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¿Qué Pasa,OSU? An Independent, Community-Based Magazine About Latin@s at Ohio State • Volume XIV Number 4 • Summer 2007

Ohio State: A Place to Do Something Great! ¡Ohio State: Un Lugar para Hacer Algo Grandioso!

In this Issue: Anthony Gonzalez: Off to the NFL with an OSU diploma in hand

Support After Arriving on Campus: The First Year Experience Program

A Thousand Miles: A Latino alumnus’ journey from OSU to Korea

Hispanic/Latin@ Organizations at Ohio State

Mi Experiencia: From the Bottom 10% to Ohio State Faculty: Professor Manuel Martínez’ story

http://quepasa.osu.edu


Editor Rachel Ramirez-Hammond Layout and Design Melissa Quintanilha

¿Qué Pasa,OSU? Volume XIV Number 4 Summer 2007

Student Assistant Giovana Covarrubias Editorial Board Ignacio Corona Mauricio Espinoza Monica Frías-Boson Víctor J. Mora Elizabeth Pages Executive Officer Víctor J. Mora Contributors Jessica Beshore Jefferson Blackburn-Smith Normando Cabán Nicole Craven Fidel Cruz Luz Escoto Antonio Ferrey Manuel Granados Tally Hart Santa Lopez-Jarrin Manuel Martinez Andrea Medina Vallenilla Brian Orefice Claudio Pasian Mario Peraza Kathleen Roca Roxana Sierra

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Messages from the University’s Leadership

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Graduates Achieve Their Goals at OSU!

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Anthony Gonzalez: Off to the NFL with an OSU diploma in hand

Víctor J. Mora, Associate Director Office of Undergraduate Admissions and First Year Experience 930 Lincoln Tower, 1800 Cannon Drive Columbus, Ohio 43210 e-mail: mora.1@osu.edu This publication is supported by The Office of Academic Affairs, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and First Year Experience, and the Office of Minority Affairs. This publication is funded by the Hispanic Oversight Committee. The Ohio State University is not responsible for the content of this publication. This publication does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the staff or the editorial board. All submissions for publication must include name and phone number or e-mail of the person(s) responsible for the work. ¿Qué Pasa, OSU? reserves the right to refuse any and all submissions for publication at any time. Note: We use “@” instead of “o/a” because we want all Latin@s, men and women, to feel included. Cover by Melissa Quintanilha

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¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

Living at OSU: The on-campus experience

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Regional Campuses: A more intimate, more affordable Ohio State experience

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Tips for Success at Ohio State

Hispanic/Latin@ Organizations at Ohio State

Becoming an Advocate for Higher Education By Jefferson Blackburn-Smith and Tally Hart

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Value and Investment: Choices beyond cost in the college selection process Valor e Inversión: Opciones más allá del costo en el proceso de selección de una universidad

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By Kathleen Roca and Jefferson Blackburn-Smith

Mi Experiencia From the Bottom 10% to Ohio State Faculty: Professor Manuel Martínez’ story

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By Manuel Martínez

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Support After Arriving on Campus: The First Year Experience Program

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By Mario Peraza

By Nicole Craven

A Thousand Miles: A Latino alumnus’ journey from OSU to Korea By Fidel Cruz

Please send all letters, press releases, and other materials to:

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By Mauricio Espinoza

The Benefits of Participating in the University Honors & Scholars Program By Brian M. Orefice

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Never be Bored: The hidden benefits of a Buck-ID By Jessica Beshore

By Rachel Ramirez-Hammond

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Ohio State Celebrates Graduation 2007

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The Office of Minority Affairs: 30 years of service to OSU Latin@s La Oficina de Asuntos de Minorías: 30 años de servicio a la comunidad latina en OSU By Normando Cabán

Why Parents from Out-of-State are Sending Their Children to OSU Por qué los Padres que Viven en Otros Estados Envian sus Hijos a OSU By Santa Lopez-Jarrin and Antonio Ferrey

The Path to Graduate School: Preparing to run the distance By Rachel Ramirez-Hammond


Jo McCulty, University Photography

Messages from the University’s Leadership Joseph A. Alutto Interim President, Interim Executive Vice President and Provost As the chief academic officer, I am pleased to welcome you and your families to The Ohio State University community. Ohio State is a wonderfully diverse, international university with amazing resources. We are large enough to provide an enormous and comprehensive array of excellent educational opportunities — more than 12,000 courses and 174 majors — including real-life research experiences with world-class faculty. In addition to our academic offerings, we have more than 800 student organizations in which you can be active and from which you can derive experiences to last a lifetime.

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We are large, it is true. Yet, we are also small enough to be a community that feels like a home away from home. You will find opportunities to connect not only with the University’s strong and growing Latin@ community but also with our local, national, and international community of faculty, students and staff from more than 130 countries around the world. I invite you and your families to explore our website at http://www.osu.edu to get a sense of the scope of opportunities that are here for you at The Ohio State University. And a special thanks to ¿Qué Pasa, OSU? for the outstanding work that it does throughout the year!

Summer Quarter 2007

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Provided by The Office of Minority Affairs

Kevin Fitzsimons

Messages from the University’s Leadership 4

Martha M. Garland Vice Provost and Dean Enrollment Services and Undergraduate Education

Mac A. Stewart Special Assistant to the President for Diversity and Vice Provost for Minority Affairs

The Ohio State University is extremely happy that you are reading this issue of ¿Qué Pasa, OSU?, our quarterly magazine directed to enrolled or prospective Hispanic/Latin@ students. We believe that Ohio State is a warm and welcoming institution, with an enormous range of academic options for talented students from across the United States and around the world. And we pride ourselves on being a university that values all kinds of diversity, knowing that preparation for life in the 21st century increasingly requires all of us to understand and value the contributions made by folks from a very wide range of backgrounds. We reinforce this commitment to diversity by encouraging all of our students to study in at least one program outside the United States and to become fluent in a non-English language (you may already have an advantage on this second goal!). Throughout this issue of ¿Qué Pasa, OSU?, you will learn of many of the programs that we support are designed to make students feel at home, no matter how far they have come to get here.

I am grateful to the staff members of ¿Qué Pasa, OSU?

The Ohio State University is a “Research I” institution, which means that our faculty are the scientists and scholars who are making discoveries and writing books that will dramatically influence the direction of civilization in the future. You will study with these professors, and you will have opportunities to work with them in labs and in libraries, so that you, too, will become discoverers of the future. Our expectations for our students are high. Our university slogan is “Do Something Great!” so when you enroll, plan to work hard. And then plan to accomplish wonderful things. We will believe in you, we will encourage you, and then we will have great pride in you as you go on to remarkable futures.

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

for helping to build a sense of community among our Hispanic/Latin@ students and personnel here at Ohio State. Thanks to their work, and that of many others, the numbers of students from this heritage is growing. Even better news is that retention and graduation rates are rising, so the number of Hispanic/Latin@ alumni increases with every commencement ceremony. Ohio State welcomes these changes, because we know that everyone benefits when diversity increases on our campuses. For more than 30 years our leadership has worked to support a course structure that would best prepare Ohio State students for success in the global community of the 21st century. We continue to build toward that objective, through scholarships; through mentoring, tutoring, and specialized advising programs; and through cultural programming that encourages a campus-wide dialogue on diversity. I hope that the many readers of this issue will participate with us in the Office of Minority Affairs as we focus on our diversity goals.


Provided by The Office of UA&FYE

Provided by The Office of Student Affairs

Mabel G. Freeman Assistant Vice President Undergraduate Admissions and First Year Experience

If you’re reading this, you are probably considering

I truly believe that The Ohio State University is a most remarkable place for learning not only because of our extensive academic and extracurricular opportunities but also because of our diverse community of faculty, staff, and students who share the expectation of success for each other.

whether Ohio State would be the right college for you. Let me suggest some reasons why it might be exactly the right place for you to continue your education. • Opportunities to succeed are limitless, which means there are enormous possibilities and lots of choices in academics, activities, organizations, experiences, and new friends.

While our national and international reputations continue to grow, we still understand that most important to our university are the people who come together everyday to make great things happen.

• It’s friendly and welcoming. Despite the size of the student body, it’s easy to make new friends and connections with other students in your classes, residence hall or student organizations. Faculty and staff are supportive and committed to your success. • Cultural and ethnic diversity are valued. There are Hispanic and Latin@ organizations, and numerous support staff, allies, major events, and several support offices where you can feel at home and share your culture with other students and members of the university community.

Our retention of freshmen returning for their second year in Autumn 2006 was a record high of 91.5 percent, indicative of a university that both attracts and supports bright and talented students. Our first-year students participate in small freshman seminars taught by our most distinguished faculty; take advantage of study abroad experiences and undergraduate research opportunities; identify internships and co-op experiences that lead directly to careers following graduation; and make friendships that will last a lifetime.

I hope you’ll seriously consider becoming a Buckeye. We’d love to have you join us!

http://quepasa.osu.edu

Ohio State…a great place to be! 

Messages from the University’s Leadership

Richard Hollingsworth Vice President Student Affairs

Summer Quarter 2007

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Graduates Achieve their Goals at OSU!

Spring 2007

Melissa Quintanilha

How OSU has helped you achieve your goals: All I have learned has helped me forge a solid foundation on which I will continue to build. I will take what OSU has given me and keep learning. Fabian plans to work in Washington D.C. for a year and then go to Switzerland to work in international relations.

Lia Lissette Letellier Luna Guayaquil, Ecuador Degree: B.S.H.E. in Textiles and Clothing

Faustino Ceballos Weslaco, Texas Degree: B.S. in Social Work

Most important academic achievement: Creating, through the University-Wide Council of Hispanic Organizations (UCHO), OSU’s first ever “Hispanics In Higher Education” conference. Samuel is currently working in student recruitment at OSU.

How OSU has helped you achieve your goals: The university atmosphere is very acceptable and it has great programs to get you through the multitude of problems that can stop you from getting a great education. Faustino plans to be a social worker in either Ohio or Texas.

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

How OSU has helped you achieve your goals: I took a break from my studies in 1998 and found many great changes upon returning to the OSU Columbus campus in 2006. Within the French & Italian Department, I saw the remodeling of Haggerty Hall, which offered the opportunity for all the language departments to be housed in one building. I enjoyed being surrounded by people who enjoyed conversations in their native or second language.

Luis Diez Fajardo, Puerto Rico Degree: Master in Business Administration

Melissa Quintanilha

Melissa Quintanilha

Sandra Margarita Patiño-Lemus Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico and Mansfield, Ohio Degree: B.A. in French

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A piece of advice for those considering OSU: OSU is an excellent university. There are so many ways you can get involved. Study hard and always get to know your professors. Lia plans to work as a fashion designer and later open her own fashion line.

Samuel Saldivar III Weslaco, Texas Degree: B.A. in English

Melissa Quintanilha

Melissa Quintanilha

Melissa Quintanilha

Fabian Jarrin Washington, D.C. Degree: B.S. in Business Administration

Your best memory of OSU: My two favorite memories would have to be my first game in Ohio Stadium and getting chills the first time I heard the OSU Marching Band playing “Hang On Sloopy” during Welcome Week. Luis plans to move to Orlando, Florida to start his career with an established industry leader.


Melissa Quintanilha

Andrea Medina Vallenilla Caracas, Venezuela Degree: B.A. in Economics and International Relations

A piece of advice for those considering OSU: OSU is the best university in the country. It is well rounded in academics and sports and will give you the best opportunities of your life. The environment on campus is positive and everyone wants to do well, so you want to keep up with everyone and do well too. James plans to work as a nurse and pursue a futher education in anesthesia.

A piece of advice for those considering OSU: Get involved!!! It is possible to work, go to school, and be involved with organizations. By getting involved, you have the opportunity to take on leadership roles. Elizabeth plans to attend graduate school in the area of higher education and student affairs.

A piece of advice for those considering OSU: Get to know your professors well, because they don’t only have experience in your field, but they can also help you find opportunities to achieve your dreams, get to know yourself better and figure out where you want to go in the future. My professors have really taught me that you have to work hard for what you want, and don’t let anyone ever tell you what you can’t do.

Melissa Quintanilha

Melissa Quintanilha

Melissa Quintanilha

Elizabeth Pages Beavercreek, Ohio Degree: B.S. in Biology

Melissa Quintanilha

Melissa Quintanilha

James Diaz Toledo, Ohio Degree: B.S. in Nursing

Lydia Letticia Saldivar Fremont, Ohio Degree: B.S.H.E. in Early Childhood Development How OSU has helped you achieve your goals: Graduating from OSU has really made me feel like I accomplished something big. If you would have told me four years ago I would be graduating in four years, married and with a family, I would have said, “No way, I can’t do that,” but being here at OSU has given me confidence in my abilities and has pushed me further than I thought I could ever go. Lydia plans to work in the area of early childhood education.

Luis Velazquez-Vargas Zamora, Mexico Degree: Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering

Samantha Martir Garcia Puerto Rico Degree: M.A. in Integrated Teaching and Learning

A piece of advice for those considering OSU: For those who are planning to attend OSU, I would tell them to have as many friends as they can. Having close friends is very important, especially during the difficult times and more important during the happy times. Although studying here can be stressful sometimes, it is good to know that you can count on them. For people like me, who came from a different country and do not have our family here, friends can be like our family.

How OSU has helped you achieve your goals: My main goal was to finish my M.A. in Education. My professors in the Department of Teaching and Learning have been of great help and encouragement. Since the beginning, they took into consideration and respect my background as a Puerto Rican. They also were very understanding with my pregnancy and the birth of my new child. A good advice for new students is not to be afraid to talk with your professors; they are of great help. Samantha plans to go back to Puerto Rico, teach, and complete a Ph.D. in the future. Continues on page 10

http://quepasa.osu.edu

Summer Quarter 2007

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Provided by OSU Departmetn of Athletics

Anthony Gonzalez: Off to the NFL with an OSU diploma in hand By Rachel Ramirez-Hammond Gonzalez thrills the crowd with one of many touchdowns.

