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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com




OPEN ENROLLMENT STARTS FEBRUARY 1ST!

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Interested parents can check our online schedules for Information Meetings that will be held for each school.

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www.edvantages.com ★ www.perfomanceacademies.com columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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getting started: TABLE OF CONTENTS ON THE GO 10 12 14 16 18 20 21 22 23 24 25

NEWS ON THE GO PRODUCT PIX WORTH THE PRICE OF A SITTER? COLUMBUS PARENT PROFILE: Bexley’s Maggie Smith-Beehler WELL-DRESSED: What the Well-Dressed Valentine Is Wearing PEOPLE YOU SHOULD MEET: Marlene Robbins VITAMIN ME: Capital Style editor Kristy Eckert HOUSEBROKEN: Dispatch columnist Joe Blundo TAKE IT FROM TRACY: 10TV’s Tracy Townsend NEIGHBORHOOD SPOTLIGHT: Pickerington SHOP SPOTLIGHT: Rule (3)

HOT TOPICS: EDUCATION 28 30 32

THE MONTESSORI MYSTERY: What’s it really about? BE A BETTER VOLUNTEER: And why it matters CHARTERING THE FUTURE: Community schools provide students with additional learning options

NEED TO KNOW

FAMILY FUN

34

42

38 40

AGE-APPROPRIATE: ADOPTION AGES 0-1: Open Adoption: Opening up the possibilities AGES 1-6: Foreign Adoptions: Creating and nurturing transcultural families AGES 8-13: A Family to Call Their Own: Kids of all ages need safe, loving homes THE GO-TO GUIDE: Tutoring services PEDIATRIC HEALTHSOURCE: from Nationwide Children’s Hospital

44 46 48 50

52 53

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CALENDAR: 180 THINGS TO DO THIS MONTH

RECYCLED FUN: Retablo art from Mexico and the Ohio Craft Museum HANDS ON: A box to put your Valentines in! COOKING WITH KIDS: Super Jambalaya for the Big Game PARTIES: A Brrrrthday Party at The Chiller Easton EATING OUT WITH KIDS: Whole World Natural Bakery & Restaurant in Clintonville DAY TRIPPIN’: EnterTRAINment Junction in West Chester PLAYGROUND PATROL: Grange Insurance Audubon Center in downtown Columbus REVIEWS: Books, apps, games, websites and all the kids’ music Grammy nominee albums! ON THE COVER: Fiber artist Sue Quellhorst created the sweater and scarf worn by our model Megan. Quellhorst’s work is available at Studios on High, 686 N. High St. in the Short North Arts District. PHOTO BY DANIEL SOHNER

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com


The Karate Kid Difference.....

Self Esteem! The most powerful gift you can give your child is positive self esteem. It empowers him/her to achieve in all areas of life, from the school room to the playground. Our carefully structured Martial Arts programs are geared to bring out the best in your child.Through an exciting program of self defense, fitness and fun, your child will be equipped with the attributes of success, including self esteem, a positive attitude, increased concentration and self discipline.

Call about our Introductory Special which includes a FREE Uniform!

Powell In the Giant Eagle Plaza (Corner of Sawmill Pkwy. and Powell Rd.) 614-760-0000

Lewis Center 95 Neverland Drive (N.W. Corner of 23 and Powell Rd.) 740-549-1313

Pickerington 773 Windmiller Dr. Suite C 614-920-9480

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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getting started: LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

The Little Things BY JANE HAWES

ColumbusParent.com

34 S. Third St. Columbus, Ohio 43215 614-461-8878 (voice) 614-461-8746 (fax) 614-888-8888 (classifieds) www.ColumbusParent.com PUBLISHER

Katie Wolfe Lloyd I had lunch the other day with my friend Kathy. We drove over to Franklin Park Conservatory, tucked into plates of good stuff from their cafe, and got caught up on each other’s lives while surrounded by beautiful orchids and Chihuly glass art. She e-mailed later and said, “I feel like I’ve been on vacation.” And she was right. That little hourlong break from the cold and dreary Columbus winter did feel like a mini-vacation. And it reminded me that the best way to get through winter is to carve out time for all the little things that make life worth living. Like a new pair of gloves. I’m the “wear it ’til it falls apart” type, so when I had to admit that my ratty old gloves just weren’t doing the job any more, I popped into Macy’s on the way home and found not one, but two pairs outrageously on sale. And every time I slip a pair on now, I think I can honestly say my hands feel like they’re on vacation. It’s amazing how much of an impact the little things can have on your spirits. Like our cover photo. See that puff ball of orange frou-frou on our adorable model Megan’s head? Her mom, Becky, had brought it along, just in case a little extra something was needed. We already had the idea to wrap Megan in a gorgeous oversized sweater and scarf created by local artist Sue Quellhorst (whose work is available at Studios on High in the Short North). That explosion of color and texture around Megan’s beautiful face was good — but that little extra poof of color made it great. The cover concept sprang from a little tradition we have in our family. Is it me or is this also the time of the year when your kids just need more hugs? We call it “getting wrapped up and topped off with mother love” when one of them comes looking for a hug. And I thoroughly recommend being generous with the mother — and father — love, no matter what season it is. Several of our articles this month also call upon the potency of parent love. Be sure to check our Age Appropriate articles on the topic of adoption. When our writer Debbie Angelos told me about

kwolfe@columbusparent.com DIRECTOR OF NICHE PUBLICATIONS

Brian Lindamood blindamood@columbusparent.com EDITOR

Jane Hawes jhawes@columbusparent.com NICHE PUBLICATIONS ADVERTISING MANAGER

Amy Bishop abishop@columbusparent.com ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Terra Shoaf tshoaf@columbusparent.com ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Jessica Wrightsel jwrightsel@columbusparent.com DIGITAL ADVERTISING SPECIALIST

Vanessa Micic vmicic@columbusparent.com PHOTO EDITOR

Will Shilling wshilling@columbusparent.com PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR

Rebecca Zimmer rzimmer@columbusparent.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Michaela Schuett mschuett@columbusparent.com DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

PHOTOGRAPHER

Daniel Sohner dsohner@columbusparent.com

Maria Hunte, the single mom she profiled who has six children, five of them adopted out of the foster care system, Angelos dubbed her “Super Woman.” No kidding. And that’s a lot of love this woman is putting out there in the world. We also unveil our first “Worth the Price of a Sitter?” article from Melissa and Geoff Dutton. I think the title pretty much says it all, and I think you’ll also enjoy their insights. Finding ways to take good care of the people in our lives is always a worthwhile endeavor and we hope their adventures inspire you to do the same … even if it’s just a little something like a hug!

WEB PRODUCER

Elizabeth Warren ewarren@columbusparent.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Nikki Davis ndavis@columbusparent.com CONTRIBUTORS Debbie Angelos, Joe Blundo, Kevin Brashear, Olivera Bratich, Geoff Dutton, Melissa Kossler Dutton, Kristy Eckert, Elizabeth Jones, Kristen Maetzold, Megan Moriarty, Phil Pikelny, Elizabeth Seufer, Truda Shinker, Shawn Sines, Tracy Townsend DISTRIBUTION If you would like to receive Columbus Parent at your business, or to report delivery concerns:

John Henry 614-410-1797 jhenry@dispatch.com

Columbus Parent is published and distributed by The Dispatch Printing Company every month, available at more than 1,200 locations throughout Central Ohio. One free copy per person. Circulation: 58,000 copies. Copyright © 2011 The Dispatch Printing Company

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com


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columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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Is your child on the right track?

Dublin & Worthington’s Favorite Child Care Center! 1123 Bethel Rd. Columbus, 43220 614.451.5200

3480 Snouffer Rd. Columbus, 43235 614-792-8700

getting started: ON THE WEB

Back by popular ma de nd and because you’ve all been such good moms this past year, Columbus Parent announces its Mom of the Year contest for 2011! We’ve got all kinds of treats in our prize package — travel, fashion, beauty, you name it.

on ColumbusParent.com We’ll take nominations online at ColumbusParent.com, starting Feb. 14 (love your mom on Valentine’s Day) and continuing until Feb. 28. Then, we’ll pick out five finalists whom you can vote for (by using the Facebook “like” feature) throughout March. Our winner will be notified on April 1 (no foolin’ about that!) and then featured in our May issue! Keep an eye on ColumbusParent.com for more information!

www.jellybeanjunction.com

Setting The Standard In Early Care & Education Offering outstanding Reggio-Inspired Infant, Toddler and Preschool programs, as well as Kindergarten, afterschool & summer camp for school-age children.

www.TheCompassSchool.com Discover the difference that degreed teachers, excellent parent communication, NAEYC Accreditation, and a welcoming family environment can make. Schedule your personal tour today! Open House Saturday February 19th 10:30AM - 1:00PM You are invited to our Dr. Seuss-themed Open House! “Cat In The Hat”, juggling unicyclist, children’s activities, storytelling, refreshments, games and more! This is a free community event – please join us and bring a friend!

The Compass School 3989 North Hampton Drive Powell, Ohio 43065 (located off of Sawmill Pkwy)

614.764.8844 8

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

Think of it like the bench at the playground where the parents hang out and chat. Columbus Momstyle is the community part of ColumbusParent.com. Just click on the Momstyle link on the home page to reach the message boards and join the conversation with other Central Ohio moms and dads just like you!

Other Online Giveways But it’s not just the Mom of the Year contest we’ve got going on. Faithful readers know that we’re always giving away great prizes — like Disney on Ice Princess Classics tickets (with VIP parking at Nationwide Arena) and a Swedish Massage at Woodhouse Day Spa this past month. Be sure to check ColumbusParent.com, the Columbus Parent Magazine page on Facebook and our Twitter feed (@ColumbusParent) for more prize giveaways in February!


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columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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on the go: NEWS ON THE GO

mobileart Heather Wirth believes in giving kids the tools they need to develop their creative side and discover a passion for life. Wirth, a painter and floral designer, engages kids through art. “I grew up loving art, and not really ever feeling connected to anything or anyone else,” said Wirth, who studied the arts at the University of Maryland and the Columbus College of Art & Design. “I can’t even think of where I would be in life if art wasn’t at the center of everything I do.” Alarmed by the growing cuts to art programs, Wirth brainstormed ways to bring art to young people. The Clintonville resident eventually worked with other artists to create Artmobile, a traveling art class staffed by volunteers. The program launched its first after-school class in January. The Artmobile also is available to the public at community events. Look for it at Goodale Park and the North Market this spring and summer. Visit columbusartmobile.com for more details. —MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

AT PLAY

Changing the Rules Not every one of our kids will grow into leaders, but as parents we have opportunities to help them recognize their leadership and decision-making skills early if we remove the pressure of real life. Consider encouraging your children to take leadership roles by sitting down to a board game or card game with the kids and letting them take the lead. One of the strategies I use with my children is to let them set the house rules when we play. Feel free to let them make nonsense rules and see how they work

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out, and when they succeed or fail, help them to understand why through discussion and let them change the rules again. We encourage our children to make decisions about not just what we play but how. If you’ve got the family together at the table, it’s a great opportunity to break out of traditional roles and watch and learn. Consider how you interact with your children and help them by giving decisionmaking roles to them instead. Most kids will naturally expect Mom or Dad to be banker or judge in games, but you can

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

foster you child’s inherent leadership skills by surrendering that role. Seek out games where one or more players have to make decisions and then work to encourage your children to take on these roles. Help guide them, but resist the urge to countermand. Games are a great way to teach children about sportsmanship and how to handle victory and defeat gracefully. Encourage improvisation when problems arise and work with the family to find small ways to change the traditional rules to common games. —SHAWN SINES

COOKIE!

Somehow we think the Cookie Monster would approve. The Girl Scouts have gone hightech in their mission to keep the world stocked with Thin Mint, Samoa and Trefoil cookies: There is now a mobile app that will help you locate where they are being sold. Girl Scout troops took orders from Jan. 15-31, and they’ll not only be delivering those orders in March, they’ll also sell cookies at booths in public locations. Central Ohio Girl Scouts — who are part of the Girl Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland Council — will be one of 21 councils nationally to pilot the Cookie Locator app this year, which will tell you where and when those booths are open for business. The free app, which also will supply cookie nutritional information, e-mail alerts when cookies are available nearby, and a “discover your cookie personality” quiz, will be available for iPhone and Android smart phones, and a version for Blackberry phones also is expected. You can get the app it by calling **GSCOOKIES (**472665437) from a smart phone, or by visiting the iPhone App Store or Android Marketplace. —JANE HAWES


New Friendships

AROUND TOWN

Where the happening kids just happened to be

on the Field

JANUARY 17

Aireana, Aulan a and Delaney Wilburn

Shango Black-Smith Jo nn ay a K vi tz and Carmen Johnson

Gianna and Cherod Cole

Not only does the Pickerington Central High School Girls soccer team have game, they’ve got grace, too. During a non-conference game scheduled with Columbus East High School, the Pickerington girls not only noticed that their opponents lacked uniforms and cleats, they took their concern a step further. In eight days the team and their community raised enough funds — nearly $1,800 — to provide two sets of new uniforms to the Columbus East team. The two teams’ coaches have kept in touch and said they have witnessed new friendships bloom on and off the field. —GINA JACOB

MLK OPEN HOUSE at the King Arts Complex

GREEN EDUCATION A paperless middle school is scheduled to open this fall. Students at New Media Middle School, 43 S. Douglas St., will have 24/7 internet access to complete and submit school projects. The tuition-free community school is being developed by leaders of The Arts & College Preparatory Academy with help from the middle school’s design team, which is comprised of representatives from area universities, organizations, businesses and government. Visit newmediamiddle.org or call 614-448-7203 for enrollment information. —ELIZABETH SEUFER

Carlton, Amari, Tyshawn Morris

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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on the go: PRODUCT PIX

Li’l Suckers

Finally, those blood curdling screams make sense. Give your little one something to sink his teeth into with the Li’l Vampire Pacifier ($5) from ThinkGeek.com. With an orthodontic nipple (to ensure those fangs come in straight), this pacifier is sure to frighten siblings, pets and nursing mothers everywhere. Go to thinkgeek.com

Are You

SMARTER than a Robot? The Toysmith 4M Smart Robot toy ($15) is fun to put together and then watch as it navigates by bouncing off anything in its path. And we found an even funner way to play with the one we found at The Works Gift Shop in Newark: Liberate the bouncing ball that goes inside that top dome and watch it go. The cat will never forgive us, but it sure was worth it. 55 S. First St., Newark, 740-349-9277; attheworks.org

COME TOGETHER

We found these Beatle-ized wooden-peg toy figures at Wholly Craft (for a pricey $24 but, without a doubt, a collector’s item), but you might get inspired to decorate some of your own. You can find them at craft stores like Michael’s and Joann Fabrics. And to get some great ideas on how to decorate them, just search the Internet using the term “wooden peg people.” 3169 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-447-3445; whollycraft.net

oink LE ROUGE

This strangely friendly-looking pig is part of the Somewhere City character series, created by StrangeCo and the Museum of Modern Art. You can find plush and rubber versions of Oink (starting at $12) in Columbus at the Wexner Center Store. 1871 N. High St., Campus, 614-292-1807; wexarts.org

CLEANS UP WELL It’s the time of year when a little bit of cleanliness goes a long way. And if you’re looking for something different but super-safe to spritz the kids’ hands with, try this all-natural hand sanitizer. It’s got a nose-perking spicy scent that just seems right in the winter time. We found ours for about $3 at Generation Green, and the line is also carried at area Target and Whole Foods stores. 6351 Sawmill Rd., Dublin, 614-761-2222; generationgreenstore.com

Monogram necklaces make a great and age-appropriate piece of jewelry for kids, and these cloth-covered and embroidered buttons ($10) are made right there in Powell’s Cute as a Button shop. 38 W. Olentangy St., Powell, 614-430-9408; cuteasabuttonstore.com CONTRIBUTORS: DEBBIE ANGELOS, JANE HAWES

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com


HARVEST PREPARATORY SCHOOL 4595 Gender Road, Canal Winchester, OH Phone: 614-382-1111

FEB/MARCH 2011 - Applications for Ohio’s EdChoice Scholarship Program Will Be Accepted.

Founded 1986

MARCH 2011 - Open Enrollment Begins. Call for Info. Today! Quality Christian Education for Age 3 - Grade 12. Now Accepting Applications for 2011-12 School Year!

Please Visit www.harvestprep.org columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

13


on the go: WORTH THE PRICE OF A SITTER?

Refectory RESTAURANT & BISTRO BY GEOFF DUTTON & MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

For parents with young children, it’s the standard by which all evenings out together are judged: Was it worth the price of a sitter? Beginning this month, the Dutton couple of Geoff and Melissa launch their search for romantic, personal and parental rejuvenation that is worthy of hiring a babysitter.

February 3–20, 2011 Park Street Theatre

512 Park Street, Columbus, Ohio

PICKING THE SPOT

Illustration: Andrea Yost

Ticke

t 9-18 s

$

3 Ways to Purchase Tickets: Call CCT at 614-224-6672 Call CAPA at 614-469-0939 Visit TicketMaster.com

By Douglas Evans; Based on his book The Elevator Family Recommended for everyone age 4 and older–60 minutes.

CCT Academy offers theatre classes for ages 3-16. For more information visit our website.

www.ColsChildrensTheatre.org 14

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

THE REFECTORY RESTAURANT & BISTRO

WILL SHILLING PHOTO

1092 Bethel Road, Northwest Side 614-451-9774 therefectoryrestaurant.com TIP: Despite its reputation as one of Columbus’ finest restaurants, The Refectory has a variety of dinner specials and wine tastings that make it a possibility for most couples. Check out the restaurant’s website for more details. It’s also a good idea to sign up for the restaurant’s VIP E-Club that provides information on special events. New members receive a $25 gift card for joining.

Melissa: With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, we aimed for a romantic and elegant dinner. Geoff: Our impulsive and carefree hearts longed to splurge, but our Christmas-battered budget served as a reality check. Or so I thought. Melissa made dinner reservations at the Refectory Restaurant & Bistro, a French restaurant widely considered to be among Columbus’ finest. Translation: Expensive. Melissa: Searching ads and the internet, I was amazed at the number of special deals offered by even the swankiest restaurants. A tough economy seems to have prompted an array of special limited menus, wine tastings with appetizers, and other promotions at high-end restaurants. The deals provide an opportunity to sample fare you may not otherwise be able to afford. Geoff: There weren’t many minivans with Cheerio-littered baby seats in the parking lot. This special deal was called “First Friday,” the monthly promotion offering a multi-course meal for $50 per person. It was still expensive enough that we should have known better, but it was priced just plausibly enough that we couldn’t resist.


February 25-27 Palace Theatre JEFF HINCKLEY/DISPATCH PHOTO

THE FOOD

Geoff: Foie gras. Dover sole au gratin.

