Page 1

COLUMBUS MONTHLY

12/2013

The LeVeque Tower was once the fifth -tallest building in th e world!

built

BUILT COLUMBUS + JENI BRITTON BAUER + MELT BAR & GRILLED

COLUMBUS 10 EssEntial Buildings that dEfinE Our City Plus: rogue, rebel, visionary architects

$5.99 | columbusmonthly.com DECEMBER 2013

12 7

25274 76606

2

J

gEt tOasty at mElt Bar & grillEd

us En Es i B hE r r P it OwtO Er n B fO a rg u OO Er d

rEal anChOrs sEt “anChOrman” straight traight


The red nose knows the way to Oakland

Since 1940

171-time landscape award winner • Voted Best Garden Center Columbus Monthly July 2013

C2_C4_DEC_CM.indd 2

11/13/13 10:36 AM


001_007_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 1

11/13/13 9:52 AM


e v i g o t r . e v e e i t c e t r e aInt’sd b . e v i e c e r and You give and you give and you give. Don’t you deserve a little something in return? For every $100 Charles Penzone Salons gift card purchased, receive our extravagant Appreciation Collection, with over $100 in savings for spa and salon services. Gift it or keep it. The choice is yours. Offer is good December 4 – 15, in-salon, at charlespenzone.com or by calling 614.418.5350.

001_007_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 2

11/13/13 12:09 PM


001_007_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 3

11/13/13 12:09 PM


Brady, Age 5 Pediatric Cancer

NACH-1957 Giving Print Ad_Brady_ColsMo.indd 1 001_007_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 4

11/13/13 9:53 AM


Please give today. Brady’s ready for the sledding hill. Your gift helps us get kids home for the holidays. Brady has cancer. Surgeons at Nationwide Children’s Hospital removed a fast-growing tumor during a 10-hour surgery, followed by six rounds of chemo. Is he resting quietly?

Well, that’s just not who Brady is. He’s a 5-yearold boy who would love nothing more than to be home. At the top of the sledding hill with his friends from the neighborhood.

WHY GIVE NOW? For every child, who hopes to go home soon, we know many children will be spending the holidays here with us at Nationwide Children’s. But if you make a gift to us right now, we’ll do everything in our power to make sure they’re home soon. So please, give what you can. And hurry. Because these kids need you now.

Make Your Gift Today. 1-855-739-5437 (KIDS)  NationwideChildrens.org

11/1/13 3:45 PM 001_007_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 5

11/13/13 9:53 AM


HOLMES C A place to visit in all seasons. The Simple Life. One Weekend at a Time.

Holiday events throughout December including: • Christmas with The Browns, family singing group - December 3,4 • Journey to Bethlehem in Walnut Creek - December 7 • 6th annual Christmas Cookie Tour of Inns - December 8, 9 • Live Theater featuring Half-Stitched, The Musical through December 21 • New Year’s Eve Party featuring nationally known comedian, Brad Strine, • and singer, Matthew Ward • Charming Holiday Events throughout Holmes County every weekend in December • Sleigh Rides • Shopping and Dining Mark your calendars for: • Classic in the Country, High School Girls Basketball Tournament • January 18,19,20 More details, make reservations, buy tickets and plan your weekend visit at

www.visitamishcountry.com.

BED & BREAKFASTS

001_007_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 6

INNS

RUSTIC CABINS

Photographer: Doyle Yoder

Photographer: Clyde Norman

Photographer: Christine Barranco

e.

HANDMADE FURNITURE

11/13/13 12:33 PM


S COUNTY

90

Located 1 ½ hours north of Columbus and 1 ½ hours south of Cleveland

UNIQUE GIFTS

001_007_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 7

QUILTS

HOMEMADE FOOD

71

70

Plan your weekend visit to Ohio’s Amish Country at: www.visitamishcountry.com or call 1-877-643-7874 for your free planning kit. We look forward to seeing you! E

75

HOLIDAY ACTIVITIES

11/13/13 12:33 PM


‹‹‹

COLUMBUS M ONTHLY

12.13

Jeni Britton Bauer and John Lowe

FEATURES

64 BUiLT COLUMBUS

Edited by Kristen Schmidt Travel into Columbus from any direction, and its skyline rises like a mirage from the rural landscape surrounding it. This month, we take you inside some of Columbus’ most storied buildings––and inside the creative, inspired minds that brought them from sketch to reality.

on the C over: LeVeque tower; Photo by tessa berg

8

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

76 gO giRLS

by Kristen Schmidt For more than 100 years, the Columbus School for Girls has prepared young women for college and careers, much of the time ensconced behind a brick wall on Broad Street in Bexley. The school has a reputation for sky-high tuition, academic rigor and being a favored institution for privileged Columbus girls. That’s all true, but it’s only part of the story.

82 JeNi'S 2.0

by Michelle Sullivan Jeni Britton Bauer and her inventive, addictive ice cream have become national phenoms. Some people would seize the opportunity of fame and escape the confines of a hometown. Instead, she’s digging in deeper to Columbus and outstretching the now powerful hand of her business to other likeminded artisans.

Photo: tessa berg

COVER STORY


Gift her beauty

ift g A

u

yo r o f

                                                         

           

Give her he e what she really wants – a unique experie n experience that reminds her every day that she is the th h beauty you cherish most. Call today to arrange her special gift 614.888.MUDD (6833) or visit us at drmarybethmudd.com

008_017_UPFRONT_DEC_CM.indd 9

11/13/13 11:59 AM


CONTENTS D E PA RT M E N T S

14

upfrONT

16

Small Talk

21

CiTy JOurNal

57

Baller Katie Smith on coming home and her future on the sidelines, Car2go and Uber arrive in Columbus, fact-checking Will Ferrell, a longtime (but little-known) musical tradition, holiday-themed performances, pint-size art shows, (fitness) boot camps, counting birds for conservation, gift-wrapping the city and the rebirth of Gahanna’s

parTiES

136

rEviEw

Despite missteps along the way, the new offerings at Latitude 41 surpass the expected ho-hum hotel restaurant fare.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS

Scenes from the Presidents Cup Opening Ceremonies and Savor the City

special advertising section

ThurbEr’S COlumbuS Writer, humorist and favorite native son James Thurber mined his hometown over and over again in his work. As his star rises again (this time at the box office), visit some of the places that surely inspired him.

ThE bailiff whO kNEw TOO muCh

Year in Review

Columbus Monthly (USPS 093-290) is published monthly. Known address of publication is 34 S. Third St., Columbus, Ohio 43215. Subscription rates: $24 per year inside Ohio and $28 outside Ohio; outside U.S. $40. Single issue, newsstand, $5.99. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. POSTmaSTer: Send address changes to Columbus Monthly, 34 S. Third St., Columbus, Ohio 43215.

10

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

ChEESE, plEaSE

140 142

GuidE TO diNiNG OuT

145

ThE diSh

2014 Models By Jenny RogeRs

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 89

TrENdiNG

135

THe

COlumbuS CalENdar

Retired Air Force Col. Linda Murnane, who works in the Franklin County Municipal Court, might be the most overqualified bailiff in the country.

152

R E S TA u R A N T S

89 99

117

89

11/13/13 10:26 AM

auTO prEviEw Highlighting the year’s hottest cars

bEST dOCTOrS A comprehensive list of the city’s best doctors

COlumbuS mEdiCal GuidE We’ve outlined what the latest changes in health care––notably increased coordination of care––mean for Central Ohioans, plus compiled a directory of medical resources in the area.

146

Cleveland-born Melt Bar and Grilled, a restaurant devoted to grilled cheese, opens in the Short North with a sizzle.

diNiNG NOTES An Italian Village eatery resurrected, sliders in the Wonder Bread building and craft beer-based vinegars

In his first year as executive chef of Barcelona, Jacob Hough has made small changes to yield a big difference.

SpEakEaSy Lessons from the Speakeasy Kitchen

Photos: toP left, courtesy tom sheley; toP and bottom right, tessa berg

44 54

Letters and chatter about Columbus Monthly

photo: Courtesy MerCedes-Benz usA

38

A note from the editor


January 1 is the time to explore my health insurance options. Significant changes required by healthcare reform go into effect January 1. That’s why now is the time to consider your options for buying health insurance. Making a decision before the end of the year could save you money. Talk to your insurance advisor or a Medical Mutual representative today. Call 877-325-6664 or visit MedMutual.com/individual.

Š 2013 Medical Mutual of Ohio

008_017_UPFRONT_DEC_CM.indd 11

11/13/13 11:59 AM


DESIGN IN -A - BOX

34 S. Third St. Columbus, Ohio 43215 614-888-4567

interior design simplified

For a flat fee abode will put together a detailed design plan for your DIY project.

columbuSmonthly.com VOLumE 39 / NumbER 12

furniture layout

fabrics, finishes

Vice preSident & publiSher

paint selections

Katie Wolfe Lloyd director of diSpatch magazineS

Brian Lindamood

Please visit our website for more information    

EDITORIAL editor Senior editor dining editor Special SectionS editor aSSiStant editor editorial aSSiStant

Kristen Schmidt Tom Tiberio Beth Stallings Jenny Rogers Michelle Sullivan Emily Thompson

DESIGN & pRODucTION art director production manager deSigner digital editor

Carrie Sosnowski Craig Rusnak Michaela Schuett Todd Hoffman

pHOTOGRApHY director of photography photo editor photographer

Will Shilling Tim Johnson Tessa Berg

ADVERTISING adVertiSing director Senior account executiVe account executiVeS claSSified SaleS SaleS aSSiStant

Rheta Gallagher Evi Lopez Michelle Crossman, Holly Gallucci, Kelly Morris Anthony Kramer, Terri Palcsak Kristen Wendel

mARkETING director of marketing & Strategy marketing manager

Jean Nemeti Lauren Reinhard

cIRcuLATION marketing SpecialiSt circulation aSSiStant

Jillian Ralls Christine Dougal

office manager

Silvana Hildebrandt shildebrandt@columbusmonthly.com 614-469-6214 letterS: letters@columbusmonthly.com preSS releaSeS: pressreleases@columbusmonthly.com adVertiSing: advertising@columbusmonthly.com

Audit Pending

Columbus Monthly magazine is published monthly by the Dispatch Printing Company. All contents of this magazine are copyrighted Š 2013, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, Ohio, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Columbus Monthly, 34 S. Third St., Columbus, OH 43215.

SubScriptionS

subscribe@columbusmonthly.com Toll Free: 877-688-8009

12

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

d

E


defy your busy life Even though life goes at breakneck speed, there’s no reason to look like it. Thanks to non-invasive, rejuvenating technologies,you can put yourself back on your to-do list. See what we can do.

 see Jennifer’s story and her before & after at: timelessskinsolutions.com

31 South High Street, Dublin, OH 43017 (614) 799.5100 photo by roharik.com

008_017_UPFRONT_DEC_CM.indd 13

11/13/13 12:00 PM


UP FRONT The Shape of the City

Kristen Schmidt kschmidt@columbusmonthly.com @MonthlyEditor 14

Where I’m headed this month: 1. Listening in to TedXColumbusWomen speakers at the Columbus Foundation on Dec. 5. Local speakers will focus on the theme “Invented Here,” as will speakers at TedXWomen in San Francisco; the event in Columbus includes a live webcast from California. tedxcolswomen.com 2. Braving the crowds at Holiday Hop on Dec. 7, hoping to find the perfect gifts for friends and family. shortnorth.org 3. Taking in holiday movie favorites on the big screen. The Gateway Film Center screens classics such as “White Christmas” and “It’s A Wonderful Life,” and admission is free with a toy donation to the Open Shelter. gatewayfilmcenter.com 4. Warming up the ol’ vocal cords for ProMusica Chamber Orchestra’s sing-along version of Handel’s Messiah on Dec. 13 at the acoustically pristine Southern Theatre. Tickets are $25. promusicacolumbus.org 5. Continuing what’s become a New Year’s Eve tradition with friends: a decadent dinner at home, followed by games, conversation and maybe (if we can stay upright) a midnight toast.

Photo: tessa Berg

To help his naive suburban Teenager look not quite so out of place on the wide sidewalks of Chicago, my dad offered some sage advice: Don’t look up at the buildings. Gawking at the Sears Tower was the move of a rube too unaccustomed to skyscrapers to take them for granted. Thankfully, I’m not one for self-preservation. Ogle openly I did, at buildings by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Louis Sullivan. I would loiter in the Tribune Tower lobby en route to Michigan Avenue window shopping just to look at the architectural details inside. How could these buildings ever be less than extraordinary? The habit persists, and, whether jogging along the Scioto Mile or riding shotgun cruising into the city along I-70, my eyes are constantly drawn upward to the Columbus skyline. Some people think it’s unremarkable, even forgettable; every city has a few regrettable buildings. But there is so much architectural treasure to uncover. If you can, find a copy of the “AIA Guide to Columbus,” a book that acts as both a field guide to buildings and a primer for Columbus architecture appreciation. It has been a constant companion, lending stories about stately homes and skyscrapers alike. It’s a great starting place for an education on how Columbus was built and who did the creative heavy lifting. When I came to the city a few years ago, I even found a familiar name in those pages. Daniel Burnham, the architect and city planner whose ideas reshaped Chicago after the Great Fire of 1871, designed two significant buildings in Columbus: the Wyandotte Building at 21 W. Broad St., which is still standing, and the Union Station Arcade, which is not. Just one arch was saved when the arcade was demolished in 1976; that’s the one you see in McFerson Commons near Nationwide Arena. The arcade does live on—in the I-670 cap, which architect David Meleca scaled based on measurements taken from the remaining original arch. For this month’s cover story (page 64), we found these and so many other fascinating stories of how Columbus came to be shaped the way it is today. We hope you enjoy gazing at these buildings, on the page and from the sidewalk, just as much as we have.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

008_017_UPFRONT_DEC_CM.indd 14

11/14/13 5:32 PM


TIMELESS DESIGNS FOR EVERY STYLE, ROOM AND BUDGET

www.karugs.com 1090 West Fifth Avenue at Kenny Road 614-294-3345

008_017_UPFRONT_DEC_CM.indd 15

11/13/13 12:01 PM


s m a l l ta l k letters and chatter about Columbus Monthly Westerville’s No. 1 Westerville residents got a boost of hometown pride in October, when real estate website Movoto named it the best suburb in America. An analysis in Columbus Monthly (May 2013, “Best Suburbs”) did not reach the same conclusion. A few people took the opportunity to rib us a bit. “Boy, did you guys blow it on your [May] cover story. How about a mea culpa?” wrote George Mackey.

they’re kiNd of a big deal When we cooked up the idea to ask local anchors to myth-bust “Anchorman” Ron Burgundy’s antics, we weren’t sure our local news anchors would go for it. Boy, were we wrong. Anchors from all our local network affiliates were game, and they clearly had fun with their answers (page 24). Our only regret: We couldn’t fit them all in the story. But we’ll sneak in a couple outtakes here: Myth: Some broadcasters will read anything on the teleprompter.

Sorry, George. Just as there is more than one way to skin a cat, there is more than one way to employ statistics to arrive at a conclusion. Our method, a factor analysis performed by an emeritus professor at Ohio State University, used housing, education and crime data to rank 19 Columbus suburbs, all with populations greater than 5,000 people. Movoto started with the three largest suburbs surrounding each of the 25 largest cities in the country and then ranked them across criteria including amenities, cost of living, crime, education and employment. They used some of the same sources we did, including the U.S. Census. We reached different outcomes (New Albany was No. 1 in our rankings, and Westerville was No. 10) with different information and different methods, but I guarantee we’re both confident in the results.

“I’ve actually started a newscast with, ‘Good Evening, I’m Martie Salt’ (his female coanchor), just because it was in the prompter and my brain was in Maui,” says Bob Kendrick of ABC6/FOX28.

COLUMBUS MONTHLY

5/2013

BEST SUBURBS + WHITEHALL

Best sUBUrBBss plus Great cities for

e buyers & more kids, commuters, first-tim

communitie s rated

REBRANDING + COLUMBUS ZOO CEO

reBooting a ‘BUrB whitehall reinvents itself $5.99 | columbusmonthly.com

05

MAY 2013

7

25274 76606

2

16

Find out what the Reeves family loves about living in New Albany

MEET THE NEW ZOO CHIEF GREAT MEMORIAL PERCHES WOMEN EXECS LEAN IN

“Yes,” says 10TV News anchor Angela An. “Rickita-lickita-stickita. Say that 10 times fast.” she made our day This note from reader Carol Wickstrom about our November issue made us smile: “WOW! This issue is the best ever!! Ryan Vesler’s story is inspiring, as is ‘44 Ways to Give.’ I have read it cover-to-cover. Keep up the good work!” Even our moms don’t send us notes like that. dressed for success T. Marzetti asked us to clarify a detail in our Made in Columbus cover story, in which we reported the company makes 41 dressings sold in all 50 states. That’s not quite right—the 41 dressings mentioned refer only to the “refrigerated Marzetti Classics and Simply Dressed lines,” not the sum total of the company’s dressing offerings. Variety is indeed the key to happy salads.

Myth: Suit shopping can bring a man out of a funk. “You know what, I do think it’s healthy to invest in a new suit. But in terms of organized field trips to buy new suits?” says Jerod Smalley of NBC4 Sports. “Yeah, that’s never happened.”

columbusmonthly.com columbusmonthly.com

columb

letters

columbusmonthly.com

As seen on TwiTTer

letters to the editor

@dconeil: Only the cardigan-wearing Fedoraistas at Columbus Monthly would not rank Donatos in the Top 25 of Columbus pizzas.

@TShutt_3: Congrats to @HOMAGE and @ryanvesler on the awesome article in the latest Columbus Monthly!

@JeffBC94: @cbusbrewadv work your way through @ColumbusMonthly’s top pizza list—it’s practically begging to be made into a tour!

@ItsRedGiraffe: RGD was featured in @ColumbusMonthly’s November issue! #columbus #ohio #614 #columbusmonthly #redgiraffedesigns

@XuedanW: Oh hey, and there’s me. ;) Big thanks to Columbus Monthly for including me in such a talented group!

@HoneyRoseK: @MonthlyEditor @ColumbusMonthly We love how much you all support small biz here! Columbus rules!

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Send to: Editor, Columbus Monthly, 34 S. Third St., Columbus, Ohio 43215. Or email: letters@ columbusmonthly.com. A letter must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number. Letters will be edited for length and clarity. All letters sent to Columbus Monthly are considered for publication, either in print or online.

photo: middle, tessa berg

While we can’t offer a mea culpa, we would like to say this: Congrats on the much-deserved props, Westerville!

Myth: Broadcasters warm up with tongue-twisters.


RECOMMENDED #1 DOCTOR DRY EYE BRAND*

Dry eye relief that lasts.

And lasts.

SYSTANE® Ultra Lubricant Eye Drops work in harmony with your natural tears to soothe, hydrate, and protect your eyes, providing you with relief that lasts.† MANUFACTURER COUPON 500065700872

3

$

off any SYSTANE® product.

EXPIRATION DATE 6/30/14

Coupon void if altered, copied, sold, purchased, transferred, exchanged or where prohibited or restricted by law. CONSUMER: Limit one coupon per specified item(s) purchased. This coupon good only on product sizes and varieties indicated. RETAILER: ALCON LABORATORIES, INC. will reimburse you face value plus 8¢, if submitted in compliance with ALCON LABORATORIES, INC. Coupon Redemption Policy dated 12/15/11, available upon request. Consumer must pay sales tax. Good only in USA. Send coupons to ALCON CONSUMER DIVISION, CMS DEPARTMENT #00067, #1 FAWCETT DRIVE, DEL RIO, TEXAS 78840. Cash value 1/20 cent.

photo: middle, tessa berg

systane.com © 2013 Novartis

9/13

SYS13125CN

LASTING RELIEF FROM D RY E Y E S Y M P T O M S

Learn more about the SYSTANE® Family of Products at systane.com.

SYSTANE® Ultra Lubricant Eye Drops are for the temporary relief of burning and irritation due to dryness of the eye. * Based on a survey of 600 eye care professionals’ recommendations for artificial tears and related products. MarketVision Research. November 2012. †

Davitt WF, Bloomenstein M, Christensen M, Martin AE. Efficacy in patients with dry eye after treatment with a new lubricant eye drop formulation. J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2010;26(4):347-53.

© 2013 Novartis

008_017_UPFRONT_DEC_CM.indd 17

9/13

SYS13116JAD

11/13/13 12:01 PM


018_020_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 18

11/13/13 9:54 AM


  

THE MALL AT TUTTLE CROSSING

ÂŽ

It’s a Family Affair!

Create memories this holiday season! For more information on holiday events, extended hours, photos with Santa and more, visit MallAtTuttleCrossing.com.                  

018_020_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 19

11/13/13 9:54 AM


Forget sugar plums.

DREAM ABOUT PANDORA.

Sterling silver charms from $25

INTRODUCING PANDORA’S WINTER 2013 COLLECTION.               head. And maybe, if you’re lucky, you’ll dream of the twinkling lights, warm colors and the timeless traditions of PANDORA’s enchanting new Winter Collection. Celebrate the season at PANDORA.net.

TUTTLE CROSSING Next to Simply Rr’s 614.718.1295

018_020_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 20

POLARIS FASHION PLACE Next to Accent on Image 614.846.1729

EASTON TOWN CENTER Next to the Lego Store 614.454.3266

11/13/13 9:55 AM


For Love of The Game OSU alum Katie Smith comes home

K

atie Smith deflects a compliment like an opponent’s shot. The first female athlete to have her number retired at Ohio State, Smith won two WNBA championships, has three Olympic gold medals and—if you count her American Basketball League career—is women’s basketball’s all-time leading scorer. Yet she is decidedly unflashy. For the Logan native, who quietly retired this year, it’s always been about the game. Here, she dishes on going back to school and her prospects as a coach. tTom Tiberio

photo: tessa berg

Ever since college, Columbus has been home, whether I’ve been here or not. Your connections, your family, the university. It’s kind of who you are. Right now, the plan is to coach as an assistant for the New York Liberty over the summer. I’m finishing grad school [at OSU] to be a registered dietitian in the spring. I really would like to pursue

something at Ohio State, possibly be the female version of Eddie George’s position. Basketball’s given me so much. I’m thankful for every opportunity that I’ve had. So many people had a hand in what I’ve done. Like most of us, you do what you do because you love it. The accolades, or the extras, are kind of a bonus. Don’t get me wrong, you do want to be acknowledged. But all the attention makes me a little ... I’m more of a deflector. I would imagine it’s mostly just where I’m from and how I was raised. You do a good job, you do your work, whether anybody’s watching you or not. It was the ultimate honor to put on the red, white and blue. And to know, we can flat-out say, we’re the best in the world. To represent Logan. And Ohio State, and Ohio, and my family. For me, the WNBA is not just about basketball. It’s all about opportunities. Whatever you can dream of, having that opportunity to go out and pursue it. But at the end of the day, it’s gonna take a lot of hard work. Columbus Monthly • December 2013

21


CityJournal|City

Take It To Go We love to share things in Columbus. Buses, bikes, cab fares (see story below)— and now cars with Car2go. The concept: Hop in one of the 200-odd Smart cars parked about town, drive it and leave it almost anywhere afterward. You don’t have to pay to park, gas is included and anyone 18 and older can use one—for three blocks or 300 miles. We wanted more details, too, so we tried it for ourselves. tMichelle Sullivan Get started Use a credit card to pay the $35 sign-up fee at columbus.car2go.com. While you wait a few days for the member card you’ll use to access the cars, download the Car2go app to your smartphone. It’ll come in handy later.

drive it After you place your member card near the digital reader on the windshield and open the door, Car2go’s touch-screen navigation panel and voiceover control give you instructions. Smart cars don’t have much pick-up, but they’re easy to operate. Ideal for one-way trips and errands for anyone sans automobile, the

Uber arrives in ColUmbUs 22

cars also cover “that first and last mile” of a commute to a bus stop or park-andride, Hill says. “A dollar trip can save you a mile walk.” Take it anywhere, but bring it back to the home area (the 30-squaremile zone from German Village to Morse Road, viewable online) before you park it for good. Park it Car2go vehicles park for free in public spots—even at meters. For a mid-trip stop, park anywhere you’d normally park, including private lots and garages (just be prepared to pay for those). Lock the car and take the keys with you to indicate to

other Car2go users the car is unavailable. Word to the wise: Have an idea where to park beforehand. “It’s a little rough Downtown, and we’re working out a way to make it better,” Hill says. Remember, you’re paying for time spent circling for a spot. Pay For it Once you scan your member card to unlock the Smart car, your meter starts and runs until you end your trip. Car2go automatically charges your account 38 cents per minute plus tax for time spent driving or in a stopover. Rates go down when a trip exceeds one hour.

Hailing a cab is so last year. Now commuters and barhoppers can secure a ride in seconds with just a smartphone thanks to a service new to Columbus. Trending in cities including New York, Chicago and Charlotte, Uber users request an on-demand, livery-licensed driver in a luxury sedan or SUV through the free mobile app, which also tracks the driver’s progress and previews the fare. Uber charges your credit card post-trip (no need to tip) and even lets you split the bill with friends. It’s most reliable closer to the city center, but Columbus operations manager Matt Whiffen says Uber is sending more cars to the suburbs each day. uber.com tMichelle Sullivan

photos: courtesy car2Go

Find it If you’re in the city core, you’ll be surprised by how many cars there are (Car2go plans to have a fleet of 250 by the end of the year, says Columbus manager Nick Hill) and how close they can be. Use the app or website to view available cars in your area. View a car’s fuel level and call dibs on one up to 30 minutes before you need to drive.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 22

11/14/13 3:03 PM


We Care About What’s Best for You!              Benjamin P. Almasanu • Pediatric & Adolescent Practitioners David T. Applegate II • Marysville Primary Care Mary S. Applegate • Marysville Primary Care Ian Baird • Riverside Infection Consultants Lauren Bar-Lev • Ohio Center for Pediatrics Gregory A. Barrett • Riverside Pediatric Associates Lee E. Budin • Building Blocks Pediatrics David D. Burnsides • Dublin Internal Medicine Jennifer H. Campbell • Building Blocks Pediatrics Mary Beth Cass • Ohio Center for Pediatrics Kathleen Costlow • Pediatric & Adolescent Practitioners Virginia K. De Verteuil • Pediatric & Adolescent Practitioners Diana Donati • Jasonway Internal Medicine Lorna F. Donovan • Pediatric & Adolescent Practitioners Paul D. Dusseau • Northwest Family Physicians Joseph F. Fiala • Crosswoods Pediatrics Robert C. Forsythe • Riverside Pediatric Associates Amanda E. Gordon • Central Ohio Medicine Lawrence P. Heiny • Pediatric & Adolescent Practitioners Marietta Ann Hofmeister • Columbus Internal Medicine Lisa Horn • Central Ohio Medicine Julianne C. Huefner • Arlington Mill Run Internal Medicine Julie B. Hundley • Central Ohio Medicine Mihai Jipa • Central Ohio Medicine

Amy R. Kelley • Amy R. Kelley, M.D. Joan Ellen King • Columbus Internal Medicine Justin Krueger • Marysville Primary Care Jay E. Martin • Arlington Mill Run Internal Medicine J. Kevin Moffa • Central Ohio Medicine David R. Neiger • Jasonway Internal Medicine Mary-Lynn Niland • Step By Step Pediatrics Janet Sigler Orr • Building Blocks Pediatrics Audra Parker • Provider Physicians East Michael A. Perry • Building Blocks Pediatrics Scott A. Prenger • COPC Internal Medicine Group M. Bonnie Pugh • Ohio Center for Pediatrics Darryl A. Robbins • Pediatric & Adolescent Practitioners Kim G. Rothermel • Ohio Center for Pediatrics David H. Sharkis • Jasonway Internal Medicine Alan D. Steginsky • Central Ohio Medicine Kathleen C. Stiles • Small World Pediatrics Robert L. Stone • Central Ohio Medicine Maria Y. Varveris • Central Ohio Medicine Gwynette Williams • Riverside Pediatric Associates Ian Wilson • Westerville Internal Medicine Roger D. Wilt • Northwest Family Physicians J. William Wulf • J. William Wulf, M.D.

             

www.copcp.com

      

photos: courtesy car2Go

(614) 326-4646

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 23

11/13/13 10:41 AM


CityJournal|Culture

you ou Stay Classy, Columbus It’s a fact. There’s something inherently intriguing about newscasters, and the cult following behind the movie that brought us Ron Burgundy only reinforces that. In honor of “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues” and to separate broadcast fact from fiction, we talked to some real-life anchors in Columbus. You may recognize them. They’re kind of a big deal. t Tom Tiberio

Myth: Broadcasters warm up with tongue-twisters.

Myth: Some broadcasters will read anything that is put on the teleprompter. A-n-y-t-h-i-n-g. “A former co-anchor of mine was reading a story about a robbery suspect … At the end, he said, ‘Call plice if you’ve seen something,’ because the ‘o’ was missing. During break, he said, ‘Why did you laugh?’”—Carolyn Bruck, ABC6/FOX28 “Rarely is there such a thing as a clean newscast. There’s always going to be something that goes wrong. It’s our job to make sure that viewers don’t even see that.”—Jerry Revish

Myth: It’s all about the hair. “It’s a very cosmetic business inherently. We get emails all the time––about hair and clothes and the makeup. Viewers are very interested in what you’re wearing and how you look.”—Marshall McPeek

“Don’t touch Jeff Hogan’s hair. Enough said.”—Angela An, 10TV News

“No. But you know what’s funny, since the movie came out, I think that a lot of people that work in this business will think of things like, ‘How now brown cow.’ And in those moments waiting around to do a live shot jokingly do that. At least I find myself doing it––‘The arsonist has oddly shaped feet.’ ”—Jerod Smalley, NBC4 Sports

Myth: Rival news stations hate each other and are protective of their “turf.” “It gets competitive, but I have never been in a rumble.”—Ellie Merritt, NBC4

“I’ve worked in a bunch of markets, and everybody is competitive. We all want to win. The ratings are very important. But at the same time, we’re all colleagues. While there’s plenty of competition, you run into folks in the field and at events, and everybody’s friendly.” —Marshall McPeek, meteorologist, ABC6/FOX28

Myth: Anchors will sometimes trash-talk after the mic is killed at the end of a newscast. “No trash-talking, but definitely jokes, especially with our studio crew. They keep us on our toes.”—Angela An

“On a typical night, when the mics are off, our studio is a non-stop teasing, editorializing, politically incorrect, gallows-humored, high-volume, verbal rumpus room. We should charge admission.” —Bob Kendrick, ABC6/FOX28

Myth: It’s important for an anchor to have a catchy sign-off. “I have gotten to where I sign off every 11 o’clock newscast with, ‘Have a good night and sweet dreams.’ I don’t know, one day, one evening it just came to me. We were leaving our viewers, and we were the last thing they saw before turning in for the night.”—Jerry Revish

24

“I have never had a sign-off line. Usually, ‘good night’ will suffice. Although … maybe I should try, ‘Stay classy, Columbus.’ What do you think?”—Ellie Merritt

photo: top right, paramount p pictures

“It all depends on the person. Sometimes we’re sitting here reading our copy out loud at our desk. You don’t want to go on the air cold. Sometimes I will find myself opening my mouth in a way to make sure I get it around the words and make sure every word stands on its own.”—Jerry Revish, 10TV News

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 24

11/14/13 5:17 PM


photo: top right, paramount pictures

This Holiday, Discover Extraordinary Craftsmanship, Quality, And Exquisite Design of Jack Kelege Exclusively At Alexanders Jewelers

Alexanders Jewelers 021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 25

11/14/13 10:31 AM


CityJournal|Music Apollo’s Fire

Early Music in Columbus has brought international talent to the city for more than 30 years

T

he instrumentalists start with a slow intro, gradually building to a female singer’s vocal entry with a delicate but full sound that’s almost haunting. One singer then becomes many as the choir crescendos to the song’s climax, all while the audience remains as silent as if the cathedral’s dark wood pews were empty. The start of this Apollo’s Fire performance is like most classical concerts—except you can’t understand the words to the Gaelic songs, and you may not recognize some of the instruments. Cleveland orchestra Apollo’s Fire specializes in baroque period music and will perform “Sacrum Mysterium: A Celtic Christmas” Dec. 6 at First Congregational Church Downtown, the latest installation in the Early Music in Columbus series. The series, which began in 1980 at Capital University, brings at least six medieval, Renaissance and baroque groups from around the world to Columbus each year. Early Music program director Katherine Wolfe admits the series appeals to a niche audience. But she also points out that early music includes a wide range of cultures, styles and instruments, like recorders, lutes, early violins, harpsichords, bagpipes, shawms and crumhorns. “The period of music we’re talking about covers maybe 800, 900 years,” Wolfe says. “Sometimes the music is more serious with more of a religious aspect to it. But there are some concerts that are more light-hearted and might have some lyrics that border on risque.” For a concert series in its 34th season, Early Music has somewhat flown under the radar. “A lot of times people come [to a concert], and they’re like, ‘Oh my gosh, this is so fabulous. I had no idea this even existed in Columbus,’ ” Wolfe says. “But I think part of it is that people have to be looking for this or have an interest in it.” Ronald Cook, one of the founders of Early Music in Columbus and director of local ensemble The Early Interval, says Columbus is one of the few cities around the country that has an early music concert series. “To have a series like this in Columbus, it’s quite a testament to the strength of the arts culture here,” Cook says. earlymusicincolumbus.com t Emily Thompson 26

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Seasonal performances abound this month, so we’ve highlighted a few others worthy of your calendar. t Emily Thompson Sweet Honey in the Rock: “Celebrating the Holy Days” 8 p.m. Dec. 5, $20-$50, Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., 614-469-0939, capa.com Five-piece female a capella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock pays homage to different faiths and holiday traditions around the world. Columbus Symphony Orchestra: Holiday Pops 8 p.m. Dec. 6-7, 3 p.m. Dec. 8, $25-$68 Ohio Theatre, 39 E. State St., 614-228-8600 columbussymphony.com Santa and Mrs. Claus join the Columbus Symphony Orchestra and Chorus for the annual carol concert. Gallery Players: “Elijah’s Angel” Dec. 7-8, 12, 14-15, $10-$20, The Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus, 1125 College Ave., 614-231-2731, columbusjcc.org The JCC’s Gallery Players presents the world premiere of “Elijah’s Angel,” adapted from the Michael Rosen book about a Jewish schoolboy and a Christian woodcarver who come together on the first night of Chanukah and Christmas Eve.

photo: courtesy early Music in coluMbus

Rare Rhythms

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS


photo: courtesy early Music in coluMbus

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 27

11/13/13 10:42 AM


CityJournal|Arts

B I M

Small and Mighty Ohio Art League’s Thumb Box show asks artists to ‘think big, create small’

Wh

C

atherine Bell Smith is accustomed to people seeing her artwork and then leaving with nothing more than the memory of it. “Because I do installation work, it’s usually like room-size pieces,” Bell Smith says. “Fifteenfoot ceilings are required.”

Tiny Tinkering

ne

We also found two slightly larger small-works exhibits to check out this month. —Emily Thompson

con

wh

ab

Wo

Muse Gallery: Small Works Show Through Dec. 17 190 E. Whittier St., German Village 614-565-0314 amusegallery.com

ave

Tom

en of

For Muse Gallery’s first annual Small Works Show, artists submitted works 24 inches by 30 inches or smaller.

28

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Stop by Roy G Biv during Holiday Hop (or until Dec. 28) and check out gallery members’ creations, which must be less than 12 inches square.

photos: tessa Berg

But recently Bell Smith, who has a studio at the Tacocat Cooperative, has taken things in the other direction. A member of the Ohio Art League, she has participated in OAL’s Thumb Nature-inspired Box Exhibition for the past art in Catherine four years. The show, which Bell Smith’s opens with a reception Dec. studio 5, will be on view at the OAL Gallery until Dec. 28. Thumb Box pieces, which as a rule must Unlike Bell Smith, Neiwirth has be no greater than 6 inches square, have a history of working on a small scale a reputation not just for their small size, for her jewelry business; among other but also for their small price tags. things, she makes dainty reproductions “It’s great for us as artists to be of treats and confections. able to sell the work,” Bell Smith Bell Smith enjoys the challenge that says. “But it’s also great for collectors, comes with small works (the Thumb Box especially beginning collectors that motto is “Think Big! Create Small!”), which don’t have a lot of money to spend.” she says require patience and “microscopic Artist Amy Neiwirth, who runs inspection.” The series has inspired her to Sweet Stella Designs, agrees. make smaller pieces throughout the year. “Shows like this make buying artwork “People will look at the bigger pieces accessible for people who might not and not be able to afford those,” says necessarily be able to afford large-scale Bell Smith, “but then they’ll say, ‘Ah, I pieces,” Neiwirth says. “And it’s great can take one of those home.’ ” 1552 N. for the holiday gift-giving season, too.” High St., Campus, oal.org tTom Tiberio

Roy G Biv Gallery: Small Works Exhibition Dec. 7-28 997 N. High St., Short North 614-297-7694 roygbivgallery.org


BUT FOR OHIO STATE, I WOULDN’T BE HERE TO SEE MY LITTLE BOY GROW UP. When Tom woke up sweating and experiencing chest pains, he knew he needed help. He went with his wife to Memorial Hospital of Union County where they recognized that Tom was having a heart attack and quickly contacted their partner, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, a best hospital for cardiology and heart surgery as ranked by U.S.News & World Report. With treatment times and survival rates better than the national averages, doctors at Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital quickly cleared Tom’s blockage and he was on the road to recovery. Now, he can enjoy creating memories with his wife and young son. See more

photos: tessa Berg

of his story at osu.edu/butforohiostate.

Tom – Marysville, OH

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 29

11/13/13 11:19 AM


CityJournal|Fitness

A

Basic Training

P

Thanks to the fun factor—and its effectiveness— boot camp-style exercise is gaining recruits

A

The formula for most boot camp-style classes is basic: Go hard, rest, repeat. It’s straightforward, it’s fun and there’s a reason it’s gaining more and more followers—it works. Just don’t call it a trend. “I don’t see this kind of training going away,” says Steven Devor, associate professor of kinesiology at Ohio State University. “Boot camps are really a larger part of the functional-fitness picture, and people are finally starting to get it.” Functional fitness means getting people off traditional weight machines and moving them toward exercises that involve compound, multi-joint movements. This high-intensity interval training works the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems simultaneously—think burpees, push-ups, rope-climbing, box jumps and tire flips. We investigated three boot camp-style classes in Columbus so you can find the one that’s right for you. ▼Jenny Rogers

Four-Week Boot Camp

Where: Buckeye Kettlebells (1110 Claycraft Rd., Ste. B, Gahanna)

Where: Xtreme Fitness Boot Camp with Bobby Steiner (Four Seasons Golf & Fitness Center, 5000 E. Broad St.)

Perfect for: The exercise lover who wants to increase strength while nursing an injury, athletes who want stronger back muscles Details: Kettlebell training, which originated in Russia, focuses on strength while incorporating cardio. It’s a simple workout of basic movements (a highlight is the Kettlebell Snatch, which burns up to 20 calories a minute), and it can increase flexibility and improve posture. It’s also easier on the joints than other boot camp-style workouts without sacrificing intensity. Sweat factor: “On a scale of one to 10, I can give you a workout that’s a 12,” says Dave Clancy, who founded Buckeye Kettlebells in 2008. “But nine out of 10 times, I want people to walk out fresh and feeling good. I have a 75-year-old doing this workout!”

30

Perfect for: Results trackers, workout fanatics who need a strict schedule Details: Steiner’s four-week boot camp is a glorious mix of weight-lifting, cardio and old-fashioned fun, from ladder drills and box jumps to stair sprints and extreme core exercise. Each day of the week is dedicated to a specific workout (Wednesday is “leg day,” the biggest calorie-burner). “In addition to the fitness training, you become incredibly skilled at exercises you likely weren’t familiar with before,” Steiner says. “Spend a year with me, and you’ll be proficient in Olympic lifts that you haven’t even heard of.” Sweat factor: “I’m not cracking a whip, but I’ve put together an insurmountable amount of work, and you do what you can,” Steiner says. “I can’t imagine anything that’s more difficult, unless you’re not trying.”

Ladies Only Where: Better Body Boot Camp for Women, by Nancy Eisenman (foreverfitbynancy.com) Perfect for: First-timers and experienced exercisers alike Details: “There’s a fun quotient,” says Nancy Eisenman of her boot camp, which, when weather permits, is held outdoors. “Sometimes it’s more about strength, other times endurance. But I keep the intensity up.” No two of Eisenman’s exercises are the same in any given week, but she does have favorites: lunges, squats, barre-style exercise and the ever-present burpee. She promises you’ll see a noticeable shift in the shape of your body within the first few weeks. Sweat factor: “Because I’m a woman and my camps are geared toward women, I’ve designed the workout specifically for them,” Eisenman says. “We’re not climbing walls and throwing tires. We’re strengthening and toning.”

photos: tessa Berg

Kettlebell Training

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 30

11/14/13 4:41 PM


A lot of spirit Plenty of grit A ton of courage

photos: tessa Berg

At Columbus School for Girls, all girl means unlimited potential. VISIT US ON JANUARY 26 TO LEARN MORE Admission Open House, 1 p.m. 614.252.0781 www.columbusschoolforgirls.org

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 31

Columbus School for Girls

11/13/13 10:45 AM


Carolina ChiCkadee

CityJournal|Outdoors

Don’t want to brave the elements for this year’s count? If you live within the designated count circle, you may be able to participate right from your backyard. Here are four popular species to spot in winter and how to attract them.

whitebreasted nuthatCh

rob thorn

Bird’s-Eye View Each year around Christmastime, tens of thousands of volunteers—dubbed “citizen scientists”—flock outdoors in the name of conservation. This month will mark the 114th Christmas Bird Count, an event organized by the National Audubon Society that serves as a sort of bird census. The tally, which occurs across the country over a three-week period, takes place on Dec. 15 in Columbus. Teams of volunteers will spread out in a 15-mile radius (the center point is near the intersection of Cassady Avenue and East Fifth Avenue) and count anything with feathers. Senior editor Tom Tiberio caught up with Rob Thorn, the compiler for the count for the last 15 years, in between outings. columbusaudubon.org where are you right now? I’m at O’Shaughnessy [Reservoir]. I’m in my car to stay out of the wind. how long has the christmas bird count been going on in this area? Columbus has had counts going back to the ’40s, but they didn’t really standardize them until, I think, the mid- or late ’60s. where does columbus fit into the larger picture when it comes to winter migration for birds? We’re kind of between two routes. There’s a big route that runs down the East Coast, called the Eastern Flyway. And there’s a big flight path a little bit to the west of us, where birds funnel down the Mississippi Valley. So we don’t get enormous flocks. What we do get is little bits of both. Our diversity is just as good as either of those spots. 32

we heard that you had record numbers last year. We actually had 89 species, which was nine species beyond our previous high. We have slowly started to realize that we do have really unusual birds, and if we work hard enough, we can find them. Over the last 10, 12 years, every year we’ve found some really knockout birds. Six or seven years ago, we found a Rufus hummingbird, which is a rare hummingbird from the West.

caroliNa chickadee, white-breaSted Nuthatch, tuFted titmouSe Food: All three of these birds––often seen at the feeder together––like black oil and striped sunflower seeds, peanuts and suet, says Tom Sheley, owner of Wild Birds Unlimited. Shelter: Feeders designed just for these small clinging birds will exclude larger birds such as starlings, grackles, pigeons and doves, Sheley says. He suggests setting up feeders out in the open, 8 to 10 feet away from the nearest tree or fence to protect against predators.

tufted titmouse

NortherN cardiNal Food: “The quintessential suburban backyard bird,” cardinals also like both types of sunflower seeds as well as safflower seeds, Sheley says. Shelter: Because they’re larger, cardinals need a bigger perching space. Sheley points out they prefer brushy, shrubby areas. The edge between a woodlot and a field, which most people’s backyards simulate, is a natural spot for them.

PHotos: tHorn, tessa Berg; carolina cHickadee, wHite-Breasted nutHatcH, tufted titmouse, cardinals, courtesy tom sHeley

FOur Calling Birds

what do you think is the biggest draw? For most people, it’s just a fun way of getting out. This is the time when they can count all their backyard birds and walk around their neighborhood and badger their neighbors. This is the one day a year when all those house finches at your feet actually count for something.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 32

11/14/13 1:58 PM


PHotos: tHorn, tessa Berg; carolina cHickadee, wHite-Breasted nutHatcH, tufted titmouse, cardinals, courtesy tom sHeley

Presenting the sophisticated luxury and exceptional craftsmanship of Ralph Lauren Furniture.

Howard Brooks Interiors 7780 Olentangy River Road Rt. 315 just north of I-270

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 33

11/13/13 10:45 AM


CityJournal|Shopping

Photo: Dwight Carter

From columbus with love Finding the perfect holiday present is always tricky—and it gets even more complicated when friends and family are spread out across the country. We’ve rounded up local gift options so you can send a little bit of Columbus to everyone on your list, from your best friend who moved for a job to your niece away at college. tEmily Thompson

d 1.

2.

4. 5.