Across the country, when many people think of Ohio State, the first thing that comes to their mind is, “Football!” It is sometimes easy to forget that the players we see on ESPN are also students, who face a number of challenges, demands, and pressures. Some successfully manage the pressure and excel, while others can’t handle it. ¿Qué Pasa, OSU? is proud to feature a true Ohio State success story, wide receiver Anthony Gonzalez, who graduates this year with a bachelor of arts in philosophy. Gonzalez is a sure handed, speedy receiver who specializes in clutch catches. Gonzalez became a household name to Ohio State fans after his acrobatic 26-yard catch set up the game-winning score with 37 seconds to play in the fall 2005 big game against rival University of Michigan in Michigan. His 2006 season was spectacular, with 49 receptions and a total of 723 yards, as Gonzalez played a critical role in Ohio State’s undefeated regular season. Gonzalez decided to pursue his dream of playing professional football, and was

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drafted in the first round of the NFL by the Super Bowl Champion Indianapolis Colts. Yet Anthony did not give up his academic goals to pursue his athletic ones. Gonzalez also earned first-team CoSIDA Academic All-America honors. In order to have these honors, a student must be a starter or important reserve, be nominated by his or her sports director and also have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.20. Gonzalez said, “Both school and athletics must be crucially important in order to excel at both. This is not unlike anything that people excel at in the world.” González hopes to attend law school someday, and is interested in labor and corporate law. Gonzalez’s father, Eduardo, came to the United States from Cuba in 1965, and his mother Jenna’s grandparents came to the United States from Germany. Anthony commented, “My heritage has always been a very important part of who I am and how I act. Our family is very proud of where we come from. ”At Ohio State,

his success on and off the field was a combination of the impact of many different people. Gonzalez said, “I don’t think you can attribute the development of a person to one individual. There have been many different people that have shaped my development here at OSU. These people include, but are not limited to, my entire family, my coaches, and teammates.” As to how he felt about his time at Ohio State, Gonzalez answered, “I have had a great experience, which I wouldn’t trade for anything in the world. I have gotten to do and see things that I never would have otherwise been able to do and see without Ohio State and the football team.” When asked about his legacy, Gonzalez stated, “I would always like to be known as a person who tried to figure out what was right and had the courage to follow through.” The ¿Qué Pasa, OSU? staff and the entire Buckeye Nation congratulate Anthony on his graduation and wish him the best in his NFL career and all of his future endeavors. ¡Buena suerte, Anthony! 


Benefits of Participating in the University Honors & Scholars Center Programs

As you learn more about the many opportunities available to students at The Ohio State University, we wanted to highlight some of our many programs offered through the University Honors & Scholars Center. Students who are members of these two distinct programs — the University Honors Program and the Ohio State Scholars Program — are motivated students who become actively involved in their college experiences both in-and-out of the classroom. There are many ways that you can become an active part of the opportunities made available through the University Honors & Scholars Center. Our students actively seek academic challenges, and there are a variety of courses that serve to expand your knowledge in a variety of disciplines. In addition to general courses offered at the university, the following are some examples of the courses available to you through the University Honors Program: Anthropology H202: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, Business H555: Introduction to International Business or Spanish H450: Introduction to the Study of Literature and Culture in Spanish. Many of our students are also active in undergraduate research. Students from all disciplines — from sciences to engineering, from business to humanities — are involved with undergraduate research. Many will participate in one of our largest events, the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum, where they have the opportunity to display and discuss their research with interested students, faculty and staff. Denman participants are also invited to apply to participate in our Research Exchange Program with the University of São Paulo (USP). Each year, students from Ohio State and USP travel to present their research at the other institution’s campus. In addition to academic pursuits, we en-

http://quepasa.osu.edu

courage our students to be active outside of the classroom in a variety of organizations, trips and activities that we offer through our office. One organization you may consider is Unity, our Honors & Scholars group for students interested in issues associated with diversity and multiculturalism. Students who are interested in community service find such opportunities in many of our class honor societies, as well as our Adopt-a-School Program. Our students also travel often, and have been to a variety of places, including Chicago and Washington, D.C., this year. International trips are also possible, as Honors students may participate in our London Honors Program, and Scholars students have been to places such as Bolivia, Mexico and Senegal! Two new short-term study programs are planned for next year, one that will go to Spain and Portugal, and the other is a service-learning trip to Mexico. Members of the University Honors Program and Ohio State Scholars Program typically come from the top 20 percent of their high school class, and have standardized test scores of at least a 27ACT or 1,220SAT. Begin to think about what interests you, and what you might like to become a part of as you begin your college search. Please visit our website at http:// www.honors-scholars.osu.edu for more information about our programs and application processes. You can also

Provided by Brian M. Orefice

By Brian M. Orefice

An OSU student explains his research at the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum.

The Denman Undergraduate Research Forum — where students have the opportunity to display and discuss their research with interested students, faculty and staff — is just one of the many opportunities available through the University Honors & Scholars Center. schedule a campus visit to talk to some students, faculty and staff involved with our programs. We look forward to working with you in your college search process, and hope you will consider our programs as a way to enhance your college experience. For more information on the University Honors programs, please contact Maria Gabriela Vega at vega.43@ osu.edu. For more information on the Ohio State Scholars Programs, please contact Armando Gaytan at gaytan.3@osu.edu. 

Summer Quarter 2007

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Graduates Achieve their Goals at OSU! Spring 2007 Continued from page 7

Melissa Quintanilha

Humberto Herrera Plascencia Ciudad Juárez, Mexico Degree: M.S. in Industrial and Systems Engineering How OSU has helped you achieve your goals: OSU is a great university and it definitively help me to grow up ethically, morally and professionally. OSU gave me the confidence of knowing that I’m able to reach any goal I want to.

Melissa Quintanilha

Samuel Patiño Mansfield, Ohio Degree: B.S. in Mechanical Engineering Your future plans: Work for Tyco Electronics Hartman Division in Mansfield, marry my wonderful girlfriend, Fabiana, and start a family.

Melissa Quintanilha

María del Carmen Arata Cockburn Lima, Peru Degree: M.A. in Latin American Literatures and Cultures Most important academic achievement:One of the most challenging experiences was to prepare and present papers for graduate conferences around the United States. Now I feel comfortable with cultural studies’ theories and I am able to use critical thinking to understand the current Latin American globalized reality.

Melissa Quintanilha

Vivianne Romero La Paz, Bolivia Degree: M.A in Latin American Literatures and Cultural Studies

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¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

Your future plans: After graduating I will be working hard in a non-governmental organization in my country, with many women who live in poor neighborhoods in Bolivia. I am very excited about this and planning to come back to see the new library, once the renovation is finished. One of my favorite places to study was there, in the last floor looking over the oval through the window and noticing the small people walking on the green rug. 

Bachelor’s Degrees Name Aguila, Francisco Rafael Alicea, Jennifer Marie Andorka, Michael Joseph Arroyo, Amelia Frances Bolano, Ilsa Onix Bozzolo, Carla Burrows, Carolyn Michelle Calderon, Jose Gilberto Canter, Christian A Canter, Julius B Castillo, Francisco Enrique Castillo, Jose Manuel Ceballos, Faustino Chavez, Marguerith Lucia Chavez, Mercedes Chiarappa, Rachelle Marie Christensen, Tanya Marie Cleary, Patrick F Collins, Jeffrey Max Contini, Anthony M Costello, Elena Mary Costigan, Elen Cristina De Leon, Claudia Yvette De Los Santos, Paul E

Citizenship US US US US US US US US US US US US US Peru US US

Degree B.S.P.S. B.A. B.A. B.S.H.E. B.S.C.S.E. B.A. B.S.Nurs. B.A. B.A. B.A. B.A.Jour. B.A.Jour. B.S.Soc.Work B.S.Bus.Adm. B.A. B.S.Bus.Adm.

Major PHARMSCI CRIMINOL PSYCH TXTL&CLO CS&E SOCIOL NURSING INT STDS PSYCH ECON COMM COMM SOC WORK HUMN RES ENGLISH INTL BUS

US US US US US US US US

B.A. B.S.Mat.Sc.Eng. B.A. B.A. B.A. B.S. B.A. B.A.

ENGLISH MATSC&EN ENGLISH POLIT SC ECON ECON POLIT SC HISTORY

Dialbert, Andrea Jo Diaz, James V Duenas, Sandy Duval, Daniel Alexander Elam, Valerie Michelle Escalera, Julie Anne Estrada, Eric E Gallegos, Jessica Monique Galvan, John August Garcia, Marco Antonio Garcia, Tina Jane Garcia, Vincent Michael

US US Cuba US US US US US

B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S.Nurs. B.S. B.S. B.S.Al.Hth.Prof B.A. B.S.H.E. B.Art Ed.

FINANCE NURSING MICRBIOL MICRBIOL H S PROG POLIT SC FM RES M ART EDUC

US Mexico US US

B.A. B.A. B.S.Agr. B.S.H.E.

ECON PSP ANIM SCI FM RES M

Gardner, Jeremy Lyle Gill, Nicole M Gomez, Jairo Alejandro Gomez, Elena Gabrielle

US US Colombia US

B.S.H.E. B.S.H.E. B.S.E.C.E. B.A.

FM RES M HDFS ECE GEOG

Gonzalez, Anthony E Gonzalez, Frankie

US US

B.A. B.A.

PHILOS CRIMINOL

Gonzalez, Kadi Marie Hammond, Eric Aaron Harris, David Scott Holmes, Kristyn Leticia Hutson, Bryan Allen Inoa, Ana Pamela Iturri, Julio Mauricio Jarrin, Fabian Elias Kallile, Michael Edward Kaney, Adam John Keck, Ana M Killilea, Rachell Lynn Kuhn, Matthew Charles Langhurst, Vanessa M Letellier, Lia Lissette Lomeli, Olivia Lopez, Sandra Catalina Lopez-Mora, Marilyn Luna, Branden Walter

US US US US US Domin Rep. Bolivia US US US US US US US Ecuador US Mexico US US

B.S.Nurs. B.S.H.E. B.S. B.S.Agr. B.A. B.A. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S. B.A. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S.Soc.Work B.S.Ch.E. B.A. B.S.H.E. B.A.Jour. B.S.H.E. B.F.A. B.S.Al.Hth.Prof

NURSING HDFS ECON ANIM SCI PSYCH INT STDS MARKETNG INTL BUS MEDICINE POLIT SC INTL BUS SOC WORK CHEM ENG COMP STD TXTL&CLO JOURNAL TXTL&CLO DANCE RESPTHER


Malacara, Nichole Marie Malone, Kathleen Mata, Silvia Veronica Mata, Diana Veronica Mckinney, Ashley Nichole Medina Vallenill, Andrea M Meierling, Christopher U Mejias, Nicole Michelle Mericle, James-David D Montes, Andre Gilbert Navarro, Monique Lisette Nieto, Danius Fernanda Ocasio, Jose A Ordonez, Daisy Pages, Elizabeth Pankiw, Jonathan Josue Patino, Samuel Patino-Lemus, Sandra M Pedrozo, Angela Cristina Pena, Caryl Anne Perez, Luke Matthew Ramirez, Joseph D Ramirez, Paul Ramos, Javier Julian Rentas, Tamika Laurie Reyes, Andres Eduardo Richards, Angela Cristina Rodriguez, Anthony J Rodriguez, Desiree Roosmalen, Christopher A Ross, Kelly Lance Rubinstein, Michael Eric Sandoval, Lydia Letticia Santiago, Raquel Vanessa Santos, Eduardo A Schachner, Joshua A Schneider, Andrew Paul Sepulveda, Ruben A Sprague, Susan J Staiger, Branden Clay Steinbach, Victoria Stevens, Samuel P Stier, Florencia Thornton, Anna Nichole Torres, Michael Anthony Torres, Rosa Maria Unda, Maria Eugenia Unterbrink, Roxanne M Valentin, Charles Damien Velasquez, Gilbert Joseph Velazco, Timothy Kyle Velez, Louisa M Viggers, Talia Mercedes Wilkey-Escobar, Vanesa M Williams, Michael James Young-Sharp, Brandi N Zinn, Bruno Zuniga, Rachelle Coreen

US US Mexico US US Venezuela US US US US US US US US US US US Mexico US US US US US US US US US US US US

B.A. B.A. B.S.H.E. B.S. B.S.Dent.Hyg B.A. B.S.Design B.A. B.F.A. B.S.P.S. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.A. B.S.W.E. B.A. B.S. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S.M.E. B.A. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S.Agr. B.A. B.A. B.S.Agr. B.S.E.C.E. B.S.M.E. B.S. B.S.Nurs. B.S.Arch. B.S.Soc.Work B.A.

ENGLISH COMM HDFS BIOLOGY DENT HYG INT STDS IND DSN PSYCH ART PHARM D LOGISMGT POLIT SC WELD ENG SPANISH BIOLOGY LOGISMGT MECH ENG FRENCH ACCTING FDBUSMGT POLIT SC ECON AGBUS&AE ECE MECH ENG MOL GEN NURSING ARCH SOC WORK PSP

US US US US US US US US US US US US Argentina US US US Venezuela US US US US US Mexico US US US US US

B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S. B.S.H.E. B.S.Al.Hth.Prof B.S.Bus.Adm. B.A. B.S. B.A. B.S.Design B.A. B.S. B.S.E.C.E. B.S.Ed. B.S.H.E. B.A. B.S.H.E. B.A. B.S.Soc.Work B.S.H.E. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.S.Arch. B.S. B.A. B.F.A. B.S.Bus.Adm. B.A. B.S. B.A.

MARKETNG MATH HDFS H S PROG FINANCE COMM BIOLOGY CRIMINOL VSUL DSN CRIMINOL EVOL&ECO ECE TECHED&T HUMN NTR HISTORY HDFS PSYCH SOC WORK FM RES M INFO SYS ARCH BIOLOGY INT STDS ART MARKETNG PSYCH ECON SPANISH

Master’s Degrees Name

Citizenship

Degree

Major

Acuna, Alejandra

Chile

M.S.

H&CS

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Andueza, Patricia Lorena

Spain

M.A.