Roasted duck. Saint-honore. I recognized some of the menu, but wouldn’t know what some of this was until the waiter delivered it to the table. The waiter was an unflappable pro, never appearing irritated by questions like, “Are we supposed to eat this yellow part?” Melissa: I felt like a guest judge on “Top Chef.” Often two waiters were serving us amazing food artfully arranged on the plate. There was time between courses to enjoy one another’s company and the bottle of wine we ordered. The timing between the courses seemed just right — unlike a previous visit to the bistro (on the bar side of the restaurant) where it seemed too long between dishes.

THE AMBIANCE

GEOFF: It actually felt slow to me (don’t

they realize babysitters charge by the hour!) until I took a deep breath and mentally downshifted from the busy day. For once dinner wasn’t just a chaotic prelude to the hectic bedtime routine. Tonight, the boys would be asleep when we got home. Melissa: The softly lit room with low music in the background was a perfect setting to relax and reconnect. There wasn’t a kid or a chicken nugget in sight. Geoff: I have a pretty low tolerance for snooty. So I was pleasantly surprised by the relaxed atmosphere — elegant, but not stuffy. I knew they had me when I started browsing the full menu, wondering about the $38 filet mignon with cardamom sauce, and the $10 salads. Next time….

A bottle of wine, one of the least expensive on the menu Geoff had coffee with dessert

$100 $29 $2.50

Tax and tip

$39

Babysitting fees

$40

TOTAL COST OF THE EVENING

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Phone: 740-207-1073 columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

15


on the go: COLUMBUS PARENT PROFILE

Maggie Smith-Beehler AGE: 33 HUSBAND: Jason Beehler, together almost 11 years DAUGHTER: Violet, 2 NEIGHBORHOOD: Bexley JOB: I work one full-time job as an editor, another as a mom, and a third as a published poet (under my maiden name, Maggie Smith). Most of my writing is done on my lunch hour or after my daughter is asleep. The National Endowment for the Arts recently awarded me a $25,000 Creative Writing Fellowship, which will make it financially possible for me to set aside some uninterrupted time to write — and maybe even create a studio space in my home, away from the toys, crayons and Play-Doh!

What is the most played song on your iPod right now? Probably “Peace Signs” by Sharon Van Etten

If you had to be on a reality-TV show, which one would it be? I don’t cook much, but I love to eat, so I wouldn’t mind being a judge on “Top Chef.”

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

Who is your favorite TV or movie mom?

What was your favorite book growing up?

As much as I enjoy Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford (“No more wire hangers!”), I’d have to say Frances O’Connor, who played the matriarch on “Six Feet Under”: She stole the show.

“The Boxcar Children,” hands down.

Favorite thing to do for cheap family fun in Central Ohio: Take Violet to the fountains at Capital University and let her run around in the water.

Favorite restaurant to take the whole family:

Best advice you ever received as a parent: My mom once told me to remember that every minute with your child is a gift, even the hard moments.

What have you learned as a parent that you wish someone had told you before had that first kid? The first two months are really, really hard. But it gets better.

Northstar Cafe

Favorite way to spend a Saturday afternoon:

What’s something your mom or dad did that you thought was nuts when you were a kid and now you understand?

Playing outside with Violet and Jason, and then working on poems while she naps.

Always needing to know my whereabouts. It wasn’t the cool thing, but it was the right thing.

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

Maggie Smith is the author of “Lamp of the Body” (Red Hen Press, 2005), “Nesting Dolls” (Pudding House, 2005), and “The List of Dangers” (Kent State University Press, 2010). For more about Maggie’s books and upcoming readings, visit her website at maggiesmithpoet.com.


Now Enrolling!

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columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

17


JANE’S MONTESSORI ACADEMY

on the go: WELL-DRESSED

Come Visit Us At Our Open House Events On Sun. Feb 20th, 2-4pm; Wed Feb 23rd, 6:30-8:30pm • High Quality Education from 6 weeks through 6 years • Degreed, Montessori-trained lead teachers and degreed assistants • Low Teacher Turnover • A.M., P.M., or All Day Sessions

what the

• Before school, After school, and extended (9-4) care available • Care available during school breaks • An environment that fosters individual growth for your unique child

Please join Trevor Eissler, author of Montessori Madness, for a Parent-To-Parent discussion about Education Choices on Feb. 10th From 7-9pm at the Griffin Student Center on the campus of Ohio Dominican. FREE to the public!

www.JanesAcademy.com 1375 Francisco Rd., (NW Columbus near Upper Arlington) 457-6404 contact@janesacademy.com

High Utility Bills?

WELL-DRESSED

valentine is wearing

CP

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19


on the go: PEOPLE YOU SHOULD MEET

Marlene Robbins BY JANE HAWES

It looked like a gym class before it evolved into a dance class. It sounded like a social studies class but then morphed into a music class. It felt like a whole lot of fun, but somehow there was a whole lot of learning going on, too. What exactly was it? Just another Wednesday afternoon class with Marlene Robbins at Indianola Informal K-8 School in Clintonville. A couple of dozen second graders had sauntered in. Some shed their shoes right away, while others kept them on. They’ve had Robbins as their teacher for three years now at this unique Columbus City Schools building, where children in kindergarten through the 8th grade experience a curriculum laden and interwoven with the arts. Since 1991, Robbins has served as the dance specialist on the faculty, and this second-floor space — “it used to be the girls’ gymnasium,” Robbins said of the historic brick building on East Weber Road — is her classroom. “This is all about immigration, you guys,” Robbins explained to the eager and energetic crew standing around her. “This dance originated in Russia and went to Israel. It’s called the korobushka.”

20

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

Indianola Informal K-8 School is located at 251 E. Weber Rd. in Clintonville. For more about the admissions process for lottery-based schools, go to columbus.k12.oh.us and click on “Parents and Students.” Applications for lotterybased middle and elementary schools will be accepted between Feb. 1-28.

The children have been working on a massive project all school year — creating their own countries. While other teachers weave lessons about math, geography, civics, science, language, art and music into this effort, Robbins is leading the children through the dual tasks of creating a national dance and a national game. To do so, she first teaches them real national dances, which are also called “folk” or “ethnic” dances. Each one, she explained, evolves from the history and culture of a community and says something about it. One of the steps she teaches the chil-

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

dren, in this romping, stomping, rousing dance, requires a snaking, sideways crossover step. “They do it in break dancing, they do it in soccer, they do it in Chinese dance,” Robbins shouted over the percussion-heavy world music playing on the sound system. “Oh!” the light bulb went off for one little girl. “It’s the ‘grapevine’ step!” Robbins loves the work she does, no matter how many hours she puts in on her feet each day. And for her, this project is bringing her own life in dance full circle. Now 52, the Columbus native grew up in the Eastmoor neighborhood. “I started folk dancing when I was very young, but I was also more of an athlete,” Robbins said after class had ended and the children had demonstrated their newfound Russian folk-dancing skills for the teacher who showed up to escort them to their next class. “I didn’t start formal dance training until I was 19 and I enrolled in Ohio State’s dance department,” Robbins said. After earning her degree there, Robbins pursued the multi-tasking life that many in the dance world do — performing, teaching and

choreographing. She was part of a vibrant Columbus dance scene in the 1980s when the Third Avenue Performance Space flourished. And she rode the roller coaster of public arts funding during her time with the Ohio Arts Council. She also has earned a master’s degree in arts education from Ohio State University. And in 1991, she found a true home in Indianola’s program. “The school has what’s called an ‘informal’ philosophy,” Robbins said. “That means we believe that real, live experiences enable children to learn on a deeper level. It’s very child-centered. You have multi-age classrooms.” The school is filled through a lottery system and draws students from all over the city. Begun in the 1970s, it was a K-5 school initially, but about four years ago became a K-8 facility. And in this unique curriculum, Robbins sees something she wishes she had as a child: “I was totally an ADD kid, even though it was never identified as such. Our kids here come out through cooperative learning. Their spirits stay open.”


on the go: VITAMIN ME

happy

VALENTINE’S day to me! BY KRISTY ECKERT

First off, for the record, I adore my husband, worship my son, love my friends, enjoy slipping on fabulous dresses for big events and honestly believe I have the world’s greatest job. But the moment was as beautiful as it was rare: It was a Saturday night, my husband had gone to play poker with friends, my baby was asleep, the girlfriend who was going to come over ended up home with a sick kid, and suddenly, there I was — alone with a spot-

less house (God bless a man who cleans!), not an e-mail left unanswered and no plans. Cue the trumpets and pour the wine ... Do I truly have five hours alone? To do whatever I want? With not even a load of laundry to squeeze in? I lit some candles, uncorked a bottle of Rioja, pulled out a Godiva chocolate bar, curled up on the couch and rented “Sex and the City 2.” It. Was. Divine.

Kristy Eckert is the editor of Capital Style, a bimonthly women’s magazine published by The Dispatch Printing Company. To sign up for her weekly e-newsletter, visit Capital-Style.com

So here’s the idea I’m proposing: At some point this month, make a night alone your Valentine to you. Send your husband out. Let Grandma take the kids. And don’t even ask your girls over. Just hang with you, and for a few blessed hours, do whatever it is you darn well please.

that you can adorn with charms for each child). Prices range from $25 to $200. Also, if you’re looking for a fun V Day gift for your daughter, Stile Salon & Spa at Easton has manicure prices good enough to justify some quality together time: $25 for a Delux Manicure for you, and $12 for a Little Miss Manicure for her.

Speaking of Valentines, I love romance and surprises and all that good stuff, but I never think hint dropping is bad. If there’s something you want, tell your spouse. If he has a better idea, more power to him. If he doesn’t, he’ll be relieved. Right now, I’m loving Belle Street jewelry, made by a talented local woman and sold at Enjoy Co. (Granville), Fritzy Jacobs (Worthington) and On Paper (Short North). Her jewelry is dainty and sophisticated (and she sells lovely mother’s necklaces

And fashion lovers, you may also want to pencil in the year’s two biggest award shows so you don’t get wrapped up in Sunday night dinner and homework time and forget: The Grammys (Feb. 13) and The Oscars (Feb. 27). The Oscars, especially, makes a good excuse for a casual party, so get planning. Your options are many, from assigning each guest a movie and asking them to bring an associated food and wine to doing a dips-and-desserts-only potluck. Enjoy!

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21


on the go: HOUSEBROKEN

Informal Education I have a degree from Kent State University, where I learned how to write coherently, interpret literature and construct a logical argument. But I was still pretty much an idiot. I had no idea what to do with a leaky faucet, couldn’t cook a pot roast worth eating, and would have died within three hours if stranded in the woods. If you’re lucky, you get an informal education when your formal one ends, because that’s when you leave college, enter the real world and find out how much you don’t know. So, I’ve been thinking: What are the most useful things I’ve learned outside the classroom? Cooking would surely rank near the top. What it has saved me in pizza deliveries alone is incalculable.

I learned by trial and error — mostly error. If you’re going to charge unprepared into an activity, cooking is a pretty good one because it’s not likely to result in financial catastrophe and odds are you won’t kill anyone. I was able to essentially bungle my way to competence in the kitchen, making one bad meal after another — the worst ever being kale soup that my wife still remembers with revulsion — until I figured out how to do it right. A second vital element in an informal education is an ability to fix things around the house. Here, you really can kill yourself, so it pays to be wary. However, just about anyone can learn to do things with the surfaces of walls.

or ! F ee Only1 F on nts 0, 201 i t a de rch 2 r t is Stu s Ma g Re ew Expire ENROLLING N

E E FR

By watching my father-in-law, I learned how to fix holes in walls, strip paper from them, paint them, and add woodwork to them. This yielded dramatic results at low cost and minimal risk. Later, I advanced to plumbing, but not too far. My policy is to mess only with faucets and only on Sundays. If I screw up a faucet repair, it’s not going to flood the entire house. And if I do it on Sundays, I have the option of calling a plumber for help on Mondays without paying weekend overtime rates. An informal education should also include some survival skills. I’m highly pleased with the fact that, if stranded in the wilderness, I know how to build a simple but effective hut out of sticks and leaves and

BY JOE BLUNDO

will be able to stay warm and somewhat dry. I would still die (I don’t really know how to fish or hunt), but it would be by starvation rather than hypothermia. I learned hut construction as a Boy Scout dad. My son was going for his wilderness survival merit badge, and I picked up a few things by hanging around. Unlike cooking or plumbing, this is not an everyday skill. It’s more like a competency that boosts your sense of self worth. If I’m having a bad day, I console myself by thinking, “Well, at least if civilization ends tomorrow, I’ll be able to provide my family with a nice home out of yard waste.” I still can’t tune up a car or program a computer. But that’s why they say education never ends.

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

Joe Blundo’s column So to Speak appears in the Life section of The Columbus Dispatch. Visit his blog at Dispatch.com


on the go: TAKE IT FROM TRACY

The

Homework headache BY TRACY TOWNSEND

A funny thing happened when my husband and I attended parent/teacher conference this year. Our son Ian’s teacher asked how I liked third grade so far. “It’s driving me crazy — there’s so much homework,” I complained. Once I realized my inner voice had indeed escaped, I added a smile to lighten the mood. Third grade really is OK. Ian likes his teacher and we like that he is being challenged. There are days though when we ask ourselves whether we had this much homework way back when we were in third grade? We’ve long given up discussing the matter because … well, we — err, Ian — has work to do: reading, math, science and social studies.

My mom friends with older children tell me homework gets worse in fourth grade. Oh joy! Seriously, the demands and expectations are higher for our children and there is more homework. Parent and pediatric behavioral health experts say we can clear the air of conflict and complete assignments by first identifying our children’s “homework style.” “Don’t think the attitude toward homework is your fault. It’s not necessarily you. Your child is a unique individual,” said Dr. Daniel Coury who practices pediatric developmental and behavioral health medicine at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The father of four says two of his children were self starters but the other two had to be closely monitored. There are simple strategies to employ, including designating the time and place for homework. Is your child one who needs a break from the school day before homework or is it better to get right on task with homework after school? Designate a place to do the work — the kitchen table is fine — which allows you to be at least within earshot to supervise. “Supervision lets the parent know what the child is doing and sends the message to the

child that mom and/or dad value their education,” said Coury. One critical strategy parents can use with children who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is to break homework into chunks. Start with one section or chunk of the work then go on to another section. Coury specializes in treating children with ADHD and said that breaking up homework can help tremendously: “We have 30 minutes until dinner, so which part of the assignment can we do now? Then we’ll finish the other part after dinner.” Bottom line, friends: This is our new reality. Take advantage of any tools provided by your child’s teacher and do your part. Don’t forget to check your child’s backpack — daily. If it feels like a second job, it is. The reward when it comes to homework and our children isn’t a salary, but the priceless message that we value their education, and of course, them.

Tracy Townsend is a news reporter and anchor with 10TV News HD.

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23


on the go: NEIGHBORHOOD SPOTLIGHT

Pickerington BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTO PHOTOS BY DANIEL SOHNER

Driving around Pickerington you’re likely to see houses on big lots, schools set back from the road and small businesses offering unique goods. The community, which straddles Franklin and Fairfield counties, offers residents a taste of the country with some big-city opportunities for fun. “Pickerington has a somewhat rural feel,” said resident Stacy Bender. “It’s nice that we’re not a big city. We have the best of both worlds.” The small-town feel extends to local business, added Jen Dear, membership director for the Pickerington Area Chamber of Commerce. “A lot of businesses are locally owned,” she said. “There’s a sole proprietor or one or two employees.” Families need to check out one of the city’s newest attractions, Rule (3). The family-entertainment center features a restaurant, bowling alley and arcade. The facility, which opened in August 2009, includes a giant claw machine (think Toy Story, only bigger), duck-pin bowling and Wii lounges. Customers pay for most games and activities with a card they preload with money.

24

“It’s perfect for anybody of any age,” said Dear, a mother of three. Another fun option is Rock Factory Art & Music Studios, where kids can take music and art lessons, record songs, join a band or pursue other creative interests. Younger kids can romp and run in the area’s plentiful outdoor spaces. The recently installed equipment at Victory Park is different than typical playground offerings, said Mabry Morrow, who likes to go there with her two daughters. The play set is modern with fun climbing areas and a funky slide. Plus, Morrow said, “It has a really great cushy surface.” Across the street at Sycamore Creek Park families will find a more traditional play set, skate park and covered bridge. Pickerington Ponds, part

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

Rule (3)

Feather Your Nest

Planet Coffee and Tea Co. of the Metro Parks system, has much-used walking trails. The park, designated as one of the state’s best birding areas by the National Audubon Society, is a good place to spot blue heron. Inside fun can be had at the Pickerington Public Library. The farm-themed children’s area hosts regular story hours. The Marcus Pickerington Cinema often has special events geared for children.

The movie theater presents a children’s film series each winter. Frosty Flicks, featuring $2 movies, starts Feb. 6. Local kids really look forward to the weekend movies every year, Morrow said. “Pickerington is really kind of centered around the kids,” she said. “It’s friendly. You run into people you know.” Even the local coffee shop, Planet Coffee and Tea Co., welcomes youngsters.

Owner Lisa Brown usually greets kids with a piece of candy. It’s not uncommon for little ones to color or even to munch on sides of bacon while adults visit the shop, which sells homemade baked goods and serves breakfast and lunch. “We have a meeting area where moms can come in and bring their kids,” she said. Brown, who bought the business in July, plans to host cookie and cupcake decorating parties in the meeting room. The Kindred Spirits Gifts

and Home Décor offers an ever-changing selection of goods. Fun finds include homemade hair clips, decorated onesies and wood stepstools for kids. In downtown Pickerington, Feather Your Nest, is another sure bet for interesting gifts and home-decorating items. The store has great hanging lamps, fun hair accessories and pretty baubles for the home. Environmentally conscious shoppers will want to check out Resale Furniture, which sells used furniture in a wide variety of styles.


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2610 Newark-Granville Road Granville, Ohio 43023 740.522.2020 • www.welshhills.org

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PLANET COFFEE & TEA CO. 1252 Hill Rd. 614-861-2040 facebook.com/pages/ Planet-CoffeeTea/74454824893 FEATHER YOUR NEST 36 W. Columbus St., Canal Winchester 614-834-3392 featheryournestnews. blogspot.com

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VICTORY PARK 49-71 Lockville Rd., across from City Hall recreationparks.net/ oh/fairfield

MARCUS MOVIE 1776 Hill Road North 614-759-6500 marcustheatres.com/ Theatre/TheatreDetail/157

KINDRED SPIRITS CRAFTS AND HOME DÉCOR 799 Windmiller Dr. 614-759-9808 kindredspiritsgiftsand homedecor.com

ROCK FACTORY ART & MUSIC STUDIOS 449 Hill Road North 614-735-4715 rockfactorystudios.com

RESALE FURNITURE 30 W. Columbus St. 614-837-5456

RULE (3) 650 Windmiller Dr. 614-864-7853 rule3.com

SYCAMORE CREEK PARK 100 Lockville Rd. recreationparks.net/ oh/fairfield

PICKERINGTON PONDS 7680 Wright Rd. metroparks.net/ ParksPickeringtonPonds.aspx

Music Instruction Artist Development Recording Voice - Guitar - Piano - Theory Songwriting - Production 3100 Tremont Rd. Suite 020 Upper Arlington, 43221

Phone: 614-451-1976

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PICKERINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 201 Opportunity Way 614-837-4104 pickeringtonlibrary.org

*Year round program for children ages 2 1/2 to Kindergarten *NAEYC Accredited *Recipient of Ohio Dept. of Ed.’s High Quality Program Award *Degreed teachers with an average of 15 years teaching experience For a private tour call 614-487-5155 columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

25


FREE TUITION

on the go: SHOP SPOTLIGHT

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RULE (3)

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Mutual trust and respect are the foundation of our schools. Our seats are filling fast, so apply online, take a tour and see for yourself the difference we can make in your child’s confidence, education and life. Learn more at NewMediaMiddle.org or call (614) 448-7203 26

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

Don Smith and his late partner Brian Stoner built Rule (3) as a place for families to come and have fun together. The Pickerington site, which Smith has dubbed a “play-cation center,” includes a bowling alley, restaurant and bar, arcade, Wii and Xbox lounges, and minibowling lanes. Rule (3) also has outdoor volleyball courts and corn-hole games. “Bowling is making a big comeback,” Smith said. “We wanted an upscale bowling area surrounded with other fun things to do.”