S

Buckeye

The Ohio State Buckeye Snack Bucket ($29.95)— complete with candy buckeyes, buckeye pretzels and caramel corn—is the top holiday seller for Anthonythomas. It costs about $10 to ship—but beware if you’re sending it to a warm-weather state (Florida, California, New Mexico, Texas or Arizona); the cost could go up to $23 with ice and special arrangements, says director of retail operations Candi Trifelos (yes, that’s really her name). Multiple area locations, anthony-thomas.com

34

2. For the SpiritS

AFicionAdo

Because of state liquor laws, Middle West Spirits can’t ship their products directly from the distillery. Just in time for the holiday season, they’ve recently teamed up with Andrew’s Wine Cellar in New York (andrewswinecellar.com) to offer five OYO spirits—vodka, honey vanilla-bean vodka, stone fruit vodka, bourbon whiskey and small-batch wheat whiskey—via mail order (free shipping for orders that exceed $250). Family gettogethers just got a lot more fun. middlewestspirits.com

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

3. For the

Foodie

“Many people with German heritage just want a little taste of home,” says Juergens marketing assistant Tatiana Keidel. Whether you’re German or not, Juergens’ sweet treats are hard to pass up. Advent stollen (fruit cake), anise-flavored springerle cookies, weinbrand bohnen (brandy beans), lebkuchen (gingerbread) and marzipan are big holiday sellers for the German Village bakery, which ships minimum orders of $25. 525 S. Fourth St., German Village, 614-2246858, juergensbakery.com

4. For the true-Blue

JAcketS FAn

Give your favorite Blue Jackets fan a reason to visit Columbus with a holiday pack (starting at $89). Two tickets for two games and a playerautographed holiday-themed puck come bundled in a gift box with shipping included. Choose between autographs from Sergei Bobrovsky, James Wisniewski, Jack Johnson, Brandon Dubinsky, Marian Gaborik and Jared Boll. bluejackets.nhl.com

5. For the perSon

With everything

Send a one-of-a-kind present to that relative who’s impossible to buy for with celebrate local’s custom gift boxes. A sales associate at the Easton store will help you fill a Priority Mail box with locally made, individually wrapped items. You just pay for the stuff inside, shipping and a $2 to $10 packing fee. Choose a theme—like Ohio State, breakfast or spicy stuff—or just fill it with an eclectic assortment. 3952 Townsfair Way, Easton, 614-471-6446, celebratelocalohio.com

photos: tessa Berg

1. For the Forever

Photo: Rob Waymen

3.

T


CELEBRATE THE holidays with

!

ticketmaster.com | 800-745-3000 & outlets capa.com | 614-469-0939 | CAPA Ticket Center Photo: Dwight Carter

sweet honey in the rocK CElebrating the holydays

Spectrum Series Sponsor

David & Mo Meuse

Thursday, December 5 | Capitol Theatre | 8 pm

dave koz & Friends Christmas Tour 2013 Sunday, December 8 | Palace Theatre | 7 pm

the irish tenors—Wright Kearns tynan the premiere irish holIday celebration tour Monday, December 9 | Palace Theatre | 8 pm

SISTER’s Christmas Catechism Friday & Saturday, December 20 & 21 | Lincoln Theatre | 8 pm Photo: Rob Waymen

jim brickman The magic of Christmas Saturday, December 21 | Southern Theatre | 8 pm

Giƒt

photos: tessa Berg

Certificates

THANKS TO OUR SUPPORTERS

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 35

Give the gift of

entertainment! Purchase a CAPA gift certificate today–redeemable for any performance in our downtown theatres! OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF CAPA

11/13/13 10:46 AM


CityJournal|Neighborhoods

Gahanna R

ight where Big Walnut Creek flows through downtown Gahanna is a string of shopping and dining mustvisits, including old favorites and a newly reborn Creekside Plaza. After sunset, stick around for a spectacular light show that illuminates Olde Gahanna’s wooded backdrop throughout the holiday season.

t Michelle Sullivan

➊ Honey Grove Botanicals Everything in this tiny candle and apothecary shop is made with natural ingredients by owner Barb Drobnick. Every concoction is “born out of necessity,” she says, from her botanical facial serum with hydrating oils to her icy mint body soak with spearmint and bergamot for sore muscles. Make-and-take herbal bath salts and teas (from $6.99) are a fun way to personalize a moment of relaxation. 121 Mill St., Suite 126, 614-638-7809, honeygrovebotanicals.com

WISH LIST ➎ Pick up a tin of fudge ($15) for the holidays, made at The Chocolate Tree (81 Mill St., Suite 150) using homemade chocolate from owner Sally Held’s parents in Pennsylvania.

➋ Lola and Giuseppe’s Trattoria For years, former pastry chef Lola Iacobone and her Italian husband Giuseppe (Joe) have cooked signature dishes, such as eggplant parmesan and their buzzed-about meatballs, straight from his mother’s recipes. Although portions are heaping, it’s tough not to lick the plate—or turn down the tiramisu. 100 Granville St., 614-473-9931, lolas-italian.com ➌ Koko This charming tea salon and bakery mimics a Parisian patisserie, with rose-colored walls and homemade cakes, macarons and truffles. Set in an old Victorian house, Koko offers custom blends of hot, cold and bubble teas, as well as the 120 cupcake flavors for which

owner Ava Misseldine is known (her red velvet cupcake was featured on the Food Network’s “Best Thing I Ever Ate”). All her baked goods are organic, and fruit and vegetable juices are used in lieu of artificial dyes. 116 Mill St., 614-389-3459 ➍ Upscale Resale Furnishings Since it opened 16 years ago, June Axline’s furniture resale store has developed quite a following. Pieces by Ethan Allen, Sherrill Furniture and Thomasville are among those that can be found for a fraction of the original cost. Items are marked down every 30 days, but Axline warns against playing that game: “If you love it, don’t wait.” Most pieces sell within 60 days. 57 Granville St., 614-476-4070, upscaleresalefurnishings.com

8.

➏ Fair-trade Lily and Laura bracelets ($15) from Jewels and More (121 Mill St., Suite 122) make great party favors. Each of these colorful, beaded bracelets is individually crafted by artisans in Nepal.

6.

36

towN StrEEt HigH StrEEt

➑ Ask the experts at The Wine Guy Wine Shop (101 Mill St., Suite 105) whether a bottle of California J. Lohr Arroyo Vista chardonnay ($21) or Argentine Allamand Malbec ($20) is best for your next dinner party.

MiLL StrEEt

Need a little good fortune? Pop into Zodiac (69 Mill St.) for a bundle of sage ($5) to cleanse your home of negative vibes or an astrological reading ($30) to learn what the stars say about your future.

grANViLLE St rEEt

7.

5.

photos: top, Ryan M.L. young; wish List, tessa BeRg

wALNut StrEEt

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 36

11/14/13 4:54 PM


Urban Baggerie

The Shops at Worthington Place 7227 N. High Street, Suite 105 Worthington, OH 43085 614-433-0486

Polaris Fashion Place 1500 Polaris Parkway, Suite 1008 Columbus, OH 43240 • First Floor near Macys 614-985-4177

www.urbanbaggerie.com

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 37

11/13/13 10:47 AM


CityJournal|Parties

Presidents CuP OPening CeremOnY Columbus Commons hosted a huge welcoming party for the Presidents Cup on Oct. 2, with appearances by host Jack Nicklaus, team captains Fred Couples and Nick Price and a concert by the country band Rascal Flatts. Foods from South Africa, South Korea, Australia and Argentina highlighted the global spirit of the event. presidentscup.com

 

1. Diane Pierce, Suzanne Ivey, Karen Nelson, Tina Leggett 2. Ryan and Kelsey Coll 3. Lindsay Whyte, Matt Blakesky 4. Mike Powell, Christy Randle 5. Dan Scarry, Jan Blum 6. Sonia Aulia, Longeveldt Amfazema 7. Neal and Erin Shah 8. Shannon Larson, Judy Ott 9. Angie and Bruce Black photos: Jodi Miller

38

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 38

11/14/13 5:02 PM


photos: Jodi Miller

021_040_CITYJOURNAL_DEC_CM.indd 39

11/13/13 10:47 AM


CityJournal|Parties

Savor the City

1. Bill Sieloff, Jodi Lee, Chris Rutter, Steve Sylvia 2. Katie McKivergin, Christy Walters 3. Dan Marcelain, Maggie Ellison 4. Mike and Marianne Corrova 5. Azuka MuMin, Rita Deedrick 6. Rachel and Michael Rourke 7. Mathew Adair, Michael Wilkos 8. Arch Award nominees Darci Congrove, Candice Watkins (award winner), John Angelo

40

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

photos: Dan trittschuh

Lovers of local history gathered at COSI on Oct. 3 for an evening of food from classic Columbus restaurants, including TAT, Lindey’s, Hickory House and The Top Steakhouse. To cap the night, partygoers danced and swayed to the musical stylings of the VaudVillities. The annual Savor the City event benefits the Columbus Historical Society. columbushistory.org


Caring for Communities Good neighbors care about the community. And community caring is a year-round tradition at American Electric Power. In 2012, AEP and the American Electric Power Foundation distributed nearly $18 million to more than 2,400 organizations across our 11-state territory to support basic human needs, help students succeed in school, enhance the environment and enrich our culture through the arts.

To learn more about how AEP connects to our communities, view our Community Connections report at AEP.com.

041_043_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 41

11/13/13 10:23 AM


ADVERTISEMENT

Gallup® has audited and certified Best Doctors, Inc.’s

FIVE PRACTICAL STEPS

database of physicians, and its companion

YOU CAN TAKE TO GET THE RIGHT DIAGNOSIS:

Best Doctors in America® List, as using the highest industry

1.

Ask your doctor questions about your diagnosis and treatment. Keep asking questions every step of the way until you’re satisfied with the answers.

standards survey methodology and processes.

Published studies show that misdiagnosis

2.

Get a second – or third, or fourth – opinion. Given today’s misdiagnosis rates, you become your own best health advocate by actively seeking the right answers for your particular condition.

3.

Take the time to get to know your family medical history – and make sure your doctor knows about it. If you search for “My Family Health Portrait” on Google you’ll find a handy online tool from the U.S. Surgeon General to assemble your own family medical history.

4.

Take someone with you to doctor’s visits. Bring along a friend or family member to remind you of questions you want to ask, and to help you write down important notes.

5.

If you had a biopsy and your diagnosis is based on your pathology report, try to get it reviewed again. If that interpretation is wrong, your diagnosis – and your treatment – could likely be wrong, too.

occurs from 15-28% of the time in the U.S.

In 2012, Best Doctors, Inc. reported it had corrected or refined diagnoses in 34 percent of cases in the U.S. and corrected or improved treatment in 68 percent of cases.

For further information, call (800) 223-5003 or visit bestdoctors.com

041_043_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 42

11/14/13 3:46 PM


“We all have the power to make a real difference in our own care or that of a loved one.” David Seligman, Chairman and CEO at Best Doctors, Inc.,

Despite the best efforts of dedicated, time-strapped doctors, misdiagnosis still happens far too often. In today’s overburdened health care system, it’s harder than ever to have enough time to do the deep thinking needed to carefully examine each piece of a patient’s case. From a care and policy perspective, there is much that can and should be done to acknowledge and address the problem, but the private sector is taking proactive steps to combat the issue. Many of the world’s leading corporations and health plans are offering expert second opinions and other services such as helping employees find the right doctor or decide on the best treatment options, in an effort to ensure that employees get the right diagnosis. The truth is everyone must be involved when it comes to getting the right diagnosis – doctors, patients, hospitals, employers, insurers and policymakers alike. Misdiagnosis doesn’t have to happen. We all have the power to make a real difference in our own care or that of a loved one.

David Seligman Chairman and CEO

Unsure if you have access to Best Doctors as an employee benefit? Share this with your Human Resources Department.

041_043_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 43

11/13/13 10:24 AM


DECEMBER

.......

don’t miss

....

• Multi-talented funnyman Bill Cosby performs at the Palace Theatre on Dec. 6, and we can only hope he’ll be sporting a classic Cosby seasonal sweater. See Events. • John Mayer and Phillip Phillips bring their acoustic sounds to the Schott on Dec. 3, following the release of Mayer’s album “Paradise Valley.” See Music. Compiled By Emily Thompson

44

PHoto: courtesy balletmet

• The holiday season wouldn’t be complete without BalletMet’s annual enchanted performance of “The Nutcracker,” Dec. 12 through 24 at the Ohio Theatre. See Dance.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 44

11/14/13 1:59 PM


Scott Antique Markets Ohio Expo Center

Send it in

To be listed, events must be of general interest and open to the public. There is no charge; items will be included as space permits. We must receive written information seven weeks prior to the first of the month in which the event takes place. February deadline is Friday, Dec. 13. In providing information, please follow the format of the appropriate category, including a phone number the public can call for more information. Mail: Columbus Calendar Columbus Monthly 34 S. Third St. Columbus, Ohio 43215 Fax: 614-461-8746 Email: calendar@columbusmonthly.com

Benefits

PHoto: courtesy balletmet

Dec. 2 PACO Charity Happy Hour Large one-topping pizzas (hot or take-and-bake) will be on sale for $7.99, and beer and wine will be available in the cafe. Portions of the pizza sales and all bartending tips will go directly to Paralegal Association of Central Ohio’s scholarship program. 5-8 p.m. The Hills Market, 95 N. Grant Ave., 614-306-8481, pacoparalegals.org Dec. 6 Clothe-A-Child Gala and Auction Charity Newsies kicks off its Newspaper Drive week with the annual Clothe-A-Child Gala and Auction, which features cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, live and silent auctions and a program. 6 p.m. $35, $60 couples. Hilton Hotel Downtown Columbus, 401 N. High St., 614-620-1507, charitynewsies.com Dec. 7 Wagons Ho! Ho! Ho! The community is invited to help RMD Advertising and the Mid-Ohio Foodbank assemble 400 new red wagons, fill them with canned goods and gift cards and distribute them to families in Central Ohio. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Mid-Ohio Foodbank, 3960 Brookham Dr., Grove City, 614-794-2008, wagonshohoho.org Powell Reindeer Run This 5K walk/run through the Kinsale community benefits Toys for Tots. The race will start and finish at the football stadium. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $30. Olentangy Liberty High School, 3584 Home Rd., Powell, 614-266-9174, signmeup.com/95805 Winter Accessories Drive The first 300 people to donate a new children’s scarf, hat or gloves will receive a free ticket voucher to see Monster Jam at Nationwide Arena on Jan. 3. 10 a.m.-noon. Charity Newsies, 4300 Indianola Ave., 614-263-4300, charitynewsies.org

S 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

December

T 3 10 17 24 31

W 4 11 18 25

T 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

S 7 14 21 28

Monthly, Nov. thru March!

2013-2014 SHOWS: DECEMBER 21 & 22 JANUARY 18 & 19 FEBRUARY 15 & 16 MARCH 22 & 23

Show Hours: Saturday 9am - 6pm Sunday 10am - 4pm

Directions: Ohio Expo Center Columbus, Ohio I-71 Call: 740.569.2800 to exit 111 (17th Ave.)

www.scottantiquemarkets.com

800 Booths!

Covenant Enforcement

Reserves Board Member Education

Developer Transition

We Put It All Together For You.

Amendments Document Interpretation

Assessment Collections

We Do OneThing And Do It Well.

Condominium/Homeowner Association Law We provide comprehensive information, education, and communication with the board.

Kaman & CUSIMANO, LLC 470 Olde Worthington Road, Suite 460 • Columbus, Ohio 43082 614-882-3100 • Toll-Free 888-800-1042 ohiocondolaw.com • ohiohoalaw.com

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 45

45

11/13/13 3:19 PM


Dec. 14 Christine’s Christmas A holiday concert in memory of Christine Wilson benefiting the Christine Wilson Burn Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The annual concert has raised more than $380,000 for children’s charities. 7:30 p.m. $76$101. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., 614-355-0818, giving.nationwidechildrens.org Dec. 21 2013 Columbus Winter Avant-Garde Art & Craft Show Finish up your holiday shopping at this arts and crafts show, which offers original handmade items. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Columbus nonprofit Pets Without Parents. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $3, free for children under 13. St. Agatha Church, 1860 Northam Rd., Upper Arlington, 440-227-8794, avantgardeshows.com

Dance

O N

C O S I ’ S

E X T R E M E

S C R E E N

An Incredible Journey. A Story of Monumental Courage. A Magical Place.

Dec. 1 The Central Ohio Youth Ballet: “The Nutcracker” 2:30 p.m. $11-$22. The Midland Theatre, 36 N. Park Pl., Newark, 740-345-5483, midlandtheatre.org Dec. 5-6 Kristina Isabelle Dance Co.: “The Floating City” 7:30 p.m. $22, $11 students. Riffe Center Studio Two, 77 S. High St., 614-469-0939, ticketmaster.com Dec. 5-8 Dance 2013: Once Again 7:30 p.m. Thu, 8 p.m. FriSat, 2 p.m. Sun. $18. Fritsche Theatre at Cowan Hall, Otterbein University, 30 S. Grove St., Westerville, 614823-1109, otterbein.edu Dec. 6-7 The Westerville Christmas Spectacular: Dance and Music 6 p.m. Fri; 11:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sat. Westerville Central High School, 7118 Mt. Royal Ave., Westerville, 614-794-3298, westerville.k12.oh.us Dec. 12-24 BalletMet: “The Nutcracker” $25-$80. Ohio Theatre, 39 E. State St., 614-229-4848, balletmet.org Dec. 13-14 Columbus Dance Theatre: “Matchgirl” $30, $25 seniors, $15 students. Otterbein University’s Fritsche Theatre, 30 S. Grove St., Westerville, 614-849-0227, columbusdancetheatre.com Dec. 13-15 New Albany Children’s Ballet Theatre: Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” 7 p.m. Fri, 2 and 7 p.m. Sat, 2 p.m. Sun. $15-$25. Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts, 100 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., New Albany, 614-469-0939, newalbanycbt.org

Events a St Stephen tep ephe hen he n Low Low f film ilm

NOW SHOWING

FILM SPONSOR:

ANNUAL PRESENTING MEDIA SPONSOR:

PROMOTIONAL PARTNER:

Visit cosi.org for showtimes | 46

Dec. 4 Author Book Signing and Discussion Meet authors who capture and retell the stories of the Capital City during this annual event. Columbus-themed books will be available for purchase, and book proceeds will support The Columbus Historical Society. 6-9:30 p.m. Free. Columbus Historical Society at COSI, 333 W. Broad St., 614-224-0822, columbushistory.org Dec. 5 Cheryl Donegan Donegan’s work is unified by a sustained interrogation of surfaces, whether canvas, screen, fabric, plastic or the artist’s own body. 6:308:30 p.m. Free. CCAD Canzani Center, 60 Cleveland Ave., 614-224-9101, ccad.edu Dec. 6 The Golden Dragon Acrobats Impresario Danny Chang and choreographer Angela Chang combine acrobatics, traditional dance, costumes, ancient and contemporary music and theatrical techniques in this performance. 7 p.m. $15-$30. The Midland Theatre, 36 N. Park Pl., Newark, 740-345-5483, midlandtheatre.org Bill Cosby Actor and comedian Bill Cosby has also

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 46

11/13/13 3:18 PM


authored best-selling books “Fatherhood,” “Time Flies” and “I Didn’t Ask to Be Born (But I’m Glad I Was).” 8 p.m. $39-$68. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., 614-469-0939, capa.com Dec. 7 CCAD Art Fair A semi-annual juried showcase of works by more than 100 CCAD students, faculty and alumni. Admissions fund student scholarships, and sales proceeds go directly to the artists. 10 a.m. Loann Crane Center for Design, 112 Cleveland Ave., 614-224-9101, ccad.edu Brainy Banking Family Day Spot a counterfeit bill, learn what money is made of, play a marketplace game and learn how to start a savings account during this hands-on event. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Free. COSI, 333 W. Broad St., 614-228-2674, cosi.org Short North Holiday Hop Free. Short North district, along North High Street between Fifth Avenue and Nationwide Boulevard, 614-299-8050, shortnorth.org Dec. 10 MythBusters: Behind the Myths Tour Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage, co-hosts of the Emmy-nominated Discovery series “MythBusters,” invite fans to join them on stage and assist in their not-always-orthodox approach to science. 7:30 p.m. $62-$168. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com Dec. 11 Chris Matthews Anchor of MSNBC’s “Hardball” and the NBC-syndicated “The Chris Matthews Show,” as well as the author of numerous bestsellers including “Jack Kennedy,” Matthews now tells the firsthand story of the friendship between President Ronald Reagan and the speaker of the House in “Tip and The Gipper: When Politics Worked.” 7:30 p.m. $20 adults, $18 students and seniors. Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E. Broad St., 614-464-1032, thurberhouse.org Dec. 26 Harlem Globetrotters The Globetrotters’ Fans Rule World Tour kicks off at the Schottenstein Center. 2 p.m. Starting at $20. Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr., 800-745-3000, harlemglobetrotters.com

Exhibits Angela Meleca Gallery Andrew J. McCauley and Casey Riordan Millard, through Dec. 20. 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tue-Fri, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 144 E. State St., 614-340-6997, angelamelecagallery.com Art Access Gallery Open Landscapes, through Dec. 31. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue-Fri, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 540 S. Drexel Ave., Bexley, 614-3388325, artaccessgallery.com Capital University: The Schumacher Gallery Memories of World War II: Photographs from the Archives of The Associated Press, through Dec. 6. 1-5 p.m. Mon-Sat. 303 E. Broad St., 614-236-6319, schumachergallery.org CCAD Canzani Center Gallery My Crippled Friend; Richard Aschenbrand: Alphabet Alliteration, through Jan. 11. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tue-Fri, noon-6 p.m. Sat-Sun. 60 Cleveland Ave., 614-224-9101, ccad.edu Columbus Cultural Arts Center Cut and Torn – Paperscapes, though Dec. 28. 1-4 p.m. and 7-10 p.m. Mon, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and 7-10 p.m. Tue, Wed and Thu, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Fri-Sat. 139 W. Main St., 614-645-7047, culturalartscenteronline.org Columbus Museum of Art The Big Idea: Color, through early 2014; George Bellows and the American Experience, through Jan. 4; Think Outside the Brick, through Feb. 16; Matthew Brandt: Photographs, through March 9. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tue-Sun, 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Thu. 480 E. Broad St., 614-221-6801, columbusmuseum.org COSI Curious George: Let’s Get Curious!; Positive Exposure: The Spirit of Difference, through Jan. 5. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Sat, noon-6 p.m. Sun. 333 W. Broad St., 614228-2674, cosi.org Dublin Arts Council Masayuki Miyajima: Infinite Possibilities, through Dec. 20. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tue, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Wed-Fri, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. 7125 Riverside Dr., Dublin, 614-798-8395, dublinarts.org

Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Merry & Bright, through Jan. 5; Bruce Munro: Lights at Franklin Park Conservatory, through Feb. 8. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Wed. 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Galleria Evangelia Strong & Vibrant, Dec. 27-Jan. 11. Noon-7 p.m. Fri-Sat, noon-5 p.m. Sun. 4269 N. High St., 614-354-6557, galleria-evangelia.com German Village Meeting Haus Jeff Stahler: Moderately Confused Creator and Cartoonist, Dec. 5-20. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat, noon-3 p.m. Sun. 588 S. Third St., 614-221-8888, germanvillage.com Groveport Town Hall The Art of the Comic, through Dec. 31. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon-Sat, noon-6 p.m. Sun. 648 Main St., Groveport, 614-836-3333, groveport.org Hawk Galleries Dan Dailey and Linda MacNeil: Sculpture, Paintings and Sculptural Jewelry, through Dec. 29. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tue-Fri, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat, 1-5 p.m. Sun. 153 E. Main St., 614-225-9595, hawkgalleries.com Hayley Gallery Laurie Clements: Dreaming of Italy, through Dec. 5. Noon-8 p.m. Tue-Thu, 1-9 p.m. FriSat. 270 E. Main St., New Albany, 614-855-4856, hayleygallery.com Muse Gallery Small Works Show, through Dec. 17. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Wed, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Thu-Sat, noon-4 p.m. Sun. 190 E. Whittier St., 614-565-0314, amusegallery.com Ohio Art League Fall Juried Exhibition, through Dec. 6; Thumb Box Exhibition 2013, Dec. 5-28. Noon-6 p.m. Mon-Wed, noon-8 p.m. Thu-Sat. 1552 N. High St., 614299-8225, oal.org Ohio History Center Faces of Appalachia: Photographs by Albert J. Ewing, through Dec. 29. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed-Sat, noon-5 p.m. Sun. 800 E. 17th Ave., 614-2972300, ohiohistory.org The Ohio Statehouse Holiday Exhibit, Dec. 2-31. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon-Fri, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat-Sun. 1 Capitol Sq., 614-752-9777, ohiostatehouse.org Ohio Wesleyan University: Beeghly Library Love Life, through Jan. 6. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon-Thu, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat, 1 p.m.-2 a.m. Sun. 43 Rowland Ave., Delaware, 740-203-6908, ross.owu.edu OSU Faculty Club Jeffrey Regensburger Oil Paintings, through Dec. 31. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Fri, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Thu. 181 S. Oval Dr., 614-292-2262, ohio-statefacultyclub.com OSU Urban Arts Space The Department of Art Bachelor of Fine Arts Senior Projects Exhibition, Dec. 3-14. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue-Sat, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Thu. 50 W. Town St., 614-292-8861, uas.osu.edu Pizzuti Collection Cuban Forever; Inaugural Exhibition: Looking Back, Looking Forward; Sculpture Garden, through June. 632 N. Park St., 614-280-4004, pizzuticollection.com Reed Arts Structure/Figure: Photography by Robert Colgan, through Dec. 28. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon-Fri, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 943 W. Third Ave., 614-291-0253, reedarts.com Riffe Gallery The Modern Table: Ohio Furniture Designers, through Jan. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wed and Fri, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Thu, noon-4 p.m. Sat-Sun. 77 S. High St., 614-466-2613, oac.state.oh.us Rivet Gallery The Work of Jeff Lamm, Dec. 7-31. Noon7 p.m. Tue-Sat, noon-5 p.m. Sun. 1200 N. High St., 614294-8697, rivetart.com Roy G Biv Gallery Small Works, Dec. 7-28. 3-6 p.m. Wed-Fri, 1-5 p.m. Sat. 997 N. High St., 614-297-7694, roygbivgallery.org Sean Christopher Gallery Ohio Hushed and Hurried: Jeffrey Cortland Jones, Dec. 7-Jan. 25. 3:305:30 p.m. Wed-Fri, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Sat. 815 N. High St., 614-291-5890, seanchristophergalleryohio.com The Works Family Matters, through Jan. 11. 10 a.m.6 p.m. Tue-Sat. 55 S. First St. Newark, 740-349-9277, attheworks.org Terra Gallery Fall Salon Show, through Dec. 4. Noon6 p.m. Mon-Sun. 8 E. Poplar Ave., 614-228-4188, terra-gallery.com Wexner Center for the Arts Blues for Smoke, through Dec. 29. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue-Wed, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Thu-Fri, noon-7 p.m. Sat, noon-4 p.m. Sun. 1871 N. High St., 614292-3535, wexarts.org Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 47

47

11/13/13 3:18 PM


Film

If

am it

n dre you ca

N WE CTAE IT CREA

e Avenu t Lane3 s e W 1741 486-465 315 om -486-1 1-800rtjewelers.c e b i r e jacks onds fo iam Cut D rilliance. Ideal um B Maxim

y We Bu

Like us on

Gold

comfort & joy

Boiled Wool Slippers

1880 West Henderson Road in the Northwest Center

(614)457-6662

www.eastonshoes.com 48

COSI Glacial Balance, 7 p.m. Dec. 5. Free; The Polar Express, 7 p.m. Dec. 13, 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Dec. 14. $10, $8 members; Extreme Screen Movies: Rocky Mountain Express, Penguins 3D. 333 W. Broad St., 614-2282674, cosi.org Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center of Worthington Get Reel @ The MAC: The Nightmare Before Christmas. 3 p.m. Dec. 15. $3. 777 Evening St., Worthington, 614-431-0329, mcconnellarts.org The Gateway Film Center Columbus Documentary Week: 20 Feet From Stardom, 4 p.m. Dec. 8. $7.50$10, The Act Of Killing, 8 p.m. Dec. 8. $10. 1550 N. High St., 614-247-4969, gatewayfilmcenter.com Wexner Center for the Arts Glacial Balance, 7 p.m. Dec. 3. $8, $6 members, students and seniors; Zoom Family Film Festival: Silent Comedy Shorts and Cartoons, 7 p.m. Dec. 5, Kid Flix Mix, 10 a.m. Dec. 7, A Letter to Momo, 11:30 a.m. Dec. 7, International Shorts from Seattle’s Northwest Film Forum, 2 p.m. Dec. 7, Party Mix, 4 p.m. Dec. 7, Ernest & Celestine, 7 p.m. Dec. 7. $4, $3 members, Mondo, 1 p.m. Dec. 8. Free; Medora, 7 p.m. Dec. 10; Cocksucker Blues, 7 p.m. Dec. 13. $8, $6 members, students and seniors. 1871 N. High St., 614-292-3535, wexarts.org

Holiday Dec. 1 Gingerbread Competition This year’s theme is “Holiday Favorites: Books, Movies and Television Specials.” Register in one of four categories (youth, teen, adult or family) by Dec. 1 and deliver your completed entry Nov. 30 or Dec. 1. First-, second- and third-place prizes are awarded in each category. All entries will be on view beginning Dec. 3. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Village Lights Follow more than 10,000 luminaries to German Village shops, businesses and restaurants open late with holiday treats, discounts and special offers. Festivities include carolers, live holiday music, horse-drawn carriage rides and BalletMet’s “The Nutcracker.” 6-10 p.m. German Village Meeting Haus, 588 S. Third St., 614-221-8888, germanvillage.com Dec. 3 Ohio Statehouse Holiday Festival and Tree Lighting Meet Santa and Mrs. Claus, watch the lighting of the holiday tree, enjoy refreshments, participate in festive arts and crafts activities and listen to local bands and choirs. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. The Ohio Statehouse, 1 Capitol Sq., 614-728-9777, ohiostatehouse.org Dec. 3-31 Holiday Tours on Capitol Square Step back in time with a guided tour of the 1861 Statehouse and see holiday decorations as they were in Victorian times. Walk-in tours meet in the Map Room every hour on the hour, except at noon. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon-Fri, 1-3 p.m. Sat-Sun. Free. The Ohio Statehouse, 1 Capitol Sq., 614-752-9777, ohiostatehouse.org Dec. 4 Mrs. Claus’ Kitchen Decorate cookies at Mrs. Claus’ Kitchen, warm up by the fire and enjoy hot beverages. Santa and two of his reindeer will make a special appearance. 6-9 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Dec. 6-7 Holiday Fair A lighting ceremony of more than 120,000 lights will be held at 6 p.m. on Friday, followed by a local band on the Columbus Bicentennial Pavilion stage. Activities on both Friday and Saturday include trackless train rides, carousel rides, a petting zoo, strolling entertainment and visits with Santa. Both evenings will end with a festive fireworks display, and food trucks will be on site. 4-9

p.m. Free. Columbus Commons, 160 S. High St., columbuscommons.org Dec. 7 Children’s Christmas Celebration Presented by Vaud-Villities Productions, the Children’s Christmas Celebration features Central Ohio youth performances of “Frosty the Snowman,” photo opportunities with Santa and Mrs. Claus, face-painting, games, a Secret Santa Gift Shoppe, a Sweet Treat Shoppe and makea-Christmas craft. 1-5 p.m. $5. Covenant Presbyterian Church, 2070 Ridgecliff Rd., Upper Arlington, 614-2627469, vvproductions.com Dec. 7 & 14 Breakfast with Santa Join Santa for breakfast and a meet-and-greet photo opportunity and decorate holiday cookies. 8:30-10 a.m. $25 members, $30 nonmembers, $12 members ages 3-10, $15 non-members ages 3-10, free for children under 3. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Dec. 7, 14, 21 Visit with Santa Children will be greeted by Santa’s elves and helpers, who will guide them to the letterwriting station. They will then sit on Santa’s knee and pose for a keepsake photo, complete with a picture frame the children make themselves. They can also participate in craft time in Mrs. Claus’ kitchen. 9 a.m.1 p.m. $5 for each craft, $12 for three crafts. Ohio Herb Education Center, 110 Mill St., Gahanna, 614342-4380, ohioherbcenter.org Dec. 8 Wrap It Up @ The MAC This holiday art sale features ceramics, jewelry, scarves, cards, ornaments and more by local artists. Noon-4 p.m. Free. Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center of Worthington, 777 Evening St., Worthington, 614-431-0329, mcconnellarts.org Dec. 11 Holiday Wreath Demonstration Botanica staff will demonstrate how to add some holiday cheer to a plain evergreen wreath. 2 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Holiday Food from Around the World Learn about winter holidays from around the world and taste traditional celebration food. Samples and hot beverages are $1 each. At 7 p.m., Magpie Consort will perform selections from their holiday program, “Christmas in a New World.” 6-9 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Dec. 14 COSI’s Holiday Celebration This celebration includes the Holiday Scavenger Hunt and other activities throughout the day. Bring in new mittens, gloves or scarves for the month-long Mitten Mania to receive $1 off COSI general admission for each item (limit three items per person). 10 a.m.-3 p.m. COSI, 333 W. Broad St., 614-228-2674, cosi.org Dec. 21 Holiday Crafts Children choose from several craft stations to create and wrap their own holiday gifts ($2 per craft). The Suzuki Music Cello Choir will perform at 2 p.m. in the Grand Atrium. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Dec. 28-29 1950s Family Weekend: Holidays A family weekend of hands-on activities and programs related to the exhibit 1950s: Building the American Dream. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Sat, noon-5 p.m. Sun. $10 adults, $9 seniors, $5 children ages 6-12. Ohio History Center, 800 E. 17th Ave., 614-297-2300, ohiohistory.org

Music Dec. 1 The Saturday Music Club: Holiday Concert 1:30 p.m. Free. Kensington Place, 1001 Parkview Blvd., 614-

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 48

11/13/13 3:18 PM


3-SHOW PACKAGES

NOW AVAILABLE! STARTING AT JUST $129

     

      

      

NEVER HEAR THE WORDS “SOLD OUT”

           

                                  

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 49

11/14/13 10:15 AM


Three New Master’s Degrees Advance your career and earn a master’s degree in one of ODU’s new health and medical programs.                            *Pending final accreditation

Discover how you can earn your master’s degree at Ohio Dominican University.

        

50

284-9084, sites.google.com/site/saturdaymusicclub Fifth Harmony, Kat Graham, Midnight Red 4:30 p.m. $19.79-$50. The LC Pavilion, 405 Neil Ave., 614-461-5483, promowestlive.com Columbus Songwriters Association Showcase Finale 6 p.m. $25 advance. Woodlands Tavern, 1200 W. Third Ave., Grandview, 614-299-4987, woodlandstavern.com Dec. 3 John Mayer with Phillip Phillips 7 p.m. $49.50-$69.50. Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr., 800-745-3000, schottensteincenter.com 21st Annual Music Celebration Concert 8 p.m. $20; $10 seniors, Alumni Association members and children; free for OSU students, faculty and staff. Mershon Auditorium, Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St., 614-292-3535, music.osu.edu Bill Frisell’s Big Sur Quintet 8 p.m. $20, $17 members, $13 students. Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St., 614-292-3535, wexarts.org The Mahones 8 p.m. $12, $14 ages under 21. Rumba Cafe, 2507 Summit St., 614-268-1841, columbusrumbacafe.com Dec. 4 Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas 7 p.m. $10 advance, $12 day of. The Basement, 391 Neil Ave., 614-461-5483, promowestlive.com The Worthington Chorus 7 p.m. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org The Infamous Stringdusters 7:30 p.m. $18.50 advance, $22 day of. Newport Music Hall, 1722 N. High St., 614-461-5483, promowestlive.com Drag the River 9:30 p.m. $10. Ace of Cups, 2619 N. High St., 614-262-6001, aceofcupsbar.com Dec. 4-8 Columbus Jazz Orchestra: “Home for the Holidays� featuring Debbie Gravitte 7:30 p.m. Wed-Thu, 8 p.m. Fri-Sat, 3 p.m. Sun. $30-$52. Southern Theatre, 21 E. Main St., 614-294-5200, jazzartsgroup.org Dec. 5 Anthony Green 7 p.m. $15 advance, $17 day of. A&R Music Bar, 391 Neil Ave., 614-461-5483, promowestlive.com Over the Rhine 8 p.m. $28.50. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., 614-294-5200, capa.com Sweet Honey in the Rock: “Celebrating the Holy Days� 8 p.m. $20-$50. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., 614-469-0939, capa.com Dave DeWitt Trio with Randy Mather 9 p.m. $7. Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza, 5601 N. High St., Worthington, 614-436-2625, nataliescoalfiredpizza.com Dec. 6 Apollo’s Fire: “Sacrum Mysterium – A Celtic Christmas� 8 p.m. $27, $22 seniors, $12 students. First Congregational Church, 444 E. Broad St., 614-861-4569, earlymusicincolumbus.org The Stray Birds with Rebecca Frazier 8 p.m. $22 advance, $25 day of, $15 students, $5 children. Columbus Performing Arts Center, 549 Franklin Ave., 614-439-8877, sixstring.org Dec. 6-8 Columbus Symphony Orchestra: Holiday Pops 8 p.m. Fri-Sat, 3 p.m. Sun. $25-$68. Ohio Theatre, 39 E. State St., 614-228-8600, columbussymphony.com Dec. 6-8, 11 Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus: “Joy! Home with the Family� $20 advance, $25 day of. Multiple area locations, 614-228-2462, cgmc.com Dec. 7 “Signs� of Christmas Choir Performance 2 p.m. Free. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St., Westerville, 614-882-7277, westervillelibrary.org Mr. Gnome $10 advance, $15 day of. Woodlands Tavern, 1200 W. Third Ave., Grandview, 614-299-4987, woodlandstavern.com Dec. 8 Hilliard Davidson High School Madrigals 2 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 50

11/13/13 3:18 PM


Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Halestorm 6:30 p.m. $20 advance, $25 day of. The LC Pavilion, 405 Neil Ave., 614-461-5483, promowestlive.com Dave Koz and Friends Christmas Tour 2013 7 p.m. $28-$65.50. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., 614-469-0939, capa.com Jennifer Knapp & Margaret Becker Christmas Tour 7 p.m. $15, $17 ages under 21. Rumba Cafe, 2507 Summit St., 614-268-1841, columbusrumbacafe.com Dec. 9 The Story Tour 7 p.m. $28-$78. Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr., 800-745-3000, schottensteincenter.com The Irish Tenors 8 p.m. $23-$53. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., 614-469-0939, capa.com Dec. 10 Sirens 8 p.m. $5. Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza, 5601 N. High St., Worthington, 614-436-2625, nataliescoalfiredpizza.com Frontier Ruckus 8 p.m. $10, $12 ages under 21. Rumba Cafe, 2507 Summit St., 614-268-1841, columbusrumbacafe.com Dec. 12 David Allan Coe 7 p.m. $15-$125. The Bluestone, 583 E. Broad St., 614-884-4646, liveatthebluestone.com Songwriter Showcase: Mark Brinkman, RJ Cowdery, BeJae Fleming 9 p.m. $5. Natalie’s CoalFired Pizza, 5601 N. High St., Worthington, 614-4362625, nataliescoalfiredpizza.com Dec. 13 Drake with Miguel, Future 7 p.m. $49.75$99.75. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., 614-246-2000, nationwidearena.com ProMusica Chamber Orchestra: “Messiah Sing-Along” 7:30 p.m. Southern Theatre, 21 E. Main St., 614-464-0066, promusicacolumbus.org Cornmeal 8 p.m. $10 advance, $13 day of. Woodlands Tavern, 1200 W. Third Ave., Grandview, 614-299-4987, woodlandstavern.com Phil Clark & the Soul 10 p.m. $7. Natalie’s Coal-

Fired Pizza, 5601 N. High St., Worthington, 614-4362625, nataliescoalfiredpizza.com Dec. 13-15 Vaud-Villities Productions: “Under the Mistletoe” 8 p.m. Fri-Sat, 2:30 p.m. Sun. $20. Northland Performing Arts Center, 4411 Tamarack Blvd., 614262-7469, vvproductions.com Dec. 14 Capital University Ensemble 2 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Jars of Clay with John Mark McMillan 6:30 p.m. $20. Skully’s Music-Diner, 1151 N. High St., 614-291-8856, skullys.org A Not So Silent Night with The Floorwalkers, The Regrettes 7 p.m. $16-$26. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., 614-384-5639, capa.com John Berry Christmas Concert 8 p.m. $35$55. The Midland Theatre, 36 N. Park Pl., Newark, 740-345-5483, midlandtheatre.org The Ark Band, SHRUB, Bum Wealthy 8 p.m. $10. Woodlands Tavern, 1200 W. Third Ave., Grandview, 614-299-4987, woodlandstavern.com Westerville Symphony: “Sounds of the Season” 8 p.m. $25. Battelle Fine Arts Center, Otterbein University, 170 W. Park St., Westerville, 614-899-9000, westervillesymphony.org Bob Teague Presents: An Evening with Verlon Thompson 9 p.m. $15. Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza, 5601 N. High St., Worthington, 614-436-2625, nataliescoalfiredpizza.com Dec. 14-15 ProMusica Chamber Orchestra: “A Classical Holiday” 5:30 p.m. Sat, 7 p.m. Sun. $10-$49. Multiple locations, 614-464-0066, promusicacolumbus.org Dec. 15 Central Ohio Symphony: Holiday Concert 2 and 4:30 p.m. Ohio Wesleyan Univer-

sity, Gray Chapel, 61 S. Sandusky St., Delaware, 740-362-1799, centralohiosymphony.org CityMusic Columbus: “Irish Christmas in America” 2 p.m. $13.75-$27.50. The Grand Valley Dale Ballroom, 1590 Sunbury Rd., 614-223-3093, citymusiccolumbus.org Broad Street Hand Bell Choir 2 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Dec. 18 The Columbus Opera 7 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Spoken Word: Speak Williams with Barbara Fant, Naki Akrobettoe 7 p.m. $10. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., 614-384-5639, capa.com Dec. 18-19 Harmony Project: “Hope & Harmony” 7:30 p.m. $25-$50. Southern Theatre, 21 E. Main St., 614-464-0066, capa.com Dec. 19 Donny & Marie: “A Broadway Christmas” 8 p.m. $49.50-$125. Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr., 614-292-2624, schottensteincenter.com Dec. 20-21 Papadosio: “Earth Night 2K13” 8 p.m. $25-$45. The LC Pavilion, 405 Neil Ave., 614-461-5483, promowestlive.com Dec. 21 Jim Brickman: “The Magic of Christmas” 8 p.m. $33-$68. Southern Theatre, 21 E. Main St., 614-464-0066, capa.com Dec. 22 New Albany Symphony: “Holiday Spectacular” 3 p.m. $11-$23. Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts, 100 W. Granville St., New Albany, 614-975-3495, mccoycenter.org

The average cost of raising a child from “imphood” to college is

$252,634.

2200 West 5th Avenue, Suite 200



Columbus, OH 43215



614.481.8449



pdsplanning.com

Investments | Retirement | Financial Planning

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 51

51

11/14/13 2:00 PM


Your Columbus Connection to Hilton Head Meet Dr. Grant Evans • Successful Columbus Chiropractor for 30 Years • Bought and/or Sold Over $25 Million in the last 10-12 years on Hilton Head Island. • Referring Agents Will Be Compensated

Realtor® 614-314-6074 (Cell) | 843-785-4396 (Office) | gpe5253@yahoo.com

The Grove City Chamber Singers 2 p.m. Free with admission. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-7158000, fpconservatory.org Dec. 26 Trans-Siberian Orchestra: “The Lost Christmas Eve” 3 and 8 p.m. $31.50-$71.50. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., 614-2462000, nationwidearena.com Dec. 28 “Swingin’ the New Year” featuring Byron Stripling and Bobby Floyd 8 p.m. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., 614-294-5200, jazzartsgroup.org Dec. 31 The Spikedrivers NYE Party 8 p.m. $15 advance. Woodlands Tavern, 1200 W. Third Ave., Grandview, 614-299-4987, woodlandstavern.com The Werks with roeVy, ATTAK/CARMA 8 p.m. $25. Newport Music Hall, 1722 N. High St., 614-461-5483, promowestlive.com Natalie’s New Year’s Eve Celebration with Teeny Tucker 10 p.m. $25. Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza, 5601 N. High St., Worthington, 614-4362625, nataliescoalfiredpizza.com

Sports Columbus Blue Jackets Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., 614-246-2000, bluejackets. nhl.com. Lightning, 7 p.m. Dec. 3; Wild, 7 p.m. Dec. 6; Devils, 7 p.m. Dec. 10; Blues, 7 p.m. Dec. 14; Jets, 7 p.m. Dec. 16; Flyers, 7 p.m. Dec. 21; Penguins, 6 p.m. Dec. 29 OSU Sports Call 614-292-2624 for tickets. ohiostatebuckeyes.com Basketball, men’s Schottenstein Center. Maryland, 7 p.m. Dec. 4; Central Connecticut, 4:30 p.m. Dec. 7; Bryant University, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 11; North Dakota State, 8:15 p.m. Dec. 14; Delaware, 7 p.m. Dec. 18; Louisiana-Monroe, 7 p.m. Dec. 27 Basketball, women’s Schottenstein Center. Gonzaga, noon Dec. 8; Army, 7 p.m. Dec. 13; UT Martin, 7 p.m. Dec. 17; Appalachian State, 7 p.m. Dec. 20; North Carolina Central, noon Dec. 29 Ice Hockey, men’s Schottenstein Center. Michigan, 7:05 p.m. Dec. 2; Mercyhurst, 7:05 p.m. Dec. 28-29 Ice Hockey, women’s OSU Ice Rink. Minnesota, 7:07 p.m. Dec. 7, 12:07 p.m. Dec. 8

Theater Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Columbus Children’s Theatre: Hansel & Gretel, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Dec. 7. Free with admission. 1777 E. Broad St., 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Ohio Theatre Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 1. $22-$32. 39 E. State St., 614-469-0939, capa.com Riffe Center Catco: A Christmas Carol, Dec. 4-22. 77 S. High St., 614-469-0939, catco.org Palace Theatre Flashdance: The Musical, Dec. 17-22. 34 W. Broad St, 614-469-0939, columbus. broadway.com Shadowbox Live Holiday Hoopla, through Dec. 28; Scrooge, through Dec. 29. $30, $20 students, seniors and military; Holiday Lunchbox, Dec. 3-20. $10, $5 students, seniors and military. 503 S. Front St., 614-416-7625, shadowboxlive.org Short North Stage Songs of the Season, Dec. 1222. Garden Theater, 1187 N. High St., 614-7254042, shortnorthstage.org The Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus Gallery Players: Elijah’s Angel, Dec. 7-8, 12, 14-15. $10-$20. 1125 College Ave., 614-2312731, columbusjcc.org

52

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 52

11/14/13 2:01 PM

E a

If se


EXTENDED HOURS Mon-Thur: 7AM-8 PM & Fri-Sat: 8AM-2 PM!