SPAN&POR

Arata, Maria

Peru

M.A.

SPAN&POR

Asseo, Lorna Kristine

US

M.Arch.

ARCH

Chamorro, Pilar

Spain

M.A.

SPAN&POR

Diez, Luis L

US

M.B.A.

MBA

Figueiredo, Juliana Peboni

Brazil

M.S.

VET CLIN

Finkey, Joel Michael

US

M.B.A.

MBA

Flores, Alina

Mexico

M.Bus.Log.Eng.

BUS LOG

Gambina, Federico

Argentina

M.S.

MATSC&EN

Harless, Monique A

US

M.S.W.

SOC WORK

Hernandez, Eloy Ricardo

US

M.H.A.

HSMP

Hunt, Aaron W

US

M.B.A.

EMBA

Kahn, Jessica Aileen

US

M.Mus.

MUSIC

Martir, Samantha

US

M.A.

EDU T&L

Murillo, Susana

Bolivia

M.C.R.P.

C&R PLAN

Pagan, Samuel W

US

M.B.A.

MBA

Parsons, Ronnie George

US

M.Arch.

ARCH

Pitts, Candice Augusta

Belize

M.A.

ENGLISH

Quiros, Alfredo M

Costa Rica

M.A.

EDU PAES

Robles, April Denise

US

M.H.A.

HSMP

Rodriguez, Pedro Leonardo

US

M.B.A.

MBA

Romero, Vivianne Elizabeth

Bolivia

M.A.

SPAN&POR

Sandoval, Juana Rachel

US

M.C.R.P.

C&R PLAN

Santiago, Hector Ricardo

US

M.S.

NAT RES

Saucedo, Michael Lee

US

M.B.A.

MBA

Soto, Armando Renan

US

M.S.

PHARMACY

Toro, David Radames

US

M.Mus.

MUSIC

Tudi, Reddy Ashok

US

M.B.A.

EMBA

Vazquez, Javier Orlando

US

M.S.

PHARMACY

Zapata, Katherine Patricia

Venezuela

M.Occ.Ther.

OCC THER

Doctorate Degrees Name Alpizar, Carlos Andres

Citizenship Costa Rica

Degree Ph.D.

Major AED ECON

Amaral, Luiz Alexandre M

Brazil

Ph.D.

SPAN&POR

Bartell, Cesar Raul

US

O.D.

OPTOMTRY

Cruz, Claudia Esther

US

J.D.

LAW

Dias E Souza, Menira B De L

Brazil

Ph.D.

VET PREV

Festing, Maria Helen

US

Ph.D.

MOL GEN

Galdamez, Juan Evenor

US

O.D.

OPTOMTRY

Guzman, Jorge Enrique

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Guzman, Maria Del Ma

US

D.V.M.

VM COLL

Helmick, Ryan Alexander

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Jones, Angela Marie

US

Pharm.D.

PHARM D

Lamb, Jarom Frederick

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Lebario, Anthony

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Martinez, Loren Lynn

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Merolla, Andrew Joseph

US

Ph.D.

COMM

Nieves-Ramos, Ricardo F

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Ochoa, Jorge Alberto

US

J.D.

LAW

Perez, Michael R

US

J.D.

LAW

Ramirez, Carmen Hernandez

US

Ph.D.

PHARMACY

Readinger, Laura Graciela

US

J.D.

LAW

Rosario, Carmen Marie

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Snavely, Adam Howard

US

M.D.

MEDICINE

Torres, Audrey Hortencia

Venezuela

Ph.D.

VET PREV

Valdez-Balderas, Daniel

Mexico

Ph.D.

PHYSICS

Vorys, Yolanda Cecile

US

J.D.

LAW

Williams, Jeffrey Slaney Jr

US

O.D.

OPTOMTRY

Summer Quarter 2007

11


A Thousand Miles: A Latino alumnus’ journey from OSU to Korea

Provided by Fidel Cruz

By Fidel Cruz

Fidel Cruz

When I was a young boy growing up in a working-class town on the south side of Lorain, Ohio, in the shadows of the National Tube Company, I remember lying in the grass in our back yard on a late fall afternoon telling our family dog, “When I get old enough, I’m gonna go far away.” I wasn’t quite sure where I was going to go or even how I was going to get there, but I knew that I would go. I came from a broken home, as did many of my friends, from parents who earned a modest income and did the best they could with what they had. I can recall as a student at Southview High, seeing my town literally falling apart. The steel mill was laying people off by the hundreds, unemployment was high and options were even fewer than before for most Latin@s. Many of us were not finishing school and even less attended institutions of higher learning. There almost seemed to be a thick economic pall that hung over the city, like it was stuck in a decade’s long stupor. This only reinforced my resolve to find something “different” and to go far away. My way out was simple — study. I enjoyed literature and history most; they opened a new world for me. Soon, all I could think about were the places I wanted to go and that, like a comfortable pair of gloves that had grown too small for me, I would have

12

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

to leave behind everything that was secure and familiar. My time at The Ohio State University only fueled my desire to experience more. I now had friends from Nigeria, Philippines, Japan, and Qatar and from most of the states across this country. I met Muslims, Jews and agnostics and all of these people and their cultures and ideas helped me realize that the world was just as large as I had expected. Literature became a trusted friend and I tried to learn what I could from it and tried to apply it to my life. However, like everything in life, there are hurdles and we have to do our best to overcome them. Sometimes we fail, but with each successful completion of a hurdle, there are opportunities. After about nine years in Columbus, I took a teaching job in Seoul, South Korea, teaching composition and to learn more about Asian culture. It was a chance to get a better perspective of myself. I was immediately happy with my new life. I was new so everything was a learning experience; and did I ever learn! Looking at the Korean alphabet, Hangul, for the first

“I suppose if you never leave home, you will never understand the broader perspective of life that transcends all menial things.”

time made me realize that the transition would not be easy. I had never seen characters like that before, but I had to try to become familiar with them. Over time, it got better. Not perfect, but better. Whenever I meet a Korean for the first time, they always have that same look on their face when I introduce myself. A look of shock, not because they like the way I speak, but my name. There is no real Korean equivalent for the sound of “f”. So, at first many Koreans will call me, “Pidel.” It is just something I’ve had to get use to. I was fortunate that my skills in writing helped me to secure positions in research and development of English textbooks that gave me the opportunity to write more. The more I wrote the more valuable I became to my company. Through networking, I began doing freelance editing and revising for Korea’s oldest and largest travel magazine. I would write about hotels throughout the major cities in Asia, Beijing, Singapore, Shanghai, Cebu, Hanoi, Phuket. Now, as a content editor for a Korean English education on-line company, my life is more secure than ever before. Seoul, a city of over 10 million people, seemed like an unlikely place for me to call home. I was originally supposed to go to Japan, however there was a position available in Korea sooner, and I thought that I could simply travel there when my assignment here was complete. But, just like all the best laid plans, things change, and I do believe that all things happen for a reason. Being an expatriate is not easy. Language and customs do not come quickly; they take time. Koreans are generally very accommodating by nature. They are very proud people and family oriented, molded by thousands of years of Confucianism, which dictates how you speak and address your elders, equals and juniors. It is common that parents live with their


Provided by Fidel Cruz

children when they get older and meals are best had with family and friends. This reminded me very much of my Latino culture. At first, there were many times where people would stare at me. Many Koreans seem confused when I told them that I’m from the United States (mi-guk); they think Americans are tall, blond, and white. All the things I’m not. Now, I’m not sure if it’s just that I have been here so long and do not notice the stares of curiosity anymore or maybe, they’ve seen me so often, that I’m just a part of the changing scenery. However there are still those who have questions for me. As a result, my life here is two-fold, as a Mexican-American and as a writer, the former causing confusion in this very homogenous culture, the latter, the instrument from which I’m able to explain away that confusion. After almost

five years I’m still explaining. Koreans do not really understand that I can claim two nationalities; I am an American of Mexican decent, shaped by the pull of two cultures, “Life in the Hyphen,” as Ilvan Stavans wrote. Then there is the question of home. Some Latin@s say that I’ve forgotten what it is like to be Hispanic — that I’ve forgotten La Raza. However if they listen to what I write about, they will be able to understand that being Hispanic is not something you can simply forget or do away with. Have I really forgotten my culture when everything I do or write is a reflection of it? Just because you leave the nest does not mean that you forget the food that nurtured you. Just because your home is thousands of miles from where it used to be does not mean that you

do not ache for it. I suppose if you never leave home, you will never understand the broader perspective of life that transcends all menial things. Now as I make a brief reflection of my life, where I am from, where I am now and where I am going, I know that they have all been steps on a continuous journey; ever forward to someplace “different.” Confucius said that even a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. I am still taking those steps in life, taking chances and I hope that you do to. You never know where those steps will take you and all the knowledge that you will discover along the way. Who knows, maybe one day our paths will cross, and if that is the case, then I cannot wait until I see you. Annyeonghi kaseyo. 

The Changdeokgung Palace is set within a large park in Seoul, South Korea. It is one of the “Five Grand Palaces” built by the kings of the Joseon Dynasty. The literal meaning of Changdeokgung is “Palace of Prospering Virtue”.

http://quepasa.osu.edu

Summer Quarter 2007

13


Becoming an Advocate for Higher Education By Jefferson Blackburn-Smith and Tally Hart

stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu)

Studies by organizations like the Lumina Foundation increasingly show that students at all age levels understand the importance of going to college, and how a college education will dramatically increase their lifetime earnings and happiness. These studies also show that low income and first generation college students, or students whose parents have never graduated from college, don’t understand the process of getting to college. For many of these individuals, the only experiences they have with college students are athletes, and they incorrectly believe that someone will knock on their door one day with both a letter of admission to a university and the academic scholarship to make college affordable. What can you do to help these students? Become an advocate for higher education! You might be a parent, a guidance counselor, a teacher, a mentor, an aunt or an uncle, or a concerned adult who knows a young person and wants to help open doors to a future with a college education. It doesn’t matter whether you have been to college or not; you can have a positive impact on a student’s life by helping them

14

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

understand the college search process. In fact, first generation college students, again and again, tell that their journey to a degree began with one person inspiring them to go to college: a teacher, a grandparent, a coach or a family friend. These mentors helped the students understand that going to college was possible, gave them some direction on how to get there, and the students did the rest. So where to start? Academics Be an Advocate Tip #1: Tell students to push themselves to take challenging classes Studies show that students understand that earning good grades is very important in getting into college, but that they don’t understand what courses they need to take. The simple fact is that the more rigorous curriculum a student takes, the better prepared for college they will be, and the better prepared for work they will be if they choose to go directly into the work force. Decisions that students make as early as middle school can have an impact on whether or not they are academically prepared for college. Here are some important recommendations: If the student has the option of taking Algebra I and/or a foreign language in the 8th grade, encourage them to do so. This will allow them to take the highest-level math available in high school. The minimum number of courses students should take in high school include: • 4 years of college prep English • 4 years of college prep Math, through pre-Calculus or Calculus • 3 years of college prep science (with a lab) including: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. 4 years are preferred. • 3 years of the same foreign language (4 years preferred.) • 3 years of social sciences • 1 year of visual or performing arts

Students taking this rigorous curriculum will be better prepared for college or work. Students should also take the highestlevel courses in which they can succeed, including Honors, or AP and IB, if available. The College Search Be an Advocate Tip # 2: Help students find the college that is the right fit Studies also show that students don’t understand the process of searching for a college. A good mentor can point them in the right direction early enough to make a huge difference. Perhaps the single most common problem low income and first generation students have is that they wait until their senior year of high school to begin looking for a college. Students can start their search online by identifying schools that offer the right academic programs and meet other needs, like size of student body, distance from home and cost, by using a number of college search engines. A few examples can be found at: http://www.collegenet.com, http://www. act.org and http://www.collegeboard.com. Students should begin as early as possible, even in 9th or 10th grade. Although many colleges, including community colleges and open admission four year colleges, don’t require ACT or SAT scores for admission, more selective schools usually do, and students should plan to test as early as possible so they have the option of testing a second time. Test scores usually improve on subsequent tests because the student becomes more comfortable with the testing format. Also, students can prepare for the test with free resources offered on the websites of both testing organizations. Both organizations offer test fee waivers to low-income students. Guidance Counselors Be an Advocate Tip #3: Help students find information Many students have said they wouldn’t


Deadlines Be an Advocate Tip #4: Help students meet deadlines for both admissions and financial aid Perhaps the number one challenge low income and first generation students face is missing application and financial aid deadlines. Every college has its own application, scholarship and financial aid deadlines, and because of the numbers of students applying, often can’t help students who miss deadlines. Please encourage your students to make a college search calendar, and to list all of the appropriate deadlines for any schools in which they have interest, so they can be sure they will not miss anything important. See the college search timeline that accompanies this article for more information. 

stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu)

think of going to see their high school counselors because they associate counselors with being in trouble. High school counselors are often excellent sources of information about the college search process, financial aid and deadlines. Additionally, many communities have college access programs that provide additional college process guidance (and scholarships!) to students in the community. Be sure to encourage your student to check out these valuable resources. The Ohio State Access website (http://www.osu.edu/access/) has tips and recordings that may help students and advocates understand the process.

Just like teachers, you can play an important role in a young person’s future.

College Search Timeline 9th grade

12th grade

• Be sure you are on top of your high school courses. Take your first college

• Don’t let up on your academics! Your senior year grades are very im-

prep English, Math (Algebra I or Geometry), Science (Unified Science) and

portant.

foreign language.

• Meet with your guidance counselor early in the year to understand his/her timeline for sending your transcript to the colleges to which

10th grade

you are applying.

• Be sure you are on top of your high school courses. Take your second

• Know your deadlines. Some deadlines could be as early as Novem-

college prep English, Math (Geometry or Algebra II), Science (Biology,

ber 1.

Chemistry, or Physics) and foreign language.

• Apply to all of your schools by winter break or earlier.

• Take the PLAN or PSAT if offered in your high school.