What does the name Rule (3) mean? It’s a conversation starter. We wanted something unique. All good things come in threes. We came up with three rules: Play Hard. Play Happy. Play Here.

What type of parties do people have here? We have several happiness zones. There’s literally something for the entire family to do. We focus on children’s birthdays, 20th wedding anniversaries, Sweet 16 parties, surprise 30th birthdays. We try to make ourselves a nice location to accommodate 12 or 112.

You purposely built Rule (3) to be a place for families and teens to hang out. Why was creating that type of business important to you? It is fun to see families do things together. Sometimes, we literally have four generations of a family celebrating here. You don’t see that anymore. Our goal was to bring that back.

While playing games, kids earn tickets to redeem for prizes. One of the prizes is an Xbox Connect that requires 35,000 tickets. Has anyone ever won one? We just had a lady do it. I thought it was pretty good that she was able to get her children to save their tickets.

Do you offer any specials to attract families? We have a food and fun combo. It’s nine different entrees or meals that you can choose from and get $10 to use anywhere. We also have a kids-eat-free special on Mondays.


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We’re going to have a ton of fun stuff just for you on Kids Day sponsored by

CROOKED HOUSES — Ten of these funny-looking playhouses will make up the Jeld-Wen Doorway to Your Community AWESOME ACTIVITIES — From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., you’ll be able to make crafts to take home at the CW Columbus Kids Korner area SCIENCE TIME — From noon to 1:30 p.m., COSI on Wheels will be on hand with interactive stations you can explore FURRY FRIENDS — At 1:30 p.m., animals from the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium will pay a visit KID CHEFS — You can watch members of the Young Chefs’ Academy make some delicious dishes between 3-4 p.m.

We haven’t forgotten about you, Mom & Dad While you’re at the show on Kids Day, you won’t want to miss: Presented by:

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The HGTV star of “Carter Can” and “Red Hot and Green” will take the stage for appearances at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. In partnership with our official sponsors:

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Our annual Garden Showcase has a rock ’n’ roll theme this year. Take a stroll through gardens inspired by the Stones, Elvis and more.

CHILL IN STYLE

KIMBERLY LACY

Looking for ways to liven up your place without breaking the bank? Come see the star of HGTV’s “Curb Appeal” at 4 p.m.

Among the many new features at the show this year are the 97.1 The FAN Cave, a finished basement sponsored and built by The Basement Doctor; the 97.1 “My Guy” Ultimate Garage, complete with its own patio/beer garden; and the Capital Style VIP Lounge — the best seats in the house for the Home Idea Center Stage.

Guests and presenters are being added all the time! For a full schedule, updates and details, check out www.dispatchevents.com.

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

27


hot topic: EDUCATION

the

Montessori mystery BY TRUDA SHINKER

What’s it really about?

Montessori education is one of those things that many of us have heard about, but don’t really understand. Most people have a vague idea that Montessori schools let kids do whatever they want but, beyond that, very few people could tell you anything else about this century-old educational philosophy. Maria Montessori, an Italian physician who worked with underprivileged children in the early 1900s, observed that, if given the proper environment, children could absorb an incredible amount of information without the assistance of an adult. Thus was born the core of the Montessori philosophy: Children teach themselves. From this central tenant stem the key components of Montessori:

FREEDOM WITHIN LIMITS: Children in a Montessori classroom are allowed to choose their area of focus. They are given small group or individual lessons on topics and then permitted to explore learning materials on their own. “Montessori encourages independent learning,” explained Amy Williams, director of the Teacher Education Program at the Columbus Montessori Education Center. “Kids are doing all different things in the classroom.” However, children are not allowed to just do nothing all day or to focus on one thing while ignoring all other topics. “We give children freedom, but also responsibilities,” said Susan Walling, a teacher at St. Joseph Montessori School in Columbus. “We help them set goals, take turns with materials, and do follow-up work.”

THE PREPARED ENVIRONMENT: To enable independent learning, the Montessori classroom is very carefully prepared by the teacher. “In the Montessori philosophy, the materials and the environment are seen as another teacher,” explained Kimberly Miller, assistant professor of education at Ohio Dominican University. Each classroom has areas for exploring art, math, language, science, geography, music, sensory items and practical life (a Montessori hallmark in which children learn age-appropriate life skills such as cleaning and dressing). Learning materials are easily accessible and available to the children at all times. Typically, “the teacher makes a presentation and then the children can use the materials on their own,” said Walling. “The classroom is rich in opportunities to deepen learning.”

TEACHER AS OBSERVER AND GUIDE:

Lenn Turner, director of the Columbus Montessori Education Center, and some of her students

WANT TO LEARN MORE? A free Montessori event is being held on Thurs., Feb. 10, from 7-9 p.m. in the Griffin Center at Ohio Dominican University, 1216 Sunbury Rd., Columbus. Trevor Eissler presents “Montessori Madness,” a parent-to-parent talk about Montessori education. For more information, call 614-457-6404.

28

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

OTHER MONTESSORI RESOURCES INCLUDE: American Montessori Society: amshq.org The Montessori Foundation: montessori.org

In a traditional classroom, teachers take center stage. In the Montessori classroom, teachers take a backseat to the students, but that doesn’t mean that they aren’t an integral component of the philosophy. “The teacher observes the students and is constantly taking notes on their cognitive, emotional, and motor skills,” said Williams. “The teacher then guides the children based on those observations.” “We always say, ‘Follow the child, but don’t follow them off a cliff,’ ” laughed Kathy Koehler, who also teaches at St. Joseph Montessori School. Teachers guide their students so that they get a well-rounded education. “The teacher is responsible to make sure that kids have the right skills for their age group,” said Walling. “We help kids achieve a balance.”


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HANDS-ON, CONCRETE LEARNING: “Maria Montessori found that children learned best with hands-on materials,” said Miller. Children in a Montessori classroom learn their ABCs by working with sandpaper letters. They use cubes and other manipulatives to learn math. They are taught to care for themselves and their environment with child-sized tools. Students who attend Montessori high schools do service-learning projects in which they put their classroom lessons to work in the community.

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THE MULTI-AGE CLASSROOM: Montessori classrooms are composed of multiple age groups. The “Children’s House,” or pre-school, classroom has children ages 3 to 5. Then firstthrough third-graders are grouped together, and so on. The children stay with the same teacher for all three years. The older children work with the younger children in the classroom. “Sometimes the best teacher is another student,” said Williams. Walling added, “Not only do the students learn to listen and respect each other, but they also get the chance to feel confident and competent.”

COOPERATION FROM PARENTS: All of the teachers and parents interviewed for this article agreed that a Montessori education requires commitment on the parents’ part. “Parents must allow their children to struggle with a task and not jump in to help,” said Koehler. “If they don’t carry over the principles at home, the child will be confused.” To that end, many Montessori schools offer parent-education classes. Sarah Saxbe Bartz, a parent from Columbus Montessori, said she has integrated Montessori practices in her home, such as having her children clean up after themselves and take the lead in conflict resolution. “It can be a challenge to allow your kids to do things that aren’t comfortable for them,” said Karin Wurapa, whose three children attend St. Joseph Montessori School. “We often do for our children out of love, but forget that they are capable of doing things for themselves. Montessori reminds us to give kids the room to learn.”

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www.TheGardnerSchool.com columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

29


hot topic: EDUCATION

Be a Better Volunteer (and why it matters) BY JANE HAWES

“Volunteers needed.” Are there any words that elicit a wider range of reactions from parents than those? Dread — where am I going to find the time? Excitement — finally, I can get out of the house and talk to other grownups! Frustration — this means I have to work with that control freak Petunia Humpnagle again. And fear — how am I ever going to feed 207 kids and 23 teachers on a $94 budget? Volunteering is a fact of parental life. If schools had to pay for every experience their students have, well…they couldn’t. So it’s often up to parents to make up the labor, materials and money gap. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

WHY IT MATTERS

“First and foremost, if your kid sees you actively involved in their school, that makes their education experience much more meaningful for them,” said Becky Piela, a former teacher and principal who retired last year after 47 years in the Dayton and Columbus Catholic schools systems. “You should want to do it because you want that school to be successful,” Piela added. Rhonda Wharton is a Columbus City Schools mom who has been volunteering in her three children’s school buildings for close to two decades. Her oldest is now 26 and her youngest is 15. “I like that I can keep close tabs on my child at school, and she knows it, plus I can see what’s changing in the district,” said Wharton who added that she uses one vacation day a month on average to volunteer. At Columbus Academy, a private school in Gahanna with a strong culture of volunteerism, parents say they see the “trickle down” effect of their charity with their children. “It makes them more inclined to be helpful,” said Amelia Jeffers. “My son volunteered recently to work at an event that I was working at. I didn’t even know he had until he asked me when we were going to be leaving for it.”

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Helpful Hints DON’T • Volunteer in order to snoop or “gather ammo” against teachers or administrators • Gossip with other parents about what you observe • Change a staff member’s way of doing something without talking to him or her first • Confront a staff member about a perceived problem in front of students: Discuss it privately. PHOTOS COURTESY KEVIN DUBENION

At Columbus Academy, Garnett Johnson and his daughter Taylor, Brian Welch and son, Nathaniel, Craig Tuckerman and son, Arie

WHY IT’S NOT EASY

The benefits are many, but that still doesn’t make volunteering an easy task — for parents or for the school’s staff. Piela said it’s easy for parents to get burned out when they commit to more than they can realistically handle. And Courtney Bosca, with children in both the Gahanna schools and at Columbus Academy, agreed: “You can easily get sucked into saying ‘yes’ to everything. I had my reality check because of an illness.” But economic realities these days also are making it harder for parents to volunteer. As late as 1989, Piela said, “I don’t think any of the mothers in the school I was in worked. Now most of our parents do work and people are very cautious with their time.” Bosca said the volunteer pool at Gahanna has definitely shrunk in recent years, but she’s found it’s actually harder to get volunteers for the activities that take place after work hours and on weekends: “I think it’s more a matter of people not wanting to get sitters at night.”

HOW TO MAKE IT WORK

But parents at every type of school in the area said that when it matters, you will find the help you need: “As with any place,” said Bosca, “you have your core volunteers and they’re the ones who always show up.” And Kevin Dubenion, with a fifth grader at Columbus Academy, said he’s trying to put a different face on those core volunteers. A male face, to be specific. “Let’s be real,” Dubenion said, “moms drive this place, and sometimes the dads just lift up their feet and coast. But I really like to get dads involved.” That’s part of why he started the Lunch Bunch — “the happiest hour on earth,” he bills it — where on the last Friday of each month, dads come into the cafeteria at Academy and oversee family-style serving of meals. The project was such a hit, it prompted the school to change all its meals to family-style seating where one adult, whether a teacher or a parent, sits, eats and talks with seven to nine students at each table. That kind of problem solving is what schools need most from volunteers, said Piela. A good volunteer, she said, “listens to what a person wants them to do, but also uses good initiative. Instead of asking questions every two minutes, they figure out what needs to be done and they do it.”

DO • Be realistic about what you can do • Show up and be on time • Ask for help or instructions if you’re not clear about how to do something • Help those who will follow you in a volunteering job by writing down what you did and how you did it • Be innovative about problem solving if you see the need

Columbus Academy dad Blane Walter serves student Mallory Smith


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columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

31


hot topic: EDUCATION

Chartering the Future BY ELIZABETH SEUFER

Community schools provide students with additional learning options

Anthony and Ted Pennington

CHOOSING A COMMUNITY SCHOOL SEARCH. Find community schools near you at the Ohio Alliance for Public Charter Schools website, oapcs.org. Click on “Find a School” and type in your zip code. DO SOME HOMEWORK. Check school report cards at the Ohio Department of Education’s site, ode.state.oh.us. Click on “School Options,” “Community Schools” then “Your School’s Local Report Card.” You can search by school name and pull up a list of all community schools in Ohio. VISIT. Spend some time at the school, so you can experience the atmosphere and interact with the staff and students.

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Ted Pennington is glad he doesn’t have to wake up his 15-year-old son, Anthony, for school anymore. Much has changed since Anthony began attending The Arts & College Preparatory Academy this school year. Anthony approached his father with the idea after hearing about the school from friends. “He gets me up now, and I get up at 6 a.m.,” said Mr. Pennington, a Reynoldsburg resident. “He wants to be there at 7 a.m.” School doesn’t start until 9 a.m., but Anthony and his friends arrive early to practice music for their rockband class. Anthony said he loves everything about his new school. His grades have improved, too. “I felt like ACPA had more to offer for me personally, with the music and arts available,” Anthony said. “I was drawn to the smaller student body and more lively atmosphere.” The Arts & College Preparatory Academy is a community high school on the East Side of Columbus, but its students come from all over Central Ohio. The school received an excellent rating from the Ohio Department of Education for the 2009-10 school year and was named a School of Promise. Community schools, which are also known as charter schools, are tuition-free public schools, explained Ohio Department of Education spokesman Scott Blake. Students attending community schools are required to take the same Ohio Achievement Assessments and Ohio Graduation Test as students enrolled in traditional public school districts. Community schools serve as an

alternative to traditional K-12 public schools, according to the ODE. The first pilot community school was started in Lucas County in 1997. During the 2010-11 school year, about 98,000 students were enrolled in more than 340 community schools, said Bill Sims, president and CEO of the Ohio Alliance for Public Charter Schools. Sims said community schools tend to be unique learning environments and some specialize in specific disciplines like the arts, special education, technology and international studies. Community schools have sponsors, according to the ODE, which oversees those sponsors. A governing authority is responsible for operating a community school. A school’s curriculum is detailed in a community school contract. Teachers in both traditional public school districts and community schools must meet state certification and licensing requirements and must be highly qualified, according to the ODE. Teachers in community schools, however, are allowed to teach outside of their areas of certification. Funding for community schools is handled differently than it is for traditional public school districts. Blake said there’s a separate formula for community schools and that funding varies based on the school district each student resides in. “(Charter schools) get, on average, about two-thirds of what a district gets for its students,” Sims said. “More charter schools close down for financial reasons than they do for academic reasons. They really operate on very thin margins.”

Common myths about community schools include that they all perform poorly and that they’re not public schools. Neither statement is true, Sims said. As is the case with traditional public schools, all community schools are not equal in terms of their success. “It only takes one closed school to paint a really negative portrait,” said Marty Griffith, director of development and business partnerships at The Arts & College Preparatory Academy. “ACPA is a great story of what’s possible over time with a dedicated group of professionals.” Griffith said that upon leaving the high school, roughly 75 percent to 80 percent of students have applied and been accepted to a twoor four-year college or a career path program. “Atmosphere is the No. 1 key to our success,” Griffith said. “Kids will work if they’re engaged and motivated to learn. That’s what we’ve learned at ACPA.” Assistant Principal Richard Albeit, who has prior public school district experience, said he was skeptical of ACPA at first. He now refers to it as an “oasis.” “The rapport between students and staff — it’s not friendship, but mutual respect,” Albeit said. “What I tell parents is…your kid will be as excited about coming to school every day as they were in second grade,” Griffith said. “Usually, in the middle school years, something happens. School becomes a chore instead of a joy. We try to rediscover the joy of learning.”


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need to know: AGE APPROPRIATE: ADOPTION

Open Adoption Opening up the possibilities BY KRISTEN MAETZOLD Jeff and Amy wanted to be there for the birth of their soon-to-be-adopted son. The Hilliard couple now laughs over the fact that when they stepped off the plane in Arizona they had little more than a used car seat, luggage and their biological daughter, Jaelyn, then 5. They would buy diapers there, while a dresser drawer in their hotel room would serve as a makeshift crib. The family had started the adoption process two years prior, but when the call came that they finally had been matched with a birth mother, they had barely a week to prepare before the Arizona woman’s labor would be induced and their son born. Jeff shared the story of how they met mother and son together in a Phoenix hospital room: “She was changing his diaper and she turned around and handed him to Amy and said, ‘Here you go.’ I just couldn’t wrap my head around it.” Amy tearfully talked of the birth mother’s sacrifice: “She did that for the child. It had to have been hard for anybody to do that.” “(Parents) learn more in that 30-minute meeting than they’ll ever get in a 15-page document,” said Nancy Burley, executive director of Adoption Circle, a private Columbus adoption agency. Burley compared the adoptive experience to the proverbial monster-under-the-bed: “Adults are fearful of what they can’t see and what they don’t know.” Burley said when the two sides meet and mystery is removed, it eases a lot of anxieties for all involved. Jeff understands. Like his son, he is also adopted but the details about his family of birth remain a mystery: “For years I’ve wondered who my biological parents are, what they are like, and if I have biological siblings.” He said this is one of the reasons why the couple chose to have a level of openness in the adoption of their son. Gehrig will be 2 in June. His parents plan to introduce the concept of adoption to their son in the next year or so. Burley said that’s wise: “If you start sharing information from the very beginning, then that is what’s normal to the child. They don’t know anything else.” Jeff and Amy (who asked not to share their last name for this story) will one day give Gehrig copies of the letters they still send his birth mother as well as several mementos she wanted him to have. While they were content to tuck their son in a dresser drawer those first few days, they promise that details of his adoption won’t be tucked away. “We want him to grow up with it,” said Jeff, “so it’s always a part of him and part of his story.”

0YE-A1RS

Jeff and Amy with daughter Jaylen and adopted son Gehrig

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

LEVELS OF “OPENNESS” • Open adoption means that the birth mother and adopted family know who each other are. • At the very least, adoptive parents receive the social/medical history of the birth parent(s). • In its most “open” form, birth parent(s) remain actively involved in the child’s life. • The adoptive parents remain the sole legal parents. • Open adoption is legal in Ohio but it’s not legally enforceable. An adoptive parent is not obligated by law to maintain contact with the birth parent(s).