The Gentle Dentist isn’t just a name we go by — it’s a philosophy we live by. Also known as Coulman Dental, The Gentle Dentist has been striving to make going to the dentist an experience our patients actually enjoy.

Columbus’ choice for prompt dental care! Our patients named us “The Gentle Dentistâ€? “My experience was fantastic. The hygienist and dentist were very friendly and clear about everything. I have always been very apprehensive of my dental appointments until I started going to The Gentle Dentist. Now I actually look forward to coming.â€? –Kaleb Burkhart             portrays a very positive vibe. Makes it nice to come in and feel so special. I have not encountered anyone who wasn’t friendly, helpful, and courteous. Keep up the good work!â€? –Kathy Owens

Exceptional Service means we work around your busy life!

We respect your time. Our office hours make it simple and convenient to schedule an appointment that works for you. Our staff stays on schedule down to the minute to make sure you’re never kept waiting.

FREE— for New Patients:: Take-Home Whitening Kit T w        “I absolutely love The Gentle Dentist. Your team works quickly to get us checked in and seen on time. Thank you for being AWESOME!â€? –Brianna Booth

If you call us in the morning, we can often see you that same day! Read more about what our patients say about us on our website!

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH US TODAY:

CoulmanDental.com  (614) 431-3311 69 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Worthington, Ohio

044_053_CALENDAR_DEC_CM.indd 53

11/13/13 10:57 AM


c u lt u r e

A Walk in Thurber’s Footsteps Writer, humorist and favorite native son James Thurber mined his hometown over and over again in his work. As his star rises again (this time at the box office), visit some of the places that surely inspired him By Peter tonguette his month brings “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” starring Ben Stiller as the teller of tall tales, to the big screen. While Stiller is the face of the film, its bones come courtesy of James Thurber (18941961), who wrote the short story for The New Yorker. This is the second shot Hollywood has taken at adapting “Walter Mitty” (a 1947 version starred Danny Kaye). Before we let Tinseltown take Thurber for its own, however, we would do well to remember he was born and raised in Columbus, a background he rehashed in a slew of stories and cartoons. “It just keeps coming back,” says local historian and Thurber aficionado James R. Tootle. “It’s just something that he mined for years, going on to his New Yorker career. Long after he left Columbus, he just kept drawing on [it for] these stories.” Tootle attributes their timeless quality to the middle-American character of his hometown. As he puts it, “Columbus is just such a typical American city.” One of Thurber’s most famous anthologies is titled “My World—and Welcome to It.” Despite his journeying, it is clear his world, in many ways, is our world.

54

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

251 Parsons ave.

77 Jefferson ave.

The two-story, red-brick house where Thurber was born on Dec. 8, 1894, was distinguished mainly by its generous front porch and peaked roof. After the construction of Interstate 71 in the 1960s, the house was no more. But by then, the Thurber family was long gone—they moved when James was still a tot. “His father was active in Republican Party politics, so when his party won, he had a good job,” Tootle says. But as political fortunes changed, so did the family’s residence. “As those elections happen, local and national, sometimes the family is doing fine,” he says. “And then they get voted out, and then they’ve got to hunt out something else.” By Tootle’s count, the family lived in at least nine other places between 1899 and 1913.

Thurber did not cut the apron strings during his time at Ohio State, residing with his parents at this address. “The significance of this particular house is most of the stories of ‘My Life and Hard Times’… were written about when he lived in this house,” says Anne Touvell, director of operations at Thurber House, which has doubled as a museum and literary center since 1984. “So ‘The Night the Bed Fell,’ that happened in the attic. ‘The Night the Ghost Got In,’ [the ghost] ran up the back stairs we walk up and down every day.” The input of one of Thurber’s brothers, Robert, was solicited on decor items from wallpaper to rugs to ensure the house resembled the one that provided Thurber with so much raw material.

Birthplace

thurBer house

IllustratIon: MIchaela schuett; photos: courtesy the thurber house

T


1739 n. hiGh St.

the ohio union

At first, Thurber did not apply himself at Ohio State. “One entire year, he just kind of dropped out and didn’t tell anybody,” Tootle says, adding that he traded the classroom for the public library. By his senior year, boosted by his membership in Phi Kappa Psi, he was one of 16 students selected to join the Sphinx honorary society. Spots throughout campus acknowledge Thurber, but one recent addition is a limestone panel on the south side of the new Ohio Union, which features his likeness. “We chose Thurber, Bellows and Lichtenstein to represent Ohio artists, as they embodied various areas of art,” says the Ohio Union’s Beth Ullum.

124 E. 14th AvE.

Phi KaPPa Psi fraternity

Thurber’s admission to Phi Kappa Psi (still housed in the same building that it was in the teens) was an especially meaningful event for him. “A lot of those fraternity brothers that he had remained friends throughout his life,” Tootle says. Foremost among them was playwright (and later film director) Elliott Nugent. More sociable than Thurber, Nugent coaxed his chums into letting the nascent scribe in. “Some of the fellas weren’t sure who he was or why or whatever, and then [Nugent] really made the case,” Tootle says. “He said, ‘He’s a little shy and you may not know him, but boy, this guy is just really good.’”

1000 GrEEnlAwn AvE.

Green Lawn Cemetery

IllustratIon: MIchaela schuett; photos: courtesy the thurber house

Thurber’s gravestone, Tootle says, is “just a small, unpretentious stone,” located near the main building at Green Lawn Cemetery. A small marker, perhaps, for a Columbus native who truly made it big.

14 E. GAy St.

310 S. hiGh St.

79 E. StAtE St.

It seems newspapers were part of the marrow of the Thurber family. “Thurber and his brothers and his dad would do a lot of newspaper contests, where there’d be some kind of a puzzle in the newspaper and you’d figure it out,” says Tootle, adding that one 1916 Columbus Monitor contest netted tickets to the World Series. After leaving Ohio State, Thurber found work at The Columbus Dispatch, but the paper’s quick-turnaround deadlines would haunt him. “Whenever I’m in the Midwest, I still wake up with a start, wondering what time it is and thinking I have to cover City Hall by one o’clock,” he told The Columbus Dispatch Magazine in 1959, by which time the paper had moved from East Gay Street to South Third Street.

For about a decade in the 1940s and 1950s, Thurber’s mother and brother Robert set themselves up in what was then the Great Southern Hotel. There is a lesson here: If you stay long enough at a hotel, you just might get a bar named after you. In tribute to the Thurber family’s association with the hotel, the Westin Columbus operates Thurber’s Bar (the logo for which features Thurber’s famed round spectacles). The Westin’s Phil BeMiller says the Thurber artwork featured on its walls constitutes “the second largest collection of such work in the country.”

After Thurber penned a play, could he really have premiered it anywhere but Columbus? Thus, “A Thurber Carnival” (which subsequently won a Tony Award) debuted at the Hartman Theatre on Jan. 7, 1960. During its heyday, the theater hosted out-of-town tryouts for a dazzling array of shows, including William Inge’s “Picnic,” starring Paul Newman. Open since 1911, the Hartman became the go-to place for plays during an era when many other local theaters were switching to film exhibition. “It maintained live theater,” says local historian Dick Barrett. The Hartman building was demolished in 1971, and the Hyatt on Capitol Square sprang up in its place.

the CoLumbus DisPatCh

Great southern hoteL

hartman theatre

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

55


1314_CBJ_MK_HolidayPack_ColumbusMonthly_ColorFullPagePrintAd.indd 1 056_063_DEPT_JUSTICE_DEC_CM.indd 56

11/14/13 10:38 AM 11/14/13 3:09 PM


13 10:38 AM

people

PHOTO: TESSA BERG

W

The Bailiff Who KneW Too Much Retired Air Force Col. Linda Murnane, who works in the Franklin County Municipal Court, might be the most overqualified bailiff in the country By Joel oliphint

ithout Judge Anne Taylor’s frequent smiles, affirming nods and patient explanations, courtroom 4C of the Franklin County Municipal Court would not be a particularly cheery place. Unlike the neighboring Franklin County Courthouse’s high-tech courtrooms and ample natural light, the municipal building is dark and musty. Well-worn wooden benches and marked-up walls expose its 35-year history. On a September morning in 4C, Taylor warmly addresses defendants and informs them of their options regarding charges such as disorderly conduct and driving under the influence. Taylor’s new bailiff, Linda Murnane, sits to her left preparing documents in blue case folders and speaking quietly with defendants after their cases are heard. A bailiff ’s duties can vary, but for Murnane it mostly involves preparing entries for Taylor’s signature, scheduling trial dates, legal research, jury assistance and general troubleshooting. It’s a vital but humble position. You wouldn’t expect, for instance, that a municipal court bailiff was once an Air Force colonel who presided over cases in Qatar, Oman and Saudi Arabia as a chief military trial judge. Or that she was on the first military assistance team sent to Rwanda. Or a senior legal officer at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Or a candidate for three federal judicial appointments. But those are, indeed, Murnane’s qualifications. When Murnane started work in January, colleagues asked Taylor about her new bailiff. She jokingly responded, “I hired Hillary Clinton.” Murnane’s resume is impressive, but it’s not the whole story. She also had to overcome unsupportive parents, an abusive first husband, a 200-mile daily commute to law school and a military that was openly hostile toward enlisted mothers. It required superhuman perseverance. “There’s no such thing as ‘can’t,’” Murnane says. “There are other things like, ‘I don’t choose to,’ or, ‘I’m not willing to put that much work in.’ But I don’t buy that you can’t do something.” Columbus Monthly • December 2013

57


M

ilitary trials in combat zones bear no resemblance to the courtroom scenes from, say, “A Few Good Men.” In combat, instead of sending all parties involved back to the states for a trial, a judge travels to the war zone to try the case in the field. There are no fancy, wood-paneled courtrooms. A hangar or a tent must suffice. As the chief trial judge in Europe for the Air Force from 2000 to 2003, Murnane presided over the first Air Force trials in combat areas during the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. She deliberated outdoors in 102-degree heat under mosquito netting, her chemical warfare gear always within reach. A sandstorm kicked up during one such trial, and when Murnane attempted to make the walk to a nearby porta-John, the sand blocked everything from view—including the brown latrine. “When I finally get out there, the wind is rocking this porta-let and I thought, ‘My God, if this porta-let falls over, I’m just going to stay here and be buried in the sand,’” Murnane recalls, laughing. It’s a situation she never could have foreseen when she enlisted in the Air Force in 1974—a choice that infuriated her father. “When my dad said I couldn’t do something, I’d say, ‘Oh, yeah? Watch me,’” Murnane says. “Telling me I could not achieve something that I legitimately felt was within my grasp was the best single motivating tool for me.” Murnane, 61, grew up in Cincinnati and first came to Columbus shortly after high school for marriage. Her husband was stationed at Lockbourne Air Force Base (now Rickenbacker International Airport); Murnane worked briefly at Lazarus in the Eastland Mall before following him to Virginia. The marriage was a nightmare, and though she tried to salvage the abusive relationship, it couldn’t be saved. Soon after it ended, Murnane’s student aid was reduced, and her job at a Virginia community college couldn’t cover the costs. Her parents refused to help pay for her

58

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Clockwise from left: Linda Murnane in Qatar; trekking the Ruhengeri Forest in Rwanda; Murnane outside her judge’s chambers in Qatar in 2002.

education. She was out of money. “I wanted to finish my degree,” she says. “So I said, ‘I gotta get me some of that GI Bill stuff.’ ” After enlisting, Murnane eventually earned her degree from a branch campus of the College of William & Mary and set her sights on law school, which seemed financially feasible only if she could get into the Funded Legal Education Program (FLEP). At that time, only seven airmen were accepted each year. Murnane knew she had to stand out, so at officer training school she earned a double commission, training all day as a supply officer, then studying by flashlight at night to become a public affairs officer. The board denied her first application. A general told her she lacked commitment and that if she were truly committed, she would have attended the Air Force Academy. Women weren’t allowed in the academy when Murnane enlisted. “The clear signal to me was, girls need not apply,” she says.


Above and right: pictures caught by Murnane during a hike in Rwanda, where she was stationed in 2003.

Instead of giving up on her law-school dreams, Murnane doubled down. While stationed with her second husband in Biloxi, Mississippi, she found a night law program at Loyola University New Orleans that required students to take three hours of classes four nights a week. Loyola is about 100 miles from Biloxi, so Murnane and her husband bought a house halfway between the two. She drove 50 miles to Biloxi in the morning, then left at 4:30 p.m. to drive the 100 miles to Loyola. After two hourand-a-half-long classes, she drove the 50 miles back home. Two-hundred miles a day, four nights a week. Murnane passed every class that semester. “I reapplied for the FLEP program and said, ‘Do I look committed now?’” Murnane says.

chichester, crlaine

She was accepted. Even as a full-time student, Murnane commuted 200 miles every weekday to be in Biloxi with her husband, who had suffered a spinal injury. And after her first daughter’s birth, childcare drop-off lengthened the commute to 300 miles. Murnane was “totally refined by the fires of tribulation and hard work,” says retired Lt. Col. Wayde Pittman, who has known Murnane for about 20 years and worked under her as a deputy chief trial judge. “For some people this would harden them, but for Linda it made her a person of extreme compassion and diligence.” “She is totally selfless,” Pittman says, “but intensely so. I’ve never met anyone like that. Many selfless people are laidback. Not Linda. She is selfless, but on a mission in doing so.”

brett, crlaine

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

59


Murnane served in the Air Force nearly 30 years, along the way raising two daughters—one of whom was born deaf and blind—and adopting a third foster daughter. In addition to her 10 years as a military judge, she was also on the first U.S. military assistance team sent to Rwanda in September 2003. Murnane and her team visited five of the genocide sites—blood stains and bags of bones still present—and taught Rwandan officials about freedom of speech and freedom of the press. After earning multiple military decorations, including the Legion of Merit, Murnane retired as a colonel in 2004. But “retirement” is not the way to describe her last nine years.

1st

In 2006, Murnane was hired by the United Nations to work at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) based in The Hague, Netherlands. The ICTY prosecutes war crimes and crimes against humanity from the war in former Yugoslavia. Murnane held several positions at the ICTY, and they often overlapped. As the acting head of chambers, she oversaw all the legal teams who drafted decisions, orders and judgments for the international judges. In her position as chief of court management and support services, Murnane was like a super-clerk of courts, leading a team of nearly 400 and

MONTH OF SERVICE FREE

(with 12 month contract)

With our flexible programs for businesses, apartment complexes and events, we’ve made it so that anyone, not just homeowners, can start recycling. In fact, we pick it up right from your doorstep to make recycling even easier than using the dumpster. We’re TrashCab and we’re here to make sure that everyone in Columbus has access to affordable, convenient recycling. Learn more about us at trashcab.com or call us at 614-918-8087 for a free quote 60

Columbus Monthly • December 2013


Murnane was on the first military assistance team sent to Rwanda in 2003. Here, she shares photos she took of several churches where thousands seeking asylum were slain.

overseeing a unit that ensured accurate record-keeping for 5 million documents and exhibits in multiple languages for instant retrieval and presentation in court. When Murnane first arrived, two of the tribunal cases she worked on were conducted in French. Murnane only had two years of French under her belt, so she hired a tutor, took a four-hour class every Saturday and eventually supervised two teams who worked entirely in French. At the same time, Murnane was the executive director for the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. Since the Netherlands is six hours ahead of Eastern time, Murnane would come home from 12-hour

She is totally selfless, but intensely so. I’ve “never met anyone like that ... She is selfless, but on a mission in doing so. ” —Lt. Col. Wayde Pittman (ret.)

days at the tribunal and run the Kentucky commission at night from her flat. “Most people don’t accomplish over a lifelong career what Linda has achieved just in the years following her retirement,” says Elizabeth Turchi, an international human rights attorney hired by Murnane at the ICTY. “Linda is my hero.”

With 1 in 5 families in central Ohio living in poverty, now is the time to take action. n. Won’t you join us? Join Jared Boll, Stinger and Jody Shelley of the Columbus Blue Jackets!

TOGETHER, WE FIGHT POVERTY, IMPROVE LIVES AND STRENGTHEN OUR COMMUNITY. When you give to United Way, you invest in nearly 160 programs and numerous partnerships in Education, Income, Health and Home—four interconnected areas that help people build pathways out of poverty.

Please give at your workplace, or give online at LiveUnitedCentralOhio.org, or mail your check to United Way of Central Ohio, 360 South Third Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215. THANK YOU.

IMPROVE LIVES. STRENGTHEN OUR COMMUNITY. LIVE UNITED.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

61


While stationed in Rwanda, Murnane taught Rwandan soldiers about freedom of speech and the press.

All these accomplishments haven’t gone unnoticed by the Obama administration. Murnane has been considered three times for federal judicial appointments. “One of the things about being in the military is that you’re limited in your political activity,” Murnane says. “All you’re allowed to do is vote. You’re not allowed to make political contributions.” Big donors typically sit high on the list of potential judicial appointments, but Murnane still managed to make the short list twice and was recommended by U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown for a position last spring.

I

t’s a love fest when Judge Taylor and Murnane speak about each other. “I consider myself so lucky to have met her,” Taylor says. Murnane ranked far above the other bailiff candidates on paper, but Taylor says the face-to-face interview sealed the deal. The only note she managed to jot down was, “Wow.” “I was going to sleep on it, but I called her about 6 o’clock and said, ‘You have the job if you want it,’” Taylor says. Murnane and her husband of 26 years, Kevin, moved to Columbus from Cincinnati that weekend. Though Murnane has a more impressive resume than many judges, let alone bailiffs, she’s nothing but thankful for her job. She’s not interested in running a campaign for a judgeship and takes great pride in her position. “I’m so grateful to Judge Taylor for giving me this opportunity,” Murnane says. “When you try to get a job after 30 years of service, you don’t know anybody… I feel so fortunate and blessed that she took a chance on an outsider.” The position requires Murnane to learn new skills. At the ICTY, a trial can last for months or years. Taylor, on the other hand, sometimes hears 70 cases in one day. Plus, cases involving drunken driving, resisting arrest and opencontainer law violations are all new to Murnane. To no one’s surprise, she has embraced the challenge. “I worked very hard to get my law degree,” Murnane says. “I had some breaks along the way, but I’m convinced there’s a reason I succeeded. And the reason I succeeded was not to stay home and watch television. I think there’s more good for me to do out there.” ■

Come indoors and enjoy the look of a

Beautiful New Kitchen

62

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

056_063_DEPT_JUSTICE_DEC_CM.indd 62

11/14/13 6:06 PM


A TIMELESS HOLIDAY

TRADITION LEHMAN’S STOLLEN BREAD

SIMPLE PRODUCTS

for a SIMPLER LIFE

A buttery yeast bread that dates back from the Middle Ages, our stollen bread is a one of a kind German treat. Once known as Christollen, it’s a local holiday favorite made by a small familyowened bakery. Packed full of candied fruits, nuts and raisins soaked in rum, the loaf is finished with a light, sweet dusting on top. This holiday season, gather around the table with family and friends and enjoy this sweet treat. For Stollen bread and other tasty treats, visit Lehmans.com Item # 1276575

On the Square in Kidron, Ohio 4779 Kidron Road, Dalton, OH 44618 IN THE HEART OF AMISH COUNTRY OPEN EVERY DAY EXCEPT SUNDAY

LEHMANS.COM 888.438.5346

056_063_DEPT_JUSTICE_DEC_CM.indd 63

11/13/13 11:00 AM


storied

Buildings EditEd by Kristen schmidt

WrittEn by Joel oliphint, Jenny rogers, Kristen schmidt, michelle sullivan, emily thompson, tom tiberio and peter tonguette

LeVeque Tower

Photo by tessa berg

William Green Building AEP Building

COSI

64

Columbus Monthly • December 2013


eVeque Tower

Travel into Columbus from any direction, and its skyline rises like a mirage from the rural landscape surrounding it. Homeward bound city dwellers know that skyline from every angle, at every peak. You know the names—Rhodes, LeVeque, Miranova, Nationwide. Each one has a story as original as itself, we found. And behind each building were creative, inspired minds that brought it from sketch to reality. This month, we take you inside some of Columbus’ most storied buildings, from cutting-edge skyscrapers to a Victorian house of glass

Huntington Center

Vern Riffe Center

Capitol Square Office Building

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

65


Tours of historic buildings in Columbus Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center, 65 S. Front St., Downtown Volunteer-led tours take visitors (eight-person group minimum) through the first two floors of the building, which feature art with American Indian, Art Deco and Classical motifs. Visitors will learn the building’s history, architecture and what happens inside on a day-to-day basis. supremecourt. ohio.gov

the ohio statehouse

66

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Columbus Landmarks Foundation tours, multiple locations Whether by bus or by foot, people on a Columbus Landmarks Foundation tour get an earful of artfully woven stories about buildings, people and neighborhoods throughout the city. Tours sell out in a jiffy, so keep up with the foundations’ website for the latest offerings. columbuslandmarks.org Ohio Theatre, 39 S. State St., Downtown A few opportunities for free tours of the Ohio Theatre are traditionally offered during the long-running summer movie series there. Visitors are led through the building, learning about its roots and restoration. Check in with CAPA in the spring to find details for 2014 tours. capa.com

photo: courtesy ohIo hIstorIcAL socIety

Still, government kept growing, so officials created office space. Where there were tall ceilings, they constructed a second floor to double the space. By the time Columbus firms Year built: 1839-1861 Schooley Caldwell Associates and Moody Architect: Henry Ustick Walter, Nolan Inc. were commissioned to restore and Cincinnati; Alexander J. Davis, New renovate the Statehouse and annex in 1989, the York City; William Russell West, Statehouse building alone had been chopped up Cincinnati; Nathan B. Kelley, Columbus; into 317 rooms. Isaiah Rogers, Cincinnati Robert Loversidge, chief Statehouse architect Style: Greek Revival with Schooley Caldwell, says one aspect of The Ohio Statehouse has come a long way the $120.4 million restoration was getting the since the original building at the corner of Statehouse back to as close to 53 rooms as State and High streets, said to possible. They also wanted a way to be cursed because bricks used to see for yourself connect the Statehouse and annex, so build it contained bones from an they enclosed the outdoor space between A variety of tours are American Indian burial mound. them with an atrium. Initially, critics offered throughout That building burned down in 1857 the year, but the Miss worried the atrium would detract from Emma Tour (offered in and was reincarnated at the center the historic buildings. But concerns were March, April and May) of Capitol Square in 1861 after a put to rest when the finished atrium sounds like a hoot. Visitors are treated 22-year construction project that matched the natural light and soft color to a Victorian-themed weathered five architects, a cholera schemes typical of Greek Revival style. lunch or supper and a historical and epidemic and political skirmishes. “Samuel Hannaford kind of set us up architectural tour Built in part by Ohio Penitentiary because the floor level of [the annex] and with an interpreter prisoners, this new 53-room Greek the floor level of [the Statehouse] are the playing Emma Jones, a socialite whose Revival iteration consisted mostly same,” Loversidge says of the architect wealthy family lived of limestone from a quarry on the who built the annex. on Capitol Square in the 19th and west banks of the Scioto River. They also used historic photographs early 20th century. As local government grew to restore the original design, down to ohiostatehouse.org over the next 38 years, the 53 recreating light fixtures and repositioning rooms could no longer house the paintings. “If Abraham Lincoln came government. So at the turn of the century, an back to this building today, he would recognize it,” annex (now the Senate Building) was built to Loversidge says of the president who visited the accommodate the Ohio Supreme Court and Statehouse twice. “He wouldn’t have recognized it other offices. before.” 1 Capitol Square, Downtown 10 EssEntial Buildings

Kelton House, 586 E. Town St., Downtown Docent-led and audio tours are offered Sundays. For $15 per person with a minimum of 15 guests, you can take a “Tour & Tea with Sophia Kelton” and enjoy stories and a few nibbles with the woman who built the home with her husband in 1852. keltonhouse.com


GREAT BUILDERS

Frank Packard

Richards, McCarty & Bulford

photos: top right, Columbus metropolitan library’s image ColleCtions; bottom, tessa berg

photo: Courtesy ohio historiCal soCiety

Frank Packard (1866-1923) was “the preeminent Columbus architect,” says Doreen Uhas-Sauer of the Columbus Landmarks Foundation. What began as an affiliation with Joseph Yost blossomed into a solo career when Yost headed East. “Frank Packard’s architecture office dominated the Columbus architectural scene from 1900 to his death in 1923,” says Barbara Powers of the Ohio Historic Preservation Office. Ironically, his success was hastened by the Flood of 1913, which Uhas-Sauer calls “the great urban renewer,” since it resulted in the creation of a Civic Center by the Scioto riverfront. (Packard led Allied Architects in the planning of that effort.) Among other Yost & Packard buildings are the Toledo & Ohio Central Railroad Station, the Great Southern Hotel and several buildings on Ohio State’s campus. One of Packard’s leastknown designs offers a peek into his worldview: His mausoleum at Green Lawn Cemetery, Uhas-Sauer says, was “done in a neoEgyptian style with appropriate motifs that remind the viewer that the Egyptians hoped for a life after death.”

10 ESSEnTIAL BUILDInGS

1 MIRANOVA PLACE

Year built: 2000 Architect: Arquitectonica, Miami; HKS, Dallas Style: Contemporary

When Ron Pizzuti started scouting possible locations for the new Pizzuti company condominium building in 1987, the view

Led by the trio of Clarence E. Richards, J. E. McCarty and George H. Bulford, this firm practiced a Beaux Arts and neoclassical style similar to that of Frank Packard. Their designs achieved a balance between the “grand” and the “inviting,” says Doreen Uhlas-Saurer of the Columbus Landmarks Foundation. She says the entrance of the Columbus Museum of Art (designed by the firm and on the National Register of Historic Places since 1992) is an example of a structure that “does not dwarf the visitor but makes one feel they are about to enter something grand but not imposing.” Some of the firm’s choices were less predictable, however. Preservation consultant Jeffrey Darbee points to two entrances at the Old Deaf School that feature, for no apparent reason, “medieval grotesque sculpted heads in stone.” Darbee adds, “I can’t think of another building in Columbus that is quite like that, that has that sort of unexpected aspect to it.”

was at the top of his priority list. He saw the spot—formerly home to a metal salvage firm and manufacturing plants—where 1 Miranova Place now stands 26 stories high and knew this was it. “It was at a time when there was talk but no action about the renaissance of the riverfront,” he says. “I saw this location as one that had unbelievable use that could basically look at the whole skyline.” Pizzuti also had another motive: “Frankly, I also wanted to live there.”

Nearly 14 years after international firm Arquitectonica constructed the $60 million residential structure in 2000, Pizzuti still lives at Miranova (and so did each of his three grown children for a time). Although the curved, glass-plated structure is a shining (quite literally) example of contemporary architecture, Pizzuti says his goal was to produce a building that would stand the test of time. “This was an opportunity for us to do something with architectural significance,” he says. “It was very important to us to deliver a design that was ageless.” Perhaps the most distinguishing feature of Miranova is the shape of the building. “The building profile curves upward towards the river like two sails,” says principal architect Bernardo Fort-Brescia in his design statement. This design means every condo faces north, providing a guaranteed view of both the river and the skyline from any condo in the building. “The view has improved over the 14 years that this building has been up, specifically the Scioto Mile,” Pizzuti says. Pizzuti also points to the ripple effect Miranova has had on riverfront development. “Our goal at the time was to encourage other developers,” he says. “Basically we wanted to change the skyline. I think we were successful in both.” 1 Miranova Place, Downtown Columbus Monthly • December 2013

67


Thomas J. moyer ohio Judicial cenTer Year built: 1933 Architect: Harry Hake, Cincinnati Style: Art Moderne

By the 1990s, the state Supreme Court had reached critical mass in its offices inside the Rhodes Tower. Longstanding Chief

Justice Thomas J. Moyer had resorted to storing files in the shower stall located in his chambers, says Jay Wuebbold, the court’s director of civic education and Moyer’s former speechwriter. In 2001, the state began an $85 million restoration of the Ohio Departments of State Building, a gleaming hunk of marble on the Scioto River constructed to house state government offices. Experts were hired to restore the building’s art, including paintings that cover the walls and ceiling of

gREat BuildERs

Florence Kenyon Hayden Rector Florence Kenyon Hayden Rector (1882-1973) was a trailblazer, but her path to becoming the city’s earliest known female architect was not an easy one. According to The First American Women Architects, she studied architecture at Ohio State University but did not graduate. When she was charged with designing the Oxley Hall dormitory at Ohio State, she was saddled with a male architect to collaborate with, ”whom she eventually had to lock out of her office for several weeks to get anything done while she designed Oxley Hall,” Doreen Uhas-Saurer of the Columbus Landmarks Foundation says. In the end, her legacy rests on the quality of her buildings. “Her designs show the influence of the turnof-the-century Arts and Crafts movement through her use of natural materials, high-quality craftsmanship, emphasis upon well-lighted and ventilated rooms, and simple designs,” says Barbara Powers of the Ohio Historic Preservation Office, who adds that Rector was—perhaps unsurprisingly—a suffragist.

68

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Daniel Burnham

Though born in New York, Daniel Burnham (1846-1912) gained his fame in Chicago, especially for the hand he had in the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. “One of the purposes of the exposition was to show how cities could be remade in a different image that was much more uplifting,” says preservation consultant Jeffrey Darbee, “and the City Beautiful movement came out of that.” In spite of his Windy City roots, however, it was yet another city—Cleveland—that inadvertently led to Burnham building union station arcade and the Wyandotte Building. “Burnham’s work in Columbus was somewhat the result of the usual ‘Columbus envies Cleveland’ scenario,” explains Doreen Uhas-Sauer of the Columbus Landmarks Foundation, since the architect had recently completed Cleveland’s Society for Savings building and the May Company department store. “Because of his stature and work in Chicago, he was quite the catch,” Uhas-Sauer says. The Wyandotte Building—which can lay claim to being Columbus’ first skyscraper, Darbee says—can still be viewed in its original glory. “The salient feature is the bay windows that you see in the Wyandotte Building,” Darbee says. “They project out to bring in more natural light, rather than having the facade of the building just a flat plane.”

photo: top, tessa berg

10 EssEntial Buildings

the courtroom. Original light fixtures were restored and improved to cast more light. Completed in 1933, the building is Cincinnati architect Harry Hake’s single contribution to Columbus, and in its restored form (the project was completed in 2004), it is a gem. Its walls inside and out are cloaked in brass bas-reliefs, sculpture, murals, metalwork and intricate woodwork, and the design draws inspiration from diverse art deco, classic, Renaissance and even rococo styles. Vaulted ceilings are encrusted in gleaming mosaics or painted with gold leaf and accented with Greek keys and other geometric motifs. Even the most utilitarian features are artful. The ground floor lobby is a tribute to Native Americans, showing them with an unusual degree of reverence for the day, Wuebbold says. Tribal leaders Pontiac, Tecumseh, Logan and Little Turtle are portrayed in bas-relief, and lighting fixtures are constructed of brass bows and arrows. Brass doors depict symbols of the Hopewell people. Wuebbold says the press corps called the pre-renovation building the “Cave of the Winds.” “You dreaded coming here,” he says. Not so anymore. 65 S. Front St., Downtown


photos: tessa berg

photo: top, tessa berg

An Architectural Scavenger Hunt The true beauty of a building is often found in the details. We stared at some of our favorite Downtown buildings for a while and came up with this scavenger hunt for you. Match the photos to the buildings listed below. How did you do? Answers are on page 75. A. Ohio Theatre, 55 E. State St. B. Wyandotte Building, 21 W. Broad St. C. City Hall, 90 W. Broad St. D. James A. Rhodes State Office Tower, 30 E. Broad St. E. Columbus Club, 181 E. Broad St. F. Atlas Building, 8 E. Long St. G. Ringside, 19 N. Pearl St. H. Elevator Brewing Co., 161-67 N. High St. I. Bricker & Eckler Building, 100 S. Third St.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

69


10 EssEntial Buildings

leveque tower

10 EssEntial Buildings

ohio Stadium

Year built: 1922 Architect: Howard Dwight Smith Style: Classical

The resounding boom of cannons fired from the Oval on Ohio State’s campus in 1920 was an announcement of sorts: The campaign to build a football stadium had just raised another $1,000. Ohio Stadium was the largest cast-in-place concrete structure in the world when it was completed in 1922 and is still one of the most renowned stadiums in history—and it cost $1 million to build. “There weren’t that many students at Ohio State at that time,” says Sarah Bongiorno, a lecturer at Ohio State’s Knowlton School of Architecture and coordinator of the exhibit Build It! The Genius of Ohio Stadium, on display in the Columbus Historical Society. “To build a stadium that was going to fit [62,000] people was really ambitious and a little crazy.” Despite critics who condemned the use of concrete—a new and uncertain 70

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

material at the time—and doubted it would ever fill to capacity, architect Howard Dwight Smith designed the stadium with fans in mind. His neverbefore-seen horseshoe layout curved toward the field, providing a better sightline for spectators seated near the south end zone. His was also the first double-decker stadium, a tremendous architectural and engineering feat, Bongiorno says. Though a 1999 renovation closed the open end of the Shoe, much of the original remains intact. The tall archways 34-year-old Smith designed after the Roman Coliseum and ancient aqueducts still provide most of the building’s 88 entries and exits. The Pantheoninspired rotunda at the northern apex was left untouched, and original towers stand where they were built. Still, too, remains the passion—unfaltering since the first time the Buckeyes played Michigan in the new stadium and exceeded its capacity—of the fans who pack the stands shoulder to shoulder, just as Smith knew they would. 411 Woody Hayes Drive, Campus

Columbus’ beloved skyscraper stands 555 feet in the air. At the time of completion, it was the fifth-tallest building in the world, a true modern marvel and a point of serious pride for the city. When it opened on September 21, 1927—“with a roar of cannon equally a salute to a visiting potentate,” The Columbus Dispatch reported the following day—the building was an awe-inspiring source of excitement for the people of Columbus. Architect C. Howard Crane went to great lengths to promote the building as “one foot taller than the Washington Monument.” (The LeVeque is actually just under a foot taller than the D.C. landmark.) “This was truly innovative at the time,” says Sam Rosenthal, a project manager with Schooley Caldwell Associates, the firm spearheading the LeVeque Tower restoration that began in 2011. “This was a true monument for the city … [LeVeque] was really a beacon for the people of Columbus.” It was a beacon for pilots, too. As the tallest structure for miles, the tower served as an aerial lighthouse, providing radio signals for transatlantic pilots. The history of the tower is nontraditional, as office-building histories go: It was commissioned by the American Insurance Union and served as the company’s headquarters and also as an addition for the swank Deshler-Wallick Hotel (demolished in the 1970s). The building was so grand that many would argue AIU bit off more than it could chew—the company was bankrupt by the 1930s. The building, which was purchased by John Lincoln and Leslie LeVeque in 1945 and was officially renamed in 1977, has aged remarkably well, Rosenthal says, despite its construction during a time when little regard was paid to issues like how materials would change with the weather. Current renovations will bridge the gap between previously unconnected spaces. The project also includes repairs to crumbling or cracked tiles and the restoration of original art elements. 50 W. Broad St., Downtown

photo: right, tessa berg

Year built: 1927 Architect: C. Howard Crane, Detroit Style: Art Deco


LeVeque’s Stone Guardians In all its ornamented glory, the Art Deco-style American Insurance Union Citadel, as it was known at the time, was an architectural wonder. Thirty-foot statues, eagles with wings spread and a serious heap of symbolism adorned the terra-cotta tiles at the top of the 555-foot-tall tower. By the mid-1940s, many of the original sculptures and reliefs (created by Chicagoan Fritz Albert from models by New York sculptor Carl H. Keck) had been removed. Here, we highlight the LeVeque’s most striking original features.

illustrations: don foley

photo: right, tessa berg

Guards Helmeted guards are located just below the domed top of the tower. Grasping swords, these sculptures also symbolize American Insurance Union’s mission to defend the people of Columbus.

Angels Located just above the first set of four eagles are scroll-wielding angels. “The scrolls tell the story of the deeds of the insurance company … getting rid of the past and writing the future,” Rosenthal says.

The Four Colossus Each face of the citadel was adorned with a 26-foot-tall statue of Colossus holding two cherubic boys. “These most symbolized the AIU’s virtues,” says Sam Rosenthal, project manager at Schooley Caldwell Associates, the firm behind the building’s recent renovations. “It’s a bit strange, the two children, but it was meant to symbolize protection.” One of the Colossus statues was removed because it obstructed the view from Leslie LeVeque’s 41st-story office; all were removed by 1947 amid concerns that they would crumble and fall to the ground.

Bald Eagles Four 18-foot-tall eagles were designed for the corner niches near the citadel’s 36th floor, as well as for the peak of the tower. “Near the top there’s a band of eagles looking out over everything,” Rosenthal says. “The AIU was an insurance company for everyone … covering anyone who wanted the services.” The eagles, wings spread wide, also symbolized the company’s protection.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

71


10 EssEntial Buildings

one nationwide plaza

10 EssEntial Buildings

Franklin park conservatory palm house Year built: 1895 Architect: J.M. Freese Style: Victorian

The history of Franklin Park is rooted in fairs and festivals. The park is located at what was once the site of the Ohio State Fair between 1874 and 1886. The Palm House at Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens was modeled after the Glass Palace at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. And the conservatory underwent a $14 million expansion in preparation for AmeriFlora ’92, a six-month international horticulture exhibition. Today, the conservatory still serves as a cultural hub for Columbus, and the 118-year-old Palm House remains at its center. One of five remaining Victorian glasshouses in the U.S., the Palm House was built in 1895 on a limestone foundation by Columbus architect J.M. Freese. The budget: $24,000. In addition to housing tropical plants, the Palm House basement was home to several animals before the Columbus Zoo was built in the late 1920s. In the late 1980s, the City of Columbus commissioned Schooley Caldwell Associates to restore all the glass and the cupola of the Palm House. “[It was a] tricky job because the plants all had to be protected, and the new glass is tempered (meaning it can’t be cut on site),” says Robert Loversidge of Schooley Caldwell Associates. Garry Clarke, the conservatory’s director of planning, horticulture and facilities, says the glass structure—which is thoroughly cleaned every two to three years—has aged well overall, in part thanks to the 1980s renovations. “It’s a significant and enduring part of the city’s history, a rare Victorian glasshouse and one of the city’s oldest landmark buildings,” Clarke says. “In its more than 100 years, the Palm House has been an important part of the city’s cultural fabric.” 1777 E. Broad St., East Side 72

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Though it isn’t loud or ostentatious, the tower at One Nationwide Plaza stands out. It holds a firm place in Columbus’ skyline, cast against the horizon as an outlier apart from the bulk of the city’s giants. Gray concrete forms this 40-story building, with windows lining its broad face and angular tips capping off its narrow sides. The strong vertical design plays to the building’s height, emphasizing the iconic status of the corporate headquarters within, says David Brehm, Columbus principal for architecture firm NBBJ, which designed Three Nationwide Plaza. Designed by local firm Brubaker/Brandt and New York City’s Harrison and Abramovitz, the 1978 building channels the refined high-rises more commonly seen in the Big Apple and maintains its modernity. “The simplicity and the elegance of the design has caused the building to age very well,” Brehm says. When announced, One Nationwide Plaza was controversial not because of the materials or methods, but rather for the site chosen for construction. The intersection of Nationwide Boulevard and High Street, now the gateway to the booming Arena District, was once a demolition zone riddled with dirt plots and parking lots. “It was criticized by some for not contributing more to the critical mass of the Broad and High realm,” Brehm says. Looking back, the vision of placing a corporate headquarters in an area outside of central Downtown was quite forward-thinking. Plastered with Nationwide’s logo and, periodically, messages spelled out in window lights, the building serves as a permanent symbol of Columbus’ commitment to business and development. 1 Nationwide Plaza, Downtown

photos: left, Rick Buchanan photogRaphy; Right, columBus metRopolitan liBRaRy’s image collections

Year built: 1978 Architect: Brubaker/Brandt, Columbus; Harrison & Abramovitz, New York City Style: Modern


GREAT BUILDERS

Miller & Reeves

10 ESSEnTIAL BUILDInGS

The I-670 Cap

It appeared from thin air: A strip of storefronts on either side of High Street hovers above the space where I-670 for decades sliced a barren rift between Downtown and the Short North. The cap at Union Station was the first of its kind when it opened in 2004. The revolutionary design features three bridges, including one for through traffic and two others that support a 25,500-sqaure-foot retail development above the eight-lane interstate. It replaced a bleak, windswept overpass that was scarcely crossed. “I think now it’s become so much a part of the [city’s] fabric that no one really sees it anymore,” says David Meleca, the project’s architect. His design is traditional; the buildings seamlessly connect to the arts

GREAT BUILDERS

photos: top, cRaig holman; isozaki, DoRal chenoWeth iii

photos: left, Rick Buchanan photogRaphy; Right, columBus metRopolitan liBRaRy’s image collections

Year built: 2004 Architect: Meleca Architecture Style: Classical

district’s long strip of restaurants, bars and galleries. But its deep arches, broad pillars and ornate details channel Meleca’s muse, the 19th century Union Station Arcade. Using measurements from the arch in McFerson Commons on Nationwide Boulevard—the only piece of the Arcade saved from demolition in 1976—Meleca developed a pattern proportional to the original design. The columns are concrete, while a fiberglass mold forms the archways and arcades above patios. Even its embellishments and sandy color mimic the Arcade. The Cap received national praise once completed, but Meleca at one time believed the project might never happen. It took eight years and $7.8 million to build. Finding a balance between the initial return on investment and what was best for the city required some altruistic thinking. “It’s more than just about making money,” Meleca says. “It’s about wanting to fix something and do something positive.” North High Street between Poplar Avenue and Goodale Street, Short North

Peter Eisenman

“The spaceship that crash-landed on the prairie.” That is how monologist Spalding Gray reportedly described The Wexner Center for the Arts at Ohio State University, designed by academic Peter Eisenman and the late Richard W. Trott. Even some of the center’s employees were bemused by its deconstructionist appearance upon its unveiling in 1989. Curator at large Bill Horrigan remembers the staff having “crash-coursed ourselves within the Eisenman ethic,” but found it “a bit confounding: the fetishistic horror of right angles, the completely annoying columns (which couldn’t even be justified as load-bearing), the Expressionistic staircases, the steep angle of the ramp up to the galleries.” Nonetheless, the building soon became iconic in its oddness. “The Wexner Center is considered a seminal canonic work both as a project (where ideas take center stage) and as a building (where experience and function prevail),” says Ohio State architecture professor Jeffrey Kipnis, who notes that Eisenman’s work to that point consisted of just “five houses and a small office building,” but his practice skyrocketed after the success of the Wex.

In 1918, Robert R. Reeves set up shop with Orlando C. Miller, and the announcement in The Western Architect is a reminder of the name recognition Frank PackVard had in Columbus: “Mr. Miller announces the association, Mr. Reeves having been in the office of Frank L. Packard for many years.” Changing course from the publicbuilding emphasis of Packard, Miller & Reeves made hay with residential projects. Their legacy lives on most visibly in Sessions Village, which Doreen UhasSauer of the Columbus Landmarks Foundation calls “a masterpiece of a French town.” The Ohio Historic Places Dictionary notes that Reeves was inspired to build the village while globetrotting to France, where he observed the details he wanted, including “a village street of cobblestone and slate sidewalks.”

Arata Isozaki

Ohio State architecture professor Jeffrey Kipnis describes Arata Isozaki as “one of the giants of architectural culture for his thought and mobilization of Japan into a major source of contemporary architecture.” Among Isozaki’s buildings are the Art Tower Mito and Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and though he has only one work to his name in Columbus, it is a memorable one. For the expanded COSI complex, Isozaki used the bones of the old Central High School, transforming the site while still respecting what came before. As an article in The Columbus Dispatch observed, the new COSI “incorporates much of the 1924 school into its 300,000-square-foot building.” “By doing so,” says COSI president and CEO David E. Chesebrough, “he acknowledged history and the rich educational heritage of Central Ohio and created an innovative and forward-thinking complement to Central High in the rest of his design.”

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

73


Divine Houses

Some of the most beautiful buildings in Columbus, inside and out, are churches. They reflect the architectural trends of their day, but they also contain the symbolism and iconography of their particular religion or denomination. We asked historians and clergy for a peek inside some of the city’s most interesting houses of worship.

The Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church 555 N. High St., Short North Inspired by Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia, built by emperor Justinian the Great in 537, Annunciation was designed by Columbus firm Kontogiannis & Associates and opened for worship in 1990. The iconography and ornate mosaics done in 24-karat gold are awe-inspiring. “The icons lead you into worship, uplifting your mind, body and soul to God’s majestic kingdom,” says Father Demetrios Gardikes. “It gives you peace.”

Congregation Tifereth Israel 1354 E. Broad St., East Side Tifereth Israel was founded as a Hungarian Hebrew congregation, hence the 1926 building’s Byzantine Revival architecture that calls to mind European synagogues. Senior rabbi Michael Ungar says decades of renovations have created an endearing mishmash of old and modern; the sanctuary features original stained glass as well as contemporary art glass added in the ’60s. Ungar says the domed ceiling, huge chandelier and natural light give the space a soothing feel.

Broad Street United Methodist Church 501 E. Broad St., Downtown Famed Columbus architect Joseph W. Yost designed Broad Street UMC’s 1885 building with pointed arches common to Gothic Revival structures, but it’s the sanctuary’s sloped floor and semi-circular arrangement of the original pews that church historian Jim Barbee says give the space a warm, homey feel. Instead of being separated by a long center aisle, worshipers are closer to each other and the speaker.

74

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

St. Margaret of Cortona Church 1600 N. Hague Ave., West Side Portland/Boston architect Pietro Belluschi, a former dean at MIT, worked with Columbus firm Brubaker/Brandt to design St. Margaret, which was dedicated in 1968. Built from locally quarried limestone, the small church’s modern, airy design was meant to emphasize simplicity over gaudiness. Monsignor Anthony Borrelli, pastor emeritus, says the lack of decoration makes it conducive to undistracted prayer.

photos: tessa berg

Trinity Episcopal Church 125 E. Broad St., Downtown Trinity Episcopal was built in 1869 by Detroit architect Gordon W. Lloyd. Hundreds of Gothic Revival arches in the sanctuary lift the eye and heart heavenward, says head rector the Rev. Richard Burnett, and the “verticality of the space” represents an endpoint. (“Time is not circular,” he says.) Trinity renovated the interior several years ago with a vibrant six-color palette to replace the previously whitewashed walls. “It’s a place of action,” Burnett says.