• The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is available in

• Spend some time online looking at a college search website

January. Check each school’s FAFSA deadline. Don’t wait to hear if

• Visit a local college campus

you are admitted before filing your FAFSA. If your taxes are not complete, you can estimate your income for the FAFSA. Missing deadlines

11th grade

means missed financial aid!

• Be sure you are on top of your high school courses. Take your third

• Visit your final schools (again if need be) to make your decision.

college prep English, Math (Algebra II or Pre-Calculus), Science (Biol-

• Pay your acceptance fee/deposit by the national deadline of May 1.

ogy, Chemistry, or Physics) and foreign language. • Take the PSAT if offered in your high school.

Have a great college career, and become a mentor for another stu-

• Plan to take the ACT or SAT in April or June. See your counselor if you

dent in your high school!

need a fee waiver. • Plan to visit during the summer at least one college to which you want to apply.

http://quepasa.osu.edu

Summer Quarter 2007

15


Value and Investment: Choices beyond cost in the college selection process By Kathleen Roca and Jefferson Blackburn-Smith

Many students and parents experience “sticker shock” when they begin the college selection process. The dollar figures representing the cost of education can be quite daunting, but they are also often misleading and incomplete. When choosing a college, families need to look beyond cost to understand the true value of attending one institution over another. For example, what is the real value of attending The Ohio State University? All students attend college with specific outcomes in mind. Most students (and their parents) want to know that the college they select will give the student a competitive edge when they move into their career after graduation. Other students want to know that they will be prepared to move on to graduate or professional school, or that they will be able to compete for prestigious post graduate scholarships and awards. And some students want to know that their education will allow them to better understand the world in which they live, regardless of their career goals. Does Ohio State give students a competitive edge in achieving these outcomes? Yes, Ohio State does. The combination of academic opportunity, of out-of the classroom experiences that apply classroom learning in real world environments, and of Ohio State tradition and spirit create an educational experience that few other schools can match. Ohio State University offers the breadth of opportunity (academic, experiential and social) to help students reach their goals. Many Ohio State academic programs are nationally ranked, and our faculty do not just teach information, they create it. Often Ohio State faculty are using what they learned in their research to enhance the teaching in their

16

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

classrooms. Ohio State has the classroom and laboratory infrastructure to provide students with excellent learning environments. Ohio State will help the student learn how to connect what happens in the classroom with what happens outside of the classroom to give the student a competitive advantage. Students apply what they learn in the classroom in real world situations through research, internships and study abroad. They learn leadership, team work and how to collaborate both in the classroom and in student organizations. They learn how to navigate complexity through living, learning and working on a campus that is a microcosm of the real world. Ohio State creates a network of alumni living across the world who share the spirit and tradition of Ohio state. These are the mentors, friends and teachers who will help students connect their educational experience to their goals. The network of Ohio State literally extends around the globe and is present on all seven continents. It is the people of Ohio State who will ultimately make the most difference in the lives of our students. In this way, you can see that the value of the Ohio State experience is about much more than the cost of attending. So when deciding where to enroll, make sure the true value of the experience, and how that experience will give you a competitive edge, is included with the dollars and cents part of the decision. Wherever you chose to enroll, the cost of college may appear daunting, so financial aid is available to assist with the cost of education. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will determine your financial aid eligibility at OSU. This

form produces a figure called the Expected Family Contribution (EFC), which is the amount you and your family will be expected to contribute toward your educational expenses. You can determine your own financial need by subtracting your EFC from the total cost of education at Ohio State.

Cost of Education Expected Family Contribution (EFC) _______________________________ = Financial Need

Our Federal Work Study program allows students to gain work experience while simultaneously providing funding for educational costs. There are also scholarships, grants and loans to help bridge the gap between your personal resources and university expenses. At a minimum, all students qualify for a federal student loan. So, when you are comparing costs between institutions, be sure to look at the big picture and determine what you are really getting for your money. College is expensive. Ohio State is expensive. But don’t let a scholarship offer from another school sway your decision. Chances are they cannot provide the same educational, extracurricular and professional benefits that Ohio State can offer. We simply give students way more bang for their buck — and the diploma you receive from us carries a national reputation. A college education is an investment — an investment of your dollars and an investment in your future. The institution you select should maximize both your money and your future potential. 


Valor e Inversión: Opciones más allá del costo en el proceso de selección de una universidad Por Kathleen Roca y Jefferson Blackburn-Smith

Muchos estudiantes y padres se dan una gran sorpresa al empezar el proceso de escoger una universidad, particularmente en lo que se refiere al costo. El costo de una educación universitaria puede ser muy intimidante, no solamente por las cifras presentadas sino también porque la información puede ser incompleta o engañosa. Al comparar universisdades, las familias necesitan ver más allá de las cifras monetarias para así poder entender el valor verdadero de asistir a una institución. Por ejemplo, ¿cuál es el valor de asistir a The Ohio State University? La mayoría de estudiantes tienen sus metas específicas al matricularse en la universidad; ellos y sus familias quieren saber si la universidad que escogieron proveerá una ventaja competitiva en la carrera que quieren seguir. Otros estudiantes una preparación excelente para continuar con estudios de postgrado y para competir por becas prestigiosas. Hay aún otros estudiantes que buscan una educación mas global que les permita entender mejor el mundo en que viven, sin considerar metas profesionales específicas. ¿Ofrece Ohio State una ventaja competitiva a sus estudiantes para que logren sus metas? Definitivamente. La combinación de oportunidades académicas, experiencias fuera del aula aplicables al mundo real, y la tradición y el espíritu presente a través de una red externa de ex alumnos de Ohio State crean una experiencia educativa que muy pocas universidades pueden igualar. Ohio State ofrece una variedad de oportunidades académicas, sociales, y de experiencias prácticas que permiten a los estudiantes alcanzar sus objetivos. Muchos de los programas académicos de Ohio State están entre los mejores del país, y nuestros profesores no solamente diseminan información, sino que la crean. Muy comunmente los profesores en Ohio State utilizan lo que apren-

http://quepasa.osu.edu

den de sus investigaciones para enriquecer el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje en las aulas. Ohio State tiene la infraestructura de aulas y laboratorios para ofrecer a sus estudiantes ambientes de educación excelentes. Ohio State ayuda a sus estudiantes a conectar lo que ocurre en el aula con lo que ocurre fuera de ella, dándoles así una ventaja competitiva. Los estudiantes implementan lo que aprenden en el aula en situaciones de la vida real, a través de investigación, pasantías y estudio en el extranjero. Ellos aprenden liderazgo, trabajo de equipo y desenvolvimiento efectivo tanto en el aula como en su participación en organizaciones estudiantiles. Al vivir, aprender y trabajar en un campus que es un microcosmo del mundo entero, los estudiantes aprenden a resolver situaciones complejas que encontrarán en un mundo global. Además, Ohio State tiene una red de exalumnos muy amplia en prácticamente todos los rincones del mundo; estos comparten el espíritu y tradición de la universidad. Los exalumnos son los mentores, amigos y maestros que ayudarán a los estudiantes a conectar su experiencia educativa con sus metas. La red de Ohio State literalmente se extiende alrededor del globo y está presente en siete continentes. La familia de Ohio State es la que, últimamente, tiene el mayor impacto en la vida de nuestros estudiantes. De esta forma, al considerar el valor de una experiencia en Ohio State, hay que mirar mucho mas allá del costo. Al decidir dónde matricularse, asegúrese de que considera el verdadero valor de esa experiencia, y cómo ésta experiencia le dará una ventaja competitiva en su futuro. Donde sea que usted escoja matricularse, el costo de ir a la universidad puede parecer exorbitante. Por eso hay ayuda financiera disponible y mecanismos para determinar como cubrir estos costos. La Solicitud Gratu-

ita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes (FAFSA) determinará su elegibilidad con respecto a la ayuda financiera en Ohio State. Este formulario genera un número llamado la Contribución Familiar Esperada (EFC). El EFC es la suma que se espera que usted y su familia provean para cubrir los gastos universitarios. Usted puede determinar su necesidad financiera substrayendo su EFC del costo total de su educación en Ohio State. Costo de la Educación Contribución Familiar Esperada (EFC) ___ ________________________________ = Necesidad Financiera

El programa Federal de Trabajo Estudiantil permite a estudiantes obtener experiencia laboral al mismo tiempo que provee financiamiento para cubrir parte de los costos universitarios. También existen becas y préstamos para ayudarle a cubrir la diferencia entre los recursos personales y los gastos universitarios. Como mínimo, todos los estudiantes califican para obtener un préstamo federal. Entonces, al comparar costos entre instituciones, asegúrese que considera estos factores y las ofertas que cada institución ofrece. No se deje llevar solamente por la oferta de una beca; considere los beneficios que obtendrá por su dinero. Es muy posible que otra institución no pueda ofrecer los mismos beneficios educativos, extracurriculares y profesionales que Ohio State ofrece. En síntesis, nosotros ofrecemos un valor excelente por el costo. El diploma de Ohio State tiene una gran reputación nacional e internacional. La educación universitaria es una inversión — una inversión de su dinero, una inversión para su futuro. Esperamos que esta información le sea útil para tomar sus decisiones y cumplir sus objetivos. 

Summer Quarter 2007

17


From the Bottom 10% to Ohio State Faculty: Professor Manuel Martínez’ story

Provided by Manuel Martínez

By Manuel Martínez

Mi Experiencia

Manuel Martínez giving a talk at Ohio State in the spring of 2006.

18

As a faculty member of OSU I was asked to write “Mi experiencia” for the summer issue of ¿Qué Pasa, OSU?, which is prepared for Hispanic/ Latin@ high school seniors who are getting ready to go to college. I am sharing my experience with those who are going to make a difference in the future of this country, their community, for their people and their families. I remember a sociologist, a colleague of mine a few years ago, telling me that I was a sociological anomaly. He said that I was a “statistical miracle.” A one in a million coming out of the barrio, he said. I dare say that you’re each a statistical miracle. See, according to the sociologists out there, the first-generation, working class, minority student is more than likely going to fail. He or she, say the numbers people, doesn’t have the support groups, the mentors, the guidance. We’re prone to all the temptations and are “at risk” for falling into the pitfalls that have claimed so many of our friends and

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

relatives. But somehow you are making it — they’ll say. It’s a mystery. But we know better than that. Those students who are ready to continue on to college know that somewhere along the line, we have to make a decision — we have to decide that we are not going to let the obstacles keep us on the outside looking in. By the grace of God, and the encouragement by a teacher or two, or the words of our mothers or fathers, or a tia or tio, or a grandparent, we figured out that if we keep moving forward we’ll get “inside” — we’ll gain access. I’m going to get autobiographical on you right now. I’m going to give you the two instances which determined my path to this point, that taught me to keep on moving forward. The person in my life that gave me the encouragement and guidance that I needed was not an educated woman. She could barely read or write. She didn’t go past the third grade. She spent her entire childhood and much of her adulthood as a migrant worker in south Texas and the Midwest, living in a tent, moving from town to town. Her mother died when she was nine and as the eldest she had to take care of her five brothers and sisters and her father. My grandmother, Maria Martínez, used to call me on the phone when I was in grade school to ask me how to spell simple words or even numbers so that she could write out a check. But my grandmother was a proud woman, indomitable, with a spirit that was never broken. Even when she broke her hip at the age of 68, she got up as soon as she could, learned to use a cane, and get this —

went back to work. She was tough as they come and she was strict with me. I lived with her for two years when I was only six. My grandmother never let me miss a day of school. She knew the value of education. She also knew that in her day, as in mine, there was a fair amount of racism in the school system. On my first day of school, I couldn’t speak English. So I was segregated. My pal Rudy and I had to sit in the corner by ourselves and watch the other kids learn. Even though our school was in the heart of the Mexican side of town, there were no bilingual programs. So we sat there six or seven hours just watching. On the second day of school, my friend Rudy, bored and tired, fell asleep at his desk. Our teacher, Ms. Kraus, came up behind him with a yardstick and struck him in the back to wake him up. Splatt!!! Right across that boy’s t-shirt clad back. Ms. Kraus didn’t know how to speak Spanish, but she could communicate when she wanted to, and what she taught me that day, was that I wasn’t welcome, that I was going to be excluded; that I didn’t know the rules, that it might be better for me to give up. And you know what, many such as me did. Less than 50 percent of Mexican American males on San Antonio’s West Side, where I grew up, finish high school, and that’s today! The number that enter college and graduate is much less than that. So Kraus’s lesson was learned by many of my schoolmates. Needless to say, I didn’t want to go back to school. The next morning I pretended to have a stomachache. My grandmother, she didn’t let me get away with it. She sent me back everyday. But each day, I hated it worse and worse. I’ll never forget what my grandmother


did to impress upon me the absolute necessity of demanding my education. Now “demanding” is a word in need of definition, because there are different ways of demanding things. One can demand overtly, loudly, or one can demand patiently, insistently, quietly — one can demand something simply by not giving up, by being there and insisting on one’s right to access. Now I’m a writer, and I want to share a short story I wrote about how my grandmother impressed upon me the need to return back to that unfriendly, daunting, scary, threatening environment. It’s called “El Burro” and it’s quite short. Bear with me: My grandmother, my dad’s mother, took me to a shoe cobbler one day. Some little shop where the guy probably lived, right there in the neighborhood. Shabby and plain, with an unvarnished floor made of dull wood. Two or of the room. He, an old man (he seemed ancient to me, only six at the time) greeted my grandmother by first name, “Rosita,” he said smiling, a few crooked teeth poking from below his wrinkly brown lips. I could feel his warmness. Nice old coot, offering his hospitality which my grandmother took. “Got some shoes for you today, Lencho.” She held out a pair of old lady shoes for the guy to take. He grabbed them, happy-like, a regular business man, he walked immediately to his bench and began to re-heel my grammo’s

Manuel Martínez (left) with his brother and grandmother in 1970.

boy, he looks like a good boy,” Lencho said as he tap-tapped

wants, all the time pretending to be sick,

with a little hammer, like some elf from a

coming home crying early from school

fairy story. “Oh, he’s okay, but he’s gonna be

because he don’t like it.” Those two, old

a burro.” The old man stopped tapping for

lovely burros looked at me so sad. “Well,

a second to peer over at me with a mock-

here’s your money,” my grammo said

penetrating look. “You don’t wanta be no

handing Lencho a couple of bucks. He

burro, boy.” He started tapping again, but

took it, put it in his apron and my grammo

kept talking too. “I’m a burro.” I looked over

took my hand and headed for the door.

at my grammo because I wanted to laugh

As we walked out, I heard “heeehaaaw!”

at the old man who’d just called himself a burro. She was listening to Lencho and so I

The next day, I pretended to be sick

stifled the instinct and looked back at him.

again.