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Avery’s parents, Christine and Ron Thielman, want the 6year-old to maintain a connection with the country where she was born. The couple, who are Hilliard residents, adopted Avery when she was 14 months old. They are active members in Central Ohio Families with Children from China, a support group that promotes cultural awareness. The group gathers to celebrate important Chinese holidays and other events, said Mrs. Thielman. “You want your child to grow up proud of their country,” said Thielman, whose mother was Japanese. “They should be proud of their heritage.” It’s the right approach, said Adam Pertman, executive director of the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute in New York. Research shows that children who have connections to their place of birth have a more positive self identity and higher self esteem, said Pertman. “Everybody needs to know who they are and where they come from,” Pertman said. “It’s no less true for adopted children.” Families foster those connections by celebrating the holidays of their children’s birth country, preparing traditional foods, and learning the stories and traditions of the culture. Some families even send children to culture camps or make visits to their homelands. The key is incorporating the child’s culture into the fabric of their lives, Pertman said. “It’s not about one-shot deals,” he said. “It has to be part of their daily life.” Adhra Young and her husband work hard to make Ethiopian culture part of the “the air we breathe.” The Bexley couple, who are Caucasian, adopted their 5-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter from Ethiopia four years ago. Young started a support group for families who have adopted children from Ethiopia. The group works together to help their children maintain ties to their birth country. She also has learned to prepare Ethiopian foods and celebrates Ethiopian holidays with her family. The couple was excited to add new cultural traditions to their family. “We were happy to embrace a transcultural element,” Young said. The family also has made friends within the Central Ohio Ethiopian community and sought out African-American pro-

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

need to know: AGE APPROPRIATE: ADOPTION

A Family to Call Their Own Kids of all ages need safe, loving homes BY DEBBIE ANGELOS

Maria Hunte has six daughters. They share clothes, rooms and advice. One shares her DNA. They all share her heart. Growing up, Hunte always knew she wanted a house full of children. So in 2003, she and daughter Jelisa, now 17, decided to open their home to kids who needed a home most — foster children. Eight years and more than 12 foster kids later, Hunte’s family has blossomed with Jamilah, 15, Demitria, 13, Latandra, 12, and, most recently, HOW TO HELP A CHILDME: sisters Dominique, 18, ADJUST TO A NEW HO A new sense of worth and Giarra, 5. ics of the • Learn about the dynam is exactly what has been “I guess I have the . life child’s previous home achieved in the Hunte house I always wanted!” t rsis pe home, although it’s not can r fea t said Hunte. • Remember tha s. ing only the kids who have nd rou sur In North America, new even in felt this. there are more than scious “It’s not been easy but • Emphasize it was a con 500,000 children in fosld into a some days I look at my choice to bring that chi ter care with 114,500 of is wantkids and just feel so home, and that he or she those children available grateful for my life,” ed there. for adoption. According explained Hunte. e, to the Administration riat rop app and • When possible “There’s never a day I ld’s for Children & Families, the chi maintain contacts from look back and say that I 47 percent of those waitprevious home. wished I didn’t do this. ing to be adopted are Sometimes my kids over the age of 8. children — not because come up to me and tell me Older-child adoption stathere’s anything wrong with that they love me and that’s tistics are disheartening. them,” said Rita Soronen, the the best part.” Last year, according to the Bringing older children Dave Thomas Foundation for Foundation’s President and into a new home can have Adoption, nearly 29,000 chil- CEO. “Adolescence is hard enough but when you factor challenges, often because dren “aged out” of the fosin experiences of abuse and they have clear memories ter-care system at age 18, and emotions about experiwithout having found a fami- neglect it creates new hurdles. But a family has the ences in their previous ly to call their own. opportunity to give these homes. “The older they get, the “Families must undermore myths surround foster kids a new sense of worth.”

3S 8Y-E1 R A

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

stand that grief and fear can follow these children for quite some time,” said Soronen. But with patience, love and help from professional support networks, a child’s life can be changed. “To make that kind of difference in a child’s life can be one of the most wonderful gifts a person can get,” Soronen said. Hunte agreed: “Some people say I’m crazy and some people say I’m a saint. I just say that I am truly blessed.”

For information on foster care adoption, contact Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption at 1-800-ASK-DFTA or visit davethomasfoundation.org.


columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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need to know: THE GO-TO GUIDE

Tutoring SERVICES

BY JANE HAWES

photo courtesy of Sylvan Learning

It’s officially called “supplemental education,” but most families probably call it “tutoring.” In a nutshell, it’s outside help when your child seems to be hitting a road bump or even a brick wall with school work. In this month’s Go-To Guide, Columbus Parent talked to some of the area’s top providers of supplemental education to decipher the why, when and how of tutoring.

HOW DO I KNOW WHEN MY CHILD NEEDS A TUTOR? Any number of signals will tell you that something’s up and needs to be addressed: GRADES: it could be just one subject or all of them, but the

PHYSICAL SIGNS: Stomach aches, said Cathers, are

grades are suddenly slipping and this is the time of the year when most people decide they need to do something, said providers. If it’s one subject, said Sylvan’s Nisey Sebak, it might be something as simple as a knowledge gap caused by having missed a few critical lessons during an absence, so extra practice is needed in that area. But if a child is “only skating by in school,” said Sebak, there could be an underlying foundational problem with a broad-based skill like reading comprehension.

a classic sign of anxiety and trouble in school. Test anxiety also shows up with a number of physical symptoms like crying and sleep disruption.

HOMEWORK: if homework is “taking an abnormal amount of time to finish,” said Huntington’s Kirsten Cathers, that’s another sign. This often happens as children transition from elementary to middle school, said College Nannies & Tutors’ Susan Cornish: “There’s no more hand holding, but an enormous disconnect because of the amount of freedom occurs.” Likewise, a refusal to do homework often is “a mask for not understanding material,” said The Tutoring Center’s Gwen Kyle.

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

EMOTIONAL SIGNS: Behavior problems in school are another masking mechanism, said Kyle. Likewise a reluctance or lack of motivation to go to school often stems from a fear of criticism or failure. Boredom can also be an indicator, said Cornish, that a student may actually be under-challenged and in danger of losing interest in school. Finally, chronic frustration — yours and your child’s — is another red flag.

PARENTAL INSTINCTS: Your gut is telling you that something’s wrong. Parents, said Cathers, “are typically going to know their kid better than anyone else.” Even if they’re getting good grades but you feel like something is wrong, “go with your gut,” Cathers said.

WHAT SHOULD I DO? • Talk to your child’s teachers first. Every tutoring expert we talked to said they encourage parents to communicate with the school and let them know they are considering outside help. “Classroom teachers can sometimes feel threatened by a parent seeking outside help,” said Sebak, so she encourages parents to use the word “coach,” not “tutor,” because it’s a less emotionally-loaded term. Kyle said that schools “sometimes take it personally,” but as long as you emphasize that you want to take a cooperative and/or team approach, you can minimize tension. And teachers may actually have recommendations for tutors they know and like. • Check out a few different providers. Pay attention to how the people there make you and your child feel. • Be open and honest about the situation, and the factors that may be contributing to diminished performance in school. Now is not the time to sugar-coat reality. Be prepared to share report cards, progress reports, tests, papers and homework.


WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT?

• Most but not all tutoring services will perform a diagnostic assessment, which is a standardized test designed to pinpoint strengths, weaknesses and knowledge gaps. And they will usually charge a fee for this. The average fee in this area seems to be around $200, but you can often find coupons (including in Columbus Parent) that will help reduce that fee.

• All services will ask you and your child for your goals — what do you hope to get out of tutoring? It could be something as specific as an improved grade point average or something more abstract. “One parent told me she just wanted her child to ‘see joy in reading,’ and that’s a very valid goal,” said Sebak.

OUR EXPERTS:

Kirsten Cathers, executive director, Huntington Learning Centers, 1343 Stoneridge Dr., Gahanna, 614-4756500; 2704 Sawmill Place Blvd., Worthington, 614-889-7667; huntington• You should expect to receive a detailed, goal-oriented learning.com recommendation. If the learning issue is identified as Susan Cornish, owner, College Nanbeing a foundational problem — like reading compre- nies & Tutors, 349 W. Olentangy St., hension — do not expect a quick fix. It could require Powell, 614-761-3060, tutoring sessions for the duration of a school year or collegetutors.com longer. Gwen Kyle, director, The Tutoring Center, Columbus, 1987 W. Hender• Most families opt for tutoring sessions 1-3 times a son Rd., Upper Arlington, 614-459week, with each session usually lasting an hour. The 0091, tutoringcenter.com services we spoke to indicated that, on average, chilNisey Sebak, owner and executive dren used a tutoring service for at least 6 months. director of Sylvan Learning of Lewis • Some services will provide tutoring in your home, Center, 8645 Columbus Pike, 1-888but most prefer to conduct tutoring in their own cenEDUCATE, sylvanlearning.com

“We Are Here For You” John P. Sotos, MD Omolara Y. Dairo, MD Michele V. Mahoney, MD It is not too late to get your child a flu shot. Walk in Sick Visits at Both Office Locations 8am-9am - Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday

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ter, “away from the numerous distractions that are present at home,” said Cornish.

• Expect to receive feedback reports at set intervals from the tutoring service: They should tell you up front how often those will be. Generally you will receive a report, and your child may also be re-tested, every 10-12 hours of instruction.

• Costs vary from about $30-$75 per hour in the Central Ohio area, depending on whether you opt for one-on-one or 3:1 student/teacher ratios. Those fees generally also include consultations with a child’s school teachers. Inquire to make sure. Some services require you to sign a contract, but others do not. Some also offer financing plans, which can stretch out payments for as long as five years. Discounts for pre-paying may be available, and some employers’ benefits plans contribute to the cost of tutoring.

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614-863-8500 • www.PediatricDentistryofCentralOhio.com columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

39


Tomorrow’s careers are being taught today with hands-on training and real-word experiences at the

need to know: PEDIATRIC HEALTHSOURCE

Delaware Area Career Center

Join us for our Open House! February 10th, 2011 | 5-8pm Don’t miss your chance to get a tour of the high tech labs, industry equipment, and college-based curriculum. North Campus 1610 State Route 521 Delaware, OH 43015 (740) 363.1993

South Campus 4565 Columbus Pike Delaware, OH 43015 (740) 548.0708

Visit our web site for a list of classes and at which campus you can find them during the Open House event. www.DelawareAreaCC.org Refreshments provided from 5-7pm by:

Experience Tomorrow’s Careers Today

What can DACC do for YOU?..... Find out what current students are saying about DACC at www.DelawareAreaCC.org/high-school/blog The Delaware Area Career Center (DACC) affirms that equal opportunities are offered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, military status, national origin, disability, age, and ancestry of person. For more information, visit our website at www.DelawareAreaCC.org

EXPERTS FROM NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL ANSWER COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT HEALTH AND SAFETY My son has been having a lot of sinus infections. His doctor says he has narrow nasal passages and may need surgery. How common is this, and what can we expect? Frequent sinus infections in children are a common problem, especially for children in daycare settings. The average child may experience six to 10 upper-respiratory-tract infections over one year that have symptoms including nasal discharge and blockage. Most viral infections will resolve without treatment. A small percentage Dr. Charles will progress to bacterial sinusitis that will require antibiotics for treatment. Elmaraghy is a Narrowing or blockage of the nasal passages or sinus openings may increase member of the the chances that a cold will progress to bacterial sinusitis. Department of In a small percentage of children, surgery may be necessary to relieve the Otolaryngology at blockage and open the sinuses or nasal passages. Younger children do not Nationwide Chiltypically need surgery on the sinuses as their sinuses are still developing. dren’s Hospital Younger children with frequent sinus infections often have their adenoid, and an Assistant a patch of tissue located where the nose and throat join, removed. The adeProfessor of Clinical Otolaryngology noid can be a haven for bacteria and block the nasal passages. If sinus openings are blocked, they can be enlarged using special instruat The Ohio State ments. Both surgeries have a short recovery and can help immensely in the University College of Medicine. right patient. Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Rhinology Clinic is unique in that it offers allergy testing and endoscopic evaluation during the same visit. This allows both the allergist and otolaryngologist to determine an appropriate treatment plan.

Our family doctor says that our 10-year-old son may be developing Osgood-Schlatter Disease. I realize it has something to do with him growing so quickly, but what exactly is it and how serious is it? And is it something he’ll have all his life?

Center for PEDIATR IC & ADOLESCENT

PAIN CARE 40

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

Osgood-Schlatter Disease is an injury to a growth plate in the shin bone (tibia) in the front of the knee. A growth plate is softer and weaker than fully mature bone. Therefore, it is more susceptible to injury from either direct trauma (falling onto the front of the knee) or from repeated pulling on the growth plate from the tendon that attaches to it, which occurs during running, jumping and squatting activities. Over time, this growth plate gets irritated and inflamed. Osgood-Schlatter Disease presents most commonly in girls ages 9 to 13 and boys ages 11 to 15 as pain, swelling and tenderness in the front of the knee below the kneecap. It is typically a self-limited condition that resolves once the growth plate matures into adult bone, but symptoms can fluctuate over a few years. Symptoms usually get worse with increased levels of activity. Treatment consists of activity modification, ice, anti-inflammatory medicines, exercises to improve lower extremity flexibility and strength and sometimes a knee strap or knee pad. Often, a course of physical therapy or functional rehab can correct the underlying strength and flexibility deficits and help ease the pain. Coaches and parents should remind kids to warm up for 15 to 30 minutes before and after sports, and kids should never be encouraged to continue playing if injured.

Dr. Steven Cuff is the newest member of the Nationwide Children’s Sports Medicine team and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Sports Medicine at the Ohio State University College of Medicine.


Are You Concerned About Your Child’s Development?

To learn more about Nationwide Children’s Hospital, visit www.NationwideChildrens.org

We’re hearing so much about pertussis this year. Why has it become such a problem again? Pertussis, commonly known as “whooping cough,” is a highly contagious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable, violent coughing; it can even be life-threatening. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than half of infected infants less than 1 year of age must be hospitalized. From January 2010 to Nov. 27, 2010, there were 1,546 cases of pertussis reported to the Ohio Department of Health. At the same time in 2009, only 995 cases were reported. The pertussis vaccine offers immunity for about three years, then gradually decreases over the next few years. As this immunity wears off in children, reported pertussis cases increase. The increase may also be a result of an increase in awareness among health care providers, an increase in the use of more sensitive diagnostic tests, an increase in reporting and an overall increase in circulating pertussis. When an infected person sneezes or coughs, tiny droplets containing the bacteria move through the air, and the disease is easily spread from person to person. This makes it highly contagious in environments where kids are near each other, such as schools and daycares. The best way to protect your child from pertussis is to get him or her vaccinated. It is also important for adults to be immunized, especially those in homes with infants under 12 months of age.

TIP OF THE MONTH

February is Children’s Dental Health Month. Follow these easy tips to keep your child’s pearly whites healthy: • Brush at least twice a day — after breakfast and before bedtime, and also after lunch if possible. Brushing breaks down harmful plaque. • Brush all your teeth. Spend extra time on your back teeth and those along the side of your mouth. • Take your time. Brush for at least two minutes. • Use soft bristles. These are gentler on teeth and gums, but just as effective. • Floss at least once a day to remove food that gets stuck deep between your teeth. • Brush your tongue.

Dr. Olivia Thomas is the Section Chief of ambulatory Pediatrics at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. She is also a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Ambulatory Pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics at the Ohio State University College of Medicine.

The Sensory Learning Program has been proven effective for a multitude of diagnoses including Acquired Brain Injury, ADD/ADHD, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, Learning Disabilities, Developmental Delay as well as Sensory Dysfunctions that may present in the form of:

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Speech and Language delays Self-stimulating or Aggressive behaviors Sensitivities to sounds, textures, touch, etc. Learning or Perceptual problems Poor balance, coordination, and motor planning Lack of Body Awareness Poor Attention/Inability to focus Call today to schedule your FREE experiential appointment

614-545-3312 Vision Performance Center of Columbus with Steven J. Curtis, OD, FCOVD Shelley Ullom, MOT, OTR/L 3600 B Olentangy River Rd., Columbus, OH

www.SensoryLearning-Columbus.com Sensory Learning Program, Sensory Learning Center and Sensory Learning Institute are SM’s & TM’s of Sensory Learning Technologies, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

41


family fun: RECYCLED FUN

Valentine Shadow Boxes BY MEGAN MORIARTY

This time of year, stores are flooded with beautiful boxes of candy, and the packaging is often just as fun as the contents! If you are the lucky recipient of such a box, or if you have any kind of small box needing a new purpose — make a shadow box! Here, we’ll create a Valentine’s Day shadow box in the style of Mexican retablo art, using recycled and found items from around your home. Mexican retablo boxes are typically composed of several found items that go together to convey a story or message.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS: • A box, any size or shape • Found items from around your home (see below) • Cardboard scraps • Glue, such as Elmer’s or hot glue • Scissors • Soda can tab • Acrylic or tempera paint & paintbrush (optional) • Glitter (optional)

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

INSTRUCTION: 1. Find your materials: Go for a treasure hunt around your house! Look for small toys, game pieces, scraps of ribbon and paper, buttons, beads, pages from children’s books and magazines, old party decorations, bottle caps and broken or unwanted jewelry. 2. Plan your layout: Look at the materials you’ve gathered and see what inspires you the most. Can you combine some materials to form a theme or message? Does a particular color or group of colors stand out more than others? Choose items that look good together and help you express your idea. 3. Prepare your box: Paint your box inside and out, if needed, with a color or colors that work with your design. If you’d like to use some glitter, sprinkle it on while the paint is still wet.

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

4. Arrange your materials: After the paint has dried, experiment with arranging your found items. To add depth to your shadow box, glue small cardboard squares on the back of some of your items to make them pop out from the back of the box. Glue everything down with Elmer’s or hot glue. 5. Embellish: Part of the fun of Mexican retablo art is the abundance of decoration. Can you add more bling to your design? Try buttons, beads, bottle caps or shapes cut from magazines. 6. Finishing your box: When everything is glued down and secure, glue a soda can tab on the back top of your box with hot glue, or poke a small hole through the box with a nail. Use this to hang your box on the wall. All finished! Now your empty box has a beautiful new purpose.

This month’s project is brought to you by the Ohio Craft Museum, 1665 W. Fifth Ave. in Grandview. The museum is offering a free family workshop about making Valentine Shadow boxes on Feb. 6 from 1-3 p.m.; pre-registration is required. Call 614-486-4402 to sign up, or go to ohiocraft.org for info. And don’t forget Spring Break Craft Days for children aged 7-12 on March 21-23.


Save Oil Now!

Help Us Save One Million Gallons in Columbus!