10 EssEntial Buildings

Great Southern FireprooF hotel (WeStin ColumbuS)

photos: left, James D. DeCamp; right, Columbus metropolitan library’s image ColleCtions

photos: tessa berg

Year built: 1897 Architect: Yost & Packard Style: French Renaissance

Optimism surrounded the 1897 opening of the “Great Southern Fireproof Hotel,” which owes its name (and thick walls) to the constant threat of fire at the time. Four years before, one hotel and two theaters—the Chittenden Hotel and Auditorium, the Henrietta Theatre and the Park Theatre—burned down in Columbus. “We’re still standing,” says Phil BeMiller, director of sales and marketing at the historic hotel, which has operated under the Westin flag since 1996. Proclaimed by city leaders to be the “showcase of the Midwest,” the hotel was intended to complement the adjacent Southern Theatre. Designed by local architectural firm Yost & Packard, the building is known for its French Renaissance architecture, characterized by its stained glass and ornate gold trim. The Westin’s palatial lobby is anchored by the same marble reception desk that has been greeting guests since the horseand-buggy days. But the hotel has seen many reconfigurations and renovations over the years. BeMiller says the traditional European-style rooms are a little smaller than most because bathrooms were added during renovations. The hallways, however, are noticeably wide—big enough to accommodate the big steamer trunks of the day, as well as the wide hoop skirts that were in vogue. The Grand Ballroom, which BeMiller says was meant to be “fit for presidents,” hosted a ball in celebration of William McKinley’s second inauguration in 1901. These days, it’s a highly coveted wedding venue. Listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places, the building also has a reputation for being haunted—some housekeeping staff have refused to go to certain parts of the building because they say they’ve seen ghosts. 310 S. High St., Downtown

scavEngEr hunt answEr kEy 1. E; 2. A; 3. D; 4. C; 5. B; 6. F; 7. I; 8. G; 9. H

10 EssEntial Buildings

ohio hiStoriCal Center Year built: 1970 Architect: W. Byron Ireland & Associates Style: Brutalist

In the late 1960s, Ohio sold $290 million in bonds to improve and build state properties, with an emphasis on state history. For the Ohio Historical Society, whose holdings and offices were scattered among multiple properties, it was a golden opportunity. Led by Society director Daniel Porter, a plan was hatched to commission a bold design that would contrast starkly with the historical records held inside, says Barbara Powers of the Ohio Historical Society. The architect chosen was the young, Harvardeducated Byron Ireland, who had worked with famed St. Louis Gateway Arch architect Eero Saarinen. Today, the Ohio Historical Center is a revered example of modern architecture, though it’s also misunderstood. The interior is swathed in concrete. Look closely at it, and you’ll notice what appear to be the impressions of grains and knots of wood. Your eyes don’t deceive; the concrete was cured in wooden forms to give it this organic texture, which is repeated throughout the building in real oak railings and details. Four massive posts, sunk 70 feet into bedrock, support the dramatic cantilevers that constitute the building’s most striking feature. Cables throughout the building’s walls, held in proper tension with a series of hydraulic jacks, keep the walls upright. Project engineer Peter Korda, in a video celebrating the building’s 40th anniversary in 2010, explains to his interviewer that the building had to be supported by 32 temporary concrete columns until all of the permanent concrete in the building had cured and the cables could be tensed. “One of my secretaries came into the office one day to tell us that workmen were leaving the job site in droves. The rumor started that the building was going to fall down, and they didn’t want to be killed,” Korda says. “I told her that I was going to stand under that cantilever when it was cut it away. And I did really stand under it.” When the last temporary support was cut away, the building sank three-quarters of an inch and, because the cables act like giant springs, bounced back up. 800 E. 17th Ave., North Side Columbus Monthly • December 2013

75


GO

Girls For more than 100 years, the Columbus School for Girls has prepared young women for college and careers, much of the time ensconced behind a brick wall on Broad Street in Bexley. The school has a reputation for sky-high tuition, academic rigor and being a favored institution for privileged Columbus girls. That’s all true, but it’s only part of the story STORY BY Kristen schmidt | PhOTOS BY tessa Berg

O

n one of those blustery January mornings so gray the air seems opaque, a few dozen women walked briskly through a stone entrance at the Columbus School for Girls (CSG). Shaking off the chill once inside, they were greeted by staff and guided to the school cafeteria. Students in neatly pressed tartan uniforms introduced themselves to the guests and made conversation with them, answering and asking smart questions about school and work. The gentle clinking of cups against saucers punctuated the room, which was soon humming with conversation. At the suggestion of a staff member, a student, maybe 12 years old, led one woman to a table, where they sat and continued to chat as equals, nibbling breakfast. The women in the room were not parents or even acquaintances of the girls—they are among Columbus’ most influential leaders in business, politics and charitable institutions. It was the ultimate networking happy hour but with tea, muffins and tweens. Among those in attendance: Former Ohio House Speaker Jo Ann Davidson, Otterbein University President Kathy Krendl, Columbus city councilwomen Priscilla Tyson and Michelle Mills, Charles Penzone Inc. president Debra Penzone, Donato’s CEO Jane Grote Abell and Elfi DiBella, president and CEO of the YWCA Columbus. When upper school students delivered remarks about 76

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

their education, the women nodded approvingly. They were impressed, and you would have been too, when thenstudent Sarah Naguib explained why, at age 17, she founded a nonprofit to deliver laptops to Egypt (she is also a black belt in taekwondo). The audience enthusiastically applauded head of school Liza Lee, who spoke briefly but persuasively in support of all-girls education. She talked about empowerment of young women, about preparing to send them out into a man’s world with tools like intelligence, boldness and creativity. Her words were unflinchingly opinionated; they might have been harrumphed by an audience of men. But this group was rapt. If the school was looking for potential role models for students, to provide job shadows or speak in classes, they had found precisely the right audience: women who climbed to the top of their professions with grit and smarts, often without women mentors and while overcoming the everyday annoyances of gender discrimination. Singlesex education through Lee’s lens seems like a wonderful world of girl power, where stereotypes are chucked out the window and each person fearlessly raises her hand. The merits of an all-girls education can be debated—even Lee will admit it’s not the right decision for everyone. But the 115-year-old CSG permeates Columbus—it graduates


Columbus Monthly • December 2013

77


women who go on to be leaders in business, politics, medicine, academics. It’s one of very few Columbus institutions to have the influence to bring all those women to that cafeteria on a Wednesday morning. It’s a mysterious place, hiding behind its stone walls. It might be a misunderstood place, too. Is CSG elitist? The retail price of a year’s education is around $20,000. But a quarter of the students at the school receive need-based scholarships. Is it lily-white? No—31 percent of the student body is made up of “students of color,” as the school terms them. Is an all-girls education even a good idea? It depends—even within feminist circles—whom you ask.

I

’m asked to meet head of school Liza Lee in “The Mansion,” past the courtyard with the unicorn statue. Like a lot of things about CSG, these directions are eccentric but endearing. The ivy-covered Mansion is one of several buildings on CSG’s expanding campus, bounded by Broad Street and Drexel, Columbia and Powell avenues. A performing arts center is under construction, and a wellness and athletics building opened just last year. Lee’s office has a perfect view of the courtyard where girls play during recess. When the weather is nice, Lee sometimes opens French doors to the yard and lets girls roam in and out while they play. She has that mysterious quality that tells children she is a kindred spirit; when she walks into a classroom, kids run right up to her and divulge their latest stories. In return, Lee listens to them earnestly, as though no one else in the world could be more interesting. Her face paints her interest, her voice rising with her eyebrows and bright, animated eyes. Lee has long believed girls deserve to be listened to. She both graduated from and taught at the revered allgirls Brearly School in Manhattan, alma mater of Caroline Kennedy, feminists Anne and Katie Roiphe, actresses Kyra Sedgwick and Sigourney Weaver and publishing titans Katharine Weymouth and Dorothy Schiff. She then attended an allwomen’s college and went on to graduate school at Columbia. “That was my first distressing taste of co-education,” she says. “Graduate professors called on the men all the time. It was very rare that they wanted to listen to a comment from a girl. Despite graduating from an all-women’s college, I wasn’t ready to ‘lean in’ yet. I wasn’t confident. Then I thought, after I listened to all those idiot comments from my male colleagues, I thought, ‘Yes I am,’ and I started raising my hand.” To help with family finances while her husband completed medical school, Lee took a job teaching afternoon classes at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. This was when she first noticed that girls and boys learn differently, that some techniques seemed to work better with one sex than the other. After experiencing discrimination in other settings—at one job in England she was instructed to bring her own toilet paper “because women used so much,” and at another job her boss told her he planned to pay a male replacement $15,000 more than her “because he was going to be supporting a family”—the idea that the world viewed men and women differently began to crystallize for Lee. She eventually devoted her career to all-girls education, becoming a nationally recognized expert, and in 2009 was lured out of retirement with the help of childhood friend Charlotte Kessler, whose family has a long legacy of attendance at CSG. Lee will retire (again) this summer; the new head of school Jennifer M. Ciccarelli starts in July.

78

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Columbus School for Girls head of school Liza Lee


P

arents looking for information about singlesex education will find advice at both extremes—there are plentiful articles, books and research papers making arguments for it and against it. There are national organizations for both girls’ schools and co-educational schooling. Lee, like most advocates for single-sex education, believes girls and boys learn differently and get better educations when separated. She also believes that allgirls education plays an important role in countering a “toxic culture” for adolescent girls (when we spoke, the Miley Cyrus MTV awards hullabaloo was raging). “We’re all on the watch for that kind of cultural demoralization. I keep saying to the girls, I don’t want you to have a double life. I want you to be so strong when you leave here that it’s integral to you and you won’t capitulate,” she says. On the other end of the spectrum are academics, child psychologists and education policymakers who find Lee’s ideas about single-sex education at best outdated and at worst based on junk science about neurological differences between girls and boys. In 2011, a group of academics—all founding board members of the American Council for CoEducational Schooling—published an article in the journal Science Columbus Monthly • December 2013

79


debunking benefits of single-sex education. The researchers found that students at all-girls schools excelled not because they were surrounded by other females, but because they tended to come from well-off families, they met academic standards when they tested into the schools and private schools had the money to spend on extras, like tutoring, to enhance students’ experience. The authors also called research showing differences in girls’ and boys’ brains “pseudoscience” that has been refuted by more recent neuroscience. And, maybe most damning, the researchers made the case that singlesex education institutionalizes notions of gender difference: By creating singlegender educational environments, all-girls schools signal that gender is an important part of society. “I think parents who choose single-gender education are making a choice, a realistic choice,” Lee says. “At an all-girls school, we put no limits on their expectations, and we don’t put the kind of limitations on their dreams that you sometimes find in a co-ed school, even though it’s not because of anything conscious.” Parents do continue to choose CSG. Founded with two students (both went to Wellesley College) in 1898, CSG today has a student body of more than 600 girls. From the beginning, it has been a college preparatory school. If a girl does not intend to go on to a college or university, CSG is not a good fit: 100 percent of each graduating class is accepted to college. Lee is also outspoken about the socio-economic and ethnic diversity inside CSG. It’s a point of pride for the staff at the school that the student body is not homogenous. “We certainly have privileged girls here. But what we have is the full spread. It’s not just some poor kids here and some rich kids there. It’s everything in between,” Lee says. “We have families whose parents work two jobs in order to afford us.” CSG offers only need-based financial aid; since girls test into the school, they are all deemed to be there on merit. The school gives out about $1.8 million a year in scholarships. “We had a child who was homeless, and we have Jack Kessler’s grandchildren,” Lee says, referring to the prominent developer. “But what’s interesting to me is the number of families for whom this is a tremendous sacrifice.” 80

Columbus Monthly • December 2013


“I was judged not for how I looked or the way I dressed, but what I had to contrIbute Intellectually. It was the freedom to not worry about how you looked physIcally, the freedom to express your Ideas freely.” —Dr. SanDra Kim

M

ore than 25 years after they graduated from CSG, Columbus lawyer Liza Kessler still remembers classmate Sandy Kim’s intelligence and critical-thinking skills. Sandy grew up to be Dr. Sandra Kim, a pediatrician whose clinical and research work has focused on inflammatory bowel disease; she recently returned to Columbus as the medical director of Nationwide Children’s Hospital Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center. Kim arrived at CSG as a high school freshman, having transferred from a public school. “It is a little bit of culture shock to be in a co-ed school where you’ve got the geeky ones and then you’ve got the cheerleaders … [At CSG], You’re with women, and you realize you’re no longer competing with them; you’re not afraid to show that you’re smart,” she says. It was a relief when appearances took a backseat to academics, she says, and her thoughts were repeated again and again in interviews with CSG graduates. Uniforms and no boys neutralized the typical adolescent emphasis on looks. Uniforms had the double duty of leveling socio-economic status. Kessler says she had no clue which students were on scholarships, and it wouldn’t have mattered. “I was judged not for how I looked or the way I dressed, but what I had to contribute intellectually,” Kim says. “It was the freedom to not worry about how you looked physically, the freedom to express your ideas freely.” Laurel Beatty, daughter of former state Rep. Otto Beatty Jr. and stepdaughter of Congresswoman Joyce Beatty, left St. Catherine’s Catholic school for CSG in sixth grade. She says she reveled in the religious, ethnic and cultural diversity she found at the school. “You had Christian, Jewish, Muslim people and a lot of different ethnicities. I liked different, so I loved it,” she says. That education came in handy when she ran to keep the Franklin County Court of Common Pleas judgeship,

to which she was appointed in 2009. “It’s not easy to walk up to a stranger and ask them for their vote. But if you have that base of some general knowledge and appreciation for different races, religions, cultures, it’s not quite so intimidating,” she says. Another factor in Beatty’s win: The network of CSG alumnae in Columbus. “I got a lot of help from classmates, whether it was placing yard signs or walking in parades with me. They threw me a fundraiser,” she says. “Running for a countywide position, it’s not like you have staff who are paid. When you run county-wide, it is you and the people who love you.” Kessler, daughter of Jack and Charlotte Kessler and goddaughter of Liza Lee, her mother’s school friend, is the partner-in-charge at the Columbus office of global law firm Jones Day. Her aunt and sisters attended CSG, and her nieces are there now. During an interview in her office, she pulls a framed photograph from a credenza—a group of women, all CSG graduates, smile from underneath the canopy of a golf cart. The photo was taken on a girls’ getaway just a few weeks prior. “We’re very different people, doing very different things and having very different lives,” Kessler says. “One of the things CSG gives you is a respect for and protection of female friendships.” All of the women interviewed say CSG had well prepared them for the world beyond high school and for college. Each of them chose a profession that can be called “male-dominated,” but not one of them seems to notice. “You don’t doubt yourself. You feel like you’re worthy of being at the table. You know how to maintain a conversation,” says Sophia Corna, marketing manager at her family’s construction firm, Corna Kokosing. “That all stems from that education, that foundation that they give you.” Liza Lee is fond of “Lean In,” the bestselling feminist manifesto by Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg, in which she advises women to commit to making and keeping their careers a priority. Lee has shared and discussed the book with her colleagues, and she wrote a letter to the New York Times referencing it. It might be said that Lee was telling girls to “lean in” long before Sandberg put it in print. Corna recalls a conversation she had several years ago with a former classmate’s father, who was a bit dismayed at his daughter’s apparent nonchalance about settling down. “He said, ‘You know I think that school made you girls a little too independent,’ ” Corna says with a smile. “I told him, ‘We’re doing our own thing, and if that happens along the way, that’s great.’ You learn that you’re going to go out and find a career and your own path and your own future.” Columbus Monthly • December 2013

81


VU/HR expand

contract

VU/HR expand

82

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

contract


VU/HR contract

Story By Michelle Sullivan PhotoS By TeSSa Berg IlluStratIon By Michaela SchueTT

In just a few years, Jeni Britton Bauer and her inventive, addictive ice cream have become national phenoms. Some would seize the opportunity of fame and escape the confines of a hometown.

Instead, she’s digging in deeper to Columbus and outstretching the now powerful hand of her business to other artisans who are right where she was not so long ago.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

83


Early morning light pEEks through thE windows of thE north markEt. in stark contrast to an afternoon crowd, the open room is quiet and dim just after 8 a.m., save a few bakers and baristas preparing for the day ahead. doors won’t open to customers for another 45 minutes, and several stalls are still cast in darkness. the distinct scents of ground coffee, pungent curry and baking bread swirl in familiarity, met by a buttery, salty and slightly cinnamon-spicy aroma wafting above a busy booth in the back. Brittany Baum has been working since 7 a.m., mixing dough for her Bavarianstyle soft pretzels. Each batch of thick, twisted rope takes about two hours to make, so the owner of Brezel needs an early start to beat her first customers. Her dyed-blonde hair is pulled into a ponytail, bangs pinned away from her face. Jeans, a fitted T-shirt and flats are suitable for a long day on her feet. She kneads the dense mixture of flour, brown sugar, water and yeast with small hands and tattooed arms, leaning the weight of her petite frame forward on the tabletop to soften the dough to roll. Before Brezel joined the Market in 2011, Baum, now 31, spent three years baking pretzels out of her German Village home. Never a serious baker, she was determined to recreate the specialty after two vacations in Germany introduced her to its signature crunchy yet chewy texture. Baum puts her own spin on the Bavarian classic by using fresh produce, herbs and spices to create a wide variety of flavors. She already has 30, ranging from cinnamon sugar to jalapeno cheddar, and frequently experiments with new ones.

All in the FAmily

Jeni’s splendid ice Creams sister company Eat well distribution is sending these Columbus foods and products out of Central ohio— and potentially launching them onto the national stage

84

lunA Burger

BrittAny BAum pACks Frozen pretzel tWists For distriBution

WhAt: pure-plant frozen vegan veggie burgers made with whole grains and organic fruits and veggies Born in: 2009, Columbus Who: megan and Barbie luna Where: Bexley natural market, Celebrate local, Clintonville Community market, delaware County Community market, Earth fare, the going green store, the greener grocer, the hills market (worthington), huffman’s market, lucky’s market, nature’s path market, near East side Co-op, the raisin rack, rife’s market, ross granville market, summit ridge farm market, sweet meadows market, tim’s organic pantry, weiland’s gourmet market, whole foods market

JB’s Best

WhAt: tequila-based salsas and craft-brewed ale barbeque sauces Born in: 2013, athens Who: Jonathan milo leal Where: Bexley natural market, Clintonville Coop, delaware County Community market, giant Eagle market district, the hills market, huffman’s market, meza wine shop, nature’s path market, ohio tap room, raisin rack, rife’s market, statehouse museum, weiland’s gourmet market, whole foods market

shAgBArk seed & mill

WhAt: sustainably grown corn tortilla chips, crackers, popcorn and organic dry beans Born in: 2010, athens Who: Brandon Jaegar and michelle ajamian Where: Bexley natural food market, Celebrate local, Clintonville Community market, Earth fare, giant Eagle market district, the greener grocer, the hills market, kroger (gahanna and worthington), ohio tap room, weiland’s gourmet market, whole foods market

tAvern vinegAr Co.

WhAt: Barrel-aged vinegar Born in: 2011, Cleveland Who: ChefJonathon sawyer Where: middle west spirits

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

082_087_FEAT_BUSINESS_DEC_CM.indd 84

11/14/13 3:06 PM


“We’re not certified organic, but everything is,” she says. “We don’t use any preservatives in our products.” She tears a chunk from a heaping mound of dough as an employee working across from her does the same. The pair will continue to roll, twist and bake fresh pretzels for hours until they’re joined by others who’ll take over the task until about 5 p.m. Baum has hired 10 new employees in 18 months to meet the needs of Brezel’s fast-growing business. The recent growth spurt was triggered when she partnered with a local company to sell her pretzels in grocery stores. Eat Well Distribution, the Columbus-based food distributor that introduced Brezel’s pretzel twists to market freezers throughout the Midwest, was co-founded in 2012 by Jeni Britton Bauer, founder of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams. Like Baum, Britton Bauer got her start in the North Market, opening her business there with now-husband Charly Bauer in 2002. Today, Jeni’s pints are sold on 1,000 shelves nationwide—as well as in Kuwait and Dubai—and scoop shops are popping up in cities as far from Columbus as Atlanta and Chicago. Britton Bauer’s commitment to using natural, locally sourced ingredients for her handmade ice cream—in unlikely flavor combinations that have become her trademark—has earned her national recognition. Britton Bauer’s network is growing, her star is rising—and she’s bringing some Columbus favorites with her. Brezel is one of 12 brands represented by Eat Well, and the common denominator among the products is wholesomeness. Like Jeni’s ice cream, the foods are made with natural, unprocessed, mostly local ingredients. Even housewares line Made by AmyD uses recycled plastic bottles to make reusable coffee-cup sleeves. Columbus staple Block’s Bagels and newcomer Harvest Pizzeria are among the brands, as are

vino De Milo

What: Wine-based pasta sauces, salad dressings and bruschetta Born in: 2003, Athens Who: Jonathan Milo Leal Where: Bexley Natural Market, Clintonville Co-op, Delaware County Community Market, Giant Eagle Market District, The Hills Market, Huffman’s Market, Meza Wine Shop, Nature’s Path Market, Ohio Tap Room, Raisin Rack, Rife’s Market, Statehouse Museum, Weiland’s Gourmet Market, Whole Foods Market

Callie’s Charleston BisCuits

What: Handmade frozen biscuits Born in: 2005, Charleston, S.C. Who: Carrie Morey Where: The Fresh Market

MaDe By aMyD

What: Reusable coffee sleeves made from postconsumer plastic bottles Born in: 2005, Columbus Who: Amy Dalrymple Murphy Where: Celebrate Local, Touch of Earth, Wexner Center bookstore, Whole Foods Market (Dublin), Wholly Craft

siMPle squares

What: Organic, gluten-free snack bars Born in: 2011, Chicago Who: Kimberly Crupi Dobbins Where: Giant Eagle Market District, The Hills Market (Worthington), Weiland’s Gourmet Market

Athens’ Shagbark Seed & Mill corn chips and Vino de Milo pasta sauces. “These are not highly processed, fake foods. These aren’t science projects,” says John Lowe, CEO and co-founder of Eat Well Distribution and CEO of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams. “That is part of the Eat Well mission. We think that the more we can do to get more good food frozen quickly and then enjoyed easily at home, the better our world will be.”

W

hen hiring a CEO to guide their growing business, Britton Bauer and her husband saw a perfect fit in Lowe, a longtime friend they met at Short North Tavern one night in 1998. Selling pints of ice cream in grocery stores was not a priority or even part of the business plan when Lowe, a lawyer, joined the team in 2009. Jeni’s was preparing to open a fifth scoop shop in Dublin. Online ordering was the only way to bring home a pint of Jeni’s—unless you happened to live near Foragers, a specialty grocer in Brooklyn. “I asked them, ‘How did you get your pints on the shelves at Foragers?’ And they said, ‘Foragers called us and asked us if they could sell our ice cream,’ ” Lowe recalls. “That doesn’t happen in the real world. I said, ‘Maybe this truly is a world-class product.’ ” Lowe set out to quickly build a wholesale business for Jeni’s. He began by cold-calling grocers and shipping 45 pints of ice cream under 20 pounds of dry ice to each of them. Four years later, pints are shipped by the pallet from a production facility in Harrison West to every Jeni’s retailer. They’ll send ice cream anywhere it can reach in two days, whether on trucks emblazoned with Jeni’s recognizable logo or shipped via FedEx. And they still pack shipments with dry ice and buy more of it than anyone else in Ohio, Lowe says.

Brezel

What: Hand-rolled, Bavarian-style frozen soft pretzel twists Born in: 2008, Columbus Who: Brittany Baum Where: Bexley Natural Market, The Hills Market, Huffman’s Market, Weiland’s Gourmet Market

harvest Pizzeria

What: Hand-tossed, wood-fired frozen pizzas Born in: 2011, Columbus Who: Chris Crader and Bethany Lovell Where: The Hills Market, Huffman’s Market, Weiland’s Gourmet Market

BloCk’s Bagels

What: Kosher, natural New York-style water bagels Born in: 1967, Columbus Who: Hal Block Where: The Hills Market, Lucky’s Market, Weiland’s Gourmet Market

BolsanaDa

What: Handmade empanadas Born in: 2013, Columbus Who: Mike Gadd, Tomos Mughan and Matt Sefcovic Where: Look for these empanadas on market shelves starting next spring.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

082_087_FEAT_BUSINESS_DEC_CM.indd 85

85

11/14/13 4:33 PM


As Jeni’s wholesale business grew, so did the retail business. By “I’m a shoot-for-the-moon person, 100 percent,” Britton Bauer 2012, there were 10 scoop shops in Ohio. says. “I never, ever limit myself. It just wouldn’t occur to me to It was around this time Lowe conceptualized Eat think I’m going to do something little and keep it that way.” Well Distribution. And, boy, how her little ice cream business grew. “We had some scale suddenly that we could leverage to bring Before she was an ice cream maker, she was an art student our costs down,” Lowe says. and an aspiring perfumer. She collected essential oils and reveled Eat Well was formed as a business separate from Jeni’s but in blending scents. A curious hunch compelled her to mix owned by the same people. This structure cut out the middleman cayenne oil into chocolate ice cream. The result of that for items Jeni’s was ordering in large quantities, such as napkins, inspiration is known as Queen City Cayenne, and it’s one of paper cups and shipping material. They’d buy it at cost and mark her most popular flavors. it up less. Essentially, they served as their own distributor and Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams steadily generated buzz—after a failed attempt at her first ice cream business, Scream—and spilled began selling to other food businesses, too. beyond her North Market stall. Soon, she was opening Before long, they were selling these businesses not more shops and increasing ice cream production only packing materials but also product distribution exponentially. More demand and new products, services—to put their products on the shelves where Jeni’s ice cream is sold. It made perfect such as macaroon ice cream sandwiches and sense to Lowe. crumbly ice cream toppings she dubbed Gravel, “We know how to talk to frozen buyers,” required additional space and employees. he says. “We have lower shipping rates than Now, 80 employees per shift, for two shifts anybody else. We should be able to do this, each day, mix batch after 9-gallon batch. It’s because of our economies of scale, cheaper than no longer made by Britton Bauer’s hands, but anybody else. Let’s see if we can help them.” it’s made the same way she has always done it. After taking Brezel under his wing, Chocolate chips, toasted marshmallows, even Lowe assigned creative minds to the task of salted caramel are made from scratch. Fresh developing a sharp new logo, tidy website and sweet potatoes are pan-roasted, and berries are eye-catching packaging—not unlike Jeni’s—to reduced into sugary jam. mark the pretzel-maker as an Eat Well product. Britton Bauer continues to buy many of the Baum admits before Eat Well came along, same ingredients she’s used from the beginning, her marketing efforts left something to be just on a larger scale. Chillicothe’s Hirsch Fruit desired. Though she was selling her pretzels, Farm, for example, has supplied strawberries for pretzel buns and even pretzel pizza crusts to a Jeni’s Roasted Strawberry Buttermilk ice cream handful of local bars and restaurants, Baum says since day one. Back then, a flat of strawberries Eat Well brought a growth opportunity sooner would last her a week. Now, she buys 8,000 —Jeni Britton than she ever would have found alone. pounds every three weeks from the same farmers. Bauer Lowe sees parallels between Baum and Britton (She now also sources strawberries from a farm in Bauer in her early days. Tennessee.) Jeni’s has been Snowville Creamery’s biggest “She looked a lot like Jeni probably looked,” he says. “She is customer since they began exclusively using the Athens-based a wonderful person with a great product, but the chances of her dairy farm’s milk and cream four years ago. Now, Jeni’s uses about breaking through from a single booth in the North Market? The 140,000 pounds of Snowville cream in a month. odds are low.” “That’s business changing,” she says, “That’s supporting families.” Baum feels comfortable working with Eat Well because they appreciate artisan products. “They seem to really value inspiration behind their products. he women behind Luna Burger, the first product to join the They support that idea of small batches [that are] hand-created,” Eat Well family, can relate. Their veggie-burger company was she says. “That seems to be really important for Eat Well’s brand born with Ohio farmers in mind. and Jeni’s ultimately. She’s the same way.” “We were able to really source our ingredients from local farms and fine-tune our recipes by being able to fulfill them with local produce,” co-founder Megan Luna says. Megan and Barbie Luna began making veggie burgers in their ritton Bauer, 40, sits upright in her naturally lit office, arms kitchen five years ago. Both eat a vegan diet, so they tried making folded on her desk, as she discusses the philosophy behind patties with organic black beans, spelt berries, oats and spices sourced Eat Well. from local farmers for family and friends. They were an instant hit. “It’s very simple,” she says, “We want to have really great “People would request them,” Megan says. “ ‘We need more food to eat. We want our kids to have good food to eat. If we can Luna burgers!’ That is what they’d call them.” (Luna is the last do anything we can to help that, it makes us happy and excited name Megan and Barbie chose to share when they married.) and proud.” The name stuck when the product launched at the Clintonville Co-founding the company was not on her initial agenda. For Farmers’ Market. Retailers approached them about carrying the that matter, neither was opening 16 scoop shops, building an burgers, and their frozen retail business began. international wholesale business, publishing an award-winning The Lunas were making burgers by hand from a warehouse cookbook and releasing another next year. on the East Side and shipping or personally delivering them to She didn’t plan for it, but she expected it. retailers when Lowe made his proposal.

“We want our kids to have good food to eat. If we can do anything we can to help that, it makes us happy and excited and proud.”

T

B

86

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

082_087_FEAT_BUSINESS_DEC_CM.indd 86

11/14/13 5:01 PM


Jeni Britton Bauer and eat Well Ceo John loWe in her test kitChen

“It just sort of seemed like a natural fit, a natural way for us to have more time to focus on burgers and our own marketing, as opposed to having to deliver and ship [ourselves],” Barbie says. Since joining Eat Well, Luna Burger’s wholesale business has more than doubled, Megan says. “We were just beginning, just [selling in] Ohio,” she says. “They’ve taken us to Chicago and New York and everywhere in between.” Their burgers are available throughout the Midwest and on the East Coast, and Lowe is hopeful they and other Eat Well products will soon be in specialty grocer Dean and Deluca. But the Lunas still make everything from scratch, from simmering beans and blueberries to their own roasted-redpepper seasoning. With the help of two employees, they form and package each patty before sending them off to the Eat Well Distribution facility, adjacent to Jeni’s.

B

right midday sunshine meets Britton Bauer as she leaves her office and walks two doors down to Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams’ bakery kitchen. She welcomes men and women in suits and pencil skirts at the door. Inside, between ovens and stovetops used to bake pralines and mix decadent sauces for her gourmet ice cream products, a narrow table is set. The lunch menu is a veritable roll call of Ohio agriculture. Roasted Cinderella pumpkin seeds from Hirsch Fruit Farm, cheeses from Laurel Valley Creamery in Gallipolis and poached duck eggs from Rock Dove Farm in West Jefferson are just a few items in the spread. Proceeds from the $65-a-plate luncheon benefit Local Matters, a nonprofit that supports Ohio-grown food co-founded by Britton Bauer. Dedication to this and dozens of other charities and organizations—Jeni’s donated 30 percent of its 2012 post-tax

revenue to charitable causes and plans to do the same for 2013— helps fulfill one arm of her company’s two-part mission: to serve the community. Eat Well’s mission closely aligns with that of Jeni’s. “There is a need for good food in the world,” Britton Bauer says. “We should be creating food businesses here, should be feeding America good food from Ohio.” It’s a small way to make the world a better place, she says. Lowe envisions Eat Well expanding in step with Jeni’s. If Jeni’s opens distribution centers outside of Columbus, he imagines Eat Well will do the same. When that will happen, though, is still uncertain. “Eat Well is still a tiny little business that we’re trying to make sure is going to remain profitable and provide a service that the market wants,” he says. Britton Bauer doesn’t ever think about the future. “I think about now, which is a little unusual for a company,” she says. “Companies usually have a five-year plan, and we don’t.” One thing is almost certain: Jeni’s ice cream will always be made right here in Columbus. At this rate, Lowe says they’ll likely outgrow their production kitchen. Eventually, they’ll open another one, but it won’t be out of town—probably. “There is so much wealth here in the Midwest,” Britton Bauer says. “We can do so much here that I will be 75 years old before I ever have to think about that.” For now, she thinks about new flavors and recipes “every day, all the time.” She reaches for a pink Moleskine notebook and flips through the pages. It’s empty, but soon, like scores of others, it will be filled cover-to-cover with sketches, recipe concepts and calculations—a glimpse into her creative process—and very likely, her next big idea. Columbus Monthly • December 2013

87


T

G FO H SA G R E V ES T E T H D BR E A ID YEA TE AL R SH ’S O W BI

Before you

walk down the aisle...

Before you

say ‘I do’... Join us Jan. 4-5, 2014

Columbus Convention Center Hall C New location!

Featuring

• Fashion shows • Dress boutiques • Florists • Photographers • Caterers • Reception venues • Jewelers • Cake makers • Travel agencies • DJs and more

PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS NOW! Get your tickets to the show online for just $10 — a savings of $2 — before Dec. 24th at ColumbusBride.com. USE PROMO CODE BRIDE14

(Service fee may apply.)

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 88

11/13/13 3:07 PM


special advertising section

photo: Courtesy MerCedes-Benz usA

THe

2014 Models By Jenny RogeRs

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 89

89

11/13/13 10:26 AM


special advertising section

Acura MDX Style: Luxury SUV DetailS: Acura’s seven-seat SUV stunner doesn’t

Where you can finD it: Lindsay Acura

BMW 4 Series Coupe Style: Luxury Coupe DetailS: The 4 Series Coupe replaces the

3 Series Coupe, a move by BMW to further differentiate its many models (a shift that other luxury brands have already initiated). Although the engines remain the same and the model still draws inspiration from the 3 Series family, the styling is more aggressive: The 4 Series is significantly lower and wider than the 3, and this model has the lowest center of gravity of

90

any BMW. And it’s longer, too. Still, the new kid is significantly lighter than the last two-door 3 Series Coupe.

getting 240 horsepower and the 435i’s 3.0-liter, 6-cylinder engine boasting 300 horsepower.

Why it’S buzz-Worthy: The most significant element in the evolution from 3 to 4 is the design. BMW designed the 4 Series to catch your eye, and the new proportions pack a visual punch. The chassis has also received an overhaul, increasing the car’s agility, and the steering’s improved, too. Bonus: Both engines are turbocharged, with the 428i’s 2.0-liter, 4-cylinder engine

Where you can finD it: Midwestern

Auto Group BMW Dealer aSSeSSment: “It’s bigger,

lighter, faster and a more dynamic driving experience than the 3 Series Coupe,” says Mark Brentlinger, CEO of Midwestern Auto Group. “This car is selling as fast as it comes in.”

photos: Courtesy AmeriCAn hondA motor Co. inC.; BmW Group

look like a new model at first glance, as the design isn’t drastically different from the previous iteration. It’s still all practical luxury, a family-friendly auto for the minivan-shunning family. But the 2014 model is on a new platform, which translates to additional interior space and a Dealer aSSeSSment: significant decrease “The previous in weight. It boasts a model was the 3.5-liter V-6 engine benchmark for the with 290 horsepower, luxury SUV market, while safety features so there was a include forwardlot of pressure on collision and lanedeparture warnings and Acura to create a model that again a blind-spot monitor. set the standard,” Why it’S buzzsays Steve Lindsay, Worthy: The MDX owner and general has been a popular manager of Lindsay vehicle for some Acura. “And they’ve time now—one of done that. The Acura’s bestsellers, design is stunning, it’s an ideal option and the gas mileage for luxury lovers who is just a gamedon’t want to spend changer.”’ upwards of $50,000 for a sporty ride. What distinguishes the 2014 model is the 275-pound weight reduction, which has seriously impacted speed (giving you more “sport” for your buck). The MDX now achieves 27 miles per gallon on the highway (its predecessor achieved 21), and although horsepower has decreased, it accelerates faster.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 90

11/13/13 10:26 AM


photos: Courtesy AmeriCAn hondA motor Co. inC.; BmW Group

THE ABSOLUTE OPPOSITE OF ORDINARY

|

INTRODUCING THE NEW GHIBLI FROM $65,600*

|

MASERATIGHIBLI.US

THE NEW MASERATI GHIBLI IS POWERED BY A CHOICE OF TWO ADVANCED V6 ENGINES WITH UP TO 404 HP, EQUIPPED WITH 8-SPEED ZF AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION AND AVAILABLE Q4 INTELLIGENT ALL-WHEEL DRIVE.

*Maserati Ghibli base MSRP $65,600; Ghibli S Q4 base MSRP $75,700. Not including dealer prep and transportation. Actual selling price may vary. Taxes, title, license and registration fees not included. ©2013 Maserati North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Maserati and the Trident logo are registered trademarks of Maserati S.p.A. Maserati urges you to obey all posted speed limits.

THE KEY TO AN EXTRAORDINARY LIFE IS QUITE LITERALLY A KEY.

MAG MASERATI OF DUBLIN

Schedule a test drive: 614.889.2571 | www.magcars.com | 6335 Perimeter Loop Rd., Dublin, Ohio 43017

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 91

11/13/13 11:28 AM


special advertising section

Audi A3 Style: Entry-Level Luxury Sedan DetailS: Introduced in the mid-1990s,

the A3 is the German auto powerhouse’s entry-level vehicle. This model—similar in size to the original A4—sits on Volkswagen Group’s new MQB platform, which is lighter than the one it replaces. Why it’S buzz-Worthy: For years, U.S.

Audi lovers have had access only to the A3 hatchback. Now, the hatchbackadverse—and families who want a bit more room—will be able to buy and drive the four-door A3 sedan, available in the U.S. for the first time. The good news: You can now own an Audi for as little as $30,000. Plus, a convertible version should arrive stateside soon, too, says Mark Brentlinger, CEO of Midwestern Auto Group. Where you can finD it: Midwestern

Auto Group Audi

Lexus IS Style: Luxury Sedan DetailS: When it comes to dependability

and safety, the IS is classic Lexus. But the car needed a bit of a makeover—the model hadn’t really received a design overhaul since its 2006 debut—and the sharp new look is a welcome sight for those in the market for a high-end sedan that combines sport with elegance. The styling is more severe—the front end’s spindle grille is a nice touch for those who like a bit more attitude from their ride—and it’s a gadget geek’s dream. The IS comes with its own app suite, which allows you to make dinner reservations, listen to your favorite Pandora stations and more.

92

Why it’S buzz-Worthy: Lexus hit it out of the ballpark with the 2014 IS’s styling and performance. They’ve brought the car to a place where it’ll appeal to a younger market, and it’s roomy enough for a family but still sleek enough for the bachelor looking to impress. Two powerful engine options—the IS250 and the IS350—get 204 and 306 horsepower respectively. The 250 model can go from zero to 60 in about seven seconds but still manages to get 30 miles per gallon on the highway. Where you can finD it: Germain Lexus

Dealer aSSeSSment: “I just bought the IS350 F sport, and it’s extremely fun to drive. The rubber in the tires is really soft, and they stick like glue when you go around corners,” says Brian Jordan, general manager of Germain Lexus of Easton. “And since the car has all-wheel drive, it does awesome in the snow, too. Lexus has really upped its game with the F Sport.”

photos: Courtesy Audi of AmeriCA/Jim fets photogrAphy; Lexus usA

Dealer aSSeSSment: “The price range is remarkably good for an Audi, and it’s incredibly well equipped, with features that a lot of the cars it’s competing with don’t have,” Brentlinger says.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 92

11/13/13 10:27 AM


429MO

$

plus tax

36 MONTHS

model # YD3H2EJNW

DOWN PAYMENT REQUIRED

379MO

$

SE

plus tax

36 MONTHS model # UA8F3EJW

$0 DOWN PAYMENT, $0 DUE AT SIGNING

259MO

photos: Courtesy Audi of AmeriCA/Jim fets photogrAphy; Lexus usA

$

plus tax

36 MONTHS model # DE1F3EJ

$0 DOWN PAYMENT, $0 DUE AT SIGNING

Acura

5880 Scarborough Boulevard Columbus, Ohio 43232

614.863.2885 • 888.329.7608 | www.LindsayAcura.com

Available through December 31, 2013. For TL and ILX - $0 down payment, $0 due at signing, 36 months plus tax, title. For MDX - $2,999 total due at signing, 36 months plus tax, title, and first payment. Available to customers with approved credit and who qualify for the Acura Financial Services. Not all lessees will qualify. Higher lease rates apply for lessees with lower credit ratings. 10,000 miles per year. Dealer contribution may affect consumer cost, with approved credit through Acura Financial Services. Dealers set actual prices. See your Acura dealer for details. Not available with any other offer.

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 93

11/14/13 1:53 PM


special advertising section

Jaguar F-Type Style: Sports Car DetailS: Three supercharged engines: check.

Zero to 60 in five seconds: check. Jaguar returns to the serious sports-car market with the F-Type, a car to finally rival Porsche. The lightweight, aluminum two-seater offers style paired with performance and just a dash of luxury (but not enough to remove its roadster edge). A 5.0-liter V-8 engine boasts 495 horsepower, while two 3.0-liter V-6 engines get 340 and 380 horsepower respectively. And for those who want the wind in their hair, the top lowers in 12 seconds, at a speed of up to 30 miles per hour. Why it’S buzz-Worthy: Jaguar hasn’t released

Where you can finD it: Byers Jaguar Dealer aSSeSSment: “It’s the first true

sports car that Jaguar’s done since the mid-70s, and it’s one of the coolest cars I’ve seen in a long time,” says Justin Paskey, brand specialist at Byers Jaguar. “The F-Type is putting out more horsepower than its competitive models, and it has the best sound of any car coming out of the manufacturing plant. It’s really giving Porsche a run for its money.”

Jeep Cherokee Style: SUV DetailS: The SUV original, responsible for bringing the off-road experience to suburbanites, gets a major redesign for 2014. The front end looks very little like the iconic Cherokee of yore—a good or a bad thing, depending on how you feel about its skinny, slanted headlights. But the core of what makes a Cherokee so appealing— its simultaneous city and trail friendliness—remains. It’s a spacious five-seater with two engine options. A 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine gets 184 horsepower, while a new 3.2-liter V-6 makes 271 horsepower.

Why it’S buzz-Worthy: The boxy,

strong-faced Jeep Cherokee is no more, at least for the 2014 model. It’s a bold move for a company whose previous model has gained a following for a very specific styling, and it’s nice to see a car company take a few risks. The performance is on par with previous Cherokees, but there’s more to choose from now, including four trim levels (Sport, Latitude, Limited and Trailhawk), a rearview camera, a heated steering wheel and remote start. Where you can finD it: Liberty

CJD, Performance CJD Dealer aSSeSSment: “We didn’t have a vehicle in this category … so it’s great to be able to compete with the [Honda] CRV and the [Ford] Escape,” says Doug Siebert, general manager at Performance Chrysler Jeep Dodge. “And as far as design and performance, a Jeep is Jeep. It’s got a good look. And there seems to be a lot of interest.”

PHotos: Courtesy Jaguar Land rover Limited; CHrysLer

a roadster in years, so the “comeback” title is befitting of their new F-Type. Much of what the British brand has done since the early 1970s has lived in the shadow of the E-Type, one of the most iconic cars of the last several decades. And though the F-Type isn’t a dead-ringer for that racing favorite, it certainly steps up to the plate. It’s a modern car made for now, but there’s still something classic about the F-Type.

m e

T w

T p a R

T

N

94

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 94

11/14/13 11:05 AM


PHotos: Courtesy Jaguar Land rover Limited; CHrysLer

moving our economy forward. The Columbus Region’s best minds and resources are working together to meet ambitious goals by the year 2020. Thanks to unprecedented collaboration and the support of hundreds of public and private investors, more than 58,000 jobs have been created and $3.55 billion in capital investment has been made in the Columbus Region since 2010. The momentum is building. And we’re just getting started. NO. 2 METRO FOR JOB CREATION

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 95

NETWORK PARTNER

A TOP7 INTELLIGENT COMMUNITY

columbusregion.com

11/13/13 10:30 AM


special advertising section

Mercedes-Benz CLA Style: Entry-Level Luxury Sedan DetailS: The Mercedes-Benz CLA is a

substantial departure from the typical Benz styling—despite its four doors, it feels more like a coupe, with its short stature and aggressive design. It’s a smaller, more budget-friendly version of the CLS, but the interior has been influenced by the sportier SLK. It starts at $29,900 and is one of the most efficient four-door sedans Mercedes has offered.

Why it’S buzz-Worthy: With the CLA,

Mercedes-Benz is attempting to reach an entirely new audience at an entirely new price point. They’re looking to reach those in the young professional market, a group the brand hasn’t historically tried to woo. Where you can finD it: Crown

Mercedes

Dealer aSSeSSment: “The C-Class

has historically been the car that the customer stretching to the luxury market from a Nissan or the Passat would have gone for. The CLA was designed with this group in mind,” says Tom Sands, new and pre-owned sales manager at Crown Mercedes. “But even though we’re marketing this to Generation Y, the people buying this car so far have been baby boomers!”

GMC Sierra 1500 Style: Four-Door Pickup Truck

a vehicle for getting the job done—the Sierra 1500 has been redesigned from the pavement up, and now it’s a luxury ride, too. Noteworthy features include an elegant interior, an 8-inch dash monitor and seats that vibrate when you’re backing up toward an oncoming vehicle. Why it’S buzz-Worthy: The 1500 is

indeed a truck, but it doesn’t look, feel or even sound like one from the inside. It’s worthy competition for car buyers who’d typically stick within the luxury SUV market, especially those with some serious hauling to do. The new Ecotec3 engine is worth noting, too. It’s a V-8 that’s more efficient than many V-6 engines, according to PJ Haydocy, dealer principal at Haydocy Buick GMC. Where you can finD it: Haydocy GMC

96

Dealer aSSeSSment: “In the old days, the truck was more of a work

vehicle, but this actually offers both [form and function],” Haydocy says. “And the Sierra 1500 now has a tailgate that a 98-year-old woman could open!”

photos: Courtesy MerCedes-Benz usA; GenerAl Motors

DetailS: No longer is the truck simply

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 96

11/13/13 10:29 AM


2014 BUICK LACROSSE

(614) 279-8880

W. Broad St.

3895 WEST BROAD ST., COLUMBUS, OH 43228 (CORNER OF HOLLYWOOD DR. AND BROAD ST.)

MON - THUR 9-8 • FRI - SAT 9-6

270

40

Georgesville Rd.