“Yeah, I never wanted to go to school. My momma, she needed me to work anyway, so she didn’t care if I stopped going to school. Now all I do it fix these shoes, when I get shoes.” My grammo started talking to him now, ignoring me. “I’m a burra too, Lencho. I have to clean houses for those old rich white ladies over on the north side of town.” She shook her head slowly. “’Magine that. Me, an old lady, cleaning houses for ladies the same age as me.” Lencho brought over the shoes, now re-heeled. “Look at us,” he said looking at me, “a couple of burros, and you with the chance to go to school.” He shook his head sadly. I’d disappointed this man that I didn’t know. “He’s gonna be a burro too,” she said matter-of-factly, “I know it. That’s what he

Now, I did pretend to be sick again the next day, and the day after that, but each day, my grandmother made me go back. She taught me, through her own persistence, that one had to be determined. I moved back home with my parents a couple of years later, but by then my grandmother’s lesson had become much more impressed upon me than the lesson Ms. Kraus had given me that first week of school. But both lessons were important, because Ms. Kraus taught me that there would always be irrational, even cruel, people at the entryways of places that I wanted to enter. I learned from Ms. Kraus that my efforts would often be met with indifference.

Mi Experiencia

three chairs with his work bench in the middle

gray shoes. “This

Provided by Manuel Martínez

“Those students who are ready to continue on to college know that somewhere along the line, we have to make a decision — we have to decide that we are not going to let the obstacles keep us on the outside looking in.”

Continues on page 22

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Ohio Celeb Graduat Commencement speaker, President Bill Clinton, shared words of wisdom

Congratulations to the Balderas, Luiz Amaral, Audrey Torres (Venezuela) with her daughter and mother

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Jessica Kahn with her proud parents ÂżQuĂŠ Pasa,OSU?

Mauricio Iturri (Bolivia)


State brates tion 2007

Photos by Melissa Quintanilha

Gilberto Gil, Brazilian Minister of Culture, receives a Doctor Honoris Causa Degree in Music from Karen Holbrook

e Latin@ Ph.D.s: Daniel ValdezAudrey Torres and Claudia Cruz

) with his family http://quepasa.osu.edu

Lydia Saldivar celebrates with her family

Daniel Valdez-Balderas (Mexico) with his parents Summer Quarter 2007

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From the Bottom 10% to Ohio State Faculty: Professor Manuel Martínez’ story - Continued from page 19

Mi Experiencia

I’m convinced that indifference is even more deadly for the child than outright cruelty and meanness. With meanness, the child can at least react with a hatred or anger that immures him or her from some of the effects of that behavior. But with indifference, the child learns that he or she simply does not matter, does not exist; that he or she is not important. But my dear old grandmother showed me that I could not allow cruelty, indifference, or ignorance to block me. Rather, I must demand entry through quiet determination.

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I’m not going to stand here and lie to you and tell you that after my grandmother’s lessons, I became an ace student and learned to love school. In fact, I spent the next ten years failing courses, getting kicked out of two different high schools, even getting into skirmishes with the law. In short, I did some crazy things. I graduated in the years when you could earn a D average and still make it, and so by the skin of my teeth, I finished high school. I graduated in the bottom ten percent of my class, and there were over 600 of us. That means there were over 540 students that did better than me. But you know what, all that time in school, I knew I wanted to succeed, that I wanted to be something — I wanted to be a lawyer. Now, I didn’t know what it meant to be a lawyer. I had no idea. I just knew that this was something successful people became. I had no idea about what it took to succeed in school, much less what sort of steps were necessary to actually reach that goal. I had people in my corner, my mom, my girlfriend, my grandmothers, but no one had ever been to college. In fact, neither of my parents had graduated from high school. Now I was smart. I think many of you will relate to this. I read everything I could get my hands on. My family respected books. I grew up in a religious family and as children we were called upon to interpret the Bible passages, and I’m not talking NIV Bible passages, I’m talking King James Translation. That’s like reading Shakespeare. So let me tell you, I could

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

“I knew that it was TIME. It was time to choose. Was I going to make it or not? Was I going to let the obstacles and demands by those indifferent forces — be they uncaring bosses, poverty, laziness, craziness, or even plain fear — keep me forever on the outside of that doorway labeled ‘success’?” read! So when I got set to take my SATs, I was ready for the verbals. I scored high enough to get provisional entry into St. Mary’s University. Provisional meant, “okay, let’s see how you do this first year. If you do alright, we’ll let you stay.” A month before I graduated from high school, my grandmother, Maria Martínez, died from cancer. She never got to see me walk the stage. But before she went, she called me into her room and told me a secret. She said, “I’m going to leave you my house. I want you to use the money to go to college. But you have to promise me that you’re going to go and that you’re going to be something big.” Now, my family was poor; poor like government cheese and food stamps. My mom with no high school and no job experience, five children, and a husband who’d walked out a few years before, made do with what she could. So I was a working man by the time I was 12 years old. My first job was as a newspaper boy and on the first day, I got hit by a car and broke my jaw and crushed my upper teeth, but that’s another story. My grandmother’s second gift to me, that house, allowed me to enter St. Mary’s and to give the money I received as rent to my mother, so that I could cut down on work and concentrate on my studies. But it wasn’t enough. I didn’t do very well my first year. I went on scholastic probation and was about to get kicked out of school, my only chance, gone.

I remember sitting in a used car that I pawned my saxophone to buy, so that I could get to school and work, sitting there frantically cramming for a history test that I had not had the time to study for because I was still working and because I was used to simply doing what I had to do to survive, and it suddenly dawned on me. I was struck as if by a jolt of electricity. I put the book down and looked at myself in the rearview mirror, and I knew that it was TIME. It was time to choose. Was I going to make it or not? Was I going to let the obstacles and demands by those indifferent forces — be they uncaring bosses, poverty, laziness, craziness, or even plain fear — keep me forever on the outside of that doorway labeled “success”? My grandmother’s question to me seemed so real at that moment — was I going to be a burro? If I was, then I needed to quit wasting my time in college. If the answer was that I was going to succeed, I needed to make the decision. Now here’s where it gets tricky, because I can’t exactly define for you what that DECISION is. Only you know, because if you’re reading this here, you’ve made it within yourself already at some point in your life. You’ve said to yourself, this is IT, it’s TIME. I don’t know exactly how, but I’m going to find out how, and I’m not looking back. You know what? I didn’t look back. I finished with a 4.0 the last six semesters of my undergraduate years. I made it my overarching goal that I would bring my 1.4


But to return to my main theme, I succeeded through the faith my grandmother showed in me, and I now feel very deeply that it is my responsibility to pass on the secret to success that my grandmother bestowed to me. To survive, you must demand quietly through your determination, upon access, and you must insist within yourself that you will not allow anything to keep you outside those doors. Now that you’re ready to take the next step, take some time to reflect upon what you’ve learned about what it takes to succeed. Pass it on. That’s your responsibility, that’s your very special knowledge. The sociologists are right in one respect — you are the exception to that rule which specifies that a person that is born with so many obstacles in the way, will most often, and most tragically, fail in the face of indifference, poverty, and ignorance. You are each a miracle, you’re exceptional, and you deserve to succeed. But you are going to have to remember a few things in order to gain that success:

1.

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demand quietly through your determination, upon access, and you must insist within yourself that you will not allow for anything to keep you

Manuel Martínez graduating from St. Mary’s University, where he earned a B.A. in history and English.

I made it my goal to demonstrate to the naysayers that they were wrong.

2. Take help where it is offered. Don’t close off avenues that might help you to move forward. Anyone can help you. If they’ve succeeded, take their advice to heart. My mentor wasn’t Latin@ or a person of color; he was an older white gentleman from the South of all places. But he took the time to mentor me, to show confidence in my abilities, to take me seriously and to impart wisdom about writing, researching, and getting ahead in academia.

3. You will have to become a scholar on your own. That means that you will have to listen very carefully and you will have to be curious and you will have to set up a plan to satisfy that curiosity. Listen and ask questions, write down the names of books, critics, and theories that you should be familiar. Take the time to read, make notes and study. This is no longer about jumping through hoops. It is about transforming yourself from a student to a scholar.

4. Remember the sacrifices of those that have come before you. Remember what you have gone through to get where you are right now. I grew up in a neighborhood where you could be shot, where people were in very dysfunctional situations: drugs, prison, alcoholism, poverty, racism and prejudice. Always remember where you’ve

outside those doors.”

come from because it will help you to keep university situations in perspective. When I was at Stanford and I had friends freaking out over papers and research projects, ready to crumble from the so-called pressure, I remembered where my people came from and what I’d already undergone, and I thought, this isn’t anything I can’t handle. I will get through this.

5. Keep your eyes on the prize. You are doing this not only for yourself, but for your family, for your community, for your people. This world is in terrible shape. And we need leaders that are thinking about more than getting ahead. We need people at the helm that understand need and injustice, and who have the will and desire to make a difference in this world, in this country, and in the barrio. You are a statistical anomaly. You are a miracle. Be a force to reckon with. Make up your mind to succeed. I’ll leave you with this poem that inspired me throughout my education: In order to arrive at what you do not know You must go by a way which is the way of ignorance In order to possess what you do not possess You must go by the way of dispossession In order to arrive at what you are not You must go through the way in which you are not. --T.S. Eliot 

Mi Experiencia

Remember this, and it’s a tough lesson to learn, a tough thing to hear. You will encounter indifference as you continue up the ladder of higher education. Most Latin@ students that I counsel make the mistake of thinking that they are being signaled out, that various forces are arrayed against them. But the plain truth is that most of the folks you encounter along the way won’t really care one way or another whether you succeed. They’ve got their own problems, their own goals. So you need to be fueled by this indifference, by underestimation. I survived by deciding that I would show them all what I was capable of doing. It worked for me because I didn’t allow myself to feel sorry for myself.

Provided by Manuel Martínez

GPA that I’d earned my freshman year up to a 3.5 GPA by my senior year so that I could graduate cum laude and be inducted into the honor society. I earned a scholarship to Ohio State for a master’s and a series of scholarships for my Ph.D. at Stanford, and I think I made my grandmother proud.

“To survive, you must

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Never Be Bored: The hidden benefits of a Buck ID By Jessica Beshore

Worried that coming to Columbus, Ohio, might put a slight damper on your social life? Think you will be strapped for cash and stranded in your dorm with nothing to see or do? Think again. To the surprise of many new OSU students, there are actually lots of things to see and experience in Columbus, and as a student with a BuckID you receive discounts on tons of stuff — some of it for free! The BuckID is not only your official Ohio State University student identification card, but is also the key to reaping all the benefits Columbus has to offer. There are many hidden benefits that you have as an OSU student; it’s only a matter of knowing where to find them… One of the most unique treasures on the OSU campus is the Wexner Center for the Arts (http://www.wexarts.org). The Wexner Center houses galleries for visual

art, a video screening space called the Box, a film/video theater, a café, and various performance spaces for presenting theater, dance, films, videos, art exhibitions and installations. As a student, you are automatically a member that gets you discounted tickets to movies, performing arts events, and more. Some of the recent popular shows have included Brooklyn’s Antibalas, Wilco, Bright Eyes, and the infamous Hot Chip. The Wexner Center is also one of the only places in Columbus that frequently screens Spanish-language films. This year they presented the incredibly successful series: New Argentine Cinema: Four Directors which included double features of films by Lucrecia Martel, Martín Rejtman, Fabián Bielinsky, and Carlos Sorin. The Center screens a variety of contemporary films in many different languages including documentaries, classics, and flicks you just might not catch anywhere else. The first student party this year includes an outdoor screening

Brad Feinkopf

The Wexner Center for the Arts is one of many interesting places to visit on Ohio State’s Columbus campus.

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¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

of Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, free food, and more during Welcome Week — an event not to be missed. As a student, you also get a 10 percent discount in the Store which features unusual jewelry, books, housewares, magazines, kid stuff, and gift items you really might not find anywhere else in Columbus. When looking for a bite to eat on campus, also check out Cam’s on Campus in the lower lobby of the Center where you can enjoy fresh sandwiches, soup, salads, signature desserts, and coffee. A group on campus that makes sure OSU students are always occupied is The Ohio Union Activities Board — OUAB (http:// ouab.osu.edu). They bring some of the hottest acts and most popular comedians to Columbus, including the likes of Carlos Mencia, Wanda Sykes, and Dave Chappelle. The only way to get a good seat and fair-priced ticket is with your Buck ID. From a late-night karaoke session,


Explore Columbus (http://explorecolumbus.osu.edu) on the OSU campus, located at The Ohio Union at Ohio Stadium, is a program that provides students with discounted tickets to events throughout the city and even organizes trips to travel outside of Columbus — and even out of Ohio. Discounted tickets, available exclusively with your BuckID, include sports, arts, concerts, and other events. You can check out the Columbus Crew team (soccer) or Destroyers (arena football) for half the price! To almost every show that passes through Columbus, whether it’s a Broadway show or the latest international performing artist, Explore Columbus will have a discounted ticket for you. Want to go to the zoo? Out to dinner? Or a night on

http://quepasa.osu.edu

the town? Some of the general discounts that the program provides include: $15 gift certificates to Cameron Mitchell restaurants that are worth $25; free entrance to the Columbus Museum of Art and Cleveland Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame; half-price admission to the Columbus Zoo; discounted admission to COSI Science Center and the Franklin Park Conservatory; $15 gift certificates to Dave and Busters that are worth $25; and discounted tickets to the Drexel Movie Theaters, the Funny Bone comedy shows, and the Shadowbox Cabaret. And if you’re concerned about getting to any of these places, BuckID’s got you covered there as well. As an OSU student, just flash your BuckID on any COTA bus or CABS and you’ll get unlimited rides anywhere on their routes. To learn all about the other benefits of a BuckID, including information on their “Merchant of the Month” program — a program that offers up even more discounts from a different set of merchants every month — go to http://www.buckid.osu.edu. 