Over 2 billion quarts of motor oil are used in the USA every year. It’s time to start re-using this valuable resource! Through advancements in technology, Valvoline has found a way to recycle and use re-refined motor oil – and turn it into recycled motor oil that’s every bit as good as our regular motor oils. Introducing new Valvoline® NextGen™ Recycled Motor Oil. We’ve re-invented motor oil – for maximum performance and minimum use of resources. And we’re launching it this month in all of our Columbus Valvoline Instant Oil Change Centers. Oil is a valuable resource – help us in our effort to preserve it. Where does motor oil go after it is used? Motor oil does not wear out, but it does get dirty, additives are depleted and chemicals are broken down. As the motor oil is used by the engine, it gets contaminated with particles and chemicals. Over time, these contaminants build up in the oil making it less effective in protecting your engine. Historically, recycled oil was used for low-level industrial uses. While these uses are better than dumping, we can still do more. It’s time to stop using motor oil made only from crude oil and start re-using what we already have. What is Valvoline NextGen Recycled Motor oil? Valvoline Nextgen is the first national branded premium recycled motor oil. It uses oil that’s already here instead of drilling for and importing new oil. Valvoline takes used motor oil that’s been re-refined, and using a breakthrough formula, produces motor oil that is as pure as if it were made from virgin crude oil. Valvoline NextGen contains 50% recycled motor oil while providing 100% Valvoline protection. Valvoline NextGen is made 50% Recycled Oil through a multi-stage process. 100% Valvoline Protection First, large impurities are removed, and then it is distilled to remove any water. Then it is triple filtered to remove micro-impurities. Then it is re-refined to restore the right chemical properties. Finally, an advanced additive package is added, and it is blended and packaged. This formula has been tested to ensure that it meets or exceeds strenuous industry standards and specifications. Because Valvoline NextGen uses recycled motor oil, Valvoline NextGen is better for the environment. A number of Life Cycle Analyses by various organizations have been completed showing the benefits of recycling used oil. Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) looks at the entire environmental impact of a product from cradle to grave. Cradle to grave measurements are tracked throughout all the phases of a

product’s life including material extraction, manufacturing, transportation, storage, use, recovery, reuse and disposal. Based on one of the more recent LCA reports completed independently by IFEU organization*, this LCA specifically reports that producing a recycled motor oil:  Helps reduce natural resource (crude oil) depletion  Uses less energy than producing motor oil from virgin crude oil  Reduces environmental impact (emissions, global warming, and toxicity) Overall, using recycled oil is the responsible choice for the environment. You’ve got to change your motor oil so why not change to a motor oil that’s also better for the environment? However, being better for the environment is only half the equation…how does Valvoline NextGen Recycled Motor Oil perform? The answer: It’s made by Valvoline...it has 100% Valvoline Quality, 100% Valvoline protection. Valvoline NextGen Recycled motor oil is made with the same exacting standards and care as the rest of Valvoline’s products. We stand behind Valvoline NextGen Recycled Motor Oil with the same engine guarantee offer as our regular motor oils. Registration required before 125,000 miles. Limitations apply. Go to vioc.com for details. Valvoline NextGen recycled motor oil exceeds API specifications for wear protection, viscosity protection and sludge protection.

Wear Protection

Viscosity Protection

Sludge Protection

Valvoline is proud of its heritage of bringing API SN Specification NEXTGEN innovation to the motor oil category – the first to come out with the best selling racing oil of all time and the first to come out with a synthetic blend. Valvoline NextGen recycled motor oil is the next step in our long tradition of innovation.

Valvoline NextGen Recycled Motor Oil is available now at your local Valvoline Instant Oil Change center. Visit us at www.valvolinenextgen.com for more information and to find the Valvoline service center nearest you. *Fehrenbach, Horst, Ecological and energetic assessment of re-refining used oils to base oils, IFEU, February 2005.

Help Save Crude Oil Now!

Get $6 Off

your next Full Service Oil Change* with Valvoline NextGen Recycled Oil or any other Valvoline oil.

*Includes up to 5 quarts of Valvoline motor oil, filter, lube and maintenance check. Not valid with any other offers or discounts (including fleet). Valid only at participating Valvoline Instant Oil Change locations in Columbus, OH area. One coupon per visit. Expires 2/28/11. CODE: G001

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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family fun: HANDS ON

Valentine’s Day KEEPSAKE BOX

BY ELIZABETH JONES & OLIVERA BRATICH

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, so here’s a family project to retain the memories of love and affection year round. Kids can use this keepsake box to hold onto to paper valentines, trinkets and bits to remind them of the season (just leave the snowballs out of it!).

HOW YOU DO IT 1. Measure the top of the box and use the ruler to draw a square the same size on a solid-colored piece of paper. Add one inch to the length and cut out the square.

2. Use a large cookie cutter or the top of a drinking glass to trace a large circle in the middle of your square. Make sure the circle is large enough to fit a little one’s hand through — this will be your opening.

WHAT YOU NEED

3. Use scissors to cut out the circle (depending on your child’s age, this may be a step for adults).

• salvaged tissue box

4. Lay the shape over the top of the box and make sure your opening corre-

• solid-colored paper: cardstock or construction paper in red, white, pinks and purples

sponds with the opening in the box itself (it doesn’t have to match exactly, just overlap).

• patterned paper: scrapbook sheets, newspaper funnies, advertisements, paper doilies • embellishments: buttons, ribbon, artificial flowers, stamps, etc. • markers, crayons, colored pencils • ruler

5. Fold over the extra half inch on each side of the length and attach to the box using invisible tape. (Tip: dry adhesives like invisible tape or scotch tape work best with glossy surfaces.)

6. Measure the height of your box and the length of all four sides. Cut out a piece of solid-colored paper that size (you may have to attach two sheets together, depending on the size of your paper).

7. Roll this piece around your tissue box and attach using double sided tape. terned papers. Cover up the seam between the top and sides of your box by overlapping these shapes on top of the seam. Use the glue stick or double sided tape to attach the patterned paper shapes to the solid-colored paper base.

9. Use glue stick to attach any other patterned paper shapes to your box and

• dry adhesives: invisible tape, double-sided tape

10. Use marker or crayon to write your name on your keepsake box.

• wet adhesives: glue stick, tacky glue

they love about each other member and drop that note in their keepsake box. Set up the boxes in your home and do this activity once a day leading up to February 14.

44

WHO THOUGHT THIS UP

8. Cut out hearts, circles, stars and any other shapes you want from the pat-

use tacky glue to attach any embellishments like buttons, artificial flowers, etc.

• scissors

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

11. On your paper scraps, have each member of the family write one thing

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

ELIZABETH JONES operates the stationery company Poshta Design from her home in Clintonville. Poshta (the Bulgarian word for mail) was started in 2008, but Elizabeth has been working creatively with paper since she learned to hold a pair of scissors. Her work is available at Wholly Craft, On Paper and Igloo Letterpress as well as at poshtadesign.com. OLIVERA BRATICH owns Wholly Craft, 3169 N. High St. The Clintonville shop features handmade goods from over 100 crafters and artists, including clothing, jewelry, accessories, paper goods, home decor and more! Hours of operation: 1-8 p.m. weekdays, 12-7 p.m. Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Sundays, closed Tuesdays. For information, go to whollycraft.net.


OPEN HOUSE February 27 2 to 4 p.m.

HERE COMES SUMMER! Think differently.

• Openings available pre-K through 8th

Creative Summer Workshops at CCAD 27 different one- and two-week adventures for first through twelfth grades.

Visit www.ccad.edu for all the details. Registration opens March 1, 2011!

• Small, safe and challenging classes • Frequent field trips • Proven academic success • Foreign language begins in pre-K • Enrichment in art, music and computer • Morning and afternoon latchkey 3916 Indianola Avenue Columbus, OH 43214 Phone 614-267-4799

• Volunteer credits help toward tuition

Creative Summer Workshops are generously supported by

www.clintonvilleacademy.org columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

45


family fun: COOKING WITH KIDS

Super Dishes for

SUPER SUNDAY

BY KEVIN BRASHEAR

I often tell people I was born with hot sauce in my veins and wrapped in a New Orleans Saints blanket. That’s because I was born and raised in Louisiana, where food and football go hand in hand. After moving to Columbus in 2009, it didn’t take me long to realize food and football are held in the same regard here. Whether tailgating at The ’Shoe or gathering to watch the big game on TV, a couple of things are certain — you are going to have fun and eat well. Unless of course, you were a grown man this time last year, huddled in a recliner and grasping a pillow like a 7 year old watching a scary movie, as your favorite team — the one you thought you’d never see play in a Super Bowl — became NFL World Champions. What!? C’mon, I was nervous watching my Saints win the Big Game last year. Even with Big 10 vs. SEC debates, we have made some really great friends that we enjoy hosting to watch football. So when a game is on, there is food to be had. For an easy kick-off, The Big Easy is an appetizer recipe that has followed me from Louisiana. Simple enough for the kids to make on their own, it’s usually gone before halftime. When it comes to main dishes, I like to keep it simple and easy as well. Nothing accomplishes that better than a good, one-pot Jambalaya. Jambalaya is a comfort food staple in Louisiana and everyone I’ve served it to north of the Mason-Dixon Line has wondered aloud, “With the winter cold here, why in the world don’t we cook this delicious dish?” The dish is so dense it maintains heat within the pot, so halftime seconds can usually be had without having to reheat. I serve it with garlic French bread (and a good malt-based brew is a great way for the adults to wash it down). Our children like to pick out the “green things” and eat just the “chicken rice” part. However, we have the pickiest kids on the planet who also like to eat the raw peppers with cheese and crackers. And cheese. And when not in the kitchen, our children love making signs for the big game that read “Geaux LSU” or “Geaux Saints.” Geaux (pronounced “go”), you ask? It’s a Cajun thing, just like the Jambalaya.

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

CHICKEN AND SAUSAGE JAMBALAYA WITH FRENCH BREAD DIRECTIONS:

INGREDIENTS: • 1/2 stick of butter

• 3 bay leaves

KIDS: Rinse and dry all produce.

• 2 lbs of boneless chicken

• 3 teaspoons of Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasoning

GROWNUP: Chop and dice up all produce and meats into bitesize pieces.

• 2 teaspoons of ground cumin

KIDS: Prepare The Big Easy (see above).

• 2 nice sized onions • 2 bell peppers (cooks choice of color)

• 1 teaspoon of black pepper (or to taste)

• 5 stalks of celery

• A bottle of hot sauce (allow individuals to add their own heat)

KIDS: Measure out all spices and add to the pot.

• A good loaf of French bread, plus butter and garlic salt to taste

KIDS: Measure out rice, into a separate bowl. Measure the water and broth into another bowl.

• 1-1/2 pounds of andouille sausage

• 3 cups of long grain rice • 4 cups of chicken broth • 1 3/4 cups of water • 2 cloves of garlic

GROWNUP: In an 8-quart stockpot, melt butter over a medium fire, then add chopped chicken. Once exterior of chicken is white, add sausage and allow to heat a few minutes. GROWNUP: Add all diced produce on top of meats. Cook for 8 minutes. Do NOT stir!


THE BIG EASY INGREDIENTS: • 1 block of cream cheese (softened to room temperature) • 1 small jar of orange marmalade • 1 bottle of Pickapeppa Sauce • crackers DIRECTIONS KIDS: Place softened block of cream cheese in a shallow serving dish. Spoon the orange marmalade over the cream cheese. Pour Pickapeppa Sauce over the orange marmalade. Serve as a spread with your favorite crackers.

WHERE TO BUY INGREDIENTS: You can find Pickapeppa Sauce with the barbecue sauces and marinades in supermarkets like Kroger and Meijer, and Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasoning in the spice aisle. They also can be purchased online at pickapeppa.com and at shop.tonychachere.com.

GROWNUP: Stir the cooking pot, cooking for another few minutes. Veggies should be getting soft and wonderful juices should combine in pot.

Boost your brain power with music!

KIDS: Add rice to pot. GROWNUP: Stir rice into mix and raise fire to high. Add all the broth and water. Bring to a boil while stirring, not allowing rice to stick to bottom of pot. Once boiling, cover and reduce fire to a low simmer. Allow to cook for 20 minutes, stirring only occasionally to avoid sticking to bottom of pot. KIDS AND GROWNUP: Slice French bread lengthwise, butter and gently sprinkle with garlic salt. Fold back into a whole loaf, put in a warm oven (about 325 degrees) long enough to make the outside crust nice and crispy. GROWNUP: Once rice has cooked, remove from heat, stir pot and let it sit with the lid off for a few minutes before serving with sliced French bread.

To expertly develop the musician in everyone through joyful music education!

www.allegro-studios.com 614-777-4405

3960-F Brown Park Drive, Hilliard, OH 43026

allegrostudios@hotmail.com

• Guitar • Piano • Voice • Private and group lessons available for pre-school to adults

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

47


family fun: PARTIES

A Brrrrthday Party! BY JANE HAWES

COST: $15 per child, 10 minimum (and they’ve hosted up to 50 guests). This fee includes birthday table, food and drink (like pizza or hot dogs, ice-cream cups, pop and lemonade, birthday cake), skate rental and free skating for accompanying adults. Some of the extras available are goodie bags ($3.50 each) and a private party room ($25) which is a little warmer to hang out in. The other parties are hosted on an elevated area overlooking the two rinks at each Chiller location.

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

“It’s hard to find something to do for a party in the middle of winter,” said Jennifer Justice, “but both the boys liked this idea a lot.” Justice was hanging out in the front lobby of the Chiller Easton with husband Brett. Their twin sons, Will and Connor, were greeting their second-grade buddies as they arrived for the big No. 8 birthday celebration. The party — yet another one of those “turn-key” options in the Central Ohio area for kids’ birthdays where the venue provides everything from invitations to food to cleanup — was unusual in that the kids ate and opened presents first, and then tore into the headliner activity of ice skating. The strategy, said The Chiller’s Jeremy Rogers, “allows the kids more skating time — since they skate at public skating sessions with this option, they can stay on the ice until the end of the session.” One of the four time slots available for birthday parties on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays has the skating first, said Rogers, but most people like the other schedule more. But there was also some parent-appreciated wisdom to the eat-first, skate-second arrangement: It’s chilly in there. 48

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

The ice temperature stays around 20 to 23 degrees, which means the air temperature never rises above 50, said staff members. The kids (and the grownups) never took their coats off during the two-hour party time, but they sure did get hot and sweaty out there on the ice. To go from that to an hour of eating and present opening might have left them shivering by party’s end, rather than pleasantly tuckered out and ready to head home. Later, Justice said she also liked the fact that the kids got their “sitting down time” done early, plus so many parents joined them in skating. A few helpful hints that Justice passed on — have the kids wear gloves or mittens out on the ice because “they will fall down,” and also know that you “will not be the only ones out of the ice. That didn’t bother the kids at all, but it might concern some parents.” As for the need to invite only seasoned skaters to make this kind of party successful, Justice said absolutely not: “Most of them didn’t really know how to skate, but they had a blast.”

AVAILABLE TIME SLOTS: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Fridays (not recommended for kids under 8 because the open skate time period attracts a lot of fast-moving teens), 12:30-2:30 p.m. Saturdays, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Sundays are all “eat first and skate second” time slots. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Saturdays is “skate first and eat second.” LOCATIONS: The above time slots are always available at The Chiller locations in Dublin, Easton and Lewis Center. Other time slots may be available at the Ice Haus in downtown Columbus. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 614791-9999 ext. 323, or e-mail birthdays@thechiller.com. You can also visit The Chiller website at thechiller.com.


columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

49


Healthy Meals without the Funny Faces

family fun: EATING OUT WITH KIDS

Whole World Natural Bakery & Restaurant

yz Tuesdaite!

KidszEaNt For .99 ha KWidith Adult GrintidnegrloPcuarctions

se

icipa at part ONLY.

THE MOM SAYS: If you live in Clintonville, you’re probably already familiar with Whole World Natural Bakery & Restaurant. If you aren’t, here are a few facts:

We’ve got healthy food they’ll actually like, value priced just for you. Come to a participating location, mention this ad and get any kids combo for $1.99 with any regular combo purchase Visit www.wggrinders.com

• It’s Columbus’ oldest vegetarian restaurant.

• The food is 100-percent free of trans-fats and preservatives, and no processed foods are served. • It’s one of the few places in town where you can find vegan and glutenfree baked goods.

buy one. get one free. every monday.

Brewery District Polaris 585 S. Front St. 8745 Sancus Blvd. 614-224-1560 614-885-0100 claddaghirishpubs.com

fresh. simple. tasteful.

Hunan • Szechwan • Mandarin

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North 1930 E., Dublin-Granville Rd., 1 Mile East Of I-71

(614) 523-2008 50

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

What Whole World is not, at least in my opinion, is a destination restaurant for young kids. There isn’t a kids’ menu or coloring pages available and your little darlings would make a real impression if they used their outside voices in the small dining room. However, if you’re going to Whole World because you like it, you can rest assured there are kid-friendly menu items available, such as pizza and grilled cheese. My daughter and I visited Whole World for a late Saturday lunch. I chose the Black Bean Nachos for my entree, even though it’s officially an appetizer. I was served a heaping mound of blue corn chips topped with melted cheese, seasoned black beans, corn, diced tomatoes and onions, olives and avocado, and accompanied by house-made salsa — very yummy, if a little skimpy on

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

the cheese. The salsa was a tad sweet, but overall the dish was scrumptious and I would happily order it again. I also had a black cherry soda, which was deliciously tart. My only complaint is that we had to wait for what seemed a very long time for our food to arrive. But, to be fair, there is a disclaimer in the menu that says because they make all of their food to order, it may take a little longer. They weren’t lying. No trip to Whole World would be complete without a visit to the bakery case. They have a big selection of favorites like chocolate chip and peanut butter and even no-bakes, as well as a variety of vegan and gluten-free cookies. We chose a peanut butter chocolate chunk and a vegan “ball,” which was a

WHOLE WORLD NATURAL BAKERY & RESTAURANT 3269 N. High St., Clintonville 614-268-5751 wholeworldnaturalrestaurant.com PRICE: Appetizers $4.75-$8.50; sandwiches around $6.50; pizzas $7-$16 HOURS: 11 a.m.- 9 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday brunch, 2-9 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday

plain white cookie rolled in sprinkles. The ball was good, while the peanut butter chocolate chunk was great — thick, chewy and heavily studded with large chocolate chunks. The service was on the friendly side of adequate, but didn’t stand out for me. Getting to the bathroom is an adventure. It is located down a narrow set of rather steep stairs, which small

children might have trouble negotiating. It was clean and big enough for a parent and two kids, but didn’t have a diaper changing station. Bottom line: Your kids won’t starve if you take them to Whole World. The pizza and grilled cheese will keep even the pickiest kids happy, and the baked goods might even make them want to go back. —TRUDA SHINKER


 MOST DELICIOUS   

SUNDAY BRUNCH AT THE MILLER’S THE KID SAYS: When I heard that Whole World Restaurant did not serve meat, I thought, “I really don’t think I will like this place.� We were walking in when I noticed that the interior was a lot smaller than I pictured it. There was also a mural of one place cut into the four seasons. The mural had some funny pictures of animals on it. Once I saw all of the desserts in the case, I sort of changed my mind about the place. I looked at the menu and saw a lot of weird (or different) things like tofu pizza and eggplant meatball subs. I ordered cheese pizza. It was good but really saucy and there was a lot of it (for one person). To drink, I got an orange cream soda. I liked it. It tasted a little bit like Orange