2014 GMC ACADIA

Columbus Hollywood Casino

YOUR WORLD CLASS EXPERIENCE HEADQUARTERS

(614) 279-8880

W. Broad St.

3895 WEST BROAD ST., COLUMBUS, OH 43228 (CORNER OF HOLLYWOOD DR. AND BROAD ST.)

MON - THUR 9-8 • FRI - SAT 9-6

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 97

270

Georgesville Rd.

photos: Courtesy MerCedes-Benz usA; GenerAl Motors

AIRSTREAM.com

40

Columbus Hollywood Casino

11/13/13 10:49 AM


special advertising section

Cadillac CTS Style: Luxury Sedan DeScription: When the 2014 Cadillac

CTS debuted in early 2013, it did so to kudos from the auto world thanks to its new look—lower to the ground, longer and sleeker than the previous iteration— as well as its improved performance. The base CTS comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine that gets 272 horsepower, meaning you don’t need the fanciest car in the lineup to enjoy some serious speed. Why it’S buzz-Worthy: In short, the 2014 model is a brand-new CTS. It sits upon a bigger platform, offers a superquick twin-turbo V-6 engine option and looks smoother, less sharp-edged than its predecessor. With this new CTS, Cadillac aims to leave behind its square reputation and take on its European luxury competition. Where you can finD it:

Capitol Cadillac

Mazda 6 Style: Mid-Size Sedan DeScription: The 2014 Mazda 6 received a complete redesign, and it’s aesthetically and technologically better for it. The size is similar to previous generations, but the weight’s been reduced significantly (thanks to ultra-strong but lightweight steel), the engine and transmission are more efficient and the safety technology’s been upgraded. Plus, the connectivity between the car and the phone has never been so seamless.

98

Why it’S buzz-Worthy: Mazda

Where you can finD it: Germain Mazda

succeeded at creating an economic sports sedan that doesn’t look or feel like a value—a feat considering the car’s performance has improved, too (and the Mazda6 now gets 40 miles per gallon on the highway). Mazda’s always been known as a driver’s car, and the brand was able to go back to the drawing board to create a more efficient ride that hasn’t scarified anything for the sake of fuel economy. It feels like an upscale ride—but it’s still outrageously fun to drive.

Dealer aSSeSSment: “The real meat and potatoes of this car is the performance,” says Paul Germain, general manager of Germain Mazda. “It’s still competing with cars like the Honda Accord, but Mazda’s designed and built this car with a luxury audience in mind. People want great features and a great car without paying a premium price.”

photos: Courtesy General Motors Co.; Mazda

Dealer aSSeSSment: “I didn’t think they could improve on this car, but they went beyond improvement,” says Rick Biszantz, general sales manager for Capitol Cadillac in Dublin. “The CTS has been in production since 2003, and now with these enhancements … it’s just unlike anything we’ve had before. It’s roomier inside; it feels like a much bigger sedan. And this is the direction for all new Cadillac models.”

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

088_098_CARS_DEC_CM.indd 98

11/14/13 11:16 AM


Th e an nu al ro sTe r of me dic al pro fes sio na ls — pee r-r ev iew ed an d pee r-s ele cTe d— fro m de rm aTo log isT s To ne ur olo gis Ts Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 99

99

11/14/13 3:12 PM


ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

Roger A. Friedman Buckeye Allergy 5877 Cleveland Ave. 614-891-0550

David Hauswirth Buckeye Allergy 5877 Cleveland Ave. 614-891-0550

Bryan L. Martin

OSU Allergy Center, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-6557

ANEsthEsIOLOGY

Daniel C. Hiestand OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Midwest Physician Anesthesia Services 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-4919

William B. Kelly Mount Carmel Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology 793 W. State St. 614-552-0061

John S. Rogoski

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8487

Robert H. Small

CARDIOVAsCULAR DIsEAsE

William T. Abraham OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

Gary M. Ansel

OhioHealth Heart & Vascular Physicians 3705 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 100 614-272-6772

Thomas Archer

Mount Carmel Columbus Cardiology Consultants 85 McNaughten Rd., Ste. 200 614-224-2281

Philip F. Binkley

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

Charles F. Botti Jr.

Ray E. Hershberger

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. A, Dublin 614-366-5001

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Genetic Medicine 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-6081

John A. Fisher

John D. Hummel

Mount Carmel Columbus Cardiology Consultants 745 W. State St., Ste. 750 614-224-2281

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

Bruce L. Fleishman

Rami Kahwash

OhioHealth Heart and Vascular Physicians 6024 Hoover Rd., Ste. 6, Grove City 614-533-5000

Mary Elizabeth Fontana

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. A, Dublin 614-366-5001

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

Steven J. Kalbfleisch

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, Electrophysiology Department 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-366-8615

Gregory A. Kidwell

Ernest L. Mazzaferri Jr.

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. A, Dublin 614-366-5001

Laxmi Mehta

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. A, Dublin 614-366-5001

Steven D. Nelson

OhioHealth Heart & Vascular Physicians 3705 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 100 614-262-6772

David A. Orsinelli

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Dublin 614-293-7677

Raul Weiss

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-366-1241

COLON AND RECtAL sURGERY

Mark Arnold

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Surgery 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-8133

Bruce A. Kerner

Central Ohio Colon and Rectal Center 5965 E. Broad St., Ste. 120 614-864-1000

CRItICAL CARE MEDICINE

Naeem Akhtar Ali

OhioHealth Heart & Vascular Physicians 3705 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 100 614-262-6772

Theodore D. Fraker Jr.

Vincent Pompili

OSU CarePointe at Gahanna 920 N Hamilton Rd., Gahanna 614-293-1965

OhioHealth Heart & Vascular Physicians 3705 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 100 614-262-6772

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

The Ohio State University Hospital, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-247-7804

Vincent Brinkman

Barry S. George

Andrew P. Klaus

Subha V. Raman

James N. Allen

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. A, Dublin 614-366-5001

Charles A. Bush

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8487

Quinn Capers IV

Joseph Tobias

Curt J. Daniels

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Anesthesia Associates 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4200

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

Russell Paul Woda

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, Electrophysiology Department 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-366-8615

Midwest Physician Anesthesia Services 5151 Reed Rd., Ste. 105B 614-566-4919

Steven M. Dean

Emile G. Daoud

OSU Heart and Vascular Center 3650 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 300 614-538-0527

Mount Carmel Columbus Cardiology Consultants 85 McNaughten Rd., Ste. 200 614-224-2281

Arnold P. Good

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Dublin 614-366-5001

OhioHealth Heart and Vascular Physicians 765 N. Hamilton Rd., Ste. 120, Gahanna 614-533-5000

Martha Gulati

OSU Heart and Vascular Center 473 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 200 614-293-4967

Albert J. Kolibash

John Alan Larry

The Ohio State University Hospital East, Division of Cardiovascular Disease 1492 E. Broad St., Ste. 1100 614-688-6926

Charles J. Love

Garrie J. Haas

OSU Heart and Vascular Center, Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute 473 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4967

Ayesha Hasan

Raymond D. Magorien

OSU Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute 473 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 200 614-293-6081 OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-0125

James M. Ryan

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Dublin 614-366-5001

David A. Sabgir

Mount Carmel Clinical Vascular Specialists 477 Cooper Rd., Ste. 200, Westerville 614-459-7676

Mitchell J. Silver

The Ohio State University Hospital East, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine 1492 E. Broad St., Ste. 1103B 614-688-6540

Reza Behrouz

OSU CarePoint at Gahanna, Department of Neurology 920 N. Hamilton Rd. 614-293-4969

Nitin Y. Bhatt

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

OhioHealth Heart & Vascular Physicians 3705 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 100 614-262-6772

Thomas J. Boes

Frank D. Tice IV

Elliott Crouser

Mount Carmel Columbus Cardiology Consultants 85 McNaughten Rd., Ste. 200 614-224-2281

Riverside Pulmonary Associates 1679 Old Henderson Rd. 614-267-8585 OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Behind the List

What is Best Doctors? Best Doctors offers a suite of services that enable people to draw on the knowledge of medical experts to make sure they have the right diagnosis and get the right care. This list is excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® database, which includes more than 45,000 U.S. physicians in more than 40 medical specialties worldwide. The database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors Inc. For more information, visit bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by phone at 800-675-1199 or by email at research@bestdoctors.com.

Gallup® has audited and certified Best Doctors Inc.’s database of physicians, and its companion The Best Doctors in America® List, as using the highest industry standards survey methodology and processes. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2014 database, which includes more than 45,000 doctors in more than 40 medical specialties. The Best Doctors in America® database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors Inc. For more information, visit bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by phone at 800-675-1199 or by email at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors website. Best Doctors, Inc. has used its best efforts in assembling materials for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained here is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause.

Who chooses the doctors? Best Doctors physicians are selected by other doctors through a comprehensive review process; every two years, Best Doctors surveys physicians and asks: “If you or a loved one needed a doctor in a certain specialty, who would you choose?” The result of the survey is the list you’ll find on the following pages.

BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-inCross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.

Can a doctor pay to appear on a Best Doctors list? Doctors cannot pay to be included on the Best Doctors list or nominate themselves for consideration.

Copyright © 2013, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

This annual roster of medical professionals—peer-reviewed and peerselected—includes hundreds of physicians in various medical specialties, from dermatologists to neurologists. Nearly 700 Central Ohio physicians have been named a “Best Doctor” according to the 2014 list by Best Doctors Inc., a Boston-based company that’s been producing these lists for more than 20 years. We choose to run this list because we know that half the battle in medical care is knowing where to start, and this list is a great tool for doing so. It’s by no means comprehensive, but from pediatricians to rare-cancer specialists, it includes a substantial range of MDs. You take your health care seriously and have questions about who determines these lists, so we’ve put together a list of frequently asked questions (and answers) about how the doctors are chosen.

Are the results adjusted? The results of the peer-to-peer physician survey—one of the largest of its kind—are not adjusted in any way. If my doctor is not on the list, does that mean he isn’t a great doctor? No. If your doctor does not appear on the list, it simply means that he or she was not nominated by one or more of the doctors in the Best Doctors in America database.

100

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 100

11/14/13 3:12 PM


©2013 OhioHealth

WE became one of the “15 Top Health Systems” in the nation by riding some impressive coattails.

+ Truven “15 Top Health Systems” are recognized nationally for

saving more lives, having shorter hospital stays and increasing patient satisfaction

+ None of which would be possible without

the expertise and compassion of our OhioHealth physicians

Connect with an OhioHealth doctor at OhioHealth.com or call (614) 4-HEALTH

A FAITH-BASED, NOT-FOR-PROFIT HEALTHCARE SYSTEM + RIVERSIDE METHODIST HOSPITAL + GRANT MEDICAL CENTER DOCTORS HOSPITAL + GRADY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL + DUBLIN METHODIST HOSPITAL + DOCTORS HOSPITAL – NELSONVILLE HARDIN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL + MARION GENERAL HOSPITAL + WESTERVILLE MEDICAL CAMPUS 20 HEALTH AND SURGERY CENTERS + URGENT CARE + PRIMARY AND SPECIALTY CARE + WELLNESS HOSPICE + HOME CARE + 22,000 PHYSICIANS, ASSOCIATES & VOLUNTEERS

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 101

11/13/13 11:02 AM


Philip T. Diaz

Brian Zeno

OSU Asthma Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Leroy W. Essig II OhioHealth Pulmonary Physicians 111 S. Grant Ave. 614-566-9143

Riverside Pulmonary Associates 1679 Old Henderson Rd. 614-267-8585

DERMATOLOGY

Mark A. Bechtel

OSU Dermatology East 540 Officenter Pl., Ste. 240, Gahanna 614-293-1707

Matthew C. Exline

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Jess J. DeMaria

Central Ohio Skin and Cancer 300 Polaris Pkwy., Ste. 3300, Westerville 614-898-7546

Bradley R. Harrold OhioHealth Pulmonary Physicians 111 S. Grant Ave., Ste. 208 614-566-9143

Dwight A. Scarborough

Philip C. Hawley

Affiliated Dermatology Cosmetic Surgery Center 650 Shawan Falls Dr., Dublin 614-764-1711

OhioHealth Pulmonary Physicians 111 S. Grant Ave. 614-566-9143

Sharon Thornton

Stephen Paul Hoffmann

Columbus Skin Surgery Center 6670 Perimeter Dr., Ste. 260, Dublin 614-389-2200

The Ohio State University Hospital, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-247-7804

Henry Keung Wong

John G. Mastronarde OSU Asthma Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-6939

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine 760 Prior Hall, 376 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8305

Jeffrey Caterino

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine 760 Prior Hall, 376 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8305

OSU Asthma Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Gary R. Katz

The Ohio State University Hospital East, Department of Emergency Medicine 1492 E. Broad St. 614-257-3000

Amy L. Pope-Harman

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, Lung Transplant 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-5822

Mark Glenn Moseley

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine 760 Prior Hall, 376 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8305

Namita Sood

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Mark D. Wewers

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Russell Paul Woda

Midwest Physician Anesthesia Services 5151 Reed Rd., Ste. 105B 614-566-4919

102

OSU Center for Women’s Health, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 1581 Dodd Dr. 614-293-2076

Matthew Ringel

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-685-3333

Laura Ellen Ryan

OSU Center for Women’s Health, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 301 614-293-2076

FAMILY MEDICINE

David T. Applegate II

Thomas M. Best

Eric Adkins

Jonathan P. Parsons

John A. Lombardo

Matthew J. Zirwas

EMERGENCY MEDICINE

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-4581

Rebecca D. Jackson

Central Ohio Primary Care Marysville Primary Care 1044 Columbus Ave., Marysville 937-644-1441

James Martin O’Brien

Ruslana Kurpita

OSU CarePoint East, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 543 Taylor Ave. 614-685-3333

OSU Dermatology East 540 Officenter Pl., Ste. 240, Gahanna 614-293-1707 OSU Dermatology East 540 Officenter Pl., Ste. 240, Gahanna 614-293-1707

Serge Patrick Nana-Sinkam

Kathleen M. Dungan

ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM

Samuel Cataland

OSU CarePoint East, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 543 Taylor Ave. 614-685-3333

OSU Sports Medicine 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3100 614-293-3600

Edward Tharp Bope

Chalmers P. Wylie VA Ambulatory Care Center, Department of Family Medicine 420 N. James Rd. 614-257-5381

James Borchers Jr.

OSU Sports Medicine Morehouse Pavilion Building, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3100 614-293-3600

Chad Braun

Mount Carmel St. Ann’s Family Medicine Center 477 Cooper Rd., Ste. 300, Westerville 614-898-8808

William G. Buoni

OSU Center for Integrative Medicine, Department of Family Medicine 2000 Kenny Rd. 614-293-9777 Max Sports Medicine 3705 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 260 614-586-1220

Allison A. Macerollo OSU CarePoint East, Department of Family Medicine 543 Taylor Ave. 614-688-6490

Donald O. Mack

The OSU Rardin Family Practice Center 2231 N. High St. 614-293-2700

John R. McConaghy 2231 N. High St. 614-293-2700

Leon McDougle OSU CarePoint East, Department of Family Medicine 543 Taylor Ave. 614-688-6490

Scott Henson Merryman

McConnell Heart Health Center 3773 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-3830

Fred Miser

The OSU Rardin Family Practice Center 2231 N. High St. 614-293-2700

Perry D. Mostov

OSU CarePoint Lewis Center, Department of Family Medicine 6515 Pullman Dr., Lewis Center 614-688-7150

Garey H. Noritz

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5808

Thomas L. Pommering

The OSU Rardin Family Practice Center 2231 N. High St. 614-293-2700

Westerville Sports Medicine and Orthopedic Center 584 County Line Rd. W., Westerville 614-722-6200

Paul D. Dusseau

Milisa K. Rizer

Central Ohio Primary Care Northwest Family Physicians 3578 Fishinger Blvd., Hilliard 614-457-4806

Patrick Joseph Fahey The OSU Rardin Family Practice Center 2231 N. High St. 614-293-2700

Alysia Courtot Herzog Grant Family Practice East 4850 E. Main St. 614-566-0950

Douglas J. Knutson

OhioHealth Riverside Family Practice Center 697 Thomas Ln. 614-566-5414

The OSU Rardin Family Practice Center 2231 N. High St. 614-293-2700

Kristen B. Rundell

OhioHealth Riverside Family Practice Center 697 Thomas Ln. 614-566-5414

Robert Skully

OhioHealth Grant Medical Center, Outpatient Care Center 393 E. Town St., Ste. 116 614-566-9108

James B. Soldano

American Health Network 4882 E. Main St., Ste. 200 614-237-0835

Geraldine Urse

John A. Davis

Mary Jo Welker

Susan Lynn Koletar

OhioHealth Doctors Hospital, Family Practice Center 2030 Stringtown Rd., Grove City 614-544-0101 OSU Primary Care at New Albany 240A Market St., New Albany 614-293-4980

Roger D. Wilt

Central Ohio Primary Care Northwest Family Physicians 3311 Tremont Rd., Ste. 101 614-457-4806

GASTROENTEROLOGY

Michael D. Brogan

Ohio Gastroenterology Group 3820 Olentangy River Rd. 614-754-5600

Edward J. Levine

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 395 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 200 614-293-6255

Sheryl Pfeil

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 395 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 200 614-293-6255

GERIATRIC MEDICINE

Jonathan Hollister

Central Ohio Geriatrics 590 Newark-Granville Rd., Granville 888-531-7444

Stuart J. Kanter

Central Ohio Geriatrics 590 Newark-Granville Rd., Granville 888-531-7444

James F. Lamb

OSU Internal Medicine at Morehouse Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2400 614-293-8054

John M. Weigand

Central Ohio Geriatrics 2158 Columbus Rd., Granville 888-531-7444

HAND SURGERY

James F. Nappi

Hand and Microsurgery Associates 1210 Gemini Pl., Ste. 200 614-262-4263

INFECTIOUS DISEASE

Ian McNicoll Baird

Central Ohio Primary Care Riverside Infection Consultants South Medical Building, 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 3020 614-268-9487

OSU Infectious Diseases Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 400 614-293-4854

OSU Infectious Diseases Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 400 614-293-4854

William E. Maher

OSU Infectious Diseases Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 400 614-293-4854

Julie E. Mangino

OSU Infectious Diseases Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 400 614-293-4854

Stanley I. Martin

OSU Infectious Diseases Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 400 614-293-4854

Michael F. Para

OSU Infectious Diseases Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 400 614-293-4854

Harrison G. Weed

Outpatient Preoperative Assessment Center Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2250 614 366-5180

David Alan Wininger

OSU Infectious Diseases Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr., Ste. 400 614-293-4854

INTERNAL MEDICINE

Kevin J. Anderson

OhioHealth Primary Care, Endocrinology & Pulmonary Physicians 7630 Rivers Edge Dr. 614-533-4000

Mary S. Applegate

Central Ohio Primary Care Marysville Primary Care 1044 Columbus Ave., Marysville 937-644-1441

Sean Barnes

OhioHealth Primary Care, Endocrinology & Pulmonary Physicians 7630 Rivers Edge Dr. 614-533-4000

Michael Burgin

OSU Internal Medicine at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. B, Dublin 614-293-0080

David Burnsides

Central Ohio Primary Care Dublin Internal Medicine 5070 Brandeton Ave., Dublin 614-764-1777

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 102

11/14/13 3:12 PM


Michael John Cooney Mount Carmel Medical Group West 719 W. Town St. 614-228-3036

Camilla Curren

OSU Internal Medicine at Morehouse 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2400 614-293-8054

Diana Donati

Central Ohio Primary Care Jasonway Internal Medicine 770 Jasonway Ave., Ste. G2 614-459-3687

George Patrick Ecklar MetroWest Internal Medicine 815 W. Broad St.., Ste. 200 614-234-9822

Deborah A. Gordish

OSU CarePoint Lewis Center, Department of Internal Medicine 6515 Pullman Dr., Lewis Center 614-688-7150

Amanda E. Gordon Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

Marietta Ann Hofmeister

Central Ohio Primary Care Columbus Internal Medicine 4895 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 200 614-326-1502

Lisa Horn

Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

Julianne C. Huefner

Central Ohio Primary Care Arlington - Mill Run Internal Medicine 3535 Fishinger Blvd., Ste. 285, Hilliard 614-527-2562

Julie B. Hundley

Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

Terry Irwin

Knightsbridge Internal Medicine and Cardiology 4830 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. A 614-451-2174

Justin Krueger

Central Ohio Primary Care Marysville Primary Care 1044 Columbus Ave., Marysville 937-644-1441

James F. Lamb

OSU Internal Medicine at Morehouse Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2400 614-293-8054

Michael S. Langan

OSU CarePoint East, Division of General Internal Medicine 543 Taylor Ave. 614-688-6470

Jay E. Martin

Central Ohio Primary Care Arlington - Mill Run Internal Medicine 3535 Fishinger Blvd., Ste. 285, Hilliard 614-527-2562

Cynthia Gail Kreger OSU Internal Medicine at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. B, Dublin 614-293-0080

douglasbeechmd.com 614-338-1390

Bexley

OSU Internal Medicine at Morehouse Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2400 614-293-8054

David R. Neiger

Central Ohio Primary Care Jasonway Internal Medicine 770 Jasonway Ave., Ste. G2 614-459-3687

Audra Parker

Central Ohio Primary Care Physicians Provider Physicians East 6421 E. Main St., Ste. 100, Reynoldsburg 614-755-3000

Douglas A. Pope

Buckeye Family Health 1548 Sheridan Dr., Ste. 200, Lancaster 740-689-9860

Scott A. Prenger

Central Ohio Primary Care Internal Medicine Group 631 Copeland Mill Rd., Westerville 614-508-2672

David H. Sharkis

Central Ohio Primary Care Columbus Internal Medicine 4895 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 200 614-326-1502

Board-Certified. Selected by peers as a Best Doctor 10 consecutive years.

Robert A. Murden

Amy R. Kelley

Joan Ellen King

When it comes to your mental health, of course you want a Best Doctor.

Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

Mark Douglas Ricaurte

Central Ohio Primary Care 770 Jasonway Ave., Ste. 1A 614-459-2950

Adult Psychiatry

J. Kevin Moffa

Mihai Jipa

Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

DOUGLAS BEECH, MD

Mount Carmel Medical Group West 719 W. Town St. 614-228-3036 Central Ohio Primary Care Jasonway Internal Medicine 770 Jasonway Ave., Ste. G2 614-459-3687

Alan D. Steginsky

Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

Robert L. Stone

Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 103

103

11/14/13 2:58 PM


Neeraj Tayal

OSU Internal Medicine at Morehouse Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2400 614-293-8054

INTERNAL MEDICINE/ HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE MEDICINE

Jillian L. Gustin

OSU Center for Palliative Care 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-2957

Maria Y. Varveris

Central Ohio Primary Care Central Ohio Medicine 4030 W. Henderson Rd. 614-442-7550

Ryan R. Nash

OSU Center for Palliative Care 4019 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-293-2957

Geoffrey C. Vaughan OSU Internal Medicine at Stoneridge 3900 Stoneridge Ln., Ste. B, Dublin 614-293-0080

Harrison G. Weed

Outpatient Preoperative Assessment Center Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2250 614-366-5180

Ian Wilson

Central Ohio Primary Care Westerville Internal Medicine 484 County Line Rd. W., Ste. 200, Westerville 614-891-8080

John William Wulf

Central Ohio Primary Care 4885 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 110 614-457-5723

MEDICAL GENETICS

Kim L. McBride

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Center for Molecular and Human Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6200

Annemarie Sommer

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Molecular and Human Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2600

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY

Tanios S. Bekaii-Saab

David Paul Carbone

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-6786

Spero R. Cataland

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Division of Hematology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-9441

Steven K. Clinton

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Molecular and Human Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4000

OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-6529

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-6196

Gail E. Herman

William G. Blum

Steven Michael Devine

Dennis Bartholomew

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Molecular and Human Genetics Wexner Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3538

Kandamurugu Manickam

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Molecular and Human Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2600

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Division of Hematology and Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-9165

John C. Byrd

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-3196

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Blood Marrow Transplant 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-3153

Richard M. Goldberg

OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-6529

Michael R. Grever

Gregory A. Otterson

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-3196

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-6786

Eric Harvey Kraut

Sam Penza

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Division of Hematology and Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-9441

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Division of Hematology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-3316

Jerry W. Mitchell Jr.

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Hematology and Oncology Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-8629

Mid Ohio Oncology and Hematology The Mark H. Zangmeister Center, 3100 Plaza Properties Blvd. 614-383-6202

Timothy David Moore

Ohio Oncology Hematology The Mark H. Zangmeister Center, 3100 Plaza Properties Blvd. 614-383-6000

Thomas E. Olencki

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Hematology and Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-4320

Manisha H. Shah

Charles L. Shapiro

The Ohio State University Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center 1145 Olentangy River Rd. 614-293-5066

Thomas J. Sweeney Columbus Oncology and Hematology Associates 810 Jasonway Ave., Ste. A 614-442-3130

Charles F. von Gunten OhioHealth Hospice Kobacker House, 800 McConnell Dr. 614-566-5377

MD MATCH-MAkING

Dr. Chad Braun, residency program director for Mount Carmel, works with patients from the moment they’re discharged from the hospital as newborns to the moment they re-enter as adults. He also teaches the hospital system’s residents and medical students how to provide the best care. Here, he offers his tips for choosing the right physician. Jenny Rogers

What steps should a patient take to find the right doctor? CB: My recommendation is to find someone that you know and respect and ask them about their doctor and what they like about him or her. There are certainly resources, like the Best Doctors list, but personal recommendation is often best. Also, looking for doctors affiliated with academic centers is something to consider, as [these doctors] stay abreast of what’s going on in the field. Ultimately, many people chose a doctor by word of mouth. And then, of course, it’s important to meet with the doctor.

Anything else? CB: It’s imperative that you feel comfortable with a doctor, as well as the other staff. You don’t want to feel rushed during an appointment … You want to be able to sit down, communicate and connect. You’ll need to be able to tell this person pretty much everything, and that’s a lot easier to do if the relationship is more of a partnership. A doctor may have 30 people to see in one day, of course, but you still want them to take the time to connect with you. Don’t settle for a doctorpatient relationship that doesn’t meet your needs. That cannot, and will not, be the best thing for your care.

A patient has narrowed down his or her list. What should he or she consider? CB: What’s important to you from an access standpoint? When I asked other physicians about this, most felt timeliness and accessibility were critical considerations—do you want to be able to email your doctor or speak to him or her online? Do you want to be able to get in to see your doctor the same day? How important is face-toface interaction? We’re moving into an interesting time in terms of new and different ways to access your physicians, and this accessibility is an important thing to consider.

Are there any other resources for patients looking for a new doc? CB: If there’s a special thing that an individual identifies with—whether it’s gender, ethnicity or sexual orientation— there are resources online that will list these physicians. It can be difficult to go to a doctor that doesn’t really understand who you are, so this can be helpful. You do have to be careful with online ratings, of course. Always try to find a personal recommendation.

“It’s imperative that you feel comfortable with a doctor, as well as the other staff.”

104

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 104

11/14/13 3:13 PM


Dublin Springs There’s Hope. There’s Help®

Hap Holi py days A Be h spec avioral H ia of m lizing in ealth H e o The ntal illn the trea spital re’s ess & tme hop e. T addicti nt here o ’s he n. lp.

The holidays can be a time of celebration and joy… But for some the holidays can be a time of sadness, depression, substance abuse, and hopelessness. Dublin Springs Behavioral Health Hospital offers inpatient and outpatient treatment programs to address chemical dependency and mental health issues in a time of crisis. As always, our licensed professionals are here 24/7 to help those in need.

NO COST ASSESSMENTS AVAILABLE www.dublinsprings.com

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 105

7625 Hospital Drive, Dublin, OH

Call Today:

11/13/13 11:03 AM


Jeffrey Zangmeister

Russell R. Lonser

Ohio Oncology Hematology The Mark H. Zangmeister Center, 3100 Plaza Properties Blvd. 614-383-6000

The Ohio State University James Neurosurgery Clinic 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-685-1965

John M. McGregor

NEPHROLOGY

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery Cramblett Hall, 456 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-5440

Anil K. Agarwal

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Nephrology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4997

Ehud Mendel

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Neurosurgery 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-5346

William H. Bay

Kidney Specialists 495 Cooper Rd., Ste. 425, Westerville 614-823-8500

Daniel Prevedello

James P. Fulop

OhioHealth Neurological Physicians 931 Chatham Ln., Ste. 200 614-533-5500

John T. Kissel

OSU Neurology Clinic Martha Morehouse Tower, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-4969

Victoria H. Lawson OSU CarePoint at Gahanna, Department of Neurology 920 N. Hamilton Rd. 614-293-4969

D. Joanne Lynn

OSU Neurology Clinic Martha Morehouse Tower, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-4969

Deborah A. Bartholomew

Stoneridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 4053 W. Dublin Granville Rd., Dublin 614-764-2262

Michael L. Blumenfeld

Lisa Keder

OSU Center for Women’s Health, Division of Gynecology 1581 Dodd Dr. 614-293-2076

David E. Cohn

OSU Gynecologic Oncology 3651 Ridge Mill Dr., Hilliard 614-293-3873

Kidney Specialists 495 Cooper Rd., Ste. 425, Westerville 614-823-8500

Lee A. Hebert

Gary L. Rea

OSU Neurology Clinic Martha Morehouse Tower, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-4969

Larry J. Copeland

Herbert B. Newton

Cynthia B. Evans

OSU CarePoint East, Department of Neurosurgery 543 Taylor Ave. 614-293-4933

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Nephrology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4997

Ali R. Rezai

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery Dodd Hall, 480 Medical Center Dr. 855-255-0550

Uday Nori

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Nephrology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4997

Todd Pesavento

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Nephrology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4997

Brad H. Rovin

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Nephrology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4997

Kevin Schroeder Riverside Nephrology Associates 500 Thomas Ln., Ste. 4A 614-538-2250

Dan Spetie

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Nephrology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4997

Chris Valentine

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Nephrology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4997

William Wilmer

Kidney Specialists 495 Cooper Rd., Ste. 425, Westerville 614-823-8500

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY

Janet W. Bay

OhioHealth Neurological Physicians 931 Chatham Ln., Ste. 200 614-533-5500

106

NEUROLOGY

Reza Behrouz

OSU CarePoint at Gahanna, Department of Neurology 920 N. Hamilton Rd. 614-293-4969

Bakri H. Elsheikh

OSU CarePoint at Gahanna, Department of Neurology 920 N. Hamilton Rd. 614-293-4969

Avrom D. Epstein Central Ohio NeuroOphthalmology 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 440 614-221-4166

Geoffrey A. Eubank

Ohio Health Neurological Physicians 931 Chatham Ln., Ste. 200 614-533-5500

Kevin M. Flanigan Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neuromuscular Disorders 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2203

Donald L. Freidenberg

2121 Bethel Rd., Ste. F 614-457-3100

Miriam Laura Freimer

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Neurology North Doan Hall, 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4969

James Layne Moore

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Neuro-Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-4448

Francis J. O’Donnell

OrthoNeuro 70 S. Cleveland Ave., Ste. A, Westerville 614-890-6555

Michael K. Racke

OSU Multiple Sclerosis Center Martha Morehouse Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-4969

Zarife Sahenk

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Neuromuscular Program 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2203

Douglas Scharre

OSU Neurology Clinic Martha Morehouse Tower, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-4969

Bassel F. Shneker

OSU CarePoint at Gahanna, Department of Neurology 920 N. Hamilton Rd. 614-293-4969

Andrew P. Slivka Jr.

OSU Neurology Clinic Martha Morehouse Tower, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-4969

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

Ralph Richard Ballenger

Columbus Obstetrics and Gynecology 750 Mount Carmel Mall, Ste. 100 614-434-2400

Arthur R. James

Kingsdale Gynecologic Associates 1315 W. Lane Ave. 614-457-4827

David C. Bell

Jerry R. Mendell

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neuromuscular Disorders 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2203

OSU Obstetrics and Gynecology 2020 Kenny Rd. 614-293-3069

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1581 Dodd Dr. 614-293-4929

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Neurological Surgery 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-685-1965

Michael Falkenhain

Michelle Isley

Christopher M. Copeland

Kingsdale Gynecologic Associates 1315 W. Lane Ave. 614-457-4827 OSU Gynecologic Oncology 3651 Ridge Mill Dr., Hilliard 614-293-7460 Stoneridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 4053 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-764-2262

Jeffrey M. Fowler

OSU Gynecologic Oncology 3651 Ridge Mill Dr., Hilliard 614-293-3873

Chad I. Friedman

Ohio Reproductive Medicine 4830 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. E 614-451-2280

Edmund Funai

Stoneridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 4053 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-764-2262

Carl A. Krantz Jr.

Specialists in Obstetrics and Gynecology of Columbus 7450 Hospital Dr., Ste. 200, Dublin 614-885-8167

Mark B. Landon

OSU Maternal Fetal Medicine Tower Building, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-2222

Charles J. Lockwood

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Meiling Hall, 370 W. 9th Ave., Ste. 254 614-292-2600

Stoneridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 4053 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-764-2262

Andrew F. Hundley

OSU Camelot Women’s Health Center 4775 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. 103 614-442-2200

Jay D. Iams

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Prematurity Prevention Clinic McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr. 614-293-8949

Jason Sayat

Kingsdale Gynecologic Associates 1315 W. Lane Ave. 614-457-4827

Cynthia Shellhaas

OSU Maternal Fetal Medicine Tower Building, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-2222

Kimberly R. Shepherd

Kingsdale Gynecologic Associates 1315 W. Lane Ave. 614-457-4827

Katherine Strafford

Stoneridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 4053 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-764-2262

Stephen F. Thung

OSU Maternal Fetal Medicine Tower Building, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-2222

Wayne C. Trout

L. Paige Turner

OhioHealth Urogynecology Physicians South Medical Building, 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 4050 614-566-2727

OSU Maternal Fetal Medicine Tower Building, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-2222

Geri Hewitt

OSU Maternal Fetal Medicine Tower Building, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-2222

Joseph M. Novi

Melissa Goist

Kingsdale Gynecologic Associates 1315 W. Lane Ave. 614-457-4827

Philip Samuels

Stoneridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 4053 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-764-2262

David O’Malley

Carol J. Greco

OSU Gynecologic Oncology 3651 Ridge Mill Dr., Hilliard 614-293-3873

3545 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 401 614-261-0101

Kathleen Lutter

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 395 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 572 N 614-293-8513 OSU Obstetrics and Gynecology 2020 Kenny Rd. 614-293-3069

Ritu Salani

OSU Gynecologic Oncology 3651 Ridge Mill Dr., Hilliard 614-293-7460

Richard W. O’Shaughnessy

John P. Paraskos

Premier Women’s Health 5150 Bradenton Ave., Ste. A, Dublin 614-459-1000

Kathryn Pool

Olentangy Obstetrics and Gynecology 3802 Olentangy River Rd. 614-569-2229

Gary Reid

OhioHealth Gynecologic Cancer Surgeons 500 Thomas Ln., Ste. 4B 614-566-1150

Jacqueline Rohl OSU Obstetrics and Gynecology 2020 Kenny Rd. 614-293-3069

John S. Russ

Northeast ObGyn 1080 Beecher Crossing N., Gahanna 614-476-4101

Olentangy Obstetrics and Gynecology 3802 Olentangy River Rd. 614-569-2229

OPHTHALMOLOGY

Charlotte Agnone 114 Morey Dr., Marysville 937-578-2200

Norman Douglas Baker

Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants of Ohio 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 430 614-221-7464

Robin F. Beran

Columbus Laser and Cataract Center 5150 E. Dublin-Granville Rd., Ste. 100, Westerville 614-939-1600

Lisa M. Borkowski

Midwest Retina 6655 Post Rd., Dublin 614-339-8500

John A. Burns

Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants of Ohio 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 430 614-221-7464

Kenneth V. Cahill

Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants of Ohio 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 430 614-221-7464

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 106

11/14/13 3:13 PM


David Castellano

Jack Dingle

OSU Havener Eye Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8116

Colleen M. Cebulla

Central Ohio Eye Physicians and Surgeons 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 420 614-224-4297

Alice Epitropoulos

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8041

Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants of Ohio, Cataract and Refractive Center of Ohio 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 430 614-221-7464

Robert B. Chambers

Avrom D. Epstein

Central Ohio NeuroOphthalmology 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 440 614-221-4166

Midwest Retina 6655 Post Rd., Dublin 614-339-8500

Susie Chang

OSU Eye and Ear Institute, Department of Ophthalmology 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-652-2600

Gloria Fleming

Louis J. Chorich

Jill Foster

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8119 Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants of Ohio 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 430 614-221-7464

Midwest Retina 6655 Post Rd., Dublin 614-339-8500

Frederick H. Davidorf

OSU Havener Eye Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8116

Robert Derick

Columbus Ophthalmology Associates 5155 Bradenton Ave., Ste. 200, Dublin 614-766-2006

Andrew Hendershot

Kevin G. Kegler

Northwest Ophthalmology Center 3535 Fishinger Blvd., Ste. 230, Hilliard 614-777-3937

Curtin G. Kelley Arena Eye Surgeons 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 320 614-228-4500

Dino Klisovic

Midwest Retina 6655 Post Rd., Dublin 614-339-8500

Rebecca A. Kuennen OSU Havener Eye Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd. 614-293-5635

L. Carol Laxson

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8116

David M. Lehmann Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants of Ohio 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 430 614-221-7464

Carrie Lembach

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8116

Steven E. Katz

Ohio State Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd. 614-293-6892

Arena Eye Surgeons 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 320 614-228-4500

Richard G. Lembach

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8126

Alan D. Letson

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd. 614-293-8041

Mark D. Lomeo Midwest Retina 6655 Post Rd., Dublin 614-339-8500

Thomas F. Mauger OSU Havener Eye Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., 614-293-5635

E. Mitchel Opremcak The Retina Group 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 220 614-464-3937

Karl S. Pappa

Arena Eye Surgeons 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 320 614-228-4500

Sugat Patel

Midwest Retina 6655 Post Rd., Dublin 614-339-8500

Alan J. Rehmar The Retina Group 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 220 614-464-3937

Kiran Sajja

Arena Eye Surgeons 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 320 614-228-4500

Andrea Sawchyn

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8116

John R. Stechschulte

David Flanigan

Arena Eye Surgeons 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 320 614-228-4500

OSU Sports Medicine Morehouse Pavilion Building, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3100 614-293-3600

Amit Tandon

Grant L. Jones

OSU Havener Eye Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8116

OSU Sports Medicine Morehouse Pavilion Building, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3100 614-293-3600

Peter J. Utrata

Christopher Kaeding

Arena Eye Surgeons 262 Neil Ave., Ste. 320 614-228-4500

Paul A. Weber

OSU Havener Eye Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 5000 614-293-8116



ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Keith R. Berend

Joint Implant Surgeons 7277 Smith’s Mill Rd., Ste. 200, New Albany 614-221-6331

Julie Bishop

OSU Sports Medicine Center 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3100 614-293-0694

Thomas J. Ellis

OSU CarePoint Gahanna 920 N. Hamilton Rd., Ste. 600, Gahanna 614-293-3541

OSU Sports Medicine Morehouse Pavilion Building, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3100 614-293-3600

Adolph V. Lombardi Jr.

Joint Implant Surgeons 7277 Smith’s Mill Rd., Ste. 200, New Albany 614-221-6331

Joel Mayerson

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Orthopedic Surgery 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-4420

Laura Senunas Phieffer OSU Orthopaedics 543 Taylor Ave. 614-293-2663

Kevin J. Pugh

Orthopaedic Trauma Reconstructive Surgery (OTRS) 285 E. State St., Ste. 500 614-566-7777

Choosing the right sleep doctor can make a difference in life       

Board Certified Sleep Specialists

New Albany 614.775.6177 I Dublin 614.766.0773 www.sleepmedicine.com

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 107

107

11/14/13 2:58 PM


Troy Johnson

Ray Carl Wasielewski

Minimally Invasive Orthopedics 340 E. Town St., Ste. 7-250 614-566-8570

Joins Avada Team 

OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Amit Agrawal

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Head and Neck Surgical Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8074

Karen H. Calhoun

OSU Eye and Ear Institute, Department of Otolaryngology 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 4000 614-366-3687

Ricardo L. Carrau

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Head and Neck Surgical Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8074

Dr. Troy Johnson, AuD

We are happy to announce the addition of Dr. Troy Johnson to our Westerville office. Dr. Johnson spent the past four years in private practice in Washington. His sole focus was to provide his expertise and current technology to help those with hearing healthcare needs improve their quality of communication and quality of life. Dr. Johnson has a deep understanding of the challenges that hearing loss brings in day-to-day activities and interactions, and enjoys working hard to help people overcome those challenges with today's technology.

Call Now:

888-768-3488

Subinoy Das

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 915 Olentangy River Rd., 614-293-8310

Edward Dodson

OSU Eye and Ear Institute, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Stoneridge Medical Center 4019 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-366-3687

L. Arick Forrest

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd. 614-366-3687

Michael D. Martyn

Ohio ENT 974 Bethel Rd., Ste. A 614-538-2424

Matthew Old

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Otolaryngology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8073

Enver Ozer

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Otolaryngology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8074

©2013 HHM, Inc., X1B

108

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Otolaryngology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8074

Evan Tobin

Ohio ENT 6499 E. Broad St.., Ste. 160 614-273-2230

D. Bradley Welling

OSU Eye and Ear Institute, Department of Otolaryngology 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 4000 614-366-3687

Darryl Willett

Ohio ENT 974 Bethel Rd., Ste. A 614-538-2424

PATHOLOGY

Syed Mohsin

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Department of Pathology 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-5526

PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

Elizabeth Erwin

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Allergy and Immunology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2000

Robert C. Forsythe

Central Ohio Primary Care Riverside Pediatric Associates 4885 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 2-10 614-267-7878

Roger A. Friedman

Buckeye Allergy 5877 Cleveland Ave. 614-891-0550

Bryan L. Martin

OSU Allergy Center, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-6557

Rebecca Scherzer

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Allergy and Immunology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4404

PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT GYNECOLOGY

David M. Powell

Elise D. Berlan

Stephen P. Smith Jr.

Geri Hewitt

Ohio ENT 974 Bethel Rd., Ste. A 614-538-2424

www.avada.com Coupons • Service • Answers

Theodoros Nicholas Teknos

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 4000 614-366-7927

Downtown Close to Home Center, Adolescent Clinic 495 E. Main St. 614-722-2450 Stoneridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 4053 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., Dublin 614-764-2262

Arthur R. James

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1581 Dodd Dr. 614-293-4929

PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY

Aymen Naguib

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Anesthesia Associates 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4200

Joseph Tobias

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Anesthesia Associates 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4200

PEDIATRIC CARDIAC SURGERY

Mark Galantowicz Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3101

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY

John P. Cheatham

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2530

Linda Cripe

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2530

Curt J. Daniels

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-7677

Timothy Francis Feltes Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2565

Timothy M. Hoffman Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2530

Kerry L. Rosen

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2530

Daniel G. Rowland Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2555

Douglas W. Teske

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2530

John Wheller

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Heart Center 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2530

PEDIATRIC CLINICAL GENETICS

Scott Hickey

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Clinical Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6200

PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE

W. Joshua Frazier Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Critical Care Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3438

Mark W. Hall

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Critical Care Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3438

Nadeem Khan

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Critical Care Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3437

Nicole O’Brien

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Critical Care Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3437

Joseph Tobias

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Anesthesia Associates 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4200

PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY

Joy L. Mosser

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Dermatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5777

Patricia M. Witman

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Dermatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5500

PEDIATRIC DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS

Rebecca A. Baum

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Behavioral Health Clinic 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 3C 614-355-8080

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Jeffrey Marc Hoffman

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4874

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 108

11/14/13 3:13 PM


Leslie K. Mihalov

Carlo Di Lorenzo

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4384

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

James T. Naprawa

Steven H. Erdman

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4385

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450



PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY

Sasigarn Bowden

Cheryl E. Gariepy

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4425

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3457

Monika Chaudhari

Ivor Hill

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes 5665 Venture Dr. 614-722-6200

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3457

Robert P. Hoffman

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

Allergy

Specializing in the treatment of children and adults with asthma, hay fever, and food allergies

 

With two convenient locations!

Hayat Mousa

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4425

Carol J. Potter

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

William Byron Zipf

Central Ohio Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Services 55 Dillmont Dr., Ste. 100 614-839-3040

John M. Russo



Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

Jane P. Balint

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

Desale Yacob

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3455

John A. Barnard

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

Buckeye



Ryan S. Carvalho

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

Wallace V. Crandall

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

Jolanda Denham

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3450

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGYONCOLOGY

Timothy P. Cripe

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3250

Thomas Gene Gross

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3582

Bryce A. Kerlin

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Hematology Oncology Clinic Building H, 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3250

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 109

109

11/14/13 2:58 PM


Laura T. Martin

cancer screenings What you need and when you need it We talked to two of the city’s cancer experts—Dr. Jerry Mitchell, a member of the medical oncology and hematology team at the Mark H. Zangmeister Center, and Dr. Peter Shields, deputy director of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center—for advice on what screenings to get and when to get them. Jenny Rogers For a cancer screening to exist, according to Mitchell, it must meet three criteria: It must be cheap enough for the general population to afford; it must screen for a disease that is relatively common; and it must screen for a disease that is treatable. Mitchell says this topic is controversial but notes there are established guidelines individuals should follow. “It’s not as simple as, ‘What should I get done?’ ” Mitchell says. “But there are some screenings that are well established and have benefits.” Colon Cancer The least controversial cancer screening is the colonoscopy, an examination that everyone should have, starting at age 50. For individuals with a family history of colon cancer, the first screening should take place 10 years before the youngest member of the family was diagnosed with the disease. Colonoscopies should be scheduled every 10 years. Shields says the colonoscopy is the only screening that can truly be considered “prevention.” That’s because the exam finds polyps, which gradually develop into cancer. “It takes 10 or more years for a polyp to become cancer,” Shields says. “So anyone who is over the age of 60, has never had a colonoscopy and develops cancer … they probably had a preventable disease. And that’s really a tragedy.”