Provided by COSI

to graduate/professional Martini Mixers at local Clubs or a cookout with pets on the oval, OUAB sponsors events all around Campus and Columbus to keep students entertained and amused.

Gail Oskin/MLS/WireImage.com / Provided by Columbus Crew

Provided by Franklin Park Conservatory

Explore Columbus provides students with discounted tickets to the Franklin Park Conservatory (top), Columbus Crew team soccer games (right) and the COSI Science Center (bottom).

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Living at OSU: The on-campus experience

The friends and people you meet will help you make the transition from your home to campus life. Getting involved on campus is the best and easiest way to meet a wide variety of people, and will help you feel like a member of the Ohio State campus community. Living on campus will give you hundreds of opportunities to meet a large number of diverse students. Resident Advisors (RAs), who are upper class students that live on the floors with you, help make meeting new people a breeze. RAs accomplish this through floor and building-wide social activities which is what makes your residence hall a true community, and hopefully a home-awayfrom-home. These activities consist of everything from movie and karaoke nights, to educational activities based on diversity and personal wellness. Resident Advisors

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ÂżQuĂŠ Pasa,OSU?

Provided by Mario Peraza

Getting homesick is something that many new students experience on campus. This feeling is usually due to being nervous about not finding a connection to campus and making new friends. Luckily, the residence halls offer a variety of ways to get involved. You will have the opportunity to apply for an Office Assistant position at the front desk, get involved with the hall council, and become active in your learning community. Within our halls we offer over 40 learning communities that are academic, lifestyle or culturally based. Two of our learning communities are open to every residence hall student. You may be interested in getting involved with either or both of these: our Allies for Diversity and M.U.N.D.O. (Multicultural Understanding through Non-traditional Discovery Opportunities) communities, both focus on creating fun and educational diversity programs. One hall-based learning community, the International House, gives its residents a global perspective right here on campus. For a full listing of learning communities please visit http://housing. osu.edu.

Provided by Mario Peraza

By Mario Peraza

Just a few activities organized by the on-campus housing staff.

also serve as guides to campus life by providing you information about resources on campus. Common referrals include tutoring and study skills, wellness, counseling and health centers, as well as career and academic advising services for your continued success at Ohio State. Living on campus is an invaluable experience for Ohio State students. Buckeyes who choose to live in the residence halls find success with both their academic and social lives on campus. The on-campus

lifestyle allows you to meet people with similar academic goals, which often lead to the forming of study groups, as well as opportunities to meet people to hang out with when it is time to take a break from the books. The residence hall staff members work hard to make living on campus at Ohio State feel like your new home. If you have any questions about living on campus or the programs we offer, please contact University Housing at 614-2923930 or visit our website at http://housing. osu.edu. ď Ž


Regional Campuses: A more intimate, more affordable Ohio State experience By Mauricio Espinoza

But students who prefer a smaller, more intimate environment — and still want the benefits and prestige of an Ohio State education — can get just that by attending any of the university’s five regional campuses spread across central and northern Ohio. And there’s one added bonus: it costs much less than going to the Columbus campus. Ohio State has campuses in Newark and Marion, just east and north of Columbus, respectively; in Mansfield in north-central Ohio; in Lima in northwestern Ohio; and also the Agricultural Technical Institute (ATI) in the northeastern Ohio city of Wooster. The regional campuses were created to bring Ohio State’s world-class education and resources closer to different parts of the state and to serve students living in those communities. But anyone from anywhere in Ohio or the United States can take advantage of the personal attention and friendly, peaceful environments these campuses offer. “For students who come from small towns or are very close to their families, a regional campus is an excellent option,” said Temple Patton, minority affairs coordinator and admissions counselor at Ohio State Lima. “They will find smaller classroom sizes, very similar to what they were used to at their high schools, and will receive more individualized attention.”

and the main campus. Ohio State Mansfield has 1,464 students compared to more than 50,000 in Columbus. This difference in number of students is reflected in the average class size. The regional campuses offer smaller classes than the Columbus campus. But size and proximity to home are not the only factors to consider when thinking about attending a regional campus. When it comes to deciding between the big campus and the small campus, money also talks. “Affordability is something else to consider,” Patton pointed out. “Fulltime tuition at Lima for a year is $5,664 — about $3,000 less than in Columbus. Room and board is also cheaper here. And there’s free parking.” What’s not cheap on the regional campuses is the quality of the education they provide. Students take the same courses they would on the Columbus campus, guided by highly capable faculty — 95 percent of professors at Ohio State Mansfield have Ph.D.s — who excel at both teaching and research. Let’s cite just a couple of examples: Hispanic professors Franklin Proaño (Marion) and Dionisio Viscarri (Newark) have won Ohio State’s Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2007 and 2006, respectively.

Career options At the regional campuses, students can complete associate’s degrees as well as bachelor’s degrees in selected majors. Some of the campuses also offer master’s degrees in education and social work. Ohio State ATI — ranked No. 1 in the nation in the awarding of associate degrees in agriculture — offers two-year programs in areas such as horticulture and construction with over 90 percent job-placement success rates. Attending a regional campus is also a way to get used to college life before making the move to Columbus. Students can start any of Ohio State’s more 170 programs on any of the regional campuses and then request a transfer to Columbus, while saving a good chunk of cash in their overall Ohio State journey. Finally, another advantage of picking a regional campus is open enrollment — meaning all Ohio residents with a high school diploma or GED will be accepted regardless of their ACT or SAT scores. For more information about Ohio State’s regional campuses, go to http://www.osu. edu/academics/a-z.php#regional. 

Ohio State Mansfield campus. OSU Mansfield/Rodger Smith

Let’s face it: Ohio State is big. It’s the largest university in the United States, ranks high on the list of prime research institutions, and is located in one of the country’s fastest-growing cities.

Size, cost and quality matter Campus size and class size are indeed a big difference between the regional campuses

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Photo Services, University Marketing-Communications

Support After after Arriving on Campus: The First Year Experience Program By Nicole Craven The Picnic with the Buckeyes brings the campus community together for a celebration of the new academic year.

At Ohio State, we believe that a successful experience starts with a strong beginning. Students who complete their path to graduation begin their college career by engaging in the myriad opportunities at Ohio State. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions and First Year Experience (UAFYE) is prepared to assist you in your exploration of the activities and resources available to new students. We also coordinate events, like Orientation and Convocation, which help you get connected within the University and transition as a successful Buckeye. Before the start of your first quarter, you will participate in Orientation. It’s an exciting opportunity to meet new Buckeyes from across the nation before you begin college. During Orientation, we review what you can expect in your first year, help you with scheduling your first quarter classes, and address your academic concerns. Camp Buckeye is another summer opportunity in which you can choose to participate before classes start as a way to get to know some of your fellow classmates in a wilderness setting. Camp programs are held in late-July and throughout August and include teambuilding, leadership, and interactions with faculty, staff, and upper-class students. Participants stay in tents or cabins and experience outdoor adventures such as kaya-

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¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

king, hiking, a high ropes course, and whitewater rafting. The academic year starts with two significant events. Convocation, often known as the bookend to Commencement, is the ceremonial beginning to your first year at Ohio State. The celebratory program includes an address by the President of the University and other University officials and current students who will talk about your navigation toward success as a student. The second event, Picnic with the Buckeyes, is another way we welcome you Ohio State through an outdoor gathering of old and new friends, plenty of delicious food, and the ambiance of the music from the Columbus Jazz Orchestra. This event is open to the entire University family and admission is free. Your participation in Orientation also starts your membership in the largest summer reading program in the nation! The Buckeye Book Community is a chance for students to read at their leisure a book selected by their college of enrollment. We provide you with a copy of your assigned book at Orientation, and then you return to campus in the fall prepared to discuss and analyze what you have read. This program is frequently connected with University Survey, a course instructed by

your academic advisor serving as an introduction to campus life. As an additional component, you may even get to meet the book’s author! We are so committed to your success as a student that we have a whole series of workshops focused exclusively on the needs of new students! The First-Year Success Series weaves together over 300 lectures, seminars, and interactive discussions that address typical challenges faced by students in their first year of college. These sessions are facilitated by campus experts, community leaders, and nationally known personalities. The workshops fall under one of nine themes, including areas such as current issues, sexual health, diversity, and financial and debt management. In addition to the FYE programs, all kinds of other university offices and student-run groups at Ohio State offer many supportive programs and entertaining events, and UAFYE will help to keep you informed of all of them. FYE-news is an e-newsletter that guides you toward all the fun. With a wide range of support from UAFYE and the entire University, you will have a lot of options to ensure that your whole college experience — not just your first year — is successful and memorable. 


Tips for Success at Ohio State OSU is a big institution The key is to turn it into a smaller place. Join a student organization or club to meet people and get involved in the university. (Visit the Ohio Union website in order to view the student directory http://www. ohiounion.osu.edu/studentorgs/orgs_directory.asp).

Buying textbooks Definitely think “used” but also consider buying your textbooks online by typing “Compare textbook prices” in a search engine. It might be much cheaper than the campus bookstores. In addition, the Ohio State library has a limited number of textbooks that can be borrowed.

Printing on campus You have $5 in printing every quarter on your BuckID...use it! (Public computer sites: http://scc.osu.edu/sites/).

Explore Columbus! Even though Columbus is not New York, it has a lot to offer. No matter where you come from, you will find what you’re looking for. Check out the Experience Columbus website for things to do in Columbus: http://www.experiencecolumbus.com/.

Do your laundry right, save your clothes! If you come from a place where you have always line-dried your clothes (or someone else did your laundry!), you will have to experience commercial washers and

http://quepasa.osu.edu

dryers. The most important points to remember are: - Do not overload the washer or else it will not clean your clothes well. There should be more water than clothes in the washer! Making two loads out of an extra large load will practically save you money. - Do not overload the dryer or else it will not dry your clothes and it will wrinkle them. - To save your money and your clothes, make sure there is more air in the dryer than there are clothes! - Always read the care instructions on the label before putting clothes in the washer or dryer.

Don’t walk alone at night To ensure student safety at nighttime an escort service is available to pick you up and drop you off anywhere on campus. Call 292-3322 to schedule a pickup.

College is different from high school There are certain similarities between college and high school, but it has major differences. Even though you may be accustomed to waking up early, due to the more relaxed environment, it gets harder.

Nobody is checking your homework When at college, you have a lot of responsibility to make sure you get to your classes, turn things in on time, and study well. There is no one making sure you are doing what you need to be doing, so make sure you can be self-disciplined enough to make smart choices and get your work done. Keep yourself in check and remember your parents aren’t coming to college with you.

Don’t fall behind

If you own a bike, use the latest technology to install a tracking device (bug) in case of theft. The “bugs” are available at University Security and Fire Prevention Services, Community Crime Patrol, and Off Campus Student Services.

College life is a whole new experience. You will soon realize how many activities and involvement opportunities are available on campus. It is always good to get involved with your community but don’t forget to manage your time wisely. Participate efficiently, party smartly and study hard! Welcome to Ohio State!

If you drop, drop on time!

Meet new people

Remember that you have until the third Friday of the quarter to drop any course. After that, you will have until the seventh Friday to drop but you will get a W mark on your transcript, which stands for ‘withdrawn’ and will be permanent on your record.

There are lots of different ways to meet new people. Introduce yourself to classmates and form study groups. Find friends to have fun with. Talk to your professors and graduate assistants. It will make you feel less alone, and you never know when you meet someone who will be a good contact to have in the future! 

