ntwhere the des•gn the edifice or of the article as a w-hole and en masse-was given the first consideration and all other details of proportion, ornamentation and de coration were made subservient to the general design. This is the reason we study and base our knowledge of beauty on the relics from the ancient Greeks and Romans w-hich still exist, and re-design or modify them to suit our individual requirements. After the daw-n of the Christian Era, art, decoration and ornamentation w-ere allow-ed to lie dormant for about eight centuries, w-hen they began to revive, mostly through the

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princes in Italy, and later on in northern Europe, became patrons of art and built w-onderful cathedrals and palaces in-which the structure and furnishings againshow-examyles of the ever-existing desire to beautify spaces and surfaces w-ith ornamentation. So universal is the inherited desire in man to beautify by ornament, that the devastation of w-ars and the w-iping out of different races has not smothered it. Religious beliefs, modes of living and forms of government have died, vanished and have been forgotten, but man's persistent desire to press forw-ard, to beautify, to ornament-like his desire to be better, to make the-world a better place to live in, and to add something tow-ard its up building-is a fire that even the w-aters of pestilence and death have failed to quench. striving, no matter how- great the discouragement, sums it all UJ? in a few- w-ords. Indeed, the persistence -with which man has constructed ornamental decoration, the labor and time consumed in carving or painting the same unit or a consecutive series of units in a frieze or a border for decorative purposes, is really to b~ marveled at. Years w-ere sometimes spent in the w-ork by an artist or an artisan carving the same design repeatedly arouhd a frieze or the cornice of a building. Before the discove:r of printing, the monks and scribes w-riting the bibles could not-withstand the urge to ornament the pages w-ith borders and initials. There are wonderful examples of these hand-written bibles in the Typographic Library of the American TypeFounders Company. Later on, after printing from movable types had come into use, borders and initials w-ere quite often draw-n b_y hand and illuminated in color. Typographic borders and ornaments first appeared in copious number in 17 42, and w-ere introduced by Fournier of Paris. In the early age of commercial printing a rather futile attempt -was made to beautify by means of ornamentation. The examples of the time show- little more than the desire for ornamentation; yet had the proper decorative material been avaJable at the time there is no doubt but that many beautiful' examples w-ould have been handed dow-n to us. present-day workers in the graphic arts are more fortunate. They sulfer no handicap from lack of decorative material. Never before in the history of the craft has the printer been so mply provided w-ith decorative materials that e so easy and practical to use, and from w-hich an almost endless variety of pleasing designs may be had quickly and w-ith a minimum of effort. . The American Type Founders Company is constantly producing new- and beautiful typographic ornaments and borders. Hundreds of separate and distinct units are available for use -with the various related series of borders and ornaments, and make it possible to express practically and economically thousands of different arrangements, w-ith possibilities limited only by the printer's imagination and his desire to make his product more pleasing. And yet, with all this-wealth of typographic ornaments and borders nowavailable, the demand is ever for something • different. "The typefounder must continue to produce new- designs. Styles change in typographic decoration, and w-hat is admirable today becQnles commonplace after a while. But forw-ardlookingyrinters are secure in one fact-they realize that a study of this Company's specimen showings is/rofitable

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