Crush. After we ate, my mom and I each chose a cookie. There were so many and they all looked so good. I ended up having my mom choose for me. She ordered a peanut butter chocolate chunk and a sugar cookie ball with sprinkles. They were so good. The staff was friendly, but the food took forever to come. My stomach was growling by the time we got it. The bathrooms were really plain and we had to go down a skinny flight of stairs to get to them. I would recommend Whole World to vegetarians and kids who like trying new foods, though I think everybody would enjoy the baked goods. —EMMA SHINKER

SERVED FROM 10AM to 2:30PM FEATURING: Omelet Station • Eggs Benedict • Scrambled Eggs • Home Fries • Bacon • Sausage • French Toast Flatbreads • Pasta • Fresh Fruit • Salads • Desserts • Pastries • Weekly Chef Specials – Adults $14.95 – Kids 10 and under $6.95 6725 Avery-Muirfield Drive Dublin, Ohio 43016 | 614-799-9100| www.mtmtavern.com

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columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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family fun: DAY TRIPPIN’

EnterTRAINment JUNCTION BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

When the boys and I got word that we were needed to check out EnterTRAINment Junction, the world’s largest indoor train display, I knew Columbus Parent had the right crew for the job. Nick, 6, and Alex, 4, actually own a DVD that is nothing but video of model trains cruising around toy tracks. What I didn’t realize was that EnterTRAINment Junction’s amazingly detailed displays would appeal to moms, dads, grandparents, boys and girls. The attraction, located north of Cincinnati in West Chester, has more than two miles of G-scale train track. Trains run through intricate sets depicting various periods of railroading history, many of them painstakingly constructed by volunteers. Visitors can watch trains wind past a drive-in theatre, a Civil War camp and a dog park. Families can challenge their powers of observation by participating in the attraction’s scavenger hunt — a list of objects to find in the displays. The hunt keeps little ones excited as they meander through the exhibits. My little visitors also liked the stepstools the attraction provided, carrying them along through each gallery. I was grateful not to have to hold anybody up to see the displays. The kids also loved Imagination Junction, a 5,000-square-foot play area, which includes a climbing structure with tunnels and slides, Thomas the Train toys and a train-themed merry-go-round. There’s also an enclosed area for babies to safely crawl around. The Junction Cafe eatery serves up typical kid fare — hot dogs and chicken nuggets — at reasonable prices. The combo meal ($4) includes a piece of pizza, chips or fruit and a drink. Nearby is a hobby shop with a large selection of Thomas the Train toys and other model-railroad supplies. After lunch, the boys and I marveled over John Mackay’s Mighty Small Circus, a display on long-term loan to EnterTRAINment Junction. The miniature circus, which Mackay spent more than 30 years carving, includes 1,200 detailed pieces. The kids were amazed that someone made the horses, acrobats and

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| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

EnterTRAINment Junction 7379 Squire Court, West Chester 877-898-4656 (toll free) entertrainmentjunction.com HOURS: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday, Noon-6 p.m. Sunday. (Closed Easter Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day and on Wednesdays in January, February and March) COST: Adults, $12.95; Children, 3-12, $9.95; Children under 3 Free; Seniors (65+): $11.50; Parking Free. The attraction also features seasonal experiences – a fun house with trick mirrors and a black hole opens in February — for additional costs. TIP: EnterTRAINment Junction often offers coupons or discounts at cincysavers.com. Check the website for deals before planning your visit.

elephants out of wood. It’s housed in a second-floor observation tower that offers a bird’s eye view of the train displays. The staff recommends allowing about two to three hours for a visit, but we spent four hours there, and the kids would have happily revisited Imagination Junction before chugging back to Columbus, alas, by minivan.


family fun: PLAYGROUND PATROL

Grange Insurance

Audubon Center BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON The Grange Insurance Audubon Center is a prime winter roosting spot for bird watchers and wannabes, big and small. Parents can watch wildlife from the building’s floor-to-ceiling windows while their kids romp and play indoors. The center, which is free to the public, is located just south of Downtown and offers a stunning view of the city skyline. The building’s play area is worth squawking about, too. It features a twolevel, enclosed climbing structure where little ones can get a winter workout. Tucked into a cozy room with windows that overlook the center’s scenic property along the Scioto River, the tree-themed play set offers a safe, fun opportunity for indoor play. Kids will especially love dressing up in the bird costumes the center provides. Slipping on a pair of wings and a pointy beak adds a bit of whimsy to the experience. The room is big enough for kids to jump and run around a bit. The playroom also has a puppet theater designed to look like an underground burrow. The animal puppets are sure to spur would-be entertainers to put together an impromptu show. Parents should be prepared to sit on the floor as the room does not always have chairs. After playtime, take time to explore the rest of the center, an awesome structure reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright but constructed with modern green building practices. The center features lots of stations where kids can learn about wildlife and the environment. Children should keep an eye out for live animals. The center has aquariums for fish, turtles and snakes. The bird observation room is another great spot in the facility. The room, which doubles as a library, features numerous windows for bird watching. Sound equipment in the room allows visitors to listen to the birds as well as watch them.

It’s Everyone’s Birthday at Our Birthday Party Concert!

Family Series Sponsor:

Sunday, February 13, Palace Theatre, 1 pm ticketmaster.com capa.com • 614-469-0939 Ohio Theatre Ticket Office 800-745-3000 & outlets

.. . y l a th P wi

Hilliard

Recreation & Parks Department 614-876-5200 www.HilliardOhio.gov

Swim Lesson & Summer Program Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, February 1, 2011. Register on-line at www.HilliardOhio.gov

Play is our Business! DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

GRANGE INSURANCE AUDUBON CENTER 505 W. Whittier St., Downtown 614-545-5475 grange.audubon.org HOURS: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday

• • • •

Safety Town Fantastic Fairy Fun Circus Camp School Age Sports CampsBasketball, Volleyball, Tennis • Art Camp • Kids in the Kitchen • Sporties for Shorties columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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family fun: MEDIA REVIEWS

booksS FOR

KID

“BLACK HOLE SUN” by David MacInnis Gill

“INTERRUPTING CHICKEN” by David Ezra Stein

“OOH LA LA POLKA-DOT BOOTS” by Ellen Olson-Brown Some may try to tell you that polka-dot boots go with nothing. They couldn’t be more wrong! In this simple, exuberant picture book, with cutaway pages that transform barefoot children into bouncing, booted superstars, one discovers that polka-dot boots go with everything: “Plain coats, zany coats, sun coats, rainy coats. … Ugly pants, pretty pants, country pants, city pants.” Ooh La La is right! FOR AGES 2 TO 5.

Bedtime, and Papa is trying read to Little Red Chicken, who has promised not to interrupt (something we sense happens a lot). She can’t help herself though, and leaps into one story-within-the-story after another to warn the characters about witches and wolves, until Papa finally turns the tables. A fine bedtime story itself, with a premise likely familiar to many parents. FOR AGES 4 TO 9.

Life is cheap in the gritty, wild frontier of Mars. Durango, a young man from a disgraced aristocratic family, is an “unattached Regulator,” an upholder of the law-turned-mercenary. He and his team, including the beautiful but lethal Vienne, are hired to protect a poor, remote mining colony from cannibalistic bandits in a brilliantly imagined novel that is part “Martian Chronicles,” part “Magnificent Seven,” yet wholly original and thoroughly riveting. FOR AGES 12 AND UP.

“GYO FUJIKAWA’S A TO Z PICTURE BOOK” by Gyo Fujikawa

David Alexander, Librarian 1 at the Karl Road Branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library

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“I WANNA NEW ROOM” by Karen Kaufman Orloff

“BANANA!” by Ed Vere

In an exchange of notes, Alex lays out a convincing case to his parents for not having to share a room with four-year-old brother Ethan. He has an answer for every counter-argument offered by his mom and dad, but there are only so many rooms in the house. Alex goes so far as to propose adding on a wing of his own, complete with shark tank, bowling alley, and skateboard ramp, but, as dad says, they are “not gazillionaires.” A followup to “I Wanna Iguana,” the book is riotously illustrated by David Catrow.

Two monkeys + one banana = a recipe for conflict in this nearly-wordless book. “Banana!” cries a banana-less red-shirted monkey, over and over, and with increasing vehemence. The banana-toting, blue-shirted monkey steadfastly refuses to share, not until he hears a certain word. A simple story, hilariously rendered, that pre-readers will read again and again on their own. FOR AGES 2 TO 5.

FOR AGES 5 TO 8.

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

This gentle and elegant book does just what a good alphabet book should: reinforces letter awareness while expanding vocabulary. Alternating black and white with luminous color illustrations that recall classic Golden Books introduce children, not only to Alligator and Airplane, but to Anchor, Amaryllis and Armadillo; not only Zebra and Zipper, but Zinnia, Zombie and Zzzzzz . FOR AGES 2 TO 6.


WEBSITE school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral Science projects can be intimidating for students and parents alike, but they are also unavoidable. Here is a site that offers plenty of resources, suggestions and advice, and, moreover, addresses the most daunting issue of all: where to begin. The sample projects, though few in number, may serve to jump-start students who are looking for ideas. For the organizationally challenged, suggested timelines are provided, as are useful presentation tips. All in all, a good starting place. —DAVID ALEXANDER

FAMILY APPS

“Connect the Dots - Sea Theme” One of the most classic games from everyone’s childhood is a Connect the Dots puzzle drawing. Youngsters sequentially draw lines from one numbered dot to the next to reveal a hidden drawing. This $1.99 app does just that with 26 different seacreature puzzles of varying difficulty. Young artists can post their results on a Facebook wall. Besides revealing hidden creatures, children can also play this app against a clock to connect the dots in the shortest time.

“Glow Coloring Pro” This 99-cent coloring app has five built-in pages — a dinosaur, cupcake, rocket, truck and castle — which your child can color in. Big deal, you say? This is the first app that allows you to scan in images for your child to color or trace, which IS a big deal and offers unlimited hours of fun. The app offers access to 30 brushes and 36 colors. Once your tike has completed his or her masterpieces, they can be saved to your camera or shared via e-mail, Facebook or Twitter with grandparents, uncles, aunts or anyone else who enjoys children’s art. —PHIL PIKELNY

GAMES

“Lost in Shadow” ($50, Rated E 10+, Nintendo Wii)

Introspective challenging games are hard to find, but Hudson’s Lost in Shadow is a great blend of jumping, puzzles and story. Light and shadow challenge players to consider the environment as they progress. This is a great “team-up” title for families to work together and enjoy.

“DC Universe Online” ($60, Rated E 10+, Windows PC & Sony PS3) Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman mentor you in this online game set in DC Comic’s 4-color universe. Players make new heroes or villains to adventure with the classic heroes and save the world from an invasion by Brainiac. Continuing to play beyond the first month requires a $15 ongoing subscription. Think “World of Warcraft” with Super Heroes. —SHAWN SINES

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family fun: MEDIA REVIEWS You could win!

YOU COULD WIN!

Watch for our Safety Education Coloring Contests in March, June, September and December. Prizes include Kohl’s Gift Cards and Cool Bike/Sledding Helmets!

Music Reviews: Grammy Edition The Grammy Awards will be held on Feb. 13 in Los Angeles. We listened to the five nominated albums in the Best Musical Album for Children category and have rendered our expert opinion on them, plus taken a shot at deciding who should win and who will win.

“HERE COMES SCIENCE” by They Might Be Giants It might seem inconsistent to praise the wordy wit in TMBG’s latest kid offering after trashing the SqueeGees’ eruptions of preachy polysyllabics last month, but here’s the difference: This New York duo, now in its 28th year together, commits to the nerdiness from word one and doesn’t let up. As a result, adults will chuckle, teens will tune out, middle- and gradeschoolers might begrudgingly enjoy it, and preschoolers won’t care as they dance to the bouncy, horn-laden tunes.

SM

For coloring contest information, safety tips, or to download a free safety activity book, please visit: www.NationwideChildren.org/KISS K.I.S.S.Your Kids 56

♥ Keep Them Safe!

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

“JUNGLE GYM” by Justin Roberts

Finally, an album for 9 year olds and the children of the 1980s who gave birth to them! And that IS a compliment! Roberts, a Kenyon College grad, has created a lovely musical portrait of what it’s like to be 9 years old again (with tributes to cardboard boxes, gym-class parachutes, and snow days), and he’s framed it with music that harkens the hook-laden, upbeat, garage-band pop of the ’80s.


TM

“SUNNY DAYS” by Battersby Duo

Winter Events & Programs

Preschool/Youth

This album is loaded with elegantly stripped-down folk rock, though I wish the female vocalist (whose voice is reminiscent of Sarah McLachlan) took the lead more than the male. Most of the simple tunes are aimed squarely at the preschool and kindergarten demographic. The only serious misstep is “Flat Screen Daddy” a strange satirical swipe at consumerism with its “well-respected, balding middle-aged man” protagonist.

Jump Start Little Hoop Stars (ages 4 – 6) Saturdays, Feb. 26 – Apr. 2, 10:30 -11:30 a.m. An instructional and recreational basketball program that teaches the basics of dribbling, passing, shooting, positioning, defense and rebounding in a fun oriented program. Pillow Street Hockey (ages 3 ½ – 5 ½) Thursdays, Feb. 17 – Mar. 10, 9:20 & 10:10 a.m. This fun and energetic class teaches your child the basics of street hockey without the use of skates. Family Gym Night (ages 12 & under) Saturday, Feb. 26, 6 – 8 p.m., $5 per child. Beat the winter blahs and enjoy a night out with the family. Our gyms are set with activities, games and play areas for kids preschool through 12. Parent participation required.

“TOMORROW’S CHILDREN”

by Pete Seeger with the Rivertown Kids and Friends I love and respect Pete Seeger, I do, but so help me, the whole time I listened to this album, all I could picture was a cabal of angry little preschoolers, clad in (red) t-shirts and TOMS sneakers, muttering into their sippy cups about solar power, water pollution, and why the plural of Kleenex isn’t “Kleenices” (as Seeger really does sing in one song about how “cuh-ray-zee” the English language is). I’m at a loss to figure out why this album merited a Grammy nomination rather than, say, Caspar Babypants’ far superior “This Is Fun.”

“WEIRD THINGS ARE EVERYWHERE” by Judy Pancoast This album is perfect for the car-seat crowd. Each song is an engaging mix of spoken and sung storytelling on topics like fairy tales, superheroes and how “Yucky” most nursery rhymes are. Pancoast’s voice is bright and soothing, and she enunciates beautifully. I kept picturing little kids, zoned out in the car, staring at the scenery but absorbing the album by osmosis.

WHO SHOULD WIN THE GRAMMY: Justin Roberts for “Jungle Gym.” His album had the clearest sense of who its audience is and spoke to it consistently with well-crafted tunes and interesting lyrics. WHO WILL WIN THE GRAMMY: Pete Seeger for “Tomorrow’s Children” because most of the voters will vote based on name recognition and won’t actually listen to the albums. —JANE HAWES

School’s Out/Spring Break Camp Join us for a day of arts and crafts, games, swimming, and play! All participants must have an updated 2011 Health Care Form on file to attend the program. Please bring a sack lunch, swimsuit, and towel each day. For more information visit our website.

For more information or to register visit: www.dublin.oh.us/recreation or call 614-410-4550 Post Comedy Theater Saturday, Feb. 12 - 11 a.m. “I like him because he’s insane – completely insane” Matt Lauer, The Today Show Robert Post is a brilliant physical comedian with a stunning theatrical mind. Combine a quart of dry humor with three tablespoons of expert mime, versatile acting, and skilled juggling; add a keen sense of satire and the absurd. Blend in splendid timing and experience, and what do you get? A host of unforgettable characters at the perfect comedy feast! Recommended for ages 8 to 99 Tickets: $7 adults; $5 children and seniors Toying With Science Saturday, Feb. 26 - 11 a.m. Commissioned and developed with the Museum of Science in Boston, this performance explores the scientific principles of gravity, leverage, fulcrums and simple machines. Combining circus skills, mime, original music, and audience involvement, Garry Krinsky and his audience investigate basic scientific information and delve into the imaginations of scientists who explore our world. Recommended for ages 8 – 99 Tickets: $7 adults; $5 children and seniors

facebook.com/DublinOhio

twitter.com/DublinOhio

dublin.oh.us/enews

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february 2011

OUT&ABOUT WEDNESDAY 2

After School Attack: Art, Science or Snack! You never know which treat you’ll get during this monthly handson, activity-filled program for kids ages 8-10. All materials are provided. Registration required. 4-5 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org.

Chess Club Kids and teens (ages 10 and up) are invited to this chess club sponsored by the coaches of the Delaware Youth Chess Club. Instruction for all levels. Registration required. 2-4 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006.

Columbus Blue Jackets Hockey vs. Chicago Blackhawks 7 p.m. $20$100. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., Arena District. 614246-2000. Creative Minds Open Art Studio Creative Minds Open Art Studio is an art studio experience geared towards small hands using both free-play and guided crafts. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages six and under. Reservations are encouraged. 9:3011:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com. Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614481-3778. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit Wise About Eyes is a unique exhibit that teaches children about how to protect their vision and keep their eyes safe. Made possible by Prevent Blindness Ohio and the Ohio Department of Health, the traveling exhibit is comprised of multiple kiosks educating children on the importance of sight, the inner workings of the eye and how we see, why people need glasses, what a world without site would be like, and how to take care of our eyes. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-349-9277. attheworks.org.

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Columbus Babywearing Learn about babywearing. We have carriers you can try and borrow for a deposit. Please bring any questions and carriers to share. 10:30 a.m. Sprout Soup, 4310 N. High St., Clintonville. 614-846-4827. Creative Minds Open Art Studio Creative Minds Open Art Studio is an art studio experience geared towards small hands using both free-play and guided crafts. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages six and under. Reservations are encouraged. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com. La Leche League of Gahanna La Leche League of Gahanna is reactivating. Mothers with their nursling (and mothers-to-be) interested in breastfeeding, are welcome to attend. Breastfeeding...it makes a difference. 7 p.m. Free. Columbus Metropolitan Library Gahanna, 310 Granville St., Gahanna. 614-269-7181. llli.org. Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. Story Times: Family Story Time (25 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit Wise About Eyes is a unique exhibit that teaches children about how to protect their vision and keep their eyes safe. Made possible by Prevent Blindness Ohio and the Ohio Department of Health, the traveling exhibit is comprised of multiple kiosks educating children on the importance of sight, the inner workings of the eye and how we see, why people need glasses, what a world without site would be like, and how to take care of our eyes. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-349-9277. attheworks.org.

THURSDAY 3 Create Personalized Valentine Cards 6:30-8 p.m. $10. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-8363333. groveport.org. Creative Minds Open Art Studio Creative Minds Open Art Studio is an art studio experience geared towards small hands using both free-play and guided crafts. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages six and under. Reservations are encouraged. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com. February Family Films: Books to Movies Weekly film series held throughout Black History Month featuring a community-led dialogue by local media experts. 6 p.m. $3-$5.