Protect your bike against theft

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Hispanic/Latin@ Organizations at Ohio State

¡Bienvenidos a OSU! Maybe you are the first to go off to college, or maybe you are the last; either way, this is the start to some of the best years of your life. At a school like Ohio State you may be a little anxious about the size, but let me tell you… it’s no big deal, really! Student organizations are a great way to make Ohio State seem smaller. I have been involved in a variety of student organizations and they have made all the difference. They have helped me network, learn time management skills and have helped me create my own little niche here at OSU. UCHO serves as the council that unites the Hispanic/Latin@ organizations on campus. Currently we have 12 organization members which are very diverse but share the common goal of serving the Latin@ students here at OSU. Please take a moment to read their descriptions below. Get excited to come to Ohio State and get involved! Maria Sanchez, Chair sanchez.789@osu.edu

Hispanic Graduate Organization (HGO) The purpose of HGO is to enhance and promote personal development; provide information; support and assist the academic development; and facilitate social and cultural awareness and activity needs of its members by providing and coordinating services, programs activities, and communications for or with students, administrators faculty, and external entities. We organize social meetings and movie-

30

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

nights in which our members have the opportunity to mingle with other Latin Americans on campus; as well as outreach activities that contribute to the betterment of the Hispanic American community in Columbus. Ernesto Inoa, President inoa.2@osu.edu

Alpha Psi Lambda Fraternity Inc. — Alpha Chapter On behalf of the noble brothers and sisters of Alpha Psi Lambda, I would like to extend a warm welcome to The Ohio State University. My name is Luis Sanchez and I serve as the president of Alpha Psi Lambda. It is the nation’s first and largest co-ed Latin@ interest fraternity and it was founded right here at The Ohio State University. Our fraternity has provided both Latin@s and non-Latin@s on campus a “home away from home” for over 20 years and we look forward to introducing our familia to incoming students. As an active Greek organization, our members Alpha Psi Lambda members. Provided by Elizabeth Pages

University-wide Council of Hispanic Organizations (UCHO)

exemplify a strong focus on academics, community service, and leadership development while holding social activities which bring the fraternity together. Alpha Psi Lambda provides an environment where you can refine your leadership skills and create networks that will benefit you throughout the college experience and upon graduation. Our fraternity also serves as an incredible way to connect with the Latino culture both on campus and within the Columbus community. As you begin your endeavor at The Ohio State University, I encourage you to seek out involvement opportunities as they will allow this large campus to become more intimate and personal. I hope that you strongly consider learning more about Alpha Psi Lambda and the great opportunities that we offer. Have a great first year and as always, GO BUCKS! Luis A. Sanchez, President sanchez.796@osu.edu Miguel Lopez, Recruitment Chair lopez.154@osu.edu http://apl.org.ohio-state.edu/


Provided by HBSA

Hispanic Business Student Organization (HBSA)

The Hispanic Business Student Association (HBSA) promotes the educational and professional careers of its members with an emphasis on the Hispanic minority population at The Ohio State University. Members are encouraged to become future leaders in the business world. Inspiring guest speakers, from the public and private sector, are invited to present. Companies, organizations and individuals host workshops which are designed to address eduHBSA students represent Ohio State at a conference in Los Angeles. cational issues, business trends, and career opportunities relating to Hispanics. ers in the United States are immigrants or children of immigrants. CAMPAA The organization is open to all graduate supports reform that takes into considand undergraduate students who superation the positive contributions this port strengthening the Hispanic business society receives from immigrants, but agenda by indicating a strong interest in more importantly the enhancement promoting business education and the of our culture by the inclusion of atprofessional advancement of Hispanics. tributions from theirs. Many CAMPAA members have participated in rallies HBSA meets every other week and acand demonstrations throughout the tively participates in Hispanic Awareness city and the university communities in Week activities, and attends the annual support of fair reform. CAMPAA memNHBA Hispanic Business Student Leaderbers feel strongly about this issue and ship Conference. know that what is at stake is priceless for many immigrants and Americans. Maritza Perez, Recruiting Chair perez.137@osu.edu Additionally, CAMPAA @ OSU did not http://hbsa.org.ohio-state.edu waste any time this year in getting involved and giving back to the Hispanic community in Columbus, Ohio. Between College Assistance Migrant Sept. 14 and Oct. 15, CAMPAA members Program Alumni Association supported Hispanic Leaders in Colum(CAMPAA) bus by attending and volunteering in several Hispanic awareness events. For example, on October 14th CAMPAA volCAMPAA has taken it upon itself to get unteered in the 3rd Annual Walk-a Thon, involved with the national issue confor the Columbus Hispanic Scholarship cerning proposed immigration reform Fund, which rose over $16,000. The city by supporting fair and just legislation. of Columbus recognized October as its This is an extremely important issue beofficial Hispanic Heritage Month. Due to cause as the majority of migrant work-

http://quepasa.osu.edu

the great effort exerted by the members of CAMPAA@OSU, CAMPAA’s name was included in the official proclamation. Furthermore, the alumni have taken time from their busy class schedules to become volunteers in the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Ohio Program, by visiting with elementary and middle school English as Second Language (ESL) students. Mario Costilla costilla.2@osu.edu

PAN-Hispanic Latino Organization (PHLO) The Pan-Hispanic Latino Organization (PHLO) shall provide service and help to the community while promoting a basis for diversity and involvement in campuswide activities and developing the leadership skills of its members. More importantly it will provide incoming freshmen and currently enrolled Ohio State students with moral and academic support. PHLO will serve as a means of communication and support amongst the Hispanic community within The Ohio State University

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and the city of Columbus, and will provide cultural, educational, and social experiences to all of its members. As far as activities, PHLO participates in athletic activities such as playing soccer or football with a group of friends on weekends. We also participate in the Taste of OSU, which is where a group of organizations have an event that serves food from their respective culture(s), and we also have out-of-school activities such as going out to the movies. By joining PHLO, a student will get to experience the cultural activities that we have to offer. Becoming a PHLO member will allow students to meet with Hispanic OSU faculty and network with OSU alumni that have recently graduated. Members say that their experience with the organization has given them a sense of a family environment. You build friendships that will become important in your college career and life. Juan Segura, President segura.7@osu.edu, phlo@osu.edu

Folclor Hispano Folclor Hispano welcomes the class of 2011! My name is Clarissa Pena and

Giovana Covarrubias

Folclor Hispano promotes traditional dances from many Latin American countries.

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¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

I serve as the president of Folclor Hispano. Folclor Hispano is a dance group that strives to learn and perform traditional folkloric dances of Spanish speaking countries. These countries include Mexico, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Chile, Spain, Peru and Bolivia. Folclor Hispano has performed in the community at several events representing the Hispanic/Latin@ culture. These events include Fiesta in the Fall and Noche Latina. Noche Latina is our annual spring performance. We would like to say that joining a student organization is an excellent way to meet other students and become part of a smaller community. We hope that you will take the opportunity to join Folclor Hispano. Everyone is welcome to join regardless of age, ethnicity, or profession. Be sure to visit our table at the Student Involvement Fair during the first week of school. Also, feel free to visit our website http://folclor. org.ohio-state.edu or email pena.19@osu. edu for more information about Folclor Hispano. Clarissa Pena, President pena.19@osu.edu

Puerto Rican Student Association (PRSA) The purpose of the Puerto Rican Stu-

dent Association (PRSA) is to implement Puerto Rican influence into the broader OSU community both on and off campus by working with and conducting events in the cultural, social, political, and educational spectrum. The PRSA is a student organization created to bring together the Puerto Rican community at Ohio State and celebrate Puerto Rican culture. It is an organization that is open to anyone no matter what ethnicity. Throughout the year, we participate in several events. The most well-known event is our dominadas or domino tournaments. We all get together with friends and other people from the university and celebrate a night of domino tournaments, music, dancing, and of course, Puerto Rican food. We also participate in the annual Taste of OSU and are beginning to co-sponsor charity events for a cure for autism. We always look forward to new members! Nati Román, President roman.60@osu.edu

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) Since its inception, the Society of Hispanic


Provided by PRSA

Professional Engineers (SHPE) has endeavored to attract and retain Hispanic students interested in the science, technology, engineering and math related fields. SHPE’s commitment to students is to provide opportunities for personal and professional development. This is also an organization that focuses on being a social outlet for Hispanic Ohio State students. Our organization is geared around intellect, intelligence, and fun. Every year we hold events ranging from our Symposium in the fall quarter to our picnic in the spring. If you are looking for networking opportunities, Hispanic friends, or just something to get your mind off of school, SHPE is the perfect organization for you! We are brought together by heritage, social responsibility and desire to improve the equality of all people through the use of science and technology. We value excellence in education, professional pursuits and leadership. We obtain excellence through integrity, empowerment, achievement, diversity and continuous improvement. Luis Carbajal, President carbajal.2@osu.edu

Oi Brasil The Oi Brasil! OSU Portuguese Club is a student organization that aims to promote awareness of Brazilian and Luso-cultures through language, music and dance. An active member of UCHO and tied closely to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Oi Brasil! also functions as a forum for the diverse academic fields that work with Brazil and the Luso-world.

Members of the Puerto Rican Student Organization show their pride.

The Hispanic Oversight Committee (HOC) is pleased to know you are considering the Ohio State University as an option in your college search. At Ohio State, diversity is very important and the university leadership has shown strong support for Hispanic/Latin@ issues. Appointed by the Provost, the HOC’s main function is to serve as a voice for the OSU Hispanic/ Latin@ community to the university administration. The HOC focuses its energies on the recruitment and retention of Latin@ faculty, staff and students, and Hispanic/ Latin@ cultural and academic enrichment. Specific initiatives the HOC is currently working on include supporting the continued development of the Latino/a Studies program, enhancing graduate student recruitment, and obtaining increased funds for Hispanics related activities.

Oi Brasil! meets weekly for “bate-papo” or informal conversation tables. It is an opportunity to practice your Portuguese, “matar as saudades” and get to know others with similar interests. We are currently coordinating a schedule for a series of dance workshops (forró, pagode, samba, axé).

The HOC is a body to represent the Hispanic/Latin@ community at Ohio State, so I encourage everyone to become involved and support our efforts. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if I can be of any help, and we hope to see you on campus someday!

Isabel Gonzalez, President gonzalez.204@osu.edu

Jose Castro, Chair castro.38@osu.edu

The Hispanic Oversight Committee (HOC)

http://quepasa.osu.edu

The Organization of Hispanic Faculty and Staff (OHFS)

The Organization of Hispanic Faculty and Staff (OHFS) is the organization of all Latin@ faculty and staff at The Ohio State University. Our mission is to support the success and well being of Latin@ students, faculty and staff of the university. The OHFS promotes a sense of community by addressing issues of relevance for faculty and staff at Ohio State. We meet monthly to discuss issues of general concern to the membership, and often work in collaboration with the Hispanic Oversight Committee. OHFS plays an important role in providing educational, social and cultural opportunities for faculty and staff at OSU. In the past, OHFS co-sponsored the national premiere of the Costa Rican film Caribe and the Ecuador Cultural Ambassadors Program, helping to bring artists, film makers, and musicians from Costa Rica and Ecuador to our campus. In addition, OHFS sponsors socials for faculty and staff to get to know each other, and supports academic events such as the first ever conference on graduate education lead by the UniversityWide Council of Hispanic Organizations. We hope to see you on Ohio State’s campus soon! Ernesto Escoto, Co-Chair escoto.2@osu.edu Raul Herrera, Co-Chair herrera.1@osu.edu 

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The Office of Minority Affairs: 30 years service to OSU Latin@s By Normando Cabán

This past October, I had the wonderful surprise to receive a call from David, one of my former students who had graduated from OSU over 27 years ago. David, who is a successful attorney in Cleveland, was now contacting me as an involved community volunteer, working with the Cleveland Esperanza Latino youth organization. Given the many years since David last attended OSU, he was now researching if the Office of Minority Affairs (OMA) still offered the same opportunities and assistance that had made his matriculation to OSU a reality over 30 years ago. In chatting with this former student and exchanging pleasantries about our career paths, families, and reminiscing about the numerous other OSU Latin@s, it became clear to us the instrumental role OMA has played in shaping the lives of many of OSU Latin@s. During our conversation, I was delighted to inform David that not only does OMA

still offer the same programs such as the Freshman Foundation Program (FFP) that recruited and supported him, but that it has grown tremendously, by adding new innovative academic and financial aid programs that now place OMA at the forefront as one of the largest diversity offices of its kind in the country. David’s story of achievement is just one example of the legacy and impact the Office of Minority Affairs has been having on OSU Latin@ students. Each year a large percentage of the total OSU Latin@ freshmen class is recruited and supported by the resources and services provided by OMA. David, the successful Cleveland attorney, is just one of hundreds of OSU Latin@ alumni who made their career dreams a reality by seeking and taking advantage of the many wonderful financial, academic and placement support services that OMA has to of-

fer. Apparently the OMA legacy of support and service to the Latin@ community is one that continues to grow in reputation, as each year we witness more and more Latin@ students from all over the country being admitted and supported through one of the several programs OMA has to offer. Given the many wonderful services and financial assistance available from OMA to Latin@s who are contemplating to become OSU Buckeyes, it is highly recommended that students and parents alike take time to familiarize themselves with all the resources and services available to them through the Office of Minority Affairs by visiting the OMA web site at http:// www.oma.osu.edu. 

“We were able to come to the university of our choice thanks to the financial assistance provided by the Morrill Scholars Program (MSP).” — Claudia Torres and Rob Bonacci

Find out more at:

http://www.oma.osu.edu/recruitment

Deadlines are very important! Claudia Torres (San Juan, Texas) 34

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?


Oficina de Asuntos de Minorías: 30 años de servicio a la comunidad latina en OSU Por Normando Cabán

En octubre del año pasado, tuve la maravillosa sorpresa de recibir una llamada telefónica de David, uno de mis ex-alumnos, quien se graduó de OSU hace 27 años. David, quien es ahora un exitoso abogado en Cleveland, se estaba comunicando conmigo como voluntario de la organización juvenil latina Esperanza de Cleveland. Dado que han transcurrido muchos años desde que David asistió a OSU, su llamada tenía el propósito de investigar si la Oficina de Asuntos de Minorías (OMA) todavía ofrecía las mismas oportunidades y asistencia que hicieron posible que él se matriculara en OSU hace 30 años. En la conversación con este ex-alumno y entre el intercambio de cumplidos sobre nuestras trayecto-

rias profesionales, familia y remembranzas acerca de muchos otros estudiantes latin@s en OSU, nos dimos cuenta del papel primordial que OMA ha desempeñado en formar las vidas de muchos estudiantes latin@s en OSU. Durante nuestra conversación, aproveché para informarle a David que OMA no solamente ofrece los mismos programas de antes — como el Programa de Fundación Académica para Estudiantes de Primer Año (FFP), el cual reclutó y asistió a David durante sus años de universidad — sino que además este programa ha crecido enormemente, a través de la adición de nuevos e innovadores programas de ayuda académica y financieros que ahora colocan a OMA a la vanguardia, como una de las oficinas más grandes en aspectos de diversidad de su clase en el país. La historia de logro de David es sólo un ejemplo del legado e impacto que OMA ha venido ejerciendo en estudiantes latin@s en OSU. Cada año un alto porcentaje del total

de estudiantes latin@s de primer año es reclutado y apoyado por los programas de OMA. David, el exitoso abogado de Cleveland, es sólo uno de cientos de ex-alumnos latin@s de OSU que hicieron realidad sus sueños de iniciar y culminar su carrera profesional, haciendo uso de los muchos recursos financieros, académicos y de apoyo de OMA. Aparentemente, la reputación del legado de ayuda y servicios que OMA ofrece a la comunidad latina continúa creciendo, ya que cada año somos testigos de que más y más estudiantes latin@s de todo del país han sido admitidos y beneficiados con uno de los varios programas que OMA provee. Dado los muchos y extraordinarios servicios de ayuda financiera disponibles en OMA para los latin@s que están pensando en convertirse en Buckeyes de OSU, se le recomienda a los estudiantes y padres que tomen el tiempo para familiarizarse con todos estos recursos y servicios disponibles a través de la Oficina de Asuntos de Minorías, visitando su sitio Web en http://www.oma.osu. edu. 