Lung Cancer The latest cancer screening is a new recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Health Task Force, an organization that historically has been stringent with cancer-screening approvals. It’s not for everyone, though, notes Shields. The screening is for those at high risk for developing lung cancer—including current smokers with significant tobacco history and smokers who have quit within the last 15 years. “It took a really large study to get here. Hundreds of millions of dollars were spent,” Shields says. “This, to me, is a huge development,” adds Mitchell. All three local hospital systems (Mount Carmel, OhioHealth and The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) offer this screening for $99.

Breast Cancer “It’s clear that mammograms are useful,” Mitchell says. “What’s been controversial is when to start getting them.” The U.S. Preventive Health Task Force recommends women begin at age 50, but Mitchell feels it’s a decision that should be left up to the patient. “Have a discussion with your primary-care doctor and then make your own choice.”

Cervical Cancer The recommendation for women’s cervical cancer screenings is to begin at age 21 or at the age when sexual activity begins, as cervical cancer is a sexually transmitted virus. This screening is recommended annually until age 30; then, if a patient has had only negative results, it’s recommended every three years. “You can stop doing pap smears if you’re over age 65 and you’ve never had a positive result,” Mitchell says. “If you haven’t developed cervical cancer by 65, it’s not likely that you’re going to.”

110

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3250

Sarah O’Brien

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3550

Randal S. Olshefski

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3250

Sandeep Soni

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3250

Nicholas D. Yeager

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3553

PeDiaTric inFecTiOUs Disease

Monica Ardura

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6200

William J. Barson

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4452

Michael T. Brady

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6060

Dennis J. Cunningham

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4450

W. Garrett Hunt

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4452

Preeti Jaggi

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4494

Katalin Koranyi

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4494

Dwight A. Powell

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4450

Octavio Ramilo

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4450

PeDiaTric inTerVenTiOnaL raDiOLOgY

William Shiels

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2363

PeDiaTric nePHrOLOgY

John D. Mahan Jr. Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Nephrology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6200

Hiren Pravinkumar Patel Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Nephrology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4360

Andrew L. Schwaderer Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Center for Clinical and Translational Research Section of Nephrology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4360

William E. Smoyer

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Center for Clinical and Translational Research Section of Nephrology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4360

PeDiaTric neUrOLOgicaL sUrgerY

Ronald Grondin

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2010

Eric Jackson

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2010

PeDiaTric OPHTHaLMOLOgY

Don L. Bremer

Pediatric Ophthalmology Associates 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 4C 614-224-6222

Mary Lou McGregor Pediatric Ophthalmology Associates 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 4C 614-224-6222

Gary L. Rogers

Pediatric Ophthalmology Associates 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 4C 614-224-6222

PeDiaTric OrTHOPeDic sUrgerY

Allan Beebe

Nationwide Children’s Orthopedic Center 479 Parsons Ave. 614-722-5175

Jan Klamar

Nationwide Children’s Orthopedic Center 479 Parsons Ave. 614-722-5175

Kevin Klingele

Nationwide Children’s Orthopedic Center 479 Parsons Ave. 614-722-5175

PeDiaTric OTOLarYngOLOgY

Charles Elmaraghy Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-6600

Mary C. Hart

Ohio ENT 477 Cooper Rd., Westerville 614-221-6789

Michael D. Martyn

Ohio ENT 974 Bethel Rd., Ste. A 614-538-2424

PeDiaTric Pain ManageMenT

Joseph Tobias

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Anesthesia Associates 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4200

PeDiaTric PHYsicaL MeDicine anD reHaB

Rosalind J. Batley

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5050

Carl D. Gelfius

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5050

Ellen Kaitz

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5051

Karl Klamar

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5050

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 110

11/14/13 3:13 PM


Michelle A. Miller

Melissa Holtzlander

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5050

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4766

Mark L. Splaingard

Karen S. McCoy

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4682

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4755

Shahid I. Sheikh

PEDIATRIC PLASTIC SURGERY

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4766

Richard E. Kirschner

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Surgical Associates 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6200

Richard D. Shell

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4766

PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY

Mark L. Splaingard

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4682

Elizabeth DeFrancis Allen

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine Outpatient Care Center, Ste. 5B 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-6200

Robert G. Castile

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research Wexner Research Building 3, 700 Children’s Dr. 614-355-5724

PEDIATRIC RADIOLOGY

Brent H. Adler

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2363

D. Gregory Bates Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2289

Mark J. Hogan

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2289

Fred Robert Long Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2363

Jerry Rusin

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2363

William Shiels

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2363

PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY

Stacy Payne Ardoin Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Rheumatology Outpatient Care Center, 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-5525

Gloria C. Higgins

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Rheumatology Outpatient Care Center, 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-5525

Charles H. Spencer

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Rheumatology Outpatient Care Center, 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-5525

PEDIATRIC SLEEP MEDICINE

Mark L. Splaingard

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Pulmonary Medicine 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4682

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT MEDICINE

Elise D. Berlan

Downtown Close to Home Center, Adolescent Clinic 495 E. Main St. 614-722-2450

Andrea Bonny

Downtown Close to Home Center, Adolescent Clinic 495 E. Main St. 614-722-2450

Terrill D. Bravender Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Adolescent Health 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2450

Richard H. Gilchrist

OSU Harding Hospital, Department of Psychiatry 1670 Upham Dr. 614-293-8205

Alka K. Gulati Jhans

Barbara Gracious

Downtown Close to Home Center, Adolescent Clinic 495 E. Main St. 614-722-2450

Downtown Close to Home Center, Behavioral Health Services 495 E. Main St. 614-355-8080

Fareeda Haamid

Robert A. Kowatch

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Adolescent Health 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2450

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Behavioral Health Clinic 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 3C 614-355-8080

Cynthia Holland-Hall

Carol Lebeiko

Downtown Close to Home Center, Adolescent Clinic 495 E. Main St. 614-722-2450

Steven C. Matson Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Adolescent Health 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2450

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

John V. Campo

OSU Harding Hospital, Department of Psychiatry 1670 Upham Dr., Ste. 130 614-685-5602

5190 Blazer Pkwy., Dublin 614-766-6677

David W. Scandinaro 500 W. Wilson Bridge Rd., Ste. 240, Worthington 614-885-3707

Raymond W. Waggoner Jr.

Gestalt Associates 100 Outerbelt St. 614-751-5393

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE

Craig W. Anderson Central Ohio Newborn Medicine 285 E. State St., Ste. 520 614-566-9683

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 111

111

11/14/13 2:59 PM


Leandro Cordero Jr.

Leif D. Nelin

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Neonatology 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8660

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4528

Sarah J. Corriveau

Kristina (Kris) Reber

Central Ohio Newborn Medicine 285 E. State St., Ste. 520 614-566-9683

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4528

Margaret D. Davis

John H. Seguin

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Pediatrix Medical Group 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 3050 614-566-4731

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Pediatrix Medical Group 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 3050 614-566-4731

Peter J. Giannone Jr.

Edward G. Shepherd Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4559

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Neonatology Doan Hall, 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-8660

Gary E. Snyder

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Pediatrix Medical Group 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 3050 614-566-4731

Barry Halpern

Central Ohio Newborn Medicine 285 E. State St., Ste. 520 614-566-9683

Nancy B. Hansen

Patrick Wall

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Pediatrix Medical Group 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 3050 614-566-4731

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Pediatrix Medical Group 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 3050 614-566-4731

Sudarshan R. Jadcherla

Jonathan R. Wispe Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4528

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5155

Richard E. McClead Jr.

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4530

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, EPILEPSY

Lorie Diane Hamiwka Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-6200

James A. Menke Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4559

Randy Robert Miller

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Pediatrix Medical Group 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 3050 614-566-4731

Richard Moraille Central Ohio Newborn Medicine 285 E. State St., Ste. 520 614-566-9683

Apurwa S. Naik

Central Ohio Newborn Medicine 285 E. State St., Ste. 520 614-566-9683

Craig Nankervis

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neonatology 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4528

112

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, GENERAL

Shawn Aylward

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-4634

Lorie Diane Hamiwka Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-6200

Lenora Lehwald

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-4625

Warren D. Lo

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-4625

E. Steve Roach

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-6200

Chang-Yong Tsao

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-4625

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASE

Chang-Yong Tsao

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Neurology 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-4625

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ PEDIATRIC METABOLIC DISEASES

Dennis Bartholomew

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Molecular and Human Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4000

Gail E. Herman

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Division of Molecular and Human Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3538

Kim L. McBride

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Center for Molecular and Human Genetics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6200

PEDIATRIC SPORTS MEDICINE

Kevin Klingele Orthopedic Center 479 Parsons Ave. 614-722-5175

PEDIATRIC SURGERY

Gail Besner

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3900

Karen Diefenbach Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3900

Renata B. Fabia

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3900

Jonathan Groner Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-6200

Denis R. King

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery Outpatient Care Center, 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 6F 614-722-3900

R. Lawrence Moss

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery OCC Building, 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3900

Steven Teich

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Surgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-0448

PEDIATRIC THORACIC SURGERY

Renata B. Fabia

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-3900

PEDIATRIC UROLOGY

Venkata Rama Jayanthi

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Urology Outpatient Care Center, 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 6D 614-722-3114

PEDIATRICS/GENERAL

Ben P. Almasanu

Central Ohio Primary Care Pediatric and Adolescent Practitioners 1085 Beecher Crossing N., Gahanna 614-741-8300

Mary S. Applegate

Central Ohio Primary Care Marysville Primary Care 1044 Columbus Ave., Marysville 937-644-1441

Lauren Bar-Lev

Central Ohio Primary Care Ohio Center for Pediatrics 5040 Bradenton Ave., Dublin 614-766-3344

Terry P. Barber

Kathleen Costlow

Central Ohio Primary Care Pediatric and Adolescent Practitioners 1085 Beecher Crossing N., Gahanna 614-741-8300

William H. Cotton

Children’s Hospital Westside Primary Care 441 Industrial Mile Rd. 614-355-9700

Ann Marie Croft

Pediatric Associates 1021 Country Club Rd., Ste. A 614-501-7337

Camilla Curren

OSU Internal Medicine at Morehouse 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2400 614-293-8054

Virginia K. de Verteuil

Central Ohio Primary Care Pediatric and Adolescent Practitioners 1085 Beecher Crossing N., Gahanna 614-741-8300

Praveena Dhawale

Associated Pediatrics Huber Village Professional Center 801 Eastwind Dr., Westerville 614-882-9460

Kent W. Doherty

Mid-Ohio Pediatrics and Adolescents 595 Copeland Mill Rd., Ste. 2A, Westerville 614-899-0000

Lorna F. Donovan

Central Ohio Primary Care Pediatric and Adolescent Practitioners 1085 Beecher Crossing N., Gahanna 614-741-8300

Joseph F. Fiala

Central Ohio Primary Care Building Blocks Pediatrics 6503 E. Broad St., Ste. 100 614-434-5437

Mary Beth Cass

Central Ohio Primary Care Ohio Center for Pediatrics 5040 Bradenton Ave., Dublin 614-766-3344

Christopher B. Houts

Powell Pediatric Care 55 Clairedan Dr., Powell 614-888-8989

Elizabeth M. Jacob

Mid-Ohio Pediatrics and Adolescents 595 Copeland Mill Rd., Ste. 2A, Westerville 614-899-0000

Kathi J. Kemper

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics 503 McCampbell Hall, 1581 Dodd Dr. 614-570-5486

Irene P. Koesters

Olentangy Pediatrics 4775 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. 207 614-442-5557

Katherine Krueck

Pediatric Associates - Lewis Center Office 7420 Gooding Blvd., Ste. 100, Delaware 740-657-8000

Justin Krueger

Central Ohio Primary Care Marysville Primary Care 1044 Columbus Ave., Marysville 937-644-1441

Steven E. Lindner

Patricia Francis

Jennifer H. Campbell

Nationwide Children’s South High Primary Care Center 1392 S. High St. 614-355-9000

Robert C. Forsythe

Gregory A. Barrett

Central Ohio Primary Care Building Blocks Pediatrics 6503 E. Broad St., Ste. 100 614-434-5437

Scott A. Holliday

Diane M. LeMay

Westerville Close to Home Health Care Center 433 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville 614-355-8300

Lee E. Budin

Central Ohio Primary Care Pediatric and Adolescent Practitioners 1085 Beecher Crossing N., Gahanna 614-741-8300

Crosswoods Pediatrics 760 Lakeview Plaza Blvd., Ste. 500, Worthington 614-540-7339

Central Ohio Primary Care Riverside Pediatric Associates 4885 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 2-10 614-267-7878

Central Ohio Primary Care Riverside Pediatric Associates 4885 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 2-10 614-267-7878

Lawrence P. Heiny

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine 5072 Reed Rd. 614-326-1600

Michael R. Franks

Powell Pediatric Care 55 Clairedan Dr., Powell 614-888-8989

Raju Gaglani

Associated Pediatrics Huber Village Professional Center 801 Eastwind Dr., Westerville 614-882-9460

Uma Gupta

Northland Primary Care Center 4560 Morse Centre Rd. 614-722-6200

Licking Memorial Pediatrics 399 E. Main St., Newark 740-348-1840

Mid-Ohio Pediatrics and Adolescents 595 Copeland Mill Rd., Ste. 2A, Westerville 614-899-0000

Anne D. Littleton

Olentangy Pediatrics 4775 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. 207 614-442-5557

William W. Long

Pediatric Associates 905 Old Diley Rd., Pickerington 614-864-3222

Eileen Maher

Olentangy Pediatrics 4775 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. 207 614-442-5557

Jennifer J. Mastruserio

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine 5072 Reed Rd. 614-326-1600

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 112

11/14/13 3:13 PM


Steven C. Matson

Kathleen C. Stiles

Mary-Lynn Niland

Ellen R. Tamburello

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Adolescent Health 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2450

Small World Pediatrics 5175 Morse Rd., Ste. 400, Gahanna 614-741-4411

Central Ohio Primary Care Step by Step Pediatrics 507 Executive Campus Dr., Ste. 160, Westerville 614-891-9505

Associated Pediatrics Huber Village Professional Center 801 Eastwind Dr., Westerville 614-882-9460

Garey H. Noritz

Gwyn Williams

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5808

Central Ohio Primary Care Riverside Pediatric Associates 4885 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 2-10 614-267-7878

Autumn O’Brien

Olentangy Pediatrics 4775 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. 207 614-442-5557



Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-4953

Central Ohio Primary Care Building Blocks Pediatrics 6503 E. Broad St., Ste. 100 614-434-5437

Emerald Pediatrics 5050 Paul Blazer Pkwy. Ste. 100, Dublin 614-932-5050

PEDIATRICS/HOSPITAL MEDICINE

Rajesh Donthi

Janet Sigler Orr

Melissa M. Parsons

Path to Cancer Recovery.



Michael A. Perry

Central Ohio Primary Care Building Blocks Pediatrics 6503 E. Broad St., Ste. 100 614-434-5437

Richard A. Petrella

Mid-Ohio Pediatrics and Adolescents 595 Copeland Mill Rd., Ste. 2A, Westerville 614-899-0000

Douglas A. Pope

Buckeye Family Health 1548 Sheridan Dr., Ste. 200, Lancaster 740-689-9860

M. Bonnie Pugh

Central Ohio Primary Care Ohio Center for Pediatrics 5040 Bradenton Ave., Dublin 614-766-3344

PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5050

Brian L. Bowyer

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, OSU Sports Medicine Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3300 614-293-7604

Albert C. Clairmont

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Davis Center, 480 Medical Center Dr. 614-293-7604

Samuel C. Colachis III

Pediatric Associates 3720 Ridge Mill Dr., Hilliard 614-529-0771

Darryl A. Robbins

Lisa P. Fugate

Central Ohio Primary Care Pediatric and Adolescent Practitioners 1085 Beecher Crossing N., Ste. A, Gahanna 614-741-8300

Eileen H. Sheets

Mid-Ohio Pediatrics and Adolescents 595 Copeland Mill Rd., Ste. 2A, Westerville 614-899-0000

Larry M. Shepherd

Associated Pediatrics Huber Village Professional Center 801 Eastwind Dr., Westerville 614-882-9460

         

Sonia Abuzakhm, M.D.*                                     �  � � �   �    

*board eligible

Columbus Oncology and

Rosalind J. Batley

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Davis Center, 480 Medical Center Dr. 614-293-7604

Barbara (Bobbi Jo) Rayo

ALL PHYSICIANS ARE BOARD CERTIFIED

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Dodd Hall and Davis Medical Clinic, 480 Medical Center Dr. 614-293-7604

Carl D. Gelfius

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5050

Robert Hall

Physical Medicine Associates 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 1010 614-566-4191

Hematology Associates AN OHIO ONCOLOGY & HEMATOLOGY, LLC PRACTICE

For general cancer information please call OhioHealth’s Cancer Call (614) 566-4321

coainc.net

Tel(614)442-3130

810 Jasonway Ave., Columbus, OH 43214

SUNDAY, JANUARY 19 6:00 P.M. The Bluestone 583 East Broad St. Columbus, Ohio 43215 VIP COCKTAIL RECEPTION TO PRECEDE EVENT AT 5PM. For more information about this and other event details and to purchase tickets, please visit www.FairyGoodmothers.org.

Help us make a high school girl’s wish come true when you

PARTY FOR PROM Fairy Goodmothers, in partnership with Columbus Monthly, present our annual fundraiser & silent auction. Event will feature food from the Columbus Monthly’s “Best New Restaurants of 2013� & live music by Alex White.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 113

113

11/14/13 3:00 PM


Ellen Kaitz

Michael Joseph Sullivan

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5051

7706 Olentangy River Rd. 614-436-8888

Pankaj Tiwari

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Plastic Surgery 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 2100 614-293-8566

Velimir M atkovic

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Metabolic Bone Disease Clinic Martha Morehouse Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3300 614-366-9211

Mark D. Wells

OhioHealth Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons 285 E. State St., Ste. 600 614-566-9496

Michelle A. Miller

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-5050

W. Jerry Mysiw

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Dodd Hall, 480 Medical Center Dr. 614-293-7604

William S. Pease

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Martha Morehouse Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 3330 614-293-7604

James J. Powers

Physical Medicine Associates 340 E. Town St., Ste. 8-700 614-566-9397

Francine Pulver

OSU Comprehensive Spine Center 543 Taylor Ave. 614-293-2225

Jeffrey A. Strakowski

Physical Medicine Associates 3555 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 1010 614-566-4191

Joseph Tu

OSU Comprehensive Spine Center 543 Taylor Ave. 614-293-2225

PLASTIC SURGERY

Robert T. Heck

Columbus Aesthetic and Plastic Surgery 4971 Arlington Centre Blvd. 614-246-6900

Michael J. Miller

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Plastic Surgery 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 2140 614-293-8566

David M. Powell Ohio ENT 974 Bethel Rd., Ste. A 614-538-2424

Stephen P. Smith Jr.

OSU Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 4000 614-366-7927

114

PSYCHIATRY

Douglas W. Beech 2740 E. Main St., Bexley 614-338-1390

John V. Campo

OSU Harding Hospital, Department of Psychiatry 1670 Upham Dr., Ste. 130 614-685-5602

James Cummins

OhioHealth Behavioral Health Services 1305 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-4414

Dallas Erdmann

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Department of Psychiatry 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-3743

James R. Girvin

470 Olde Worthington Rd., Ste. 200, Westerville 614-410-6721

Julie A. Guthrie

Central Ohio Behavioral Medicine 5025 Arlington Centre Blvd., Ste. 500 614-538-8300

Elizabeth C. Hurst

North Central Mental Health Center 1301 N. High St. 614-299-6600

Mark A. Hurst

Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare 2200 W. Broad St. 614-752-0333

Peter C. Iversen

Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare 2200 W. Broad St. 614-752-0333

David P. Kasick

OSU Harding Hospital, Department of Psychiatry Neurosciences Building, 1670 Upham Dr., Ste. 130 614-293-9600

Robert A. Kowatch

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Behavioral Health Clinic 555 S. 18th St., Ste. 3C 614-355-8080

Alan Bruce Levy

North Medical Building, 3545 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 510 614-263-5598

Mary Jude McCafferty

Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare 2200 W. Broad St. 614-752-0333

Michael Mizenko

James N. Allen

The Ohio State University Hospital East, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Tower Building, 1492 E. Broad St., Ste. 1103B 614-688-6540

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, OhioHealth Behavioral Health 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-4710

Nitin Y. Bhatt

Shamsun Nahar

Thomas J. Boes

NetCare Access 199 S. Central Ave. 614-276-2273

Riverside Pulmonary Associates 1679 Old Henderson Rd. 614-267-8585

Colleen M. Opremcak

Elliott Crouser

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Practitioner Health and Wellness Program 3545 Olentangy River Rd., Ste. 509 614-566-3743

Stephen Pariser

OSU Harding Hospital, Department of Psychiatry Neurosciences Building, 1670 Upham Dr., Ste. 512 614-293-9600

Craig Thorsell Pratt

Mount Carmel Hospice and Palliative Care 1144 Dublin Rd. 614-234-0200

David W. Scandinaro

500 W. Wilson Bridge Rd., Ste. 240, Worthington 614-885-3707

Delaney Smith

ADAMH Board of Franklin County 655 Metro Pl. N., Dublin 614-752-0333

Raymond W. Waggoner Jr.

Gestalt Associates 100 Outerbelt St. 614-751-5393

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Philip T. Diaz

OSU Asthma Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Leroy W. Essig II OhioHealth Pulmonary Physicians 111 S. Grant Ave. 614-566-9143

Michael Ezzie

OSU Morehouse Lung and Sleep Center Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Philip C. Hawley OhioHealth Pulmonary Physicians 111 S. Grant Ave. 614-566-9143

Ulysses J. Magalang

OSU Lung and Sleep Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Clay B. Marsh

Rebecca Ware

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary, Allergy and Sleep Medicine Pavilion Building, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-292-4925

James L. Young

John G. Mastronarde

Mount Carmel Psychiatry 750 Mount Carmel Mall, Ste. 220 614-234-2970 OSU Harding Hospital, Department of Psychiatry Neurosciences Building, 1670 Upham Dr., Ste. 130 614-293-9600

Peter P. Zafirides

Central Ohio Behavioral Medicine 5025 Arlington Centre Blvd., Ste. 500 614-538-8300

PULMONARY MEDICINE

Naeem Akhtar Ali

The Ohio State University Hospital, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-247-7804

OSU Asthma Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Jennifer McCallister

OSU Lung Center, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Serge Patrick Nana-Sinkam

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-6939

Jonathan P. Parsons

OSU Asthma Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Amy L. Pope-Harman

OSU Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, Lung Transplant 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-5822

David R. Ralston

Central Ohio Pulmonary Disease and Sleep Medicine 745 W. State St., Ste. 510 614-464-0788

RADIOLOGY

William F. Bennett

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4456

Eric C. Bourekas

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 487 614-293-8369

Nathan C. Hall

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4456

Mark D. Wewers

Mark J. Hogan

Namita Sood

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Karen L. Wood

OSU Lung Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

Arnab Chakravarti

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-0672

Mark J. Crnkovich

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-5560

Praveen Dubey

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-5560

John Christopher Grecula

The Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology 300 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-3250

Thomas J. Pedrick OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology 3535 Olentangy River Rd. 614-566-5560

Julia White

The Ohio State University Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center, Department of Radiation Oncology 1145 Olentangy River Rd. 614-688-7040

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2289

Hooman Khabiri

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4456

Mark A. King

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology Faculty Office Tower, Ste. 320 614-293-8369

Claudia F. E. Kirsch

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4456

Adele M. Lipari

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-3011

Richard D. White

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 452A 614-293-4456

Joseph S. Yu

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiology 395 W. 12th Ave., Ste. 481 614-293-8367

Nicholas Zumberge

Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s Radiological Institute 700 Children’s Dr. 614-722-2355

RHEUMATOLOGY

Stacy Payne Ardoin Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Rheumatology Outpatient Care Center 555 S. 18th St. 614-722-5525

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 114

11/14/13 3:13 PM


Peter Embi

Dean Mikami

Joseph Flood

Peter Muscarella

The Ohio State University Hospital, Division of Rheumatology 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-4837

OSU Bariatric and General Surgery Clinic Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2500 614-293-3230

Columbus Arthritis Center 1211 Dublin Rd. 614-486-5200

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Surgery Martha Morehouse Medical Building, 2050 Kenny Rd. 614-293-5815

Wael Jarjour

OSU CarePoint East 543 Taylor Ave. 614-293-4837

Bradley J. Needleman

OSU Bariatric and General Surgery Clinic 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2500 614-293-3504

SLEEP MEDICINE

James P. Fulop

Ronald Paul Pelletier

OhioHealth Neurological Physicians 931 Chatham Ln., Ste. 200 614-533-5500

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Comprehensive Transplant Center 770 Kinnear Rd. 614-293-6724

Ulysses J. Magalang

OSU Lung and Sleep Center Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza, 2050 Kenny Rd., Ste. 2200 614-293-4925

Amer Rajab

OSU Comprehensive Transplant Center 770 Kinnear Rd., Ste. 100 614-293-6322

Markus Helmut Schmidt

Steven Michael Steinberg

Ohio Sleep Medicine Institute 4975 Bradenton Ave., Dublin 614-766-0773

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Critical Care, Trauma and Burn 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-3185

SURGERY

Ginny Li Bumgardner

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Comprehensive Transplant Center 770 Kinnear Rd. 614-293-6724

SURGICAL ONCOLOGY

William E. Carson III

The Ohio State University Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center, Department of Surgical Oncology 1145 Olentangy River Rd. 614-293-6306

Elmahdi A. Elkhammas

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Comprehensive Transplant Center 770 Kinnear Rd. 614-293-6724

William B. Farrar

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center The Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center, Division of Surgical Oncology 1145 Olentangy River Rd. 614-293-4040

E. Christopher Ellison

OSU Physicians, Department of Surgery 700 Ackerman Rd., Ste. 600 614-293-9722

Jeffrey W. Hazey

The Ohio State University Hospital, Division of General Surgery 410 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-3346

THORACIC SURGERY

Robert Higgins

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery 452 W. 10th Ave. 614-293-9250

Mitchell L. Henry

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Surgery 395 W. 12th Ave. 614-293-4627

William Scott Melvin

OSU General & Gastrointestinal Surgery at Knightsbridge 4830 Knightsbridge Blvd., Ste. J 614-293-3230

UROLOGY

Ronney Abaza

OhioHealth Dublin Methodist Hospital, OhioHealth Robotic Urologic Surgeons Medical Building, 7450 Hospital Dr., Ste. 350, Dublin 614-544-8104

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

099_115_DOCTORS_DEC_CM.indd 115

115

11/14/13 3:00 PM


TRANSFORMING MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENT FOR OLDER ADULTS NEW GENERATIONS UNIT NOW OPEN! Generations Ge G ene nera rati tion ion onss II iiss a ne new 12 new 12-bed -b bedd uunit nit ni it speciiali lizes in in the th treatmentt off th he that specializes the older adult with a primary mental health diagnosis and secondary medical issues.

Giving hope back‌

(614) 444-7472

|

We can help 24/7

www.ohp-columbus.com

116_129_MEDICAL_GUIDE_DEC_CM.indd 116

11/13/13 11:09 AM


Special advertiSing Section

✚

columbuS medical guide

c o lu mbu S

medical guide

underStanding HealtH care reform + creating a medical community + directory of reSourceS produced in cooperation with the columbus medical association Columbus Monthly • December 2013

116_129_MEDICAL_GUIDE_DEC_CM.indd 117

117

11/14/13 11:17 AM


Columbus medICal GuIde

speCIal advertIsInG seCtIon

understanding Health Care reform Whether it’s a direct result of the affordable Care act or an answer to market demands, health care is changing. We’ve outlined what these changes, notably increased coordination of care, mean for Central ohioans. by michelle sullivan

Imagine you’re admitted to the hospital for a heart problem. It turns out to be a minor issue, but you’re advised to check in with your primary-care physician in a few months. When you get to your appointment, your doctor might not even know you had a hospital stay until you say something. That’s because there’s currently little communication between hospitals and doctors’ offices, says Dr. Ben Humphrey, CEO of the Medical Group of Ohio. But thanks to the Affordable Care Act—and some new locally developed counterpart programs—that lack of communication may be a problem of the past. Today, partnerships like one between OhioHealth and the Medical Group of Ohio (known as Health4) have been established to increase coordination of care, strengthen communication between doctors and hospitals and better share important medical information. Established in 2010, Health4 is a network of Medical Group of Ohio physicians who see patients in OhioHealth facilities (as well as other facilities). Within the network, patient care is coordinated and monitored by a team of administrators who share test results on a server that any doctor can access. Nurses and system monitors can use this network to send patients reminders when it’s time to schedule regular visits and tests. These partnerships are known as Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), and Humphrey says they’ll help make your health care better and more affordable. 118

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

“We have an epidemic in this country of not very accountable or coordinated [health] care,” Humphrey says. “The Affordable Care Act was stimulated to come into play because there are a lot of problems with getting the care that is needed at a cost that’s affordable.” This new model of health care delivery, in which value is measured in quality of care rather than volume, is a team-based system that integrates physicians, insurance providers and patients and prioritizes disease prevention. The Affordable Care Act outlines the implementation of government-declared ACOs, but

some local health care systems have already adopted their own versions. “What we are attempting to do is address many of the things anyone encountering health issues wishes the system delivered, in the way of quality and affordability,” says Humphrey. “Not just in clinical quality, but also quality of service and access. We have troubles in those areas in this country.” This model of care is more integrated than what we’ve experienced in the past. When a sick person undergoes testing and treatment, those results and records are not only saved in the system but also


monitored by nurses responsible for tracking progress and determining next steps. This change is arguably most evident between inpatient and outpatient arenas. The hospital-stay scenario, for example: The ACO model ensures the physician at your follow-up appointment knows all about that hospital visit and then some, as your records will transfer automatically. The only catch: you must stay within the same health care system to benefit—at least for now.

Focusing on prevention

The new health care law prevents insurance holders from being charged a premium for pre-existing medical conditions, a relief to those who have previously struggled with both illness and insurance woes. Under the new law, the emphasis for pre-existing conditions—asthma, cancer, heart disease and diabetes, to name some of the most common—is on prevention. But preventing disease from exacerbating in patients isn’t the only incentive for physicians. All patients are recommended to receive regular preventive care, like routine mammograms and colonoscopies. Physicians practicing in ACOs are financially incentivized when patients get these screenings. In traditional ACOs, as proposed under the Affordable Care Act, physicians are reimbursed through Medicare. With these private “lower-case” ACOs—as described by Humphrey—the incentives are negotiated with insurance companies. Incentives vary from one ACO to another. In theory, Humphrey says, incentives for providing more preventive care keep patients healthier longer and allow health care systems to provide more affordable care when patients need it.

The Affordable Care Act outlines the implementation of government-declared ACOs, but some local health care systems have already adopted their own versions.

patient-centered care

Another health care model in tune with the ACO model is a shift toward patient-centered medical homes. In the medical home model, patient treatment is coordinated by a primary-care physician, and a centralized setting often facilitates partnerships between patients and MDs. There’s a strong emphasis on making sure patients understand their health care. Two years ago, the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s

Department of Family Medicine received the “Medical Home” title, an accreditation granted through the National Committee for Quality Assurance. “One goal is to work on population management and transitions of care,” says department chair Dr. Mary Jo Welker. Care coordinators—typically nurses and medical assistants—ensure patients transitioning

from hospital to home receive the care they need. This includes scheduling postop consultations, sending prescriptions to the pharmacy and confirming follow-up visits with primary-care physicians. Like ACOs, these care coordinators also prioritize preventive care. Care coordinators generate reports that identify patients who are overdue on Columbus Monthly • December 2013

119


“We’re seeing ACOs pop up in various areas, as well as more hospital mergers. Is it a result of the Affordable Care Act? It’s hard to say. Is it as result of the rising cost of health care? There’s no doubt about that.” —DR. Ben HumpHRey, CeO Of THe meDiCal gROup Of OHiO

Subscribe or renew your annual subscription to Columbus Monthly for $24. Plus, your subscription now includes bonus issues of .

Go to columbusmonthly.com or call 877-688-8009 to subscribe. 120

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

routine tests. Any person who has visited the OSU Medical Center’s Department of Family Medicine—between 60,000 and 65,000 people annually—receives reminders about outstanding screenings. As with an ACO, some insurance providers pay the Department of Family Medicine monthly, per member, for the coordination of care for their patients, as well as for hitting the target for recommended prevention screenings. Acting as a patient-centered medical home and focusing on chronicdisease management and prevention is “the foundation for an Accountable Care Organization,” Welker says. “What we’re doing is … in an effort to function as an ACO or with an ACO.” These changes, some say, were a long time coming. But in a classic case of the chicken and the egg, which came first? “We’re seeing ACOs pop up in various areas, as well as more hospital mergers,” Humphreys says. “Is it a result of the Affordable Care Act? It’s hard to say. Is it as result of the rising cost of health care? There’s no doubt about that.”

Better Care Now

The Affordable Care Act has indeed triggered some of the changes in health care delivery, says Jeff Biehl, president of Access HealthColumbus, a nonprofit, publicprivate partnership focused on improving health care delivery in the local community. “It’s not a reason for all the change, but it has been a catalyst to accelerate some of the change,” Biehl adds. ACOs impact the way physicians interact with patients. Traditionally,

physicians are paid fee-for-service, rather than for engaging with patients. “Traditional business models of health care are being turned on their head,” Biehl says. Accountable care models are also changing the way physicians organize and deliver health care services. Under a feefor-service model, a doctor might pose the question, “Can I get paid for this?” Within the accountable care framework, the doctor instead asks, “What has evidence shown will improve health?” That answer, Biehl notes, is the route the doctor will take. Mount Carmel Health Systems has two primary-care practices that are certified as patient-centered medical homes and recently established an ACO with health insurance provider UnitedHealthcare. It’s a relationship “where we’re using a clinical integration model to not only reduce the cost of care but improve the caliber of care,” says Dr. Richard Streck, executive vice president and chief clinical operations officer for Mount Carmel. This model stems from the notion that by delivering proper preventive care, major health problems are avoided, as are the high costs of care needed to treat them. “When the system works well, we end up with patients that are healthier and don’t require the acute-care services they would if we had reached that point of deterioration,” Streck says. These services, he says, are often much more invasive and expensive. Patient health remains the top priority. “The key is to demonstrate by hard metrics that we’re improving the quality of care,” Streck says. “It’s not about rationing or withholding services. It’s not just the maintenance of quality of care but also the improvement of it.” Physicians working in this model will measure improvements through readmission rates, disease management and prevention, patient safety and care delivery. If they can prove the quality of their care is improving and costs are reduced as a result, they’ll share in those cost savings with UnitedHealthcare. For Streck, it’s an exciting time for health care and a rewarding time to be a clinician. “Now that we’re moving from beyond waiting for patients to get sick,” he says, “we can actually keep our patients in the community healthier.”


Columbus mediCal Guide

speCial advertisinG seCtion

comparing costs

Private insurance exchanges opened just months ago. There is still some uncertainty about how the Affordable Care Act will affect existing insurance coverage when new plans go into effect next year, but there are a few things we do know. Buy insurance, or else Under the Affordable Care Act, health insurance is mandatory. Those who remain uninsured or choose to pass up coverage through their employer will be hit with fees starting at $95 per person or one percent of annual income, whichever is greater, according to healthcare.gov. By 2016, the fee will increase to $695 per person or 2.5 percent of annual income.

compare costs Before you’re Billed for medical services

The health care reform law is expected to provide coverage for half of the nation’s nearly 50 million uninsured people, either through private plans or Medicaid. One thing that won’t change is the high deductibles that require more out-of-pocket pay, common in many plans. “Patients are noticing they are bearing a lot more responsibility for the cost of care,” says Dr. Blaize O’Brien, medical director for Ohio ENT and chairman of the board of the Ohio Surgery Center. He and his colleagues commonly field questions from patients wanting to know up front the cost of procedures. O’Brien recommends patients cost-shop services before making a decision, as some facilities offer the same test or procedure at a fraction of the cost of others. Procedures commonly performed at the independently owned Ohio Surgery Center outpatient facility—such as ear tube surgeries and tonsillectomies—might cost a patient less. For example, UnitedHealthcare’s estimate for a tonsillectomy at the surgery center is $1,899, while its estimate for the same procedure at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is $6,746, according to O’Brien. Depending on the severity of the condition and invasiveness of the surgery, a patient might not be a candidate for an outpatient facility. O’Brien and the 19 other Ohio ENT physicians can also perform surgeries at local hospitals and inpatient facilities. Insurance coverage is also a major factor when it comes to comparing costs. Many of the top insurance providers feature online tools members can use to compare the cost of services among eligible in-network health care providers. One example is Aetna’s member payment estimator, which provides real-time, out-of-pocket cost estimates for a medical procedure based on a member’s personal benefits plan. The tool “will proactively display up to 10 cost estimates at a time for the selected procedure in a geographic area, which can help make members more aware of the cost differences among different health care providers,” says Aetna spokesperson Ethan Slavin. Regardless of your situation or condition, it can’t hurt to do the research. “The more awareness [patients] have, the better their decision-making will be,” O’Brien says. “Patients should be interested in finding out what things will cost on the front end, rather than getting billed for them on the back end.”

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

121


COluMbus MedICAl GuIde

sPeCIAl AdverTIsInG seCTIOn

Creating a Medical Community Keeping physicians connected by focusing on the creation of a strong medical community has become the primary mission of the Columbus Medical Association by Gary stelluti

It’s familiar lexicon: The Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), Accountable Care Organizations, Patient-Centered Medical Homes, Population Health Management. The list goes on. Health care has reached the tipping point, and large-scale changes are happening now. For doctors, these changes mean increased aggregation: There are more physicians than ever becoming health-system employees, and many Central Ohio MDs are also joining large specialty groups and clinically integrated networks as a means to deliver better coordinated care. This shift has also increased data sharing and has led to an increase in preventive visits and wellness care and better management of chronic diseases. These innovations are, in part, what the marketplace has demanded, but whether these approaches are built for long-term success remains to be seen. What has become very apparent is, despite all of these changes, the medical community is more isolated than ever. But why does a physician community even matter? “There are fewer opportunities for physicians to get to know each other and support each other,” says Phil Cass, CEO of the Columbus Medical Association (CMA). “This has had a profound effect, not only on physician relations, but on patient care.”

Renewing Relationships

Dr. Bill Wulf can attest to how personal relationships between primary-care physicians and specialists have changed over the years. He says much of this can 122

be attributed to geographic boundaries, narrower physician networks and the fact that very few primary-care physicians spend time in the hospital. Most inpatient rounding is done by hospitalists and specialists. “We simply don’t run into each other like we used to,” says Wulf, CEO of Central Ohio Primary Care. “In the past, we had the ability to have informal ‘curbside consults’ with specialists regarding issues or concerns we had with our patients.” Now, Wulf says, doctors need to develop a new mechanism for sharing clinical information that both parties believe is valuable. CMA is using technology and scheduled events to

“There are fewer opportunities for physicians to get to know each other and support each other. This has had a profound effect, not only on physician relations, but on patient care.” —Phil Cass

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

116_129_MEDICAL_GUIDE_DEC_CM.indd 122

11/14/13 11:18 AM


Special advertiSing Section

columbuS medical guide

“In the past, we had the ability to have informal ‘curbside consults’ with specialists regarding issues or concerns we had with our patients.” —Dr. Bill Wulf

facilitate this contact between primarycare doctors and specialists. “I believe patients will benefit from this improved communication,” Wulf says. This need, of course, is why CMA is continuing its evolution away from a typical membership organization to one that focuses on the development of a real community of physicians. Extensive research conducted by the association indicates that physicians want to better relate to one another on a personal level as well as a professional one. But with pressure to see more patients, longer hours and their own family obligations, physicians—like the rest of society—have less time for this interaction. A little more than a year ago, CMA introduced The Loop, a digital physicianonly platform that has become a place for physicians to create new relationships, get to know one another and share the best practices in a forum similar to the doctor’s lounges of previous generations. “More than 700 physicians have logged into The Loop and participated in one way or another,” says Diane May, CMA director of member relations and services. “What we’ve learned along the way is that physicians want to take it to the next level and develop an organized approach for sharing clinical information, in its truest sense. The sharing of clinical information is missing, and they want it to return.”

A Network for ShAriNg

CMA has facilitated conversations with Central Ohio’s hospital systems and the large physician groups to agree upon the parameters for the association’s new Clinical Share program. This program will be designed to disseminate mutually agreed upon clinical information, guidelines and new technologies. “CMA is well-positioned to facilitate collegial communication among physicians in our community about issues that enhance care delivery and improve public

health,” says Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, chief medical officer for OhioHealth. “Effective communication is, after all, at the heart of great patient care.” Cass believes the Clinical Share program will become the place for physicians to share information openly and honestly. Dr. Erick Forrest, director of ambulatory services for the Wexner Medical Center and director of the Ohio State University voice and swallowing disorders clinic, agrees. “Most physicians are agreeable to receiving good clinical information (without feeling like they are being marketed to) in order to make informed decisions on behalf of their patients,” he says. “It’s very appealing to participate in a community within which physicians can have open discussions about patient care and best practices, regardless of hospital affiliation.” Forrest adds that each department at the university could benefit from participating in the program.

the growiNg role of CMA

By cultivating and maintaining the largest, most accurate electronic database of physicians in Central Ohio, CMA takes its role as an honest broker of clinical information seriously. “We know we are wading into waters that, if not managed properly, can potentially cause additional friction within the health care community,” Cass says. “But we believe this is the right thing to do as

physicians. Sharing clinical information goes a long way in contributing to better care.” The Mark H. Zangmeister Center, a longtime CMA member, will be one of the early participants in the Clinical Share program. Their 13 cancer specialists have a strong interest in sharing clinical information with Central Ohio’s medical community. “We have access to the same clinical trials and research and approach cancer care with the same protocols as the large cancer institutions,” says Glenn Balasky, the center’s executive director. “We also provide a unique patient experience at our center and work hard to be good partners with referring practices and their physicians. This program has the potential to be very valuable for all Central Ohio physicians.” As the Clinical Share program develops and grows, CMA is hopeful to add face-to-face events and opportunities for participants. “Perhaps the idea of an ‘open grand rounds’ isn’t too far in the future,” Cass says. “Participating physicians will have a lot to say regarding where this program ultimately leads, and that is good news for Central Ohio’s health.” n Gary Stelluti provides communications and marketing services to the Columbus Medical Association through Health Care Marketing Strategies. Columbus Monthly • December 2013

116_129_MEDICAL_GUIDE_DEC_CM.indd 123

123

11/14/13 11:18 AM


COluMbus MediCal Guide

speCial adverTisinG seCTiOn

directory of resources One of the best things about living in Central Ohio is our wealth of medical resources. World-renowned cancer centers, pediatric experts and research institutions call Columbus home, and the city is better because of it. This directory, compiled by Columbus Monthly for the Columbus Medical Guide, offers a quick overview of Central Ohio’s hospitals, outpatient surgery centers, urgent-care centers and addiction and mental health facilities

Mount Carmel East

6001 E. Broad St., 234-6000 mountcarmelhealth.com Number of beds: 419 Primary Services: Cardiothoracic, vascular and endovascular surgery; general surgery; emergency medicine; gastroenterology and colorectal surgery; gynecology and maternity; neurology and neurosurgery; orthopedic surgery; oncology; urology; neonatal ICU (Level III); Certified Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission

Mount Carmel New Albany

7333 Smith’s Mill Rd., New Albany, 775-6600 mountcarmelhealth.com Number of beds: 60 Primary Services: Orthopedic and spine specialty hospital offering inpatient and outpatient orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery, including total joint replacement, sports medicine and spine, hand, foot and ankle problems; radiology, physical therapy and rehabilitation

Mount Carmel St. Ann’s

500 S. Cleveland Ave., 898-4000 mountcarmelhealth.com Number of beds: 312 Primary Services: General surgery; emergency medicine; cardiac diagnostic and interventional services; endovascular and vascular surgery; gastroenterology and colorectal surgery; gynecology and maternity; neurology and neurosurgery; oncology; orthopedic surgery; spine surgery; urology. The campus features a cancer center; Columbus CyberKnife (radiosurgery), Maternal Fetal Medicine Diagnostic Center and Nationwide Children’s Hospital neonatal ICU (Level III). A $110 million expansion, including integrated cardiovascular centers of excellence, an orthopedic, spine and neurosurgery patient recovery center, new open-heart surgery unit, main entrance, parking garage and patient tower with 60 additional beds is set to open in January. A new kitchen and dining area opened in spring 2013.

Mount C armel West

793 W. State St., 234-5000 mountcarmelhealth.com Number of beds: 385 Primary Services: Cardiothoracic, vascular and endovascular surgery; general surgery; emergency medicine; gastroenterology and colorectal surgery; gynecology and maternity; neurology and neurosurgery; orthopedic surgery; oncology; urology; neonatal ICU (Level III); Certified Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission; Level II Trauma Center; Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence as designated by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery; Inpatient Rehabilitation Center. This is a teaching

124

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

hospital that offers seven physician residency programs and is home to the Mount Carmel College of Nursing.