TOM DODGE/DISPATCH PHOTO

TUESDAY 1

COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM SATURDAY, FEB. 5 — It’s the 2nd annual Wendy’s Chili Open! This annual fundraising event, sponsored by the Zoo and the Westerville Sunrise Rotary Club, is held at the Water’s Edge Events Park. Your ticket will get you food from more than 25 local restaurants, live music to bop to, silent auctions and raffles, and plenty of kids’ activities! The Chili Open is open from 12 noon until 4 p.m., while the Zoo and Aquarium are open from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. that day. Tickets are $25 in advance, and $30 on the day of the event at the Zoo’s front gate, with a $5 charge for parking. For more information, go to wendyschiliopen.org. SATURDAY, FEB. 19 — You’ve always read about those crazy people who go swimming in the winter time. Well, here’s your chance to be one of them! Along with Special Olympics Ohio, the Zoo is throwing its very first Polar Plunge (and the only one in Central Ohio) this year! The Plunge (from 1:30-2:30 p.m.) and a Post-Plunge Party (from 1:30-4 p.m.) will be held at the Polar Frontier exhibition area. But fear not — you won’t have to go swimming with the polar bears (rumor has it they don’t play well with others). Instead there will be a special, supersized swimming pool, filled with nice, ice-cold water. Proceeds from the event will benefit Special Olympics Ohio and the Polar Bear Conservation Fund. It only costs $10 to participate and team fundraising is strongly encouraged. For more information, contact Megan Carney at carneysooh@aol.com or 614-239-7050. MONDAY, FEB. 21 — FREE admission on Presidents’ Day, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.!

www.columbuszoo.org


Family four-pack: $20 (includes popcorn and drink). King Arts Complex, 867 Mt. Vernon Ave., King Lincoln. 614-645-5464. kingartscomplex.com. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit Wise About Eyes is a unique exhibit that teaches children about how to protect their vision and keep their eyes safe. Made possible by Prevent Blindness Ohio and the Ohio Department of Health, the traveling exhibit is comprised of multiple kiosks educating children on the importance of sight, the inner workings of the eye and how we see, why people need glasses, what a world without site would be like, and how to take care of our eyes. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-349-9277. attheworks.org.

FRIDAY 4 Cinderella The shoe fits in Gerard Charles’ romantic and charming interpretation of Cinderella. With comical stepsisters, a fairy godmother, and of course—the all-important glass slipper—this fun production also showcases the best of the classical ballet tradition with grand scenery, luxurious costumes, dreamy choreography, and music by Alexander Glazunov. 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848. Dare to Dance Ballet & Tap 5:45 p.m. $50. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333. groveport.org. Father & Daughter Sweetheart Dance This father and daughter dance will be one to remember. Daughters ages six to 13 can attend a semi-formal dance with their fathers (or special adult male mentor). A delicious catered dinner will be provided. You will also receive a prom-type photo with your daughter, as well as a gift bag. Pre-registration is required for each individual attending. Please visit our website or call the Community Center for more information and to register. Activity #102109-01. 6:308:30 p.m. $25. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. westerville.org. First Friday Movies How about catching a hot new DVD release on the big screen at the library? Bring your best buddy and a snack if you wish! No registration required. For grades K-five. 3:15-5 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-486-2951. ghpl.org.

Skating at Creekside Noon-6 p.m. $3 skate rental; free with own skates. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. gahanna.gov. Toddler Time Join us for a morning of fun and play. A variety of large and fine motor skills equipment plus arts and crafts will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages kindergarten and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-9016500. westerville.org.

Columbus School for Girls • 56 S. Columbia Avenue • Columbus, OH 43209 • 614.252.0781 •

Columbus School for Girls, continuing a 100 year tradition of excellence, provides a superior college preparatory education within a diverse and caring community that emphasizes leadership development in an atmosphere of moral and social responsibility.

Challenge Character Community

Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

SATURDAY 5 Cinderella The shoe fits in Gerard Charles’ romantic and charming interpretation of Cinderella. With comical stepsisters, a fairy godmother, and of course—the all-important glass slipper—this fun production also showcases the best of the classical ballet tradition with grand scenery, luxurious costumes, dreamy choreography, and music by Alexander Glazunov. 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848. Columbus Blue Jackets Hockey vs. Edmonton Oilers 7 p.m. $20-$100. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., Arena District. 614-246-2000. Goddard Community Games Join us for a family-friendly event, and learn how play builds your child’s emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills! The focus will be on fun as you and your children share in a day of discovery and enrichment. 10 a.m.noon. Free. The Goddard School, 4980 Parkcenter Ave., Dublin. 614-7926586. goddardschool.com.

STUDENT VISITING DAY

Wednesday February 9 • 7:50 am -2:45 pm Call our Admission Office to schedule an individual tour 614.252.0781

discover more about our school at columbusschoolforgirls.org

Goddard Community Games Join us for a family-friendly event, and learn how play builds your child’s emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills! The focus will be on fun, as parents and their children share in a day of discovery and enrichment. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. The Goddard School, 40 Chris Perry Ln., Reynoldsburg. 614501-9224. goddardschool.com.

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Urgent Need, Urgent Care Affordable Cost

feb 2011 Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-8827277 ext. 5006.

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Story Times: Saturday Story Stomp (2-5 years) No registration required. 11-11:30 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778.

SUNDAY 6 Cinderella The shoe fits in Gerard Charles’ romantic and charming interpretation of Cinderella. With comical stepsisters, a fairy godmother, and of course—the all-important glass slipper—this fun production also showcases the best of the classical ballet tradition with grand scenery, luxurious costumes, dreamy choreography, and music by Alexander Glazunov. 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S.

High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848. Hand-in-Hand Family Workshop: Valentine’s Day Shadow Boxes Children (and their favorite adults) will create heart-shaped boxes in the style of Mexican retablo art using recycled items and other collage materials. Bring old toys, found items, recyclables and mementos from home to give your shadow box a personal touch! 1-3 p.m. Free, but pre-registration is required. Ohio Craft Museum, 1665 W. Fifth Ave., Grandview. 614486-4402. ohiocraft.org. Money Power for Teens Most teens are experts at spending money, but how many can create and manage a budget, set realistic goals, and stick to spending limits? This class, created for ages 14 and up, will help teens gain the money management skills they will need and use for the rest of their lives. The skills learned during this two-session class will be reinforced through group discussions and various interactive activities. 3-6 p.m. $12. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. groveport.org. Westerville Book Discussion Group 7-8 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext 2159.

MONDAY 7

TUESDAY 8

Cinderella 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848.

Cinderella 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848.

Pee Wee Play Gym Join us for a morning of fun and play. A wide variety of large and fine motor skills equipment will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages three and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500.

Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com.

Story Times: Music & Movement (2-5 years) No registration required. 1-1:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614481-3778. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

WEDNESDAY 9 Cinderella 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848. Columbus Blue Jackets Hockey vs. San Jose Sharks 7 p.m. $20-$100. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., Arena District. 614-246-2000. Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com.


Tree of Life Christian Schools ...

Educating in Truth, Discipling in Christ Elementary Open Houses: February 2 & 3, 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Middle & High School Open House: February 21, 7 p.m. Preschool - Grade 5 Dublin Branch 2900 Martin Rd. 614.792.2671 Indianola Branch 2141 Indianola Ave. 614.299.4906

Grade 6 - Grade 12 Northridge Branch 935 Northridge Rd. 614.263.2688

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wowway.com Limited time offer available to new residential customers in serviceable areas and current customers adding a product line. $59.99 bundle includes Xcite 2Mbps Internet and Basic Cable with two Digital Adapters. Prices exclude taxes, fees, additional equipment, installation and usage-based charges. To receive certain services you must lease a WOW! modem at $4.99 per month. Digital equipment is required on all TVs to receive Basic Cable. Additional Digital Adapters are available at $1.99 per month. Bundle prices guaranteed until January 1, 2013. Free installation for bundled services is limited to standard activation of one outlet per service. Offers and services subject to change without notice. Please see WOW!’s complete terms and conditions or call WOW! for further information regarding services and offers. Š 2011 WideOpenWest Finance, LLC.

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We think your child is extraordinary, too. At The Conservatory of Piano our dedicated team of extraordinary teachers develops an individualized plan that guarantees the success of your extraordinary child.

beginning piano classes for: • preschool ages 3 to 6 • beginners ages 7 to 11 • young adults ages 12 to 17 • adults • private lessons always available • transfer students welcome

feb 2011 Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. Story Times: Family Story Time (25 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

209 north hamilton road, columbus, ohio 43213 • (614) 755-2424 60 old west wilson bridge road, worthington, ohio 43085 • (614) 436-6076 www.conservatoryofpiano.com

THURSDAY 10 Cinderella 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848. Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com. February Family Films: Books to Movies Weekly film series held throughout Black History Month featuring a community-led dialogue by local media experts. 6 p.m. $3-$5. Family four-pack: $20 (includes popcorn and drink). King Arts Complex, 867 Mt. Vernon Ave., King Lincoln. 614-645-5464. kingartscomplex.com. Spectacular Spices Kids ages three to five will discover where sweet and savory spices come from, grind their own cinnamon and nutmeg for a spice cake, mix spices into a vegetable curry, and create a pomander from oranges and cloves. 11 a.m.-noon. $20. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614645-5923. fpconservatory.org. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

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CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’S DRALION FEB. 9-13 — Cirque du Soleil has always been the thinking man’s circus. And they’re bringing a production to the Schottenstein Center this month that promises to be a thinking kid’s circus. “Dralion” is a show designed to appeal to the entire family, with acrobats and gymnasts who perform balancing acts, dive through hoops, use skipping ropes and perform on a trampoline. In addition, there are musicians, singers and comedic characters, all communicating in that mystical, magical language of Cirque productions. Now tickets are never cheap (unless you win the ones we’re giving away this month on ColumbusParent.com). They range from about $47 up to $111 each, but there are Family Four Packs available for two adults and two children, ages 2 to 12, for a slightly discounted rate. For more information about the show or to purchase tickets, go to cirquedusoleil/dralion. The Schottenstein Center is located at 555 Borror Drive on Ohio State University’s campus.

FRIDAY 11 Cinderella 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848. balletmet.org. Columbus Blue Jackets Hockey vs. Colorado Avalanche 7 p.m. $20$100. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., Arena District. 614246-2000.

Dare to Dance Ballet & Tap 5:45 p.m. $50. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333. groveport.org. Preschool Special: Zoo Adventure! Hear stories, sing songs, play games, and discover amazing animal facts during this fun-filled zoo adventure. Parents/caregivers and siblings welcome. Siblings between the ages of


three and six MUST also register. 1011 a.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. Skating at Creekside Noon-6 p.m. $3 skate rental; free with own skates. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. gahanna.gov. Toddler Time Join us for a morning of fun and play. A variety of large and fine motor skills equipment plus arts and crafts will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages kindergarten and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. westerville.org. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

units from around Ohio and surrounding states will perform. Noon-9 p.m. $9. Central Crossing High School, 4500 Big Run South Rd., Grove City. 614801-6543. centralcrossingband.org. Cinderella 7:30-9 p.m. $26-$48. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-229-4848. Just for Kids Valentine Craft Make a heart craft and wreath for someone special. For ages 5-12. Children ages nine and under must be accompanied by an adult. 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333. groveport.org. Parent’s Night Out Families can register their children for a three-hour, fun-filled Valentine’s event designed to give parents a date-night for the special day. Hosted by Grandview Christian Assembly’s Children’s Ministry, upbeat music, family-friendly movies, fun snacks and take-home crafts are a part of the evening’s festivities for the children. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Grandview Christian Assembly, 751 Northwest Blvd., Grandview. 614557-7485. grandca.info.

Art from the Heart The Works, in partnership with Licking Memorial Hospital, presents an event linking the heart to education and art. During Art from the Heart, staff members from Licking Memorial Hospital and The Works will educate children and adults about heart health and its inner-workings. Children will then create heart-themed works of art to be framed and proudly hung throughout the halls of Licking Memorial Hospital in the spring. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Children: $3; Adults: $7; Seniors: $5. The Works, 55 S. First St., 740-349-9277. attheworks.org.

PBJ & Jazz Series: Mary McClendon and Friends PBJ & Jazz concerts are one-hour long interactive events designed to introduce jazz and American music to young children and their families. Featuring some of Columbus’ finest musicians and ensembles, PBJ & Jazz concerts are hosted by former Columbus Music Hall owner (and retired music educator), Rebecca Ogden, and are a great introduction to live music for the youngest audience member. Children receive a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, juice and a cookie. Mary McClendon is a local vocal treasure. She started singing as a small girl, and her passion continued as she grew. Currently, McClendon is an affiliate of the Jazz Arts Group, and has performed with the Columbus Jazz Orchestra, BalletMet, the Columbus Symphony, Bobby Floyd, Don Tate Jr., Bobby Pierce, Geoff Tyus, Hank Marr, Mark Flugge, and Tom Carroll. She’s also acted with Gallery Players, Center Stage Theater, Nia Performing Arts, and CATCO, and has vocally acted for commercials, election campaigns, and industrial videos. 11 a.m.-noon. $5 each ($20 family max). Jazz Academy at Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., King Lincoln. 614-294-5200. jazzartsgroup.org.

CCHS Band Competition The CCHS Instrumental Music Department is proud to announce their eighth annual Indoor Winter Guard and Drumline Competition, where more than 130

Popovich Comedy Pet Theater Family-oriented blend of the unique comedy and juggling skills of Gregory Popovich, along with the extraordinary talents of his performing pets.

SATURDAY 12 Anti-Valentine’s Day Party Teens, if chocolate, roses, and lovey-dovey couples make you want to barf, then this is the party for you! Join us for some un-love songs, angry candy hearts, and ugly valentine making. Love stinks! Teens only. 2-4 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org.

MARCH 3-6, 2011

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Veterans Memorial ■ Greater Columbus Convention Center ■ Dispatch Ice Haus ■ LC Pavilion Arena Grand Movie Theatre ■ Complimentary Shuttle Service between venues

© 2011 CLASSIC PRODUCTIONS INC

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Cleaning Closets? Make Moolah Selling your Stuff! MATERNITY

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Each of the show’s 15 cats and 10 dogs were once strays and rescued from animal shelters. Now, they love to show off onstage by performing a variety of stunts and skits. 2:30-4:30 p.m. $25/$30/$35. Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts, 100 W. Granville St., New Albany. 614-2454701. mccoycenter.org.

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Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-8827277 ext. 5006.

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A Chocolate Valentine’s Day 3:154:15 p.m. $1. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. Mommy & Me Get Organized Help your little ones learn how to get organized. A hands-on take home craft will get them started. 10-11 a.m. $12 for parent & child. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-8363333. groveport.org. Pee Wee Play Gym Join us for a morning of fun and play. A wide variety of large and fine motor skills equipment will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages three and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. westerville.org.

TUESDAY 15

THURSDAY 17

Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com.

Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com.

Family Arts and Crafts Share creative time together with your child doing arts and crafts. This program is designed for families with preschoolers to come enjoy quality time building and exploring different types of arts and crafts. For children ages five and under with parent. 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500.

February Family Films: Books to Movies Weekly film series held throughout Black History Month featuring a community-led dialogue by local media experts. 6 p.m. $3-$5. Family four-pack: $20 (includes popcorn and drink). King Arts Complex, 867 Mt. Vernon Ave., King Lincoln. 614-645-5464. kingartscomplex.com.

Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614481-3778. ghpl.org. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

WEDNESDAY 16 Child Check 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Reynoldsburg Nazarene Church, 1340 Crest Rd., Reynoldsburg. 614-5439000 ext. 216. Columbus Blue Jackets Hockey vs. Los Angeles Kings 7 p.m. $20-$100. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., Arena District. 614-246-2000. Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com. Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. ghpl.org. Story Times: Family Story Time (25 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. ghpl.org.

Story Times: Music & Movement (2-5 years) No registration required.1-1:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778.

Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org.

Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

FRIDAY 18 Dare to Dance Ballet & Tap 5:45 p.m. $50. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333. groveport.org. Family Night Friday Free family fun including crafts, games and more. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. groveport.org. Riverdance Thunderous celebration of Irish music, song, and dance that has tapped its way onto the world stage thrilling millions of people around the globe. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $23. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., Downtown. 800-745-3000. Skating at Creekside Noon-6 p.m. $3 skate rental; free with own skates. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. gahanna.gov. Teens Talk Books: Jumped “Girl fights are ugly. Girl fights are personal.” So says Leticia when she hears that Dominique challenges Trina to a fight after school. Will it really happen? Will Leticia get involved? Join us for snacks and discussion of “Jumped” by Rita Williams-Garcia. 4-5 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-822-7277 ext. 5006. Toddler Time Join us for a morning of fun and play. A variety of large and fine motor skills equipment plus arts and crafts will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages kindergarten and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent


BRRRTHDAY PARTIES ARE JUST COOLER HERE!

PARTIES INCLUDE:

Sunday, February 20, 3 pm (Concert length one hour)

Capitol Theatre, Riffe Center

Albert-George Schram, conductor The story of Cinderella performed by Phoenix Theatre for Children to the music of Prokofiev, plus more music of fairy tales, princes, and princesses! Come early for pre-concert activities beginning at 2 pm.

Series Sponsor:

Recommended for children ages 3-10.

columbussymphony.com

800-745-3000

Ohio Theatre Ticket Office (39 E. State Street)

Operating support provided by:

ICE SKATING • SKATE RENTAL BIRTHDAY TABLE w/PAPERWARE INVITATIONS • FOOD & DRINKS CAKE & ICE CREAM CHILLER T-SHIRT FOR BIRTHDAY CHILD BIRTHDAY HOST(ESS) SET UP & CLEAN UP ADULTS SKATE FOR FREE (JUST $15 PER CHILD!)

TO SCHEDULE YOUR PARTY CONTACT THE BIRTHDAY SPECIALISTS: 614-791-9999 x323 BIRTHDAYS@THECHILLER.COM WWW.THECHILLER.COM THE CHILLER ICE RINKS HOST BIRTHDAY PARTIES THAT YOUR CHILD WILL NEVER FORGET! AND, WE DO ALL THE WORK SO YOU DON'T HAVE TO!

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Polar Bear Plunge Go freezin’ for a reason to support Special Olympics Ohio. This event encourages you to take a “refreshing” dip in a pool to support Special Olympics. It includes a costume contest and post-plunge celebration at Polar Frontier. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, 4850 Powell Rd., Powell. 614-239-7050. sooh.kintera.org.

feb 2011 visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-9016500. westerville.org.

Riverdance Thunderous celebration of Irish music, song, and dance that has tapped its way onto the world stage thrilling millions of people around the globe. 2 p.m. & 8 p.m. Tickets start at $23. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., Downtown. 800-7453000.

Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-8827277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org.

SATURDAY 19 Cabin Fever Reliever Get out of the house and have some winter fun! We will have entertainment, crafts and activities for you and your preschooler to enjoy. Break the monotony of everyday with this great winter class. Designed for ages six and under. 3-5 p.m. $3 per child. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-9016500. westerville.org.

Story Times: Saturday Story Stomp (2-5 years) No registration required. 11-11:30 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778.

Family Night Out Looking for a fun, inexpensive night out for the entire family? Come to the Westerville Community Center for a night just for families. Admission will include limited snacks, as well as use of the gymnasium, game room, climbing wall and pool. No pre-registration is necessary. 6:30-9 p.m. $5 per person. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614901-6500. westerville.org.