“Pudimos venir a la universidad de nuestra elección gracias a la ayuda financiera proveída por el Morrill Scholars Program (MSP).” — Claudia Torres y Rob Bonacci

Descubra más en:

http://www.oma.osu.edu/recruitment

¡Los plazos son muy importantes! Rob Bonacci (Akron, Ohio) http://quepasa.osu.edu

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Provided by Santa Lopez-Jarrin

Why Parents from Out-of-State are Sending Their Children to OSU

“Nothing is perfect in life, but if you ask me if OSU was perfect for him, it was.” A Testimony by Santa Lopez-Jarrin My family first learned about OSU through alumni. Fabian said, “The alumnus I met suggested the school as an excellent opportunity to expand my horizons. He extolled the virtues of a large campus and proceeded to inform me about all the excellent qualities that are unique to the Ohio State experience. Ultimately, it is the strong academics and great social atmosphere that made this the perfect choice.” We never visited before he applied. We went to the orientation and everyone was helpful and I didn’t feel like I was in a huge place because he received individual attention. I felt really comfortable leaving him there.

He has had a couple of difficult times while at OSU and if the school hadn’t been so supportive of him during these times, he never would have made it. We had a situation where he was sick and the student advocate’s office really helped—they have student advocates everywhere. Ohio State can’t necessarily reach out to every single student, but once a student or a parent reaches out, we received all of the help we could imagine and people went the extra mile…and not one department but a few, because we talked to many different offices. With a school this large, I

Santa Lopez-Jarrin and her son Fabian.

never expected the personalized attention I received. Quarter after quarter, trip after trip, I could see the ongoing development of him as a person and right now I feel like he is at the top. The other big important piece is that he is very happy. He is fulfilled as a person and focused on himself and his future. My satisfaction with Ohio State has gone way beyond academics. I have been extremely impressed with the whole experience.

“Nada es perfecto en la vida, pero si me preguntan si OSU fue perfecta para él, les diría que sí lo fue.” Un testimonio de Santa Lopez-Jarrin

36

Mi familia se enteró por primera vez de OSU a través de sus exalumnos. Fabian dice: “El estudiante que conocí ahí me dijo que esta escuela era una excelente oportunidad para expander mis horizontes. Exaltó las virtudes de una universidad tan grande y me comentó todo acerca de las cualidades que hacen única la experiencia de estar en OSU. Pero no fue sino su calidad académica y la gran atmósfera social lo que la hizo la elección perfecta.”

bien de dejarlo ahí.

Nunca habíamos ido a Ohio antes de que Fabian mandara su solicitud. Fuimos a la sesión de orientación y todos nos ayudaron mucho, no me sentí en un lugar grande porque Fabian recibió atención individual. Me sentí muy

OSU no necesariamente se dará cuenta de los problemas de cada estudiante, pero una vez que un estudiante o padre de familia contacta a la universidad, nosostros recibimos toda la ayuda que se pueda imaginar y la gente

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

Fabian pasó por momentos difíciles cuando estuvo en OSU y si la escuela no lo hubiera apoyado durante ese tiempo, él no los hubiera superado. Uno de esos momentos fue cuando Fabian se enfermó y la oficina de abogados de ayuda a estudiantes realmente lo apoyó — la universidad tiene abogados para ayudar a los estudiantes en todo lugar.

da ese extra…y no sólo en un departamento sino en varios porque hablamos con varias oficinas. Para ser una escuela tan grande, nunca esperé la atención tan personalizada que recibí ahí. Trimestre tras trimestre y viaje tras viaje, pude ver el continuo crecimiento de Fabian como persona y en este momento siento que está en la cima de su desarrollo. Fabian está muy contento. El está satisfecho como persona y concentrado en sí mismo y en su futuro. OSU me ha dado una satisfacción que va mas allá de lo académico. Estoy extremadamente impersionada con esta experiencia. 


Provided by Anttonio Ferrey

Por qué los Padres que Viven en Otros Estados Envian sus Hijos a OSU

“No crea que Ohio State es buena solamente en football” Un Testimonio por Antonio Ferrey Nos interesamos bastante en Ohio State gracias a un programa llamado El Camino Adelantado de Admisión en la Escuela de Medicina. Antoney sabía que él quería ir a la escuela de medicina y este programa fue el único que en realidad le llamó atención. Mi hijo menor, Dominic, sabía que él quería ser médico y también decidió asistir a Ohio State. Vinimos a visitar OSU con Antoney, y hubo una sesión para los padres. Nos dijeron que los jovenes en ese programa están en un grupo que tiene un buen sistema de apoyo y un consejero especialmente dedicado para ellos. Una de nuestras mayores preocupaciones era que OSU es una escuela tan grande y tan lejos. La otra es que no conocíamos a nadie en Ohio — yo nunca había ido a Ohio,

y si algo pasaba, ¿qué íbamos a hacer? Pero mis hijos tuvieron experiencias impresionantes en Ohio State. Antoney siente mucha camaradería con sus compañeros de clase y ha tenido excelente ayuda de los profesores y empleados. El ha estado involucrado en investigación y eso ha sido genial para él. El llega a practicar en el laboratorio lo que ha aprendido en la clase, así que ha tenido mucha experiencia directa. Dominic acaba de empezar en Ohio State este año. Ohio State tiene un excelente programa de experiencia de primer año, y él en realidad lo ha disfrutado. Si yo fuese a darle consejo a otros padres que

The Ferrey family

son de fuera del estado y que están pensando en considerar Ohio State, yo les diría que no eliminen a Ohio State. Es una escuela muy grande, pero eso sólo significa que existen muchas oportunidades. Además, Ohio State es también muy generosa con sus paquetes de ayuda financiera. No piensen que Ohio State sólo es buena en football. Mis hijos han tenido una magnífica experiencia en Ohio State. *Para mas información sobre El Camino Adelantado de Admisión, por favor visite http://medicine.osu.edu/futurestudents/ medicaleducation/admissions/eap/.

“Don’t think Ohio State is only good at football” A Testimony by Antonio Ferrey

We became very interested in Ohio State due to the program called the The Early Admission Pathway in the medical school. Antoney knew he wanted to go to medical school and that program is what really caught his attention. My younger son, Dominic, knew that he wanted to be a doctor and also decided to attend Ohio State. We came to visit OSU with Antoney, and there was a session for parents. They told us that the kids in that program are in a group and they have guidance and a counselor and there was a good support system for them. One of our major concerns was that OSU is such a big school and was so far away. In addition, we didn’t know any-

http://quepasa.osu.edu

one in Ohio — I had never been to Ohio, and if something happened, what would we do? But my kids have had awesome experiences at Ohio State. Antoney feels a lot of camaraderie with his fellow classmates and he has excellent support from his teachers and staff. He has been involved in doing research and that has been great for him. He gets to practice in the lab what he learns in the classroom, so it has been very hands on. Dominic just started at Ohio State this year. Ohio State has an excellent First Year Experience program, and he has really enjoyed

it. If I were to give advice to other parents from out of state who are thinking about considering Ohio State, I would tell them not to brush off Ohio State. Though it is a large school, it means there are a lot of opportunities. In addition, Ohio State is also very generous with their financial aid packages. Don’t think that Ohio State is only good at football. My sons have had a great overall experience at Ohio State. *For more information about the Early Admission pathway, please see http://medicine.osu.edu/futurestudents/medicaleducation/admissions/eap/. 

Summer Quarter 2007

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stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu)

The Path to Graduate School: Preparing to run the distance By Rachel Ramirez-Hammond

I have been training for my first marathon for some time. Even though the marathon is months away, I get up every morning at 6 a.m. to be able to fit in my 40-50 miles of running weekly that I need to be ready. For me, the marathon is about setting goals, challenging myself, staying motivated, preparing physically and mentally, and the discipline it takes for me to be successful. As I wrote drafts of this article about graduate school during my marathon training, I came to realize how many similarities there are to my journey towards my marathon and preparing for a graduate education. Preparing for graduate school requires even more time than a marathon, and more extensive preparation. Getting ready for graduate school involves doing the work it takes to have a high GPA, doing research, and taking the right courses so that you are academically ready for the challenge of graduate school. The same things that make runners successful, such as endurance, discipline, dedication, preparation, consistent training, and motivation, will get you in shape to be successful in graduate school. Here are some step by step preparations:

38

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

1. Set a goal, evaluate yourself, and make a commitment Saying you will do something and actually putting in the necessary preparation to do it successfully are two different things. I had to set my goal (finish a marathon), evaluate myself (Am I physically and mentally capable of the training ahead of me?) and commit to doing what I need to do to be successful (getting up for 6 a.m. runs). The same is true with graduate school-you must decide that you want to have the door to graduate school open as an option for the future. This involves learning about yourself and defining your personal goals. Do you have a particular interest or passion in a field? What is exciting? A good way to find answers to this question is by getting involved in campus activities that help you learn about your interests, what you enjoy, and what you do well. Then make a commitment to do what you need to do to best prepare yourself for graduate school. Learn about different types of graduate programs. They range from doctoral programs that can take six or seven years, to more professional master’s programs in applied fields like social work, business or

teaching. Master’s programs are often two or three years. An advanced degree can result in better paying job and opportunities to move up in a company or an organization. 2. Do your homework and get yourself ready The most critical part of a preparation for a marathon is actually running lots and lots of miles. You came to college to learn, so don’t let anything get in the way of your good grades. If you do not do this, you may be closing doors in your future, or may not get an internship or get accepted to a graduate program that will make a big difference in your career. Remember that looking for a graduate school is completely different than looking for an undergraduate school. First and foremost, individuals entering graduate school should have a clear idea of what they want to study. In addition, you are also looking for a formula for you to be successful. This formula involves things like good grades, participating in research, and taking advantage of the career center available here at OSU. A critical piece is finding your “coach” — someone to guide you, help you under-


stand the terrain, and assist in preparing you for graduate school. These graduate school “coaches” are professors. Professors can be a tremendous help in your graduate school journey. They can tell you about different fields and graduate programs. They have already run the marathon of graduate school. They can mentor and guide you throughout your college career, and might have opportunities for you to participate in research or other activities with them. Deciding to dive in to your education and begin research as an undergraduate will be beneficial to you. Ohio State is one of the few universities that can offer so many different options and opportunities to undergraduates, so you might as well take advantage of services you are paying for! 3. Final preparations and actually running the race Race day is near. Though marathoners have been training for months, you have been training for years. It is important to begin narrowing down your search to specific programs and universities. Asking professors in the field in areas in which you are interested is a great way to get information on strong programs. It is also important to remember that a university’s general prestige might not be all that relevant to your graduate career—what you are looking for is solid programs in your area of specialization. Finding the right fit between your career and research interests and opportunities provided by the individual program is one important key to finding the right program for you. Ohio State might be a great choice for you, with over 100 graduate programs and over 10,000 students pursuing graduate educations. Yet there are thousands of programs around the country with different strengths and specialties, and it is worth your time to do some exploration into them. Yolanda Zepeda, assistant director of graduate education and diversity with the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, shared tips about looking for graduate programs and questions to ask. Zepeda said, “With the Internet and email,

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you have a great start to learning about graduate programs, and connecting with graduate students and professors in those programs. A good understanding of your own needs will help you decide which programs are right for you.” Zepeda continued by saying, “Applying to graduate school can be expensive, so think carefully about your choices. Remember that your choice of graduate program will shape your intellectual development, your professional opportunities, and your network of mentors and peers.” The application process has similarities with road races. You are one of many people applying for a program who also have trained extensively and are prepared to run. You might be a great runner in your neighborhood, but now you see hundreds, if not thousands, of people around you who are just as prepared and trained as you are, if not more. And only a few will win prizes.

Graduate school can be like this, with many highly qualified candidates competing for a very few spots in a program. And once you get admitted, there is further competition for funding, as not all students receive assistance to go to graduate school (see box at bottom of the page). The bottom line is that you cannot control your competition. All you can do is go out and run the very best race you can. And for most runners, we are not competing against others running. We do the best we can and prepare for the day the best way we know how. That should be your goal for applying for admission to graduate school. I am confident that I am prepared to achieve my goal of finishing my first marathon. This will not happen because of luck, but because I have trained well, prepared myself, and am ready for it. Good luck to you in your graduate school marathon! 

Financing Graduate School One of the first things students say when asked about a graduate education is, “How am I going to pay for it?” The good news is that graduate school can often end up with you paying less out of your pocket than you did for your undergraduate education! You get more education for much less of your money, while graduate school provides you with opportunities to learn relevant, useful, additional skills. Imagine getting paid to do what you love doing! Graduate schools all have different ways of offering financial aid, but nearly all graduate schools provide some type of assistance that can potentially cover all of your tuition, fees insurance, and also living expenses. Fellowships are usually extremely competitive, but if you get one of these, your tuition and fees are covered, and you often get a monthly stipend (which helps pay for rent and other expenses) without any work requirements. You get paid to study! Many schools often have specific fellowships for minority populations also. In addition, most schools have a wide variety of graduate assistantships (or associateships at Ohio State). This generally involves committing to working twenty hours a week as a research, teaching, or administrative assistant. In exchange for this, the school pays you a monthly salary and covers the cost of your tuition. These opportunities also provide you with hands on experience in research or teaching, which could be good training for the future. But as Zepeda mentioned, “Assistantships can support a student lifestyle, but not a new car payment, large credit card and installment payments.” Therefore, it is important for students to start managing their money now, by minimizing credit card and personal debt.

Summer Quarter 2007

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Check our calendar to find out about events of interest to the Latin@ community. Find information about relevant social, academic and cultural issues. Connect with other Latin@s from your part of the world. 40

¿Qué Pasa,OSU?

Summer07  

In this Issue: http://quepasa.osu.edu Hispanic/Latin@ Organizations at Ohio State A Thousand Miles: A Latino alumnus’ journey from OSU to Ko...

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