Nationwide Children’s Hospital

700 Children’s Dr., 722-2000 nationwidechildrens.org Number of beds: 427 Primary Services: Wellness, preventive, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitative care and research for infants, children, adolescents and adult patients with congenital diseases. National referral center for areas of pediatric care, such as interventional cardiology for congenital heart conditions, gastroenterology, neonatology, neurology, neurosurgery, hematology and oncology. The Research Institute is one of the nation’s top 10 institutes of healthfunded freestanding pediatric research facilities and one of the nation’s largest neonatal networks for sick and premature newborns. Specialty units include newborn and pediatric intensive care, dialysis, hematology/oncology, neurosciences, burn and trauma, orthopedics, inpatient and outpatient surgery, pulmonary disease, urology and infectious diseases, featuring emergency transport, heart, heart-lung, lung, kidney and blood marrow transplant. Ohio’s first Level I pediatric trauma center. Pediatric hospice; ear, nose and throat; audiology; child-abuse prevention, identification and treatment; behavioral health; healthy weight and nutrition; sports medicine. Communitybased testing, treatment and care for children and adolescents

OhioHealth Doctors Hospital

5100 W. Broad St., 544-1000 ohiohealth.com/doctors Number of Beds: 262 Primary Services: General medicine; orthopedic and general surgery; obstetrics and gynecology; medical and surgical oncology; neurology; urology; outpatient care and rehabilitation; cardiac rehabilitation; endoscopy services; diagnostic and interventional cardiology; open-heart surgery; radiology; 24hour emergency care; chest pain center; Nationwide Children’s Special Care Nursery; Hobbs Radiation Oncology Center; Heritage Center for Osteopathic Medical Education. One of the largest osteopathic teaching hospitals in the country

OhioHealth Dublin Methodist Hospital

7500 Hospital Dr., Dublin, 544-8000 ohiohealth.com/dublinmethodist Number of Beds: 107 Primary Services: Full-service, 24-hour emergency department; women’s health services including obstetrics; surgery; intensive-care beds with a link to OhioHealth’s eICU. Designed to promote the healing process by providing a comfortable environment with access to natural light and nature

OhioHealth Grant Medical Center

111 S. Grant Ave., 566-9000 ohiohealth.com/grant Number of Beds: 636 Primary Services: General medicine; medical and surgical oncology; radiation oncology; peripheral vascular treatment; vascular and endovascular surgery; diagnostic and interventional cardiology and electrophysiology; cardiac rehabilitation; joint replacement, sports medicine and podiatric and orthopedic surgery; general and acutecare surgery; blood-conserving surgery; Level I Trauma Center; 24-hour emergency and critical care; nephology; endocrinology; radiology; urology; neurology; primary stroke center; chest-pain center; wound-care center; obstetrics and gynecology; cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery; hospice area; Nationwide Children’s Special Care Nursery

OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital

3535 Olentangy River Rd., 566-5000 ohiohealth.com/riverside Number of Beds: 1,059 Primary Services: McConnell Heart Hospital and McConnell Heart Health Center; neurosciences; oncology; orthopedics; bariatrics; interventional radiology; critical care; Level II Trauma Center; Level III Perinatal Center; eICU; minimally invasive surgery; robotic surgery; women’s health services; family practice center; chest-pain center; sleep center; critical limb-care programs; spine and orthopedic unit; Center for Medical Education and Innovation; Sexual Assault Response Network of Central Ohio

Regency Hospital Company of Columbus

1430 S. High St., 456-0300 regencyhospital.com Number of Beds: 43 Primary Services: Long-term, acute-care hospital offering intensive critical care to medically complex patients who require an extended stay; part of a national group of 23 acutecare hospitals. Programs for pulmonary-vent dependency and weaning, respiratory infections and failure, COPD, pulmonary edema, neurological-CVA, head/spine injury, cardiovascularCHF and S/P open-heart. Comprehensive wound-care program for cellulitis, skin ulcers, debridement, grafts and infected wounds; orthopedic, osteomyelitis and complex ORIF trauma care. Services include daily physician visits and night coverage, private rooms, 24-hour respiratory care, ACLS-certified RTs and RNs, nutritional support, pharmacy, lab, radiology, minor bedside procedures, bedside hemodialysis and physical, occupational and speech therapies.


OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY WEXNER MEDICAL CENTER Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center—Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute

They’ll thank you for this new-found happiness. Get treatment now for drug and alcohol problems.

300 W. 10th Ave., 293-5066 cancer.osu.edu Number of Beds: 228 Primary Services: One of 41 NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the nation and one of only four centers approved by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials. Subspecialty cancer care in bone, brain, breast, cranial base, endocrine, gastrointestinal, gynecologic, hematologic, head and neck, prostate, skin, soft tissue sarcoma, spine and thoracic cancers along with molecular- and genetic-based prevention, detection and treatments for individual cancers that lead to better outcomes. Multidisciplinary team of experts including surgical and medical oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, radiation oncologists, plastic surgeons, researchers, psychosocial care and more—all of whom specialize in just one type of cancer. One of the nation’s top cancer hospitals, the James includes a 24-bed bone marrow transplant unit, intra-operative radiation therapy, special isolation rooms, chemotherapy and special transfusion areas and specialized diagnostic equipment. Outpatient services are conveniently located throughout Central Ohio with affiliate hospitals throughout the state. The new 306-bed, 21-level James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute will open in late 2014.

Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital

452 W. 10th Ave., 293-5123 medicalcenter.osu.edu/go/heart Beds: 150 Primary Services: Treats every type of cardiac care and Central Ohio’s only adult hearttransplantations program. Provides the most up-todate cardiac diagnostic testing, including advanced cardiac imaging with the latest treatment, such as cardiac catheterization techniques, pacemaker implantation, minimally invasive robotic procedures, surgical bypass and mechanical heart pumps.

University Hospital

410 W. 10th Ave., 293-8000 medicalcenter.osu.edu Beds: 862 Primary Services: Diabetes management; diagnostics and imaging; digestive diseases; general and minimally invasive surgery; inpatient rehabilitation; neurology; neurosurgery; respiratory disorders; urology; women’s health. Featuring a high-risk OB/GYN department; Level I trauma center; Level III neonatal ICU; Center for Neuromodulation; nationally ranked rehabilitation program; Center of Excellence in bariatric surgery; Central Ohio’s only adult burn center and adult transplant center. Named a Joint Commission Certified Comprehensive Stroke Center

University Hospital East

1492 E. Broad St., 257-3000 Beds: 404 Primary Services: Orthopedic treatment and surgery; sleep medicine; cardiology; wound care; emergency medicine; oncology; radiology; MRI; mammography; urology; endoscopy; rehabilitation. Home to Talbot Hall, an inpatient and outpatient treatment facility for drug and alcohol addiction

www.NKRC.org 614-210-0416

Want $500 toward your wedding photography package? EntEr thE sEcond contEst in our nEw givEaway sEriEs,

The Aisle!

Columbus Bride wants to be there every step of the way as you prepare for your big day. Our contest series — The Aisle — will bring you chances to win wedding-related gift cards and services.

NEXT sTEp: Your phoTographEr Visit ColumbusBride.com now through Dec. 27 for your chance to win a $500 gift card to one of these five area photographers: • Columbus Photo Booth Company | thecolumbusphotoboothcompany.com • Shoot2Studios | shoot2studios.com • Lambert Photographs | Lambertphotographs.com • Weese Photos LLC | weesephotobooths.com • DiBlasio Photo + Design | diblasiophoto.com Full rules and details are available at ColumbusBride.com.

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

125


Columbus mediCal Guide Select Specialty Hospitals of Columbus

1087 Dennison Ave., 458-9000; 793 W. State St., Fifth Floor, 234-0950 selectspecialtyhospitals.com Number of Beds: 176 Primary Services: Specialized acute care with core programs to treat pulmonary, renal and bariatric conditions and medically complex patients. Wound care; infectious disease intervention; neurological and trauma medical care and rehabilitation. Services include daily physician visits, transitional care unit, special care unit, private rooms, stateof-the-art telemetry, ventilator weaning, 24-hour respiratory care, dialysis, nutritional support, pharmacy, bariatric suites, on-site laboratory, minor procedure capability and physical, occupational and speech therapy. Imaging services include MRI, CT and PET scans, fluoroscopy and picture arching. Multidisciplinary team approach to patient care

ADDICTION RECOVERY AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Amethyst Inc.

455 E. Mound St., 242-1284 amethyst-inc.org Specialties: Treatment services for long-term alcohol and drug addiction and relapse prevention; housing for homeless women and children, with counseling for physical, emotional and sexual abuse; GED and jobskills preparation; individual and group counseling

The Buckeye Ranch

697 E. Broad St., 384-7700; 2865 W. Broad St., 384-7700; 2440 Dawnlight Ave., 471-2626 buckeyeranch.org Specialties: Residential and community-based treatment for kids, adolescents, teens and their families. Outpatient, outpatient groups, intensive and non-intensive homebased treatments; psychiatric services; foster care; partial hospitalization; visitation exchange related to child custody issues; deaf services; services for transitional-aged youth

Columbus Area Inc.

899 E. Broad St.; 1515 E. Broad St., 252-0711 columbus-area.com Specialties: Inpatient and outpatient treatment and services for mental health issues and alcohol and drug dependency

Columbus Public Health

240 Parsons Ave., 645-7417 publichealth.columbus.gov Specialties: Prevention, intervention and outpatient treatment for drug and alcohol addiction

Compdrug Inc.

547 E. 11th Ave., 224-4506 compudrug.org Specialties: Prevention services for drug and alcohol abuse; early intervention and treatment

Concord Counseling Services

700 Brooksedge Blvd., Westerville, 882-9338 concordcounseling.org Specialties: Mental health services for all ages, including marriage and family counseling, individual counseling, substance-abuse prevention and recovery. Various support groups; school and community-based prevention programs; assessments and linkage for elderly adults with primary physicians; support for adults with severe mental illness

Directions for Youth & Families

1066 N. High St., 299-5541; 1515 Indianola Ave., 294-2661; 657 S. Ohio Ave., 258-8043 dfyf.org Specialties: Counseling and clinical services for drug and alcohol abuse and behavioral problems; prevention and education services; parenting and life-skills programs; special programs for children who have experienced violence; 24-hour crisis-support services available for current clients only

126

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Dublin Counseling Center

299 Cramer Creek Ct., Dublin, 889-5722 dublincounselingcenter.org Specialties: Outpatient mental health treatment for children, adolescents, adults, couples and families; drug and alcohol treatment; monthly driver intervention program for DUI offenders; various support groups; grief counseling; specialized trauma services; military outreach; case-management services for children and families

Dublin Springs Hospital

7625 Hospital Dr., Dublin, 717-1800 dublinsprings.com Specialties: A 72-bed mental health and addiction treatment center offering services for adults and their families. Specialties include acute inpatient, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient services.

Maryhaven

1791 Alum Creek Dr., 445-8131 maryhaven.com Specialties: Integrated behavioral health care services, with a specialization in addition-recovery care to help men, women and adolescents restore their lives from addictive and mental illness

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Behavioral Health Services

700 Children’s Dr.; 399 E. Main St.; 495 E. Main St.; 6435 E. Broad St.; 187 W. Schrock Rd., Westerville; 275 W. Schrock Rd., Westerville; 5700 Perimeter Dr., Dublin; 75 S. Terrace Ave., Newark; 355-8080 nationwidechildrens.org/behavioralhealth Specialties: Counseling, guidance and support for children and adolescents with emotional, behavioral and developmental problems and disorders

Neighborhood House

1000 Atcheson St., 252-4941 neighborhoodhouseinc.org Specialties: Individual and group outpatient counseling for adults with alcohol and drug addiction and abuse, genderspecific groups, drug-abuse education, urinalysis drug screenings, dealer group counseling, youth and family services

Neil Kennedy Recovery Clinic

6543 Commerce Pkwy., Ste. R, Dublin, 210-0416 nkrc.org Specialties: Substance-abuse treatment including evaluation services, adult partial-hospitalization and intensive outpatient programs, youth and young adult low-intensity and intensive outpatient programs, continuing-care services

Netcare Access

741 E. Broad St.; 199 S. Central Ave.; 276-2273 netcareaccess.org Specialties: 24-hour mental health and substance-abuse assessments and referrals and crisis interventions for all ages

North Central Mental Health Services

1301 N. High St., 299-6600; 338 Granville St., Gahanna, 4757090 24-hour suicide-prevention hotline: 221-5445 Teen hotline: 294-3300 Senior hotline: 294-3309 ncmhs.org Specialties: Outpatient and residential counseling for mental health issues for all ages

North Community Counseling Centers

2300 W. Broad St., 279-7690; 4897 Karl Rd., 846-2588 northcommunity.com Specialties: Outpatient counseling for drug and alcohol-related problems; individual, marriage, family and group counseling

Northwest Counseling Services

1560 Fishinger Rd. 457-7876 northwestcounselingservices.org Specialties: Counseling services for all ages; alcohol and drug prevention, assessment and treatment services; caregiver consultation and support

speCial advertisinG seCtion Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry

880 Greenlawn Ave., 449-9664 ohp-columbus.com Specialties: Residential and outpatient programs for children, adolescents and adults with a variety of needs; senior behavioral health care

OSU Harding Hospital

1670 Upham Dr., 293-9600 medicalcenter.osu.edu Beds: 94 Specialties: Counseling and comprehensive inpatient and outpatient mental health and behavioral healthcare services for children, adolescents, adults and older adults, treating such areas as anxiety and panic attacks, depression, post-traumatic disorders, family and marital conflict, personality disorders, schizophrenia and sexual abuse

Project Linden

1410 Cleveland Ave., Ste. 2, 251-6950 project-linden.org Specialties: Outpatient counseling, referrals and drug-abuse prevention services

Shepherd Hill

200 Messimer Dr., Newark, 740-348-4870, 800-223-6410 shepherdhill.net Specialties: Individual, group and family inpatient and outpatient counseling for alcohol and drug abuse; inpatient and outpatient psychiatry

Southeast Inc.

16 W. Long St., 225-0990 southeastinc.com Specialties: Mental health and recovery services for adults with severe and persistent mental illness; psychiatric and psychotherapy services, health care and shelter for adults experiencing homelessness, chemical-dependency and addiction outpatient services, general medicine and dental care for all ages, mobile medical coach

St. Vincent Family Centers

1490 E. Main St., 252-0731 svfc.org Specialties: Pediatric behavioral health care, inpatient and outpatient care, serving children with serious emotional and behavioral issues and their families

Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare

2200 W. Broad St., 752-0333 mentalhealth.ohio.gov Specialties: Inpatient care for adults, most of whom are referred by local community mental health centers, acute psychiatric care and continued care

OUTPATIENT SURGERY CENTERS Central Ohio Surgical Institute 6520 W. Campus Oval, New Albany, 413-2233 cosisurg.com Specialties: ENT (otolaryngology), orthopedics, pain management, podiatry, plastic surgery and dental

Columbus Eye Surgery Center

5965 E. Broad St., Ste. 460, 751-4080 columbuseyesurgerycenter.com Specialties: Surgery for cataracts, eyelids, eye muscles and glaucoma; retina surgery; cornea transplants; brow-lift surgery; diabetic eye treatment

Dublin Surgery Center

5005 Parkcenter Ave., Dublin, 932-9548 dublinsc.com Specialties: Pain management, podiatry, urology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, gynecology, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, general surgery, plastic surgery

East Columbus Surgery Center

50 McNaughten Rd., Ste. 102, 864-6171 ecsc.md Specialties: Ophthalmology, podiatry, pain management


Special advertiSing Section The Eye Center

262 Neil Ave., 827-6600 theeyecenterofcolumbus.com Specialties: General ophthalmology, ambulatory surgery, vitrectomy, glaucoma, neuro-ophthalmology, cataract, cosmetic eyelid surgery, corneal transplants, therapeutic eye and facial surgeries

Green Street Surgery Center

120 Green St., 225-9321 greenstreetsurgery.com Specialties: Ear, nose and throat, ophthalmology, orthopedics, obstetrics and gynecology, gastroenterology, colon and rectal, urology, general surgery, plastic surgery

Hand and Microsurgery Associates 1210 Gemini Pl., 262-4263 handandmicro.com Specialties: Surgical, nonsurgical and microsurgical treatments, chronic conditions, trauma and advanced techniques, sports injuries, work-related injuries, imaging, hand and arm therapy specialists

Knightsbridge Surgery Center 4845 Knightsbridge Blvd., 273-0400 knightsbridgesurgery.com Specialties: Gastroenterology, gynecology, neurosurgery, colorectal surgery, urology, pain management, general surgery, plastic surgery

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Outpatient Surgery Center

700 Children’s Dr., G Building, 722-5200 nationwidechildrens.org/outpatient-surgery Specialties: Otolaryngology (ENT), general surgery, eye surgery, gastroenterology, hematology/oncology, neurology, orthopedics, plastic surgery, radiology, urology

columbuS medical guide

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Westerville Surgery Center

OhioHealth Riverside Outpatient Surgery Center

455 Executive Campus Dr., Westerville, 355-6100 nationwidechildrens.org/westerville-surgery-center Specialties: Outpatient surgery, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology (ENT), pediatric surgery, urology, plastic surgery, medical and surgical pediatric subspecialty suites offering gastroenterology

2240 Northbank Dr., 442-6515 ohiohealth.com Specialties: Orthopedics including hand orthopedics, obstetrics and gynecology, cosmetic and plastic surgery, urology, ophthalmology, general surgery

Ohio State’s Eye and Ear Institute

300 Polaris Pkwy., Westerville Medical Campus Ste. 200, 895-8747 orthofootankle.com Specialties: Sports medicine, lower-extremity wound care, diabetic care, trauma surgery, reconstructive surgery, laser treatment for nail fungus, laser vein treatment

915 Olentangy River Rd., 293-8000 medicalcenter.osu.edu Specialties: Outpatient surgery, Havener Eye Institute/ophthalmology, otolaryngology/ENT, plastic surgery, urology, OSU Hand Center

Ohio State’s Rehabilitation Services at Dodd Hall

280 Medical Center Dr., 293-3810 medicalcenter.osu.edu Beds: 60 Specialties: Ohio State’s nationally recognized and accredited rehabilitation inpatient program specializing in stroke, brain and spinal cord rehabilitation. The program was the first in Ohio and is dedicated to physical medicine and rehabilitation research, training and treatment.

Ohio Surgery Center

930 Bethel Rd., 451-0500 ohiosurgerycenter.com Specialties: Ear, nose, throat, hand, plastic and reconstructive surgeries

OhioHealth Eastside Surgery Center 4850 E. Main St., 575-6310 ohiohealth.com Specialties: Colorectal, orthopedics, plastic surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, podiatry, urology, general surgery

Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Center

Taylor Station Surgical Center

275 Taylor Station Rd., 751-4466 taylorstation.com Specialties: Ear, nose and throat, ophthalmology, orthopedics and neck and spine surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, gastroenterology, colon and rectal, general surgery, plastic surgery. Call about ENT.

OhioHealth Westerville Medical Campus

300 Polaris Pkwy., 533-3000 ohiohealth.com Specialties: Outpatient surgery center, heart and vascular services, primary care, physical rehab center, occupational therapy, aquatic and lymphedema therapies, foot and ankle services, mammography, ultrasound, bone density, CT and MRI, occupational medicine, executive physicals, injury care, laboratory services, pulmonary vascular lab, sleep medicine, wound care, 24-Hour Emergency Care Center

You ought to know more about us . . .

Pomegranate Health Systems

Acute Hospital & Residential Treatment Center Professional referrals required

Adolescent Psychiatry

We treat teens age 12-17

http://www.pomegranatehealthsystems.com/

HEALING, HOPE & RESILIENCE Columbus Monthly • December 2013

127


Columbus mediCal Guide

speCial advertisinG seCtion

URGENT CARE CENTERS

Providing medical care on a drop-in basis for non-life-threatening conditions Access Urgent Medical Care 1797 Hill Rd. N., Pickerington, 755-6370 Daily 8 a.m.-8 p.m. 4661 Sawmill Rd., Upper Arlington, 583-1133 Daily 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

Excel Urgent Care

5801 Tamarack Blvd., 436-6009 Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Mount Carmel Grove City Urgent Care

3000 Meadow Pond Ct., Ste. 200, 871-7130 Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

MedSave Clinic

New Albany Urgent Care

153 W. Main St., New Albany, 939-9110 Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

OhioHealth Urgent Care

24 Hidden Ravines Dr., Lewis Center, 740-549-2700 Daily 9 a.m.-7 p.m. 6955 Hospital Dr., Ste. 130, Dublin, 923-0300 Daily 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 5610 N. Hamilton Rd., New Albany, 775-9870 Daily 8 a.m.-8 p.m. 2030 Stringtown Rd., Grove City, 883-0160 Daily 9 a.m.-midnight 1132 Hunter Ave., 437-0278 Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

33 E. North St., Worthington, 862-1300 Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Polaris Urgent Care

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Close-to-Home Centers with Urgent Care

Premium Medical Care

Downtown (555 S. 18th St., 722-4329) Daily 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Canal Winchester (7901 Diley Rd., 355-9050) Dublin (7450 Hospital Dr., 335-7000) East Columbus (6435 E. Broad St., 355-8100) Westerville (433 N. Cleveland Ave., 355-8300) Mon-Fri 3-10 p.m.; Sat-Sun noon-8 p.m.

1120 Polaris Pkwy., Ste. 100, 847-1120 Daily 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

5175 E. Main St., 575-1200 Mon-Fri 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 909 Morse Rd., 261-8188 Mon-Fri 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun noon-3 p.m. 85 Phillipi Rd., 278-2300 Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1981 Granville Pike, Lancaster, 740-654-9400 Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

SOUTHWESTERN

OB/GYN

A DIVISION OF MATERNOHIO CLINICAL ASSOCIATES, INC

Dr. Terry Grogg, M.D. Dr. Robert Jaskot, M.D. Bethany Wayt, CNM

Reynoldsburg Urgent Care 1649 Brice Rd., Ste. B, 864-9380 Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Scioto Urgent Care

4760 Sawmill Rd., 789-9464 Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

U.S. Healthworks

4849 E. Main St., 863-5188; 4821 Roberts Rd., 850-1476 Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

Urgent Care Plus

1430 S. High St., 542-0940 Mon-Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun 11 a.m.-6:15 p.m.

Wedgewood Urgent Care

10330 Sawmill Pkwy., Ste. 300, 923-9200 Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

Westar Urgent Care

444 N. Cleveland Ave., 839-1118 Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

SOUTHWESTERN OFFERS A VARIETY OF SERVICES TO FULFILL YOUR OB/GYN NEEDS: • GENERAL OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY • OFFERING LOW INTERVENTION MIDWIFERY CARE WITH THE SECURITY OF MODERN MEDICINE • ANNUAL EXAMS FROM TEENS TO Now POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN Delivering at Dublin • ALL CONTRACEPTION Methodist  PERMANENT OR REVERSIBLE • PELVIC FLOOR RECONSTRUCTION • INCONTINENCE PROCEDURES • MINIMALLY INVASIVE OFFICE AND ROBOTIC PROCEDURES

(614) 875-0444 4461 Broadway 200, Grove City, Ohio 43123 http://moca-obgyns.com/practice-southwestern 128

Columbus Monthly • December 2013


A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

PLASTIC SURGERY

PLASTIC SURGERY

PLASTIC SURGERY

Robert T. Heck, M.D. F.A.C.S

Timothy A. Treece, M.D., F.A.C.S

Susan D. Vasko, M.D., F.A.C.S

Pomegranate Health Systems 765 Pierce Drive Columbus, OH 43223 (614) 223-1650 www.pomegranatehealthsystems.com

Columbus Aesthetic & Plastic Surgery 4971 Arlington Centre Boulevard Columbus, Ohio 43220 (614) 246-6900 www.ColumbusPlasticSurgery.com

Columbus Aesthetic & Plastic Surgery 4971 Arlington Centre Boulevard Columbus, Ohio 43220 (614) 246-6900 www.ColumbusPlasticSurgery.com

Columbus Aesthetic & Plastic Surgery 4971 Arlington Centre Boulevard Columbus, Ohio 43220 (614) 246-6900 www.ColumbusPlasticSurgery.com

MEDICAL SCHOOL: Madras Medical College (M.B.B.S.) M.D., St. Joseph’s College RESIDENCY: Fellow in Child Psychiatry, Duke University Med (Durham NC), Center Dept. Child & Adolescent Psychiatry In Psychiatry: University Med Center, East Carolina University School of Medicine (Greenville NC) BOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Cert. American Academy of Forensic Examiners HOSPITAL AFFILIATION: Pomegranate Health Systems of Central Ohio, Belmont Community Hospital, Wheeling Hospital PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: American Medical Association, Ohio State Medical Association, Ohio State Psychiatric Association, Belmont County Medical Society, Ohio Hospital Association SPECIAL INTERESTS (MEDICAL): Psychoparmacology, Pharmacogenomics (PGx), Psychopharmagenealogy

MEDICAL SCHOOL: Medical College of Ohio RESIDENCY: Plastic Surgery: Medical University of South Carolina BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic Surgery HOSPITAL AFFILIATION: Riverside Methodist Hospital, Mount Carmel East & West, Dublin Methodist, St. Ann’s, Genesis PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Ohio State Medical Association, American College of Surgeons, Ohio Valley Society of Plastic Surgeons, American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery SPECIAL INTERESTS (MEDICAL): Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Face, Body, & Breast. Specialties include Breast Augmentation, Reduction, & Laser Bra Lift, Full and Mini-FaceLifts, Advanced Liposuction, Mommy Makeovers, Tummy Tucks, Eyelid Surgery, Botox, Facial Fillers, Skin Resurfacing. Laser Center & Medspa with laser skin treatments, laser hair removal, chemical peels, clinical skincare & treatments and more.

MEDICAL SCHOOL: The Ohio State University College of Medicine RESIDENCY: General Surgery: University of Texas Health Science Center of Houston, TX; Plastic Surgery: The Ohio State University Hospital BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic Surgery HOSPITAL AFFILIATION: Riverside Methodist Hospital, Grant Hospital, Dublin Methodist, Upper Arlington Surgery Center PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Ohio State Medical Association, Ohio Valley of Plastic Surgeons, American College of Surgeons SPECIAL INTERESTS (MEDICAL): Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Face, Body, & Breast. Specialties include Breast Augmentation, Lift & Reduction, Full and Mini-Face Lifts, Advanced Liposuction, Mommy Makeovers, Tummy Tucks, Eyelid Surgery, Rhinoplasty, Botox, Facial Fillers, Skin Resurfacing. Laser Center & Medspa with laser skin treatments, laser hair removal, chemical peels, clinical skincare & treatments and more.

MEDICAL SCHOOL: The Ohio State University College of Medicine RESIDENCY: Plastic Surgery: The Ohio State University Medical Center BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic Surgery HOSPITAL AFFILIATION: Riverside Methodist Hospital, Grant Hospital, Dublin Methodist PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Ohio State Medical Association, American College of Surgeons, Columbus Medical Association SPECIAL INTERESTS (MEDICAL): Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Face, Body, & Breast. Specialties include Breast Augmentation, Lift & Reduction, Full and Mini- FaceLifts, Advanced Liposuction, Mommy Makeovers, Tummy Tucks, Eyelid Surgery, Rhinoplasty, Botox, Facial Fillers, Skin Resurfacing. Laser Center & Medspa with laser skin treatments, laser hair removal, chemical peels, clinical skincare & treatments and more.

PLASTIC SURGERY

PSYCHIATRY

PSYCHIATRY

SLEEP MEDICINE

John K. Wakelin III, M.D., F.A.C.S

Mark E. Blair, M.D.

Richard Nockowitz, M.D.

Markus H. Schmidt, M.D., Ph.D.

Columbus Aesthetic & Plastic Surgery 4971 Arlington Centre Boulevard Columbus, Ohio 43220 (614) 246-6900 www.ColumbusPlasticSurgery.com

Pomegranate Health Systems 765 Pierce Drive Columbus, OH 43223 (614) 223-1650 www.pomegranatehealthsystems.com

Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry 880 Greenlawn Avenue Columbus, OH 43223 (614) 449-9664

Ohio Sleep Medicine Institute 4975 Bradenton Avenue Dublin, Ohio 43017 (614) 766-0773 www.sleepmedicine.com

MEDICAL SCHOOL: The Ohio State University College of Medicine RESIDENCY: General Surgery: The Ohio State University Hospital. Plastic Surgery: The Ohio State University Hospital BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic Surgery HOSPITAL AFFILIATION: Riverside Methodist Hospital, Upper Arlington Surgery Center, St. Anne’s PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Ohio State Medical Association, Ohio Valley of Plastic Surgeons, American College of Surgeons, American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery SPECIAL INTERESTS (MEDICAL): Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Face, Body, & Breast. Specialties include Breast Augmentation, Lift & Reduction, Full and Mini-Face Lifts, Advanced Liposuction, Mommy Makeovers, Tummy Tucks, Eyelid Surgery, Rhinoplasty, Botox, Facial Fillers, Skin Resurfacing. Laser Center & Medspa with laser skin treatments, laser hair removal, chemical peels, clinical skincare & treatments and more.

Dr. Mark E. Blair graduated Summa Cum Laude from Anderson University with a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry and attended Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana. While in medical school, Dr. Blair joined the United States Air Force and went on to complete his residency in general psychiatry through Wright State University’s Boonshoft School of Medicine. Following residency, Dr. Blair has worked both inpatient and outpatient adult psychiatry and received awards for “Excellence In Psychiatric Education” and “Clinical Excellence”.

116_129_MEDICAL_GUIDE_DEC_CM.indd 129

MEDICAL SCHOOL: Albert Einstein College Of Medicine (New York) RESIDENCY: Harvard Medical School’s Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston) BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology HOSPITAL AFFILIATION: Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry SPECIAL INTERESTS (MEDICAL): Geriatric Psychiatry, Medical-Psychiatric Interface, Neuropsychiatry, Dementia and Delirium, and Complex Partial Seizures

MEDICAL SCHOOL: Medical College of Ohio RESIDENCY: Cleveland Clinic Foundation BOARD CERTIFICATION: Sleep Medicine, Neurology HOSPITAL AFFILATION: Riverside, Mount Carmel New Albany Surgical Hospital PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Sleep Research Society, World Association of Sleep Medicine, European Sleep Research Society, American Medical Association, Ohio State Medical Association, Columbus Medical Association SPECIAL INTERESTS (MEDICAL): Comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of all sleep disorders for pediatric and adult patients, quality sleep medicine care, long-term patient management, second opinions.

PROFESSIONAL BIOGRAPHIES

Kasiraja Sathappan, M.D. Medical Director

11/13/13 11:41 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Holiday

GIFT GUIDE 101 Beer Kitchen

For you, for a gift, for any food & beer lover! 101 Beer Kitchen offers an exceptional gastropub dining experience 7 days a week. In addition, guests can purchase gift cards, Beer of the Month memberships, upcoming event tickets and gift baskets. Cheers and Happy Holidays from 101BK! 7509 Sawmill Road • Dublin, Ohio 43016 (614) 210-1010 www.101beerkitchen.com

Square One All in stock retail 20% off November 29th - December 2nd. Excluding holiday gift sets. Wonderful Aveda gift sets available as well DOWNTOWN COLUMBUS SPA 275 S. Fourth Street • Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 365-3333 NEW ALBANY SALON 5485 New Albany Road W. • New Albany, Ohio 43054 (614) 775-0505

The Ohio State University: Pathways to the Heart and Mind This coffee table book is a perfect holiday gift for every Buckeye! “This book captures the essence of Ohio State.” - E Gordon Gee $50.00 www.pathwaysbook.com (513) 272-2700

130_134_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 130

11/13/13 3:40 PM


Holiday

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

GIFT GUIDE

Food Tour Gift Certificates! Columbus Food Adventures offers a wide variety of exciting and delicious culinary excursions. Buy a tour gift certificate for the food lover in your life! www.ColumbusFoodAdventures.com

Columbus Aesthetic & Plastic Surgery In return of your $100 consultation fee, you will receive a FREE $100 MedSpa gift card. Gift card presented at time of consultation. Obagi | SkinMedica | ZO Medical (614) 246-6900 www.columbusplasticsurgery.com

nd

Mall at Tuttle Crossing Simon Giftcards速 Make the Perfect Holiday Gift at The Mall at Tuttle Crossing速 Receive FREE gift boxes when you buy three or more gift cards. Stop by Simon Guest Services for details. Offer valid on participating cards while supplies last.

130_134_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 131

11/13/13 3:41 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Holiday

GIFT GUIDE DeepWood

DeepWood is at home for the holidays; take comfort in the DW tavern or celebrate in the traditional Dining Room. Lunch and Dinner. Private Rooms. 511 North High Street • Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 221-5602 www.deepwoodrestaurant.com

Make Fallingwater Gift Cards a holiday tradition. They can be used to purchase Museum Store gifts, tour tickets or other items. To purchase call 724-329-8501. 1491 Mill Run Road • Mill Run, PA 15464 www.Fallingwater.org

Put relaxation on your holiday list. Receive a FREE 1-hour massage session with the purchase of 3 gift cards. Rules apply. Stop by any of our 9 Massage Envy clinics today. We are conveniently located on Bethel Road and in Dublin, Gahanna, Grandview Yard, Grove City, Hilliard, Pickerington, Powell and Westerville. www.massageenvy.com

130_134_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 132

11/13/13 3:41 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Holiday

GIFT GUIDE Franny’s Gift Gallery

All I want for Christmas is Chamilia! Now featuring our sparkling Swarovski crystal Starburst Lock, $100. Plus a full array of Holiday beads await you. New location: The Shops at Worthington Place 7227 North High Street • Worthington, OH 43085 www.frannysgiftgallery.com

Pizza House Come join us this Holiday season for a Pizza House scrumptious pizza! Now featuring Gluten Free pizza and Ravioli. Check out our web specials online! 747 E. Lincoln Avenue • Columbus Ohio (614) 885.3121 Open 7 Days www.pizzahousecolumbus.com

The Scarlet & Gray Game Day Scarf! Each one is Uniquely Handmade of Chinchilla Rex. Luxuriously soft! You will be the envy of all your friends this Holiday Season. Exclusively at Minka’s Furs Price: $399.99 Holiday Special: $199.99 (614) 578-2444 www.minkasfurs.com

130_134_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 133

11/13/13 4:22 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Holiday

GIFT GUIDE

oakland nursery HOME An eclectic collection of garden, home, and one-of-a-kind pieces to accent your living space, inside and out. 4261 W. Dublin-Granville Road (614) 874-2400 (DUBLIN LOCATION ONLY) next to LaScala Restaurant www.oaklandnursery.com

OSU Athletics Department Looking for a gift for that Buckeye Fan in your life? Give the gift of tickets to see the Buckeyes in action. For Tickets go to OhioStateBuckeyes.com

The Woodhouse Day Spa Voted “Best Day Spa” in the “Best of Columbus” for both 2012 and 2013! Check our website for our Gift Card promotion! located in “Historic” Dublin (614) 790-8822 www.woodhousecolumbus.com

130_134_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 134

11/13/13 3:42 PM


C o l u m b u s m o n t h ly | d e C e M b e r 2 0 1 3

R E S TA U R A N T S

the Parmageddon

Photo: tessa Berg

Cheese, Please Every day, somewhere along the Interstate 71 corridor driving from Cleveland to Columbus is a van loaded with pierogi, the key ingredient to one of Melt Bar and Grilled’s most popular sandwiches. The Parmageddon, which owner Matt Fish says has been an iconic sandwich for the kitschy grilled cheese cafe since it opened in Cleveland in 2006, uses the popular Polish dumplings stuffed with mashed potatoes and onions as its centerpiece. Fish is bringing them to Melt’s new Short North eatery, which opened in mid-November and offers 20 sandwiches stuffed with everything from the basics (like just cheese) to the absurd (like lasagna or curry chicken) and a hefty list of craft beers to wash them down. Inspired by a pierogi he ate in Parma, a Cleveland suburb known for its Polish-American population, the sandwich is often a nostalgia kick for Clevelanders looking for a bite of their childhood. The Parmageddon is packed with dumplings, vodka sauerkraut, sauteed onions and sharp cheddar, creating a nearly 4-inch-tall beast. Is Fish worried the sandwich won’t translate to Columbus? “There’s just so much happening in it,” he says. “It’s very Cleveland, but the sandwich is just so awesome that even someone who’s never had a pierogi will get it.” 840 N. High St., Short North, 614-291-5720, meltbarandgrilled.com t Carrie Schedler

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

135


R E S TA U R A N T g U i d E / R E v i E w

Breaking the Mold

A Bluescreek double pork chop and the Tuscan Kale and Butternut Squash Salad

Despite missteps along the way, the new offerings at Latitude 41 surpass the expected ho-hum hotel restaurant fare

L

atitude 41 would like to be your destination for dinner on Friday night, even if—maybe especially if—you’re not a guest at the Renaissance Hotel above it. For years, the restaurant has called out from its bright awning, complete with the name of celebrity-lite chef Dean James Max, to its desired audience, the thousands of Downtown workers who walk and drive by every day. The restaurant went through a fallow period this year between chefs, but hotel-restaurant veteran Michael Koenig has been at the helm since late June, again luring people from outside the hotel with fresh, sustainable, local, modern, American food suitable for a special night out for anyone. 136

Koenig’s menu changes a little bit every day—take note of the date at the bottom of the page—and it ventures further than the average hotel restaurant, offering a tasting menu and giving shout-outs to local producers and farmers. But good ideas are not consistently converted to good food here. You can smear sweet fig jam and umami-bomb caramelized onions on a pizza ($10), but if the crust is still pale and soft when it arrives at a diner’s table, it’s just an assemblage of ingredients that didn’t meet their potential. A vegan pumpkin soup ($6), speckled with autumnal spices, which should have been smooth, was pulpy. Roasted grape tomatoes in the Lamb Sausage Pasta ($16) exploded with sweet, ripe flavor

unanswered anywhere else in the dish; the under-seasoned lamb sausage, pasta and wan spinach stayed mute. A classic scallops entree ($24) with saffron risotto, leeks and spinach would have been a home run had it been seasoned. Chicken liver pate was perfectly spreadable but overwhelmingly metallic and bitter. These are examples of good recipes that did not turn into great dishes during our visits. But when the kitchen gets it right, it really gets it right: mussels ($11) with Angry Orchard hard cider, fennel, shallot and creme fraiche were plump and bountiful, and grilled bread was the ideal vehicle for the sauce left at the bottom of the deep bowl. It seems like everyone is doing mussels these days,

Photos: tessa Berg

By kristen schmidt

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

135_146_RESTAURANTS_DEC_CM.indd 136

11/14/13 5:30 PM


#1 Restaurant in Columbus Crave Magazine Columbus Dispatch Top 10 2013 Certificate of Excellence 2013 Trip Advisor Diner’s Choice 2013 Open Table Private Party Space Available

135_146_RESTAURANTS_DEC_CM.indd 137

11/13/13 11:12 AM


COLUMBUSCRAVE.COM

THE LATEST DINING NEWS AND RESTAURANT PICKS SERVED FRESH DAILY FEATURING:

• The city’s biggest dining directory • Your ratings and reviews of your favorite places • Openings, closings, events & staff favorites

PLUS!

Sign up for the Crave Picks newsletter to have the latest restaurant news delivered to your inbox.

House of Japan.

Book Reservations for Corporate & Holiday Events.

HOUSE OF JAPAN Hibachi Steakhouse & Sushi Bar

138

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

DUBLIN

POLARIS

6153 Parkcenter Circle Dublin, OH 43017

8701 Sancus Blvd. Columbus, OH 43240

614-792-2445

614-781-1776

www.houseofjapanohio.com

Fig and Goat Cheese Pizza

and these were some of the best we’ve had in Columbus. A Bluescreek double pork chop ($25) was perfectly cooked, pink and juicy inside, and evenly, deeply seared on the outside. Soak up juices with forkfuls of herb-flecked spaetzle, but skip the roasted spaghetti squash on the side, which made a strong case that there is such a thing as too much butter. Saba, a syrupy reduction of unfermented grape juice from Italy, shows up on Koenig’s menus frequently. That’s great for salad lovers looking for an alternative to good ol’ balsamic; saba has a similar color but a more complex flavor and, in Koenig’s application, a richer body. Try it on the Tuscan Kale and Butternut Squash Salad ($9), a tousle of dinosaur kale ribbons sprinkled with roasted squash, goat cheese and toasted walnuts (at lunch, add chicken and feel satisfied, not stuffed). Peruse other hotel restaurant menus and, aside from Gallerie at the new Downtown Hilton, dishes as adventurous as these are scarce. Also worth noting is the pricing at Latitude 41, which doesn’t gouge the customer the way many hotel restaurants do; what diners get for their money is a good value. One tradeoff is the atmosphere, which is on the grandiose side, with too-dramatically high ceilings, bloated banquettes and red synthetic curtains that hang beside every mirrored column in the dining room. Lately, those

Photo: tessa Berg

Flaming onion volcano, shrimp tails flying, table-side cooking, and chefs performing tricks are just some of the unique experiences you’ll have while dining at the


Latitude 41 50 N. Third St., Downtown 614-233-7541 latitude41restaurant.com

Hours: Breakfast: 6:30-11 a.m. MonFri, 7 a.m.-noon Sat-Sun; Lunch: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon-Fri, noon-2 p.m. Sat; Dinner: 5 p.m. daily

Fall’s CRISPEST LOOKS? WE’VE GOT ‘EM!

6

GET ISSUES FOR JUST $

12

Price range: $30-$50 per person. Entrees range from a $15 pasta dish to a $32 steak.

Reservations: Accepted In Short: Latitude 41 in the

Subscribe today at capital-style.com. capital-style.com

Renaissance Hotel is a worthy dinner destination even for those who call Columbus home.

Rating: HHH

curtains have been drawn to divide the gaping dining room into smaller parcels, often for private dining events. They don’t close neatly or elegantly, and the room winds up looking slipshod and strange. One Friday night, I occupied the lone table in a curtained-off portion of the dining room; the experience was surreal. The server, knowledgeable and friendly, did his best to make up for it, exchanging just enough small talk, steering me away from bland menu items and gently instructing me to stir a quenelle of mascarpone cheese into a bowl of pasta to make a creamy sauce. For something more consistently social, try dinner in the adjacent lounge for a more casual, fun feel. Small clusters of Downtown co-workers frequent tables here, as do hotel guests. The result is a pleasant cacophony of conversation and laughter. The bar menu is well edited, and happy hour offers excellent values on nibbles. Try the Corn Flake Fried Chicken Pieces ($8, $5 during happy hour), which are just plain fun to eat. Dip them in the Blue Jacket Dairy feta dip that accompanies your order of housemade chips ($2, 99 cents during happy hour) rather than the ho-hum ranch that arrives with the chicken. The chips are fun, salty and greasy, too, so be quick on the draw when sharing with a friend. Also on the bar menu: several of the “share” plates, salads and pizzas on the dining room dinner menu. Find one of the banquettes along the wall; the pillows there are extra-plush, and you’ll have the best people-watching view in the room.

Y0UR HOLIDAY WINE EXPERT Let our Wine Steward help with your holiday wine gifts and purchases.

a clb | restaurant 35 N. HIGH ST. DUBLIN OH | 614.792.3466 | TUCCISDUBLIN.COM

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

135_146_RESTAURANTS_DEC_CM.indd 139

139

11/14/13 3:23 PM


R E S TA U R A N T g U i d E

dining Out COLUMBUS MONTHLY’S EDITORS R ECOMMEND THE BEST OF THE CITY

140

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Pancetta Pear Crisps at Black Creek Bistro

dinner Tue-Sat; closed Sun-Mon. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Bel Lago Waterfront Dining, 170 N. Sunbury Rd. (northeast), 891-0200. This space features American and italian fare, plus a great view of Hoover Reservoir. Open for dinner Mon-Thurs, lunch and dinner Fri-Sat, brunch and dinner Sun. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Bernard’s Tavern, 630 N. High St. (near north), 223-9601. You’ll find classic pub fare at this Short North spot. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. m Black Creek Bistro, 51 Parsons Ave. (east), 246-9662. Fresh herbs and vegetables from owner Kent Peters’ local Black Creek Heritage Farm are incorporated into the dishes at this Olde Towne East spot. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Blue Ginger, 6234 Sawmill Rd. (northwest), 792-3888. diners will find cuisine from Thailand,

Japan, China, Vietnam, indonesia and Malaysia at this Asian-fusion spot in dublin. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Buckeye Pho Asian Kitchen, 761 Bethel Rd. (northwest), 451-2828. Modern decor and highquality Vietnamese fare highlight this strip mall eatery. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. dS, MC, V; $. C. William’s Bistro, 26 grace dr. (northwest), 505-6788. This casual fine-dining spot in Powell offers contemporary American favorites. Open for lunch Tue-Fri; dinner Tue-Sat; brunch Sun; closed Mon. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Cafe Del Mondo, 659 N. Fourth St. (near north), 294-5000. Real italian home-cooking can be found at this family-run establishment. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon-Fri; closed Sat-Sun. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Cameron’s American Bistro, 2185 W. dublingranville Rd. (northwest), 885-3663. An eclectic, fun

PHOTO: MegHan RalsTOn

89 Fish & Grill, 89 E. Nationwide Blvd. (downtown), 586-4585. good seafood, burgers and salads at this downtown joint from restaurateur Richard Stopper. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Aab India Restaurant, 1470 grandview Ave. (northwest), 486-2800. The menu at this establishment on grandview’s “restaurant row” offers standard indian fare. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Abuelo’s Mexican Food Embassy, 3950 gramercy St. (northeast), 337-9006. This Easton eatery serves up traditional Mexican meals. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Akai Hana, 1173 Old Henderson Rd. (northwest), 451-5411. This shopping-center Japanese restaurant specializes in sushi and sashimi. Open for lunch Mon-Sat; dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Aladdin’s Eatery, 2931 N. High St., 262-2414; 1423-B grandview Ave., 488-5565; 6804 Perimeter Loop, 588-0330 (all northwest); 2400 E. Main St. (east), 586-1440. These casual Middle Eastern restaurants serve good, inexpensive food. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $. Alana’s, 2333 N. High St. (campus), 2946783. This fiercely independent restaurant serves outstanding creative and seasonal dishes with international flavors. Open for dinner Wed-Sat; closed Sun-Tue. Checks, AE, dC, dS, MC, V; $$. Arepazo Tapas & Wine, 93 N. High St. (east), 471-7296. The beloved downtown lunch spot now has a gahanna location with dinner hours and a full bar. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat, closed Sun. dS, MC, V; $. Arirang Oriental Market, 1526 Bethel Rd. (northwest), 459-8070. Located in the back of a grocery store, you’ll find traditional Korean comfort fare at this unassuming spot in Bethel Center Mall. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $. Bamboo Cafe, 774 Bethel Rd. (northwest), 326-1950. Find enjoyable dishes at this Vietnamese and Thai destination. Open for lunch and dinner Tue-Sun; closed Mon. MC, V; $$. Barcelona, 263 E. Whittier St. (german Village), 443-3699. The german Village favorite serves up satisfying, authentic Spanish cuisine. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Barrel 44, 1120 N. High St. (near north), 294-2277. This Short North spot offers a rousing whiskey bar, plus a decent food menu. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, dS, MC, V; $$. Basi Italia, 811 Highland St. (near north), 294-7383. A tiny, convivial gem tucked away in Victorian Village, Basi italia serves honest italian cuisine. Open for


7 days; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Cardone’s Restaurant & Bar, 377 W. Main St., Westerville (northeast), 392-2267. This restaurant offers satisfying Italian cuisine, complete with authentic desserts. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Chile Verde Cafe, 4852 Sawmill Rd. (northwest), 442-6630; 1522 Gemini Pl. (northeast), 614-846-8773. These spots serve better-than-usual New Mexican cuisine, but the real attraction is 30 margaritas and four grades of tequila. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $. China Dynasty, 1689 W. Lane Ave. (northwest), 486-7126. Popular Chinese restaurant with a large menu of entrees in various regional cooking styles. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. City Barbeque, 3758 W. Powell Rd., 224-8224; 2111 W. Henderson Rd., 538-8890 (both northwest); 600 S. State St., Westerville, 823-8890; 8491 Sancus Blvd., 573-8686 (both northeast); 108 S. Stygler Rd., Gahanna, 416-8890; 5979 E. Main St., 755-8890; 1195 W. Church St., Newark, 740-281-1605 (all east); 2261 Stringtown Rd., 423-3757 (south). This carnivore heaven For a review of the restaurant, see serves smoked ribs, pulled pork and much more. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. columbusmonthly.com/Restaurants Columbus Brewing Company Restaurant, 525 Short St. (German Village), 464-2739. At this beermFood served until at least 11 p.m. weekdays and drinker’s paradise, you’ll find well-prepared and boldly flavored pub fare. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner midnight or later on weekends; call for exact hours. Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, CB, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. Columbus Fish Market, 1245 Olentangy River For a listing of more restaurants, see Rd. (northwest), 291-3474; 40 Hutchinson Ave. (northeast), 410-3474. Find delicious seafood at both locations. Open columbusmonthly.com for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. columbusmonthly.com columbusmonthly.com/parties Cuco’s Taqueria, 2612 Henderson Rd. (northwest), 538-8701. Traditional Mexican fare is a step above the columbusmonthly.com rest at this family-friendly place. Open for breakfast, menu at an out-of-the-way spot near Worthington. lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Cuisine of India, 8475 Sancus Blvd. (northeast), Cap City Fine Diner and Bar, 1299 Olentangy 781-9610. This pleasant neighborhood Indian restaurant River Rd. (northwest), 291-3663; 1301 StoneRidge with a tasteful dining room serves good food. Open Dr. (east), 478-9999. A fun diner atmosphere and for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. an extensive menu. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner The restaurants included here are recommended this month by Columbus Monthly for dependable food quality, service and value. The opinions represent the best judgment of the editors. Credit card notations: AE, American Express; CB, Carte Blanche; DC, Diners Club; DS, Discover; JCB, Japanese Credit Bureau; MC, MasterCard; V, Visa. For a complete guide to hundreds of restaurants, see the 2014 Crave Restaurant Guide, available at newsstands throughout the city. Cost estimates are based on an average dinner price for appetizer and entree, excluding tip and beverage. The symbols used are as follows: $—inexpensive, under $15; $$—moderate, $15-$30; $$$—expensive, over $30.

Drink Dine 89

Now Booking for Holiday Events Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4-7pm & Saturday 4:30-6pm Beer Specials Starting at $3 $5 Wine and Specialty Cocktails Specially Priced Appetizers

Love What You Eat

“Here in Columbus it’s not an option for a restaurant to offer a variety of great local seafood, but at 89 Fish & Grill we seek out and rely upon as many Ohio farms, culinary artisans, and neighborhood businesses as possible. This is the difference that brings our seafood from around the world to a whole different level. It’s that local taste!” - Executive Chef John Beck

Complimentary valet parking starting at 5pm Monday-Saturday 89 E. Nationwide Blvd. • 614-586-4585 89ish.com

Available for Booking Private Events.

PHOTO: MegHan RalsTOn

Wine Down Sundays - Retail Wine Night

Cumin, 1025 Polaris Pkwy. (northeast), 854-0775. You’ll find traditional Indian cuisine such as saag paneer and chicken curry at this restaurant near Polaris. Open for lunch and dinner daily. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. De-Novo Bistro & Bar, 201 S. High St. (downtown), 222-8830. A chic space across from Columbus Commons with an eclectic menu. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. DeepWood, 511 N. High St. (downtown), 221-5602. Classic American fare gets turned on its head at this upscale spot with a cozy tavern. Open for lunch Tue-Fri; dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Dosa Corner, 1077 Old Henderson Rd. (northwest), 459-5515. At this plain little family-run ethnic eatery, you’ll find reasonably priced, boldly flavored Southern Indian vegetarian cuisine. Open for lunch Tue-Sun; dinner 7 days. DS, MC, V; $. Due Amici, 67 E. Gay St. (downtown), 2249373. High ceilings, hanging glass lamps and red brick make Due Amici an elegant yet comfortable place to dine. The straightforward menu veers toward Italian cuisine. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner 7 days; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Eddie Merlot’s, 1570 Polaris Pkwy. (northeast), 433-7307. This upscale Polaris steakhouse has a strong wine list. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. El Arepazo, 47 N. Pearl St. (downtown), 228-4830. Honest Latin American cuisine and friendly counter service can be found at this cozy establishment. Open for lunch Mon-Sat; closed Sun. DS, MC, V; $. El Vaquero, 375 Stoneridge Ln., Gahanna (east), 428-1725; 8715 Sancus Blvd. (northeast), 847-7326; 3230 Olentangy River Rd., 261-0900; 2195 Riverside Dr., 4864547; 9130 Dublin Rd., 336-1128; 3580 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., 659-0279; 259 S. Sandusky St., Delaware, 740-3620919 (all northwest); 3160 Broadway, Grove City (south), 801-9910; 1780 Hilliard-Rome Rd. (west), 876-5157. You’ll find good Tex-Mex food and good service at good prices. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Elevator Brewery & Draught Haus, 161 N. High St. (downtown), 228-0500. The food and the beer are just as enjoyable as dining in a building that’s

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

141


Middle West LAUNCHES LINE OF VINEGARS

Middle West Spirits has teamed up with Cleveland chef Jonathon Sawyer (known for his sustainable restaurant The Greenhouse Tavern) to start Tavern Vinegar Co.—a line of craft beer- and wine-based vinegars created with the chef and bartender in mind. “We’re a culinary company first,” says Middle West Spirits co-owner Ryan Lang. It took two years for the Columbus-Cleveland team to create the first batch of seven oak-barrel-aged vinegars ranging from a tart chardonnay wine vinegar to a malt-like craft beer ale vinegar. The hope is that they will be used by restaurants all over the country.

Ryan Lang of Middle West Spirits

For now, the home cook can pick up a bottle of Tavern Vinegar ($9 to $12 for 200mL) at the Middle West Spirits distillery (1230 Courtland Ave., Short North) and online at tavernvinegar.com. ▼ Beth Stallings

SLIDER RESTAURANT Club 185 OWNERS COMING TO Wonder PLAN TO OPEN bread BUILDING ITALIAN VILLAGE Traveling around the globe proved one EATERY thing to Crystal Park—mini burgers aren’t just everywhere; they also seem to work well anywhere, too. That’s why Park settled on a gourmet slider concept for her restaurant Cray Eatery and Drinkery, located in the Wonder Bread Building in Italian Village. The menu is the brainchild of Challah food truck co-owner Catie Randazzo, a friend of Park, who will craft a list of 15 to 20 sliders, rotating options every six months. According to Park, there will be beef, chicken, turkey, seafood, black bean and quinoa options—“something for everyone,” she says, including vegetarians and vegans. The part-time bartender and former Huntington Bank employee hopes that all-inclusive vibe will spread to her bar, too. “We’ll feature 15 infused liquors that will change with the seasons,” Park says, citing vodka with Werther’s Original candies as one example. “It’s something no other place has.” For now, the plan is to open Cray for dinner nightly and brunch on weekends. Park hopes to open the 2,500-square-foot, 82-seat space on Feb. 1, 2014. ▼ Beth Stallings

142

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Randy and Tina Corbin—owners of Philco, El Camino Inn, Little Palace, The Rossi and Club 185—are adding a sixth restaurant to their lineup. The restaurateurs signed a lease last month for Sunset Lounge (883 N. Fourth St.), a former Italian Village soul food restaurant that’s been closed for about a year. They’re hoping to open a new Corbin-brand business in the space by March or April. “It’ll be a familiar concept—a neighborhood bar with good food,” says Tina, adding that the couple will likely either keep the original restaurant name or change it to something that alludes to its previous life. “I don’t think that area has anything like that. We’re starting from the beginning over there.” The now-gutted space will seat 45 to 50 people and have a new patio when it opens, she says. ▼ Emily Thompson

Got a tip for Dining Notes? Email your restaurant news and updates to bstallings@columbuscrave.com

been around since 1897. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Eleven, 591 N. High St. (near north), 2259611. This cocktail lounge, connected to and run by Hyde Park Prime Steakhouse, features creative small plates and fun cocktails. Open for dinner and drinks Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Ella, 266 E. Main St. (northeast), 855-4600. This half-gallery-half-restaurant in New Albany offers notable, eclectic cooking with great service. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Explorers Club, 1586 S. High St. (south), 725-0155. This welcoming spot in Merion Village specializes in Latin-inspired comfort food. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Flatiron Bar and Diner, 129 E. Nationwide Blvd. (downtown), 461-0033. You’ll find Cajun, Creole, barbecue and Lowcountry cuisine at this cozy downtown bar and restaurant. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, CB, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. Frezno Bar and Grill, 460 S. Front St. (German Village), 824-4367. Serial restaurateurs Kevin and Lori Ames have revived their ‘90s Short North hotspot in the Brewery District, with a fusion menu as dedicated to excess as the decade itself. Open for lunch Mon-Fri, dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. G. Michael’s Bistro & Bar, 595 S. Third St. (German Village), 464-0575. Find delicious food and delightful dining at this Southern-influenced bistro and bar, where dishes are well executed. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. Gallerie Bar & Bistro, 401 N. High St. (downtown), 484-5287. Chef Bill Glover heads up the French-inspired bistro inside the Hilton Columbus Downtown. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V, $$ Giorgio, 2941 N. High St. (northwest), 2659020. With its trattoria-like atmosphere, this Italian eatery offers tasty classic dishes, with fairly priced wine pairings. Open for dinner TueSun; closed Mon. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Giuseppe’s Ritrovo, 2268 E. Main St. (east), 235-4300. Owners Giuseppe and Vesna Mangana add to the conviviality of the charming Bexley neighborhood Italian restaurant. (Giuseppe himself prepares some of the dishes.) Open for lunch MonFri; dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, MC, V; $$. Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant, 401 N. Front St. (downtown), 246-2900. The menu items at this festive and sporty Arena District brewpub restaurant are mostly tailored to show off the beers. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. Haiku, 800 N. High St. (near north), 294-8168. This bustling restaurant with polished servers offers mostly Japanese fare and has a 20-seat sushi bar. Open for lunch Mon-Sat; dinner 7 days. Sushi-only starting one hour before close. AE, DS, MC, V; $. m Happy Greek, 660 N. High St. (near north), 463-1111. At this Short North spot, you’ll enjoy Greek offerings for a reasonable price. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days; brunch Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Harvest Pizzeria, 495 S. Fourth St. (German Village), 824-1769. Enjoy memorable pizzas served on a thin crust at this German Village charmer. Open for lunch Tue-Sat; dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Holy Smoke Barbecue, 5251 N. Hamilton Rd. (northeast), 471-8844. Ribs, chicken, coleslaw, baked beans and greens are favorite staples at this Gahanna spot. (There’s also a location at the North Market.) Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Hubbard Grille, 793 N. High St. (near north), 291-5000. You’ll discover Cajun and Southern-inspired dishes at this contemporary spot in the Short North featuring pour-your-own beer spigots. Open for dinner Tue-Sun; closed Mon. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Hyde Park Prime Steakhouse, 1615 Old Henderson Rd., 442-3310; 6360 Frantz Rd., 717-2828 (both northwest); 55 Hutchinson Ave. (northeast), 438-1000; 569 N. High St. (near north), 224-2204. This Ohio-based steakhouse chain serves excellent classics in a sophisticated atmosphere. There’s also an extensive wine list, and the service is polished. Open for dinner 7 days (Mon-Sat at Frantz Road and Hutchinson Avenue). AE, DC, MC, V; $$$. Indian Oven, 427 E. Main St. (downtown), 220-9390. Long one of the city’s better Indian restaurants, with powerfully flavored food and fresh ingredients. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$.

C t S

G a G

PHOTO: MegHan RalsTOn

R E S TA U R A N T G U I D E / D I N I N G N O T E S


Celebrate the Season

As seen on

TRAV

EL CH ANNE

MAN V. FOO D

Gather with friends and family at the epic restaurant for real German food and entertainment.

L’S

Host your o r office ffi party part in our o r banquet banquet rooms or we can deliver a lunch buffet for the staff celebration. Our gift cards make great stocking stuffers! 614.444.6808 Restaurant 240 East Kossuth Street 614.444.5050 Classic Catering facebook.com/schmidtscbus twitter.com/schmidtscbus

Ship Schmidt’s famous Bahama Mama Sausages anywhere in the United States.

www.schmidthaus.com

135_146_RESTAURANTS_DEC_CM.indd 143

11/13/13 11:14 AM


J. Gilbert’s Wood-Fired Steaks and Seafood, 1 E. Campus View Blvd. (northeast), 840-9090. You’ll find just what the name says here, plus the dessert and wine selections are strong. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. J. Liu, 6880 N. High St., 888-1818; 50 W. Bridge St., 718-1818 (both north). The menu combines Asian, Italian and classic American cuisines, served in a modern, trendy setting. Open for lunch and dinner daily. AE, DC, MC, V; $$ Jeddo Kabab, 2448 Home Acre Rd. (northeast), 794-1202. A variety of flavorful wraps and kebabs can be found in this unassuming Middle Eastern restaurant. Open for lunch and dinner Tue-Sun; closed Mon. DS, MC, V; $$. Jimmy V’s Grill & Pub, 912 S. High St. (German Village), 445-9090; 1 S. State St. (northeast), 865-9090; 1788 W. Fifth Ave. (northwest), 487-1717. Greek-influenced entrees and appetizers can be found in this comfortable pub atmosphere. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days; brunch Sat-Sun. DS, MC, V; $$. m Katzinger’s, 475 S. Third St. (German Village), 228-3354. A Columbus institution with a huge list of deli sandwiches on memorable rye bread. You can eat in the friendly confusion of the restaurant or carry out. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Kaya Korean B.B.Q. & Sushi, 4710 Reed Rd. (northwest), 326-2551. Some Japanese items and sushi are offered, but the attraction here is the home-cooked Korean food. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Kihachi, 2667 Federated Blvd. (northwest), 764-9040. One of the city’s most universally praised restaurants, Kihachi offers gracious service, artfully arranged dishes and outstanding Japanese cuisine. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$$. Knead Urban Diner, 505 N. High St. (downtown), 228-6323. The latest venture from Rick and Krista Lopez features plenty of local ingredients on a fun, diner-y menu. Open for lunch Tue-Sun; dinner Tue-Sat. Checks, AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Kooma, 37 Vine St. (downtown), 224-3239. Cozy Kooma offers stylish and tasty Japanese and Korean fusion food. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner MonSat; closed Sun. AE, CB, DC, DS, JCB, MC, V; $$. La Chatelaine, 1550 W. Lane Ave., 4881911; 627 High St., Worthington, 848-6711; 65 W. Bridge St., Dublin, 763-7151 (all northwest). Enjoy bistro-like food at this French restaurant, bakery, cafe and bar. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days, brunch Sun. AE, MC, V; $$. L’Antibes, 772 N. High St., Suite 106 (near north), 291-1666. This upscale gem of a French eatery in the Short North also has a lovely patio. Open for dinner Tue-Sat. AE, CB, DC, DS, JCB, MC, V; $$$. La Plaza Tapatia Mexican Restaurant & Supermarket, 4233 Shoppers Ln. (west), 276-0333. Authentic, unpretentious and flavorful Mexican food can be found at this place in Westland shopping center. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. La Scala Italian Bistro, 4199 W. Dublin-Granville Rd. (northwest), 889-9431. This longtime eatery near Dublin serves notable Italian-American comfort food. Open for lunch Tue-Fri; dinner Tue-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Latitude 41, 50 N. Third St. (downtown), 233-7541. Located in the Renaissance hotel,

144

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Moretti’s of Arlington, 2124 Tremont Center (northwest), 486-2333. Generous portions of southern Italian and Sicilian food are served at reasonable prices at this festive space. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Moshi Sushi Bar, 2152 E. Main St., Bexley (east), 732-0641. You will find a pleasant atmosphere with a diverse menu, with mostly Japanese and some Korean offerings. Open for lunch MonFri; dinner 7 days. AE, DS, JCB, MC, V; $$. Nancy’s Home Cooking, 3133 N. High St. (northwest), 265-9012. This informal comfort food diner is known for its chicken and noodles and breakfast omelets. Open for breakfast and lunch 7 days. DS, MC, V; $. Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza and Live Music, 5601 N. High St., (northwest), 436-2625. Charred-edge pies served with a side of live Americana music. Open for dinner Tue-Sun; closed Mon. AE, DS, MS, V, $$ Northstar Cafe, 951 N. High St. (near north), 298-9999; 4015 Townsfair Way (northeast), 532-5444; 4241 N. High St. (northwest), 784-2233. Quality organic and locally produced ingredients help make the food at these attractive restaurants first-rate. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Oscar’s Restaurant & Wine Bar, 84 N. High St., Dublin (northwest), 792-3424. A nicely intimate place with well-executed American dishes, Oscar’s particularly shines with its main courses. Open for lunch Mon-Fri, dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Park Creek Kitchen, 2124 Arlington Ave. (northwest), 725-3970. There’s a little bit of everything on this contemporary-style menu, such as crab cakes, buttermilk fried chicken and salmon. Open Mon-Sat for lunch and dinner; closed Sun. DS, MC, V; $$. The Pearl, 641 N. High St. (near north,) 2270151. The latest concept from restaurateur Cameron Mitchell is this tavern-meets-oyster-bar in the heart of the Short North with a throwback vibe, craft beers and barrel-aged cocktails. Open for dinner 7 days, brunch Saturday-Sunday. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$$ Philco Bar+Diner, 747 N. High St. (near north), 299-9933. The diner is re-envisioned at the latest concept from the owners of The Rossi and Little Palace. Here, chef Andrew Smith crafts a fun menu, including johnnycake sliders, pork shoulder pot roast, hushpuppies, Coney dogs (an ode to the former tenant) and, of course, breakfast all day. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Tue-Sun. AE, DC, MC, V; $$. Pho Asian Noodle House and Grill, 1288 W. Lane Ave. (northwest), 488-8887. Enjoy Thai, Vietnamese and Chinese dishes in this spot that used to be a fast-food place. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. DS, MC, V; $. Pie’s Gourmet Pizza Bistro, 7601 E. Main St. (east), 863-5600. Hand-crafted pizzas and small plates are served in a renovated Colonial house. Open for dinner Tues-Sat; closed Sun-Mon. AE, DS, MS, V, $$ Plantain Cafe, 77 E. Gay St. (downtown), 4642822. This restaurant serves Caribbean and Central American-style dishes on bustling Gay Street. Open for lunch 7 days; dinner Mon-Sat. DS, MC, V; $$. Plate, 29 S. High St., New Albany (northeast), 855-2929. A casual Italian eatery in downtown New Albany with a focus on sourcing local (including a few ingredients from certified master chef Alfonso Contrisciani’s nearby farm). The menu features handmade pastas, sandwiches and Neapolitan-style pizza. Open for dinner Tue-Sun. AE, DC, MC, V; $$. Red, 717 N. High St. (near north), 221-8600. The sister restaurant of Two Fish Bistro, Red’s menu consists almost entirely of sushi. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Red Door Tavern, 1736 W. Fifth Ave. (northwest), 488-5433. A casual longtime neighborhood favorite offering unpretentious sandwiches. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Refectory, 1092 Bethel Rd. (northwest), 451-9774. One of the city’s finest restaurants, the Refectory is located in a restored 19th-century church. Its Frenchstyle cuisine is prepared with great flair and attention to detail. The wine list is superb. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, CB, DC, DS, JCB, MC, V; $$$. Rigsby’s Kitchen, 698 N. High St. (near north), 461-7888. The frequently changing menu of Americanstyle food with Italian overtones is full flavored. It’s one of those places where you can order at will. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Rivage Atlantique, 652 High St. (northeast), 505-7779. The owners of the Grandview Cafe go

photo: jodi miller

Motherclucker at Knead

this restaurant emphasizes the use of fresh and local ingredients in its dishes, with a menu that changes often. Open for breakfast and dinner 7 days; lunch Mon-Sat. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. Lavash Cafe, 2985 N. High St. (northwest), 263-7777. Restaurant veteran Nasir Latif offers Middle Eastern dishes and tasty desserts, plus fresh juices and fruit smoothies. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Lindey’s, 169 E. Beck St. (German Village), 228-4343. A longtime popular bistro offering fine American cuisine. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Local Roots, 15 E. Olentangy St. (northwest), 602-8060. The ribs and appetizers are good at this family-friendly, cozy restaurant in Powell. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days; brunch Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$ Lola & Giuseppe’s Trattoria, 100 Granville St., Gahanna (east), 473-9931. A friendly, family-run restaurant serving classic Italian fare. Open for dinner Tue-Sat; closed Sun-Mon. Checks, AE, DS, MC, V; $$. M, 2 Miranova Pl., Suite 100 (downtown), 629-0000. You’ll find a contemporary menu at Cameron Mitchell’s most elegant and upscale restaurant. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$$. Mad Greek, 4210 E. Broad St. (east), 338-0000. Quick, casual and genuine Greek cuisine is found in this welcoming and cheerful establishment. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Marcella’s, 615 N. High St. (near north), 2232100; 1319 Polaris Pkwy. (northwest), 844-6500. It’s got a bustling atmosphere reminiscent of a Parisian brasserie, but the food is a selection of well-executed Italian dishes. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days (dinner only at near north). AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. Market 65, 65 E. State St. (downtown), 564-6565. Enjoy fresh, locally sourced ingredients at this salad, soup and wrap spot downtown. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon-Fri; closed Sat-Sun. Checks, AE, DS, MC, V; $. Martini Modern Italian, 445 N. High St. (downtown), 224-8259. Across from the convention center, this spot offers Italian fare, inventive cocktails, a small but interesting wine list and tasty desserts. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$$. Mazah, 1439 Grandview Ave. (northwest), 488-3633. This spot, which is located along restaurant row in Grandview, serves well-prepared Middle Eastern fare. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. McCormick & Schmick’s, 3965 New Bond St. (northeast), 476-3663. This classy, upscale seafood chain location at Easton has an impressive selection of fresh fish and a knowledgeable staff. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. Melt Bar & Grilled, 840 N. High St. (near north), 453-1150. This Cleveland-based kitschy cafe is all about one thing: grilled cheese. Here, you’ll get the expected plain cheese to the odd, like two slices of Texas-style toast stuffed with pierogi, sauerkraut and cheese. Paired with a heaping side of fries and a hearty craft beer list, the gourmet bar food at Melt is known to draw multi-hour-long wait times. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $ Mezzo Italian Kitchen & Wine, 12 W. Bridge St., Dublin (northwest), 889-6100. A variety of Italian dishes—as well as prompt, friendly service—can be found at this cozy, romantic spot. Open for dinner Mon-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Milestone 229, 229 Civic Center Dr. (downtown), 427-0276. You’ll find notable views, drinks and food at this restaurant located in the new Scioto Mile park. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Mitchell’s Ocean Club, 4002 Easton Station (northeast), 416-2582. The atmosphere is that of a festive 1950s supper club and the menu features a fine array of seafood choices. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. MoJoe Lounge, 149 S. High St. (downtown), 732-4899. You’ll find a coffee shop, bar and restaurant with an interesting menu at this location across from Columbus Commons. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon-Wed; breakfast, lunch and dinner Thurs-Fri; closed Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Montgomery Inn, 4565 W. DublinGranville Rd. (northwest), 791-7427. This popular Cincinnati-based rib joint offers fall-off-the-bone soft ribs, slathered with a thick, sweet, tangy and slightly spicy tomato-based sauce. Open for


photo: tessa Berg

photo: jodi miller

upscale in Worthington, serving cuisine from the Atlantic Coast. There’s also the Back Room gastropub. Both spaces open for dinner MonSat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. The Rossi Bar + Kitchen, 895 N. High St. (near north), 299-2810. Diners will find an upscale bar atmosphere and an eclectic menu of American fare at this hotspot. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. m Rusty Bucket, 180 Market St., New Albany, 939-5300; 400 Polaris Pkwy., 890-3663 (both northeast); 2158 E. Main St., 236-2426; 73 N. Hamilton Rd., Gahanna, 475-4435 (both east); 6644 Perimeter Loop Dr., Dublin, 889-2594; 7800 Olentangy River Rd., 436-2626; 1635 W. Lane Ave., 485-2303 (all northwest). This local sports bar chain serves tasty versions of American standard fare. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. San Su Korean BBQ, 1138 Bethel Rd. (northwest), 273-0188. An authentic DIY Korean restaurant. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. m Scali Ristorante, 1901 St. Rt. 256 (east), 7597764. A tiny, family-run Italian place whose hearty pastas, veal entrees and friendly servers reassure you there really is a Mama Scali. Open for lunch Thu-Fri; dinner Tue-Sat; closed Sun-Mon. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Shanghai Lily, 6161 Glick Rd. (northwest), 789-9330. Serves a range of cuisine from China, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and Japan. Open for lunch Mon-Sat, dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Shaw’s Restaurant & Inn, 123 N. Broad St., Lancaster (east), 740-654-1842 or 800-654-2477. Shaw’s is a first-class restaurant serving continental and American cuisine. The great stock of California wines alone makes the trip worthwhile. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Shoku, 1312 Grandview Ave. (northwest), 4859490. Winning Pan-Asian cuisine, plus 11 kinds of sake. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Sidebar, 122 E. Main St. (downtown), 228-9041. This downtown spot serves Mediterranean and South American-inspired dishes. Open for dinner Tue-Sun; brunch Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Skillet, 410 E. Whittier St. (German Village), 443-2266. This little diner offers an ever-changing menu filled with locally sourced comfort foods. Open for lunch and dinner Wed-Fri; brunch Sat-Sun; closed Mon-Tue. DS, MC, V; $. Spagio, 1295 Grandview Ave. (northwest), 486-1114. Described as “European and Pacific Rim cuisine,” you’ll find a contemporary menu on restaurant row in Grandview. Open for lunch and dinner Tue-Sat; closed Mon. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. m Starliner Diner, 5240 Cemetery Rd. (west), 529-1198. Funky, fun and eclectic, this Hilliard place serves mainly Cuban, Southwestern and Mexican food. Open for breakfast and lunch Tue-Sun; dinner Tue-Sat; closed Mon. Checks, AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $. Sushi Ting, 2875 Olentangy River Rd. (northwest), 261-8888. The atmosphere is pleasing, and the service is friendly and professional at this Japanese restaurant. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. T. Murray’s Bar and Kitchen, 560 S. High St. (downtown), 824-2301. A former Lindey’s bartender goes out on his own near German Village with a restaurant serving contemporary dishes. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Taj Palace, 2794 Fishinger Blvd. (west), 771-3870. If you like spicy food, this Indian restaurant will satisfy. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Tasi, 680 N. Pearl St. (near north), 222-0788. This casual gem, owned by Kent and Tasi Rigsby of Rigsby’s Kitchen, offers excellent sandwiches, dinner entrees and some of the best espresso in town. Open for breakfast and lunch 7 days. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $. Thai Orchid, 7654 Sawmill Rd., 792-1112; 8736 Moreland St., Powell, 740-881-3000 (both northwest). While the Thai side of the menu is more lively and engaging, you’ll still find decent Chinese food at this Asian-fusion spot. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $. Thai Taste, 1178 Kenny Sq. Mall (northwest), 451-7605. Excellent Thai food comes out of this quietly attractive storefront restaurant. Open for lunch Mon-Sat, dinner 7 days. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $. Third & Hollywood, 1433 W. Third Ave. (northwest), 488-0303. You’ll enjoy delicious contemporary-American food at this upscale casual spot from the folks who brought you

R E S TA U R A N T G U I D E / T H E D I S H

Flavor in the Details In his first year as executive chef of Barcelona, Jacob Hough has made small changes to yield a big difference

J

acob Hough always wanted to work at Barcelona. The Pennsylvania School of Culinary Arts grad applied for a job as a line cook several times, he recalls, but never got hired. So Hough took a job as a line cook at the Bexley Monk, biding his time until he got the call to take an opening at Barcelona. Hough would eventually work his way up from the line at the German Village institution to sous chef, a No. 2 position he held for two and a half years under longtime Barcelona executive chef Paul Yow, who left to open his own restaurant in 2012. Now executive chef at the Spanish-inspired restaurant, Hough has made subtle changes to the Barcelona menu over the past year in an attempt to give it a deeper taste of Spain. And so far, the chef says, it’s made a difference to customers. “Diners have said things are better for all the right reasons,” says the 34-yearold chef, who immediately amped up Barcelona’s paella recipe—adding more spices, peppers and jalapenos to the base of the classic, aromatic Spanish dish—when he got the job last year. “It wasn’t bad. I just wanted to give the flavor more of a boost.” He applied the same philosophy to the tapas menu, expanding the offerings to include 12 to 15 small plates on a tasting menu that rotates every Tuesday. Hough added dishes like a braised beef short rib with fried leeks and a Spanish blue cheese and mushroom sauce, as well as a crispy pork shank with smoked paprika and rosemary cream sauce. It’s like homey, comfort food, he says, but simplified. “Our food is simple, but with a lot of flavor,” explains Hough, who plans to add more game meats to the menu this season, such as boar and ostrich. “As chefs, we tend to overdo things. But with Spanish food, it’s simple, fresh.” tBeth Stallings Columbus Monthly • December 2013

145


Cocktail Lessons Craft cocktail expert Grant Bain launched interactive bar-lesson company Speakeasy Kitchen in the spring, and he’s gradually making a name for himself as Columbus’ go-to party mixologist. For a per-person fee (usually $40 to $60), he’ll turn your get-together of 10 people or more into a speakeasy, teaching guests how to make old-timey drinks while sharing Prohibition-era trivia and quoting cocktail expert Dale DeGroff. tJenny Rogers

How’d you venture into the world of craft cocktails?

I had bartended in college, at the old Buckeye Hall of Fame. When my wife and I got engaged—and I realized how expensive a wedding can be—I wanted to make some extra money. So I decided to get a bartending gig again and got in touch with the guys at Sidebar 122. Then I ended up training [in vintage craft cocktails] for three days under Michael Ruble of The Violet Hour in Chicago. This is one of the first places to be nominated for a James Beard award for their drinks. I learned more during that training than in all my years of bartending.

So how did Speakeasy Kitchen come to be?

I started out creating these drinks for my friends, and then realized I could do so much more with it. This just couldn’t have worked five years ago. I’m creating fresh, exciting drinks and craft cocktails [that] everyone’s into right now.

What’s an evening with Speakeasy Kitchen look like?

Before the party, I’ll come over to see your space to make sure it will work and to talk about the cocktails I’m thinking about serving. On the night of the party, I’ll set up three stations: one for me and two for your guests. We’ll make the drinks (between five and 10), step-by-step, and I’ll explain a little about the cocktail’s construction … why we need the sugar, the fat and the acid. We’ll be using totally fresh ingredients, homemade syrups, aromatic bitters and craft ice. All of my ingredients are local—including basil and mint from my garden. Hiring me just makes your event easier. Speakeasy Kitchen is totally interactive—I walk the group through the history of the cocktail scene in 1980s New York City, share a little of my background, crack some jokes and explain my six degrees to Dale DeGroff, the father of the

craft cocktail scene (and author of “The Craft of the Cocktail”). From the Speakeasy Kitchen:

StocKyard Pony

1 dash angostura bitters 3 lemon slices (about an eighth of a lemon each), muddled 1/4 ounce one-to-one simple syrup 1/2 ounce aperol 2 ounces old Granddad 100 proof bourbon In a shaker tin, shake over five ice cubes (roughly 1-by-1-inch if possible) until there’s a visible frost on the metal exterior. Strain liquid (ideally with a Hawthorne strainer) into a chilled double rocks glass over ice (this time, 2-by-2-inch cubes if possible).

146

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

Northstar Cafe. Open for lunch Fri-Sun; dinner 7 days; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Thurber’s Bar, 310 S. High St. (downtown), 228-3800. Located in the Westin Hotel, this bar/ restaurant is named after humorist, writer and cartoonist James Thurber, a native of Columbus, and offers a gastropub menu. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. m Till, 247 King Ave. (near north), 298-9986. Chef Magdiale Wolmark has transformed his vegetarian Dragonfly Neo-V concept into Till. New to the menu is meat, but the place still features some of the best vegan/vegetarian food in town. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days; brunch Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Tip Top Kitchen & Cocktails, 73 E. Gay St. (downtown), 221-8300. Exposed brick and a pressedtin ceiling make for a cozy spot to enjoy fun comfort food and friendly service. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. m Tony’s Italian Ristorante, 16 W. Beck St. (German Village), 224-8669. At this friendly neighborhood Italian eatery, you’ll often find Tony himself greeting diners. Open for lunch Mon-Fri, dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DC, DS, JCB, MC, V; $$. The Top Steak House, 2891 E. Main St. (east), 231-8238. You’ll discover a straight-from-the’50s steakhouse with good food and wine in Bexley. Open for dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. Tora, 1330 N. Hamilton Rd. (east), 4288672. You’ll find sushi-bar Japanese plus Korean plus Pan-Asian items. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Tucci’s, 35 N. High St. (northwest), 792-3466. Excellent service and noteworthy seafood and steaks define this Dublin establishment. Open for lunch Mon-Fri, dinner 7 days, brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DC, DS, MC, V; $$. Udipi Cafe, 2001 E. Dublin-Granville Rd. (northeast), 885-7446. An unpretentious ethnic treasure serving pure vegetarian south Indian cuisine. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. DS, MC, V; $. Veritas Tavern, 15 E. Winter St., Delaware (northwest), 740-417-4074. The best new restaurant of 2012 serves modern American small plates. Open for dinner Tues-Sat; closed Sun-Mon. AE, DS, MC, V, $$ Vino Vino, 1371 Grandview Ave. (northwest), 481-8200. The love affair between wine and the owners—who also own Figlio—is evident in the name and well-selected wine list. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. Wine Guy Wine Shop Wine Bar & Bistro, 101 Mill St., Ste. 105, Gahanna, 536-0411; 201 Clint Dr., Suite 1200, Pickerington, 577-9463 (both east). The decor is mildly elegant, the wine list is long and the food—mostly small plates—is good. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. The Worthington Inn, 649 High St., Worthington (northwest), 885-2600. High-quality ingredients, culinary tradition and imagination blend at this comfortably refined country-inn-style restaurant. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; brunch Sat-Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$$. Wolf’s Ridge Brewing, 215 N. Fourth St., (downtown), 614-429-3936. Chef Seth Lassak brings a mix of California and France to the menu at this Downtown brewpub, transforming fancier fare into everyday stars that pair well with beer, including an ahi tuna burger, cornmeal fried sweetbreads and pan-seared foie gras. A former truck warehouse turned restaurant and brewery, the space is open and light with huge windows that allow diners to watch the brewers in action. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$ Yanni’s Greek Grill, 6196 Cleveland Ave. (northeast), 890-4775. This small, friendly, Greek tavern-style eatery serves good salads, appetizers and entrees. Open for lunch and dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. DS, MC, V; $. Yoshi’s Japanese Restaurant, 5776 Frantz Rd., Dublin (northwest), 889-1275. You’ll find sushi, sashimi and other authentic Japanese items, as well as a few Japanese-American inventions. Open for lunch Mon-Fri; dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. Z Cucina, 1368 Grandview Ave. (northwest), 486-9200. The kitchen here turns out quality Italian fare and great desserts. Open for dinner Mon-Sat; closed Sun. AE, DS, MC, V; $$. ZenCha Tea Salon, 19 Gay St. (downtown), 223-9530; 2396 E. Main St. (east), 237-9690; 982 N. High St. (near north) 421-2140. Enjoy a variety of teas and tea-inspired cuisine at these serene shops. n Open for lunch and dinner 7 days. MC, V; $.

photos: Ryan M.L. young

R E S TA U R A N T G U I D E / S P E A K E A S Y


columbus monthly

EXCLUSIVE HOMES Neil Mathias (614) 580-1662 (614) 889-0808

Virgil Mathias (614) 526-5633 (614) 889-0808 SOUL OF ITALY IN CORAZON! - Unique Tuscany showplace, private wooded lot, open style 5500SF plan, luxury master suite, gourmet kit, huge outdoor living spaces. $1,350,000. www.6916CorazonDr.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

HAWKS NEST IN DUBLIN! - Open, big & bright in this 4 bed, 3.5 bath home w/3 car garage, huge kitchen & master suite w/fireplace all just down the street from park! $424,900 www.7678FulmarDr.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Virgil Mathias (614) 526-5633 (614) 889-0808

Virgil Mathias (614) 526-5633 (614) 889-0808 SPACIOUS MUIRFIELD CLASSIC! - Kevin Knight built home on cul-de-sac lot! Dbl bridal staircase, updated kit, lrg mstr w/2 closets, custom Amish wdwk, fin LL, scr porch. $675,000. www.8426BeeswingCt.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS! - Rare upscale ranch in Tartan Fields, 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, over 3,000SF, finished LL, great kitchen, open floorplan. No more steps! $499,000 www.8015TartanFieldsDr.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Virgil Mathias (614) 526-5633 (614) 889-0808

Virgil Mathias (614) 526-5633 (614) 889-0808 TRUBERRY - BUILT SHOWHOUSE! - Richly-finished w/lots of extras, elegant but friendly! Deluxe owner ste w/opulent bth & lrg sitting rm. Lush views of golf course! $840,000. www.7916TartanFieldsDr.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

STATELY BRICK COLONIAL! - Move up to your success in prestigious area w/ Rt. 315 access! Beautiful hardwoods, den w/ views, deluxe master, fin walkout! $609,900. www.1231DaventryLn.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Virgil Mathias (614) 526-5633 (614) 889-0808

Virgil Mathias (614) 526-5633 (614) 889-0808 CONVENIENT BUT PRIVATE POWELL! - Custom Michael Edwards built home on ravine lot with unique floor plan. Granite kit, high ceilings, lrg mstr, two level deck, hrdwd flrs. $488,000. www.537WynridgeCt.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

LUXURIOUS CORAZON CONDO! - This private end unit condo bodes all the best! Cherry hrdwds, Fla rm, huge fin LL w/full bth, 1st flr mstr, upscale kit. Come see! $405,000. www.9397PratolinoVillaDr.com COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Wouldn’t you like to be looking at your home? Ask your Realtor to market your home in the Executive Living section of Columbus Monthly! Have them call Anthony Kramer at (614) 583-5796 or e-mail at akramer@dispatch.com

147_151_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 147

11/13/13 10:33 AM


columbus monthly

EXCLUSIVE HOMES Ria Bell & Becky Warnement (614) 496-8814 ria.bell@kingthompson.com FRENCH INSPIRED ELEGANCE - Stately north UA home, over 4,600 SF, on an expansive fenced lot w/3 car garage. Open living rm, kitchen and dining rm, his & her dens, fam. rm, finished LL. 4 BR, 4.5 BA, 3 season room. Updated master suite w/deck, overlooks the pool. $780,000

Pat Himes (614) 280-4137 (614) 390-9697 phimes@pizzuti.com McCAMMON CHASE - Beautifully appointed 4 BR, 3.5 BA home w/ large yard & paver patio. Soaring ceilings, open floor plan, 1st flr den, gourmet kitchen w/Butler’s pantry. Luxurious owner’s suite w/2 walk in closets & sitting area. 3 car garage, irrigation system, central vac. $464,900. PIZZUTI MANAGEMENT LLC

COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Phil Giessler (614) 832-7675 philgiessler@ camtaylor.com ONE OF A KIND - Your own professional OFFICE in amazing renovated 1887 “Wilson Schoolhouse” w/high ceilings, blt ins, kit, bath, full light & hdwd flrs within steps of stunning custom recent blt 5 BR, 3.5 BA, farmhouse on 1.56 acres in Worthington. www.camtaylor.com

Phil Giessler (614) 832-7675 philgiessler@ camtaylor.com WORTHINGTON WILLIAMSBURG INSPIRED - Custom one owner, authentic features, 3,000 SF, 4 BR, 3 BA, granite, hardwood, heated bath floors, hardy plk siding, generator, heated 4-car gar, .8 wooded acre. All of the best! Amazing! www.camtaylor.com

CAM TAYLOR CO, RELOCATION

CAM TAYLOR CO, RELOCATION Only 5 Lots Left!

Lot #5

SOLD! Lot #6

Jackie Stinchfield (614) 296-0453 Jackie@Columbus DreamHomes.com DUBLIN DREAM HOME - Frank Lloyd Wright inspired architect. 4 BR, 4 BA, 3-story, 2 car garage, 2,770 SF, .9 acre, private wooded setting & majestic views of the river. 7895 Riverside Dr. $500,000. J.T. Stinchfield & Associates. www.ColumbusDreamHomes.com KELLER WILLIAMS CONSULTANTS

Katie Winslow (614) 783-5502 katiewinslow@ remax.net BUILD TO SUIT - Build your dream home on a prominent Old Arlington location on 1/2 acre lot, across from Scioto Country Club. Designed by Hope Restoration, featuring a European style custom home w/ modern amenities. $1M+ www.2413cambridge.com REMAX RESOURCE

Lot #1

Lot #2

Lot #3

Lot #4

RiverStone Estates (614) 633-6770 (614) 783-3233 sales@ riverstoneua.com

ONLY 5 LOTS LEFT! - RiverStone Estates - exclusive Upper Arlington subdivision. 6 private, beautiful 1-ac. wooded lots. Custom built single family homes. Convenient location on Riverside Dr. & Lane Rd. Close to downtown & shopping. UA schools. www.RiverStoneUA.com RIVERSTONE ESTATES

Mike Carruthers (614) 324-4321 mike.carruthers@ kingthompson.com SESSIONS VILLAGE - 2118 E. Broad St., Bexley. Total renovation in 2008, stone & stucco 3 sty, 5 BR, 3.5 BA, 2,963 SF, architectural integrity, hardwood floors, new chef’s kit, 3rd floor FR w/18’ ceilings, pvt walled courtyard, 2 car gar and more! Now $499,900. COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Wouldn’t you like to be looking at your home? Ask your Realtor to market your home in the Executive Living section of Columbus Monthly! Have them call Anthony Kramer at (614) 583-5796 or e-mail at akramer@dispatch.com

147_151_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 148

11/13/13 10:33 AM


columbus monthly

EXCLUSIVE HOMES Marilyn Vutech & Jeff Ruff (614) 255-0600 realtors@vutech-ruff.com 782 HARTFORD STREET - Olde Worthington gem on National Register of Historic Homes! Fabulous character with expansive addition. Newer kitchen, sprawling FR, cozy den. HW floors throughout. Lg bonus room over 3 car garage all on .99 acre lot. $697,500

Marilyn Vutech & Jeff Ruff (614) 255-0600 realtors@vutech-ruff.com 8800 OLENTANGY RIVER RD - 23-acre family estate - stunning land! Huge trees, deep ravines, spectacular views from main & 2 guest houses. Pond w/waterfall, lush gardens, in-ground pool, complete equestrian complex w/ 80 x 200 indoor riding ring. $2,750,000

VUTECH-RUFF/HER REALTORS

VUTECH-RUFF/HER REALTORS

Donna Vichinsky (614) 204-3559 donnavichinsky@ hotmail.com BEAUTIFUL DESIGN! - Situated on 2 acres! Trees & privacy next to a preserve! In-ground pool! Finished LL! Private executive den w/attrium doors to patio! 1st flr master suite w/access to screened porch! Formal DR & LR! Absolutely gorgeous! $799,900. 8225 Kesegs Way.

PRICE REDUCTION! - Gorgeous Renovation! Meticulous attention to detail. Newer 2 car gar w/private fenced backyard to back porch entrance. Chef’s kit w/the finest cabinetry, granite, & appls. Separate dining area w/handsome parlor, library & entry.

COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

RE/MAX PREMIER CHOICE

Debbie P. Bower (614) 496-4477 kelcourt@cs.com

lly na 3 sio 10/1 s e d of e Pr dat Up

Donna Vichinsky (614) 204-3559 donnavichinsky@ hotmail.com PRISTINE ON PRIVATE WOODED LOT - Sought after Fenway NACC. Walking & bike paths, ponds & serene nature! Enormous 1st flr mstr ste w/FP! Amazing huge DR & LR w/views of treed lot. Open chef’s kit w/sweeping granite & breakfast bar! Large FR! $885,000. 7693 Fenway

Donna Vichinsky (614) 204-3559 donnavichinsky@ hotmail.com DESIGNER EVERYTHING! - Pure luxury! $190k in spectacular upgrades! 5200 SF, hardwood flrs, amazing GR! In-Law suite w/private bath! 2nd kit LL w/bar! Wonderful media area, exercise room! This home is beyond compare to others in same price range! $545,000 7423 Trevenia Dr.

COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON r co Dé nce K a 25 low Al

Donna Vichinsky (614) 204-3559 donnavichinsky@ hotmail.com LOCATION! LOCATION! - Private & tranquil wooded backyard! Enormous 1st flr mstr ste! Open kit & dining room! Huge bonus ste w/private BA! Fin