The Magic of Stephen Knight First-class, high-energy entertainment combining magic, comedy, and audience interaction. Dynamic magician/illusionist, Stephen Knight, takes you into a world where illusion becomes reality— and you never know what to expect. Suitable for audiences of all ages. 7 p.m. $8-$14. Midland Theatre, 36 N. Park Pl. 740-345-5483. midlandtheatre.org.

SUNDAY 20 Riverdance Thunderous celebration of Irish music, song, and dance that has tapped its way onto the world stage thrilling millions of people around the globe. 1 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $23. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., Downtown. 800-7453000.

MONDAY 21 Pee Wee Play Gym Join us for a morning of fun and play. A wide variety of large and fine motor skills equipment will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages three and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. westerville.org. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

TUESDAY 22 Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com. Story Times: Tales for Toddlers

Northside Christian School Prospective Parent Open House Feb. 3rd, 7:00 • K3 through 12th grade • Acclaimed Fine Arts • Exceptional Academics • Competitive Athletics • Foreign Languages • Small Class Sizes • Latchkey Program • Modern Science & Computer Labs • Biblical worldview that encourages spiritual growth

An exceptional value in private school options 2655 Schrock Road, Westerville 614-882-1493 • www.ncslions.org 66

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

(18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614481-3778.

ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006.

Teen Mystery Night 7-9 p.m. $2. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614481-3778.

Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Children: $3; Adults: $7; Seniors: $5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-349-9277. attheworks.org.

Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

Theatre Workshop Do you happen to have a set of happy feet? Then shuffle on down to the Theater Workshop where special guest choreographer, Kristin Gloege Michels, will help you dance the afternoon away! For kids 8-12 only. Registration required. 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org.

WEDNESDAY 23 Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com. Dino Night 7-8 p.m. Free. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333. groveport.org. Family Arts and Crafts Share creative time together with your child doing arts and crafts. This program is designed for families with preschoolers to enjoy quality time building and exploring different types of arts and crafts. For children ages five and under with parent. 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778.

THURSDAY 24 Born to Read: St. Ann’s Maternity Program Babies are born learning— and we are our children’s first teachers. With this overview of the six early literacy skills, grown-ups will discover easy ways to enhance the skills at home, with or without a book. For expectant parents, and parents/caregivers of children from birth to age two. Registration required. Free. Mount Carmel St. Ann’s Hospital, 500 S. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614898-6667. Creative Minds Open Art Studio 9:30-11:30 a.m. $8-$10. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

FRIDAY 25

Story Times: Family Story Time (25 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778.

Dare to Dance Ballet & Tap 5:45 p.m. $50. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333. groveport.org.

Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s

Skating at Creekside Noon-6 p.m. $3 skate rental; free with own skates. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. gahanna.gov.

Toddler Time Join us for a morning of fun and play. A variety of large and fine motor skills equipment plus arts and crafts will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages kindergarten and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. westerville.org. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

SATURDAY 26 A Day of Arts for All VSA Ohio celebrates its 25th anniversary with the fourth annual Sights & Sounds of the


Arts Festival, a showcase of participatory art-making activities and live performances. Past art booths have included the making of pop-up books and cards, duct tape wallets, hats, and writing unique poetry. Performers will include youth and professional vocalists, instrumentalists, and ensembles with disabilities. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Westerville Community Center, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-2415325. vsao.org. Cloth Diapers 101 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sprout Soup, 4310 N. High St., Clintonville. 614-267-7768. Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville. 614-8827277 ext. 5006. James Baggett Acclaimed garden editor and writer, James Baggett, will share his horticultural knowledge and experience during two appearances at the 2011 Central Ohio Home & Garden Show. Baggett will illustrate how five gardening “stars” built their own spectacular gardens, along with images and descriptions of their stunning and unparalleled personal gardens. 11:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Adults: $12; Children ages 12 and under, free. Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave., 614-461-5257. dispatchevents.com.

MONDAY 28 Pee Wee Play Gym Join us for a morning of fun and play. A wide variety of large and fine motor skills equipment will be available. This program will benefit your child by increasing social skills and encouraging family involvement. Every child (or family of children) must be accompanied by an adult. Ages three and under with parent. Children up to six months old are allowed at no charge. Frequent visitor cards can be purchased at the front desk of the Community Center. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per child per visit; Cards: $15 for 6 visits. Westerville Parks and Recreation Department, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. Story Times: Music & Movement (2-5 years) No registration required. 1-1:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. Wise About Eyes Traveling Children’s Exhibit 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$5. The Works, 55 S. First St. 740-3499277. attheworks.org.

ONGOING Crafty Tuesday Every Tuesday. Join us every week for kid-friendly craft time! Come anytime between 11 a.m. and 1p.m. for a themed craft, geared toward kids age 2 and up. This is a FREE event at Sprout Soup, 4310 N. High St. For more information, visit Sproutsoup.com. Columbus Babywearing First Wednesdays of the month at 10:30 a.m. This free event is at Sprout Soup, 4310 N. High St. For more information visit Sproutsoup.com. Farm and Nature Guides Volunteer weekdays at the Stratford Ecological Center to help children and adults understand the relationships between living things and their environment. The Stratford Ecological Center is located at 3083 Liberty Rd. in Delaware. For more information visit StratfordEcologicalCenter.org.

Mommies of Miracles M.O.M is a growing Ohio support community of mothers who have children (of any age) with complex medical issues or disabilities. Our mission is to eliminate the isolation mothers of exceptional needs children experience on a daily basis by providing an extended network of confidential and compassionate emotional support. Join us for monthly meetings, fun family events, couples’ enrichment activities, and advocacy initiatives. For more information on events, resources and more, go to mommiesofmiracles.com Mommies Time Out Online Support Group A fun group of moms who provide support and social activities for stay-at-home and working moms in the Columbus area. Includes playgroups, play dates, meet-ups, moms’ nights out, message boards and more. MommiesTimeOut. Proboards105.com.

Farmer’s Helper Come volunteer at the Stratford Ecological Center and become a farmer’s helper! Farmers’ helpers will assist with an abundance of activities such as animal chores, carpentry, fence building, preparing and maintaining the fields. The Stratford Ecological Center is located at 3083 Liberty Rd. in Delaware. For more information visit StratfordEcological Center.org.

MOMS Club of Clintonville A fun social and support group for stay-athome moms and their children. Playgroups, field trips and monthly moms’ nights out. 10 a.m. on the second Wednesday of each month (locations vary). For membership information, contact Carrie at 614-447- 0567, email clintonvillemomsclub@ yahoo.com, or visit our website http://clintonvillemomsclub.yolasite.c om.

Gardeners If you enjoy cultivating your green thumb then this is the perfect volunteer opportunity for you. Join the Stratford Ecological Center, 3083 Liberty Rd., to garden and maintain the vegetable gardens including the children’s garden, field gardens, giving garden, greenhouses and landscape gardens.

MOMS Club of Delaware A fun, social support group for stay-at-home moms and their children with playgroups, field trips and monthly moms’ nights out. Meets at 10 a.m. the first Monday of every month. For membership information, email at momsclubofdelaware@hotmail.com.

Mocha Moms Support group for stay-at-home moms of color. For more information email columbusmochamoms@yahoo.com MOGIS:Mothers of Girls in Sports Free group seminars for moms and daughters. New local group called Moms of Girls in Sports (MOGIS) meets the first Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at Wyandotte Athletic Club. Moms, come with your female athletes to get questions answered from Margaret on a variety of topics including nutrition, strength and conditioning, injury prevention and marketing for scholarships. Share stories and learn from other moms with girls in sports. E-mail Margaret if you plan to attend, margaret@femaleathletesfirst.com.

MOMS Club of Dublin Central Support group for stay-at-home moms. 9:45 a.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Vineyard Church, 5400 Avery Rd. Contact Mandy Skinner at amandaskinner2@gmail.com, or 614940-9392. Or go to Geocities.com/ momsclubdublincentral/.

invites you to...

MAKE IT YOUR MISSION. Fight heart disease and stop the No. 1 killer of women. Join the Go Red For Women Luncheon on Feb. 24. Visit www.heart.org/ columbusgoesred.

Colleen’s mission is

to live a heart-healthy life and be a good role model for her children. Her employer, Cardinal Health, shares the same mission – as the premier Columbus Goes Red sponsor, they are working together to promote heart-healthy lifestyles for women. Today, hearts everywhere are stronger than ever.

MOMS Club of DublinWest MOMS Club of Dublin West offers a variety of activities each month including a monthly meeting, mom and tot activities, play groups, parties, and a moms’ night out. For more information, call 614-873-9672 or e-mail momsclubofdublinwest@gmail.com MOMS Club of Dublin Southeast Support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Playgroups, monthly calendar of events, moms’ night out, service projects. Contact

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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feb 2011 Membership VP at momsclubofdublinse@yahoo.com for more info. MOMS Club of Gahanna East Support group for stay-at-home moms. Call Cathy at 614-759-6137. MOMS Club of Gahanna West Support group for stay-at-home moms. Gahannamoms@yahoo.com.

MARCH 24th 24th--27th AT THE OHIO EXPO CENTER SCHEDULE

2011

PERFORMANCE

TICKETS ON SALE JAN. 31ST

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

MARCH 24 MARCH 25 MARCH 26 MARCH 27

3:00 & 7:30 3:00 & 7:30 10:30, 3:00 & 7:30 2:00 & 6:00

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:

All Central Ohio Ticketmaster Locations & Aladdin Shrine Center Mon-Fri 10am-6pm • 614.475.2609, ext. 23 TICKET PRICES

VIP $25/$13* Center Reserve $18/$9* Reserve $16/$8* Value $10/$5* *Child tickets - 12 years & under

DOORS OPEN 1 1/2 HOURS PRIOR TO SHOWTIME

Bring the Kids Early for Games, Pony and Elephant Rides, and Indoor Carnival Rides. www.aladdinshrine.org Proceeds From This Event Are For Aladdin Shrine Center And Are Not Tax Deductible

BE A KID AGAIN!!! ALL TICKETS ON THURSDAY, MARCH 24TH ARE $8! 68

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

MOMS Club of Hilliard Northeast A social and support group for stay-athome and part-time working moms and their children. Playgroups, field trips and moms’ nights out. 9:45 a.m. on the first Thursday of the month at Scioto Ridge United Methodist Church, 4343 Dublin Rd. mchilliardnorth@yahoo.com. MOMS Club of Hilliard of Northwest MOMS Club of Hilliard-Northwest is a social and support group for stay-at-home and part time working moms and their children. We offer playgroups, field trips, mom’s nights out and much more. A general business meeting is held the first Wednesday of each month. Please visit our website at momsclubhilliardnorthwest.org or email momsclubhilliardnorthwest@yahoo.com for more information. MOMS Club of Lewis Center Northeast A social and support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Activities include playgroups, moms’ night out, service projects and more. The original chapter has since split to accommodate the great number of stay-at-home moms in our area. We are actively seeking moms living within the designated boundaries east of S. Old State Rd., south of Lewis Center Rd., north of Orange Rd., and west of Africa Rd. For membership information, call Liz at 740-6571473 or visit lewiscentermomsclubne.org. MOMS Club of Lewis Center Southeast A non-profit support group for stay-at-home moms. Actively seeking new members who live south of Orange Rd., east of S. Old State Rd., and north of Lazelle Rd. For membership information contact Gail at Moms_Club_Membership@yahoo.co m or lewiscentermomsclub.org. MOMS Club of New Albany Support group for stay-at-home moms. Contact NAMOMSclub@yahoo.com.

THE LAURIE BERKNER BAND SUNDAY, FEB. 13 — She’s only one of the hottest stars in children’s music — Laurie Berkner — and she’s bringing her band to the Palace Theatre. Don’t know Laurie? Ask the nearest crowd of Nick Jr.-loving preschoolers who she is. They’ll tell you. Time Magazine described Berkner as “a kind of sippycup Sheryl Crow.” And The Wall Street Journal said the band’s music “is distinctive because it speaks to kids without talking down to them, charming youngsters without boring grown-ups.” In this live show, there’s a “Birthday Party Concert” theme afoot: Kids can wear a party hat or bring their own birthday cake artwork (visit laurieberkner.com to download a picture to color). The band also has teamed up with Soles4Souls, an organization that provides shoes to people in need across 125 countries, to accept donations of new or gently used children’s shoes at the show. The show’s at 1 p.m. (so take those naps early or on the way in the car), and you can get tickets for $27.50 and $37.50 at the Ohio Theatre Ticket Office (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and ticketmaster.com. Or call 614469-0939 or 800-745-3000 to purchase by phone. But remember — the show’s at the Palace Theatre at 34 W. Broad St., Downtown.


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feb 2011 MOMS Club of Northwest Columbus & Upper Arlington Support group for stay-at-home or part-time working moms. Meets on the second Wednesday of each month. Call 614388-9410, or go to ColumbusMOMSClub.com. MOMS Club of Pickerington North Support group for stay-at-home moms. Also serves Reynoldsburg and Pataskala. E-mail Rachel at argillaspie@yahoo.com.

I CAN SWIM! SWIM LESSONS YMCA of Central Ohio

When a child learns to swim, she not only learns skills that can keep her safe and healthy for a lifetime, but she also gains confidence and begins to discover the potential that lies within.

Join the Y today. ymcacolumbus.org 70

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com

MOMS Club of Pickerington South Support group for stay-at-home moms living south of Refugee Rd. in Pickerington or Canal Winchester. 10 a.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at Peace United Methodist Church, 235 Diley Rd. Go to Pickerington Moms.tri-pod.com. MOMS Club of Powell Support group for stay-at-home moms. E-mail Stacie at powellmoms@yahoo.com. MOMS Club of Sunbury A social and support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Meets for business the last Thursday of each month. Monthly activities include play dates, local outings, cooking club, book club and moms’ night out. Contact Amy at 740-513-6267, or sunburymomsclub@yahoo.com for more information. MOMS Club of Westerville South Support group for stay-at-home moms. We have play groups, craft days, and a monthly moms’ night out. Meetings are at 10 a.m. on the last Thursday of each month at Grace Lutheran Church, 100 E. Schrock Rd., Westerville. Contact momswestervillesouth@yahoo.com for more information. MOMS Club of Worthington Support group for stay-at-home moms. Meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Worthington Presbyterian Church. E-mail prospectivemember@worthingtonmoms.org for more information. MOPS Dublin Fellowship support group for moms with newborns through kindergarten. The first Thursday of every month, meet at Radiant Life Church from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and the third Thursday is moms’ night out. For more information call Lindsay at 614-571-2995.

MOPS Newark Fellowship and support group open to all moms with children ages birth-5. Meets at 9:30 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at First United Methodist Church, 88 N. Fifth St. Call 740-3497020, or e-mail mops@firstumcnewark.org. MOPS Upper Arlington Lutheran Church A wonderful opportunity to meet other moms with young children. The group meets every first and third Tuesday at 9 a.m. at the Upper Arlington Lutheran Church, 2300 Lytham Rd. The cost per meeting is $5 and childcare is $2 per child. For more information, call 614-451-3736. Mothers & More Chapter 51 Nonprofit dedicated to improving the lives of mothers through support, education and advocacy. St. John’s Episcopal Church, 700 N. High St., Worthington. Call Janet at 614-888-4702, or email tsalmon11@yahoo.com. Mothers of Multiples East Columbus Support and social group for mothers of multiples. 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month. Church of the Redeemer United Methodist, 235 McNaughten Rd. Email: ECMom.org. Mothers of Preschoolers Meeting Join our MOPS group the first Tuesday of every month, September through May from 6-8:15 p.m. at the Beechwold Christian Church, 280 Morse Rd. Come for dinner, listen to a speaker and join a small discussion group to share your ideas, thoughts and experiences with other moms. Call Beechwold Christian Church at 614-8881734, or visit gobcc.com for more information. Mothers Swapping Skills Group Online notice board helps bring moms together who would like to exchange skills and services such as cooking, tutoring, babysitting, cleaning, carpooling and coaching. Group is actively seeking women leaders for guidance. Register at Groups.google.com/group/mothersswappingskills. “My” Food-Allergy Support Group A group for parents of children dealing with life-threatening food allergies. We offer monthly meetings, occasional non-food family activities and a private email group for additional support, sharing of concerns, successes, coping strategies, resources and tools. E-mail Dena Friedel at dfriedel@insight.rr.com.

New Moms’ Group An opportunity for new mothers and their babies to meet others and share information. Meets from 1-2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Elizabeth Blackwell Center, 3635 Olentangy River Rd., Columbus. Free. 614-566-4446. Nisonger Center Dual Diagnosis Clinic This clinic provides mental health diagnosis, medication recommendations and psychological assessments for people of all ages who have both a developmental disability and a mental illness. The Ohio State University Nisonger Center, 357 McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr. Call Diana Boggs, 614-292-9780, or e-mail boggs.59@osu.edu. Online Nanny Group An online group for Columbus-area nannies that helps to grow friendships and makes play dates. Go to groups.yahoo. com/group/ohionannies/. Perinatal Outreach & Encouragement (POEM, Inc.) We are moms who have survived prenatal or postpartum depression (PPD) so we understand like no one else can. POEM is the Ohio Coordinator of Postpartum Support International (PSI), the leading authority on perinatal mental health. For more information call 614-315-8989 or poemonline.org. Receptionist:Weekdays and Saturdays Volunteer your time at the Stratford Ecological Center by answering the phone, directing visitors to activities, assisting with trails and u-pick areas, as well as selling farm products. Volunteers are welcome Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. The Stratford Ecological Center is located at 3083 Liberty Rd. in Delaware. For more information, visit StratfordEcologicalCenter. org. Saturday Farm and Nature Guides Volunteer at the Stratford Ecological Center on the third Saturday of the Month to give tours of the beautiful farm to families. The Stratford Ecological Center is located at 3083 Liberty Rd. in Delaware. For more information visit Stratford EcologicalCenter.org. Trail Maintenance Come join other volunteers at to help maintain the enchanting trails of the Stratford Ecological Center, 3083 Liberty Rd., Delaware. For more information please visit, StratfordEcological Center.org.


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Invite Easter Bunny, Elmo Mickey, Dora, Cat in the Hat, Clown, Balloon Artist, Face Painter, or a Magician for your next party. Pick from 30+entertainers www.AwesomeFamily Entertainment.com 614-224-9568

STAY-AT-HOME MOMS WANTED Own your own computer? Flexible 10-15 hrs a wk. call Molly @ 614-537-5525

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off

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“Finally, a magician that can guarantee that his show will be Funny, Fun & Unforgettable...”

Hey, Kids! Saturday, March 5, is your day at the show We’re going to have a ton of fun stuff just for you on Kids Day sponsored by In partnership with our official sponsors:

columbusparent.com | February 2011 |

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Babies to Toddlers to Teens IntroducingÂ…

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Stage 1

In 3 of our most popular youth collections

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

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bedroomsfirst.com 72

| February 2011 | columbusparent.com


Columbus Parent February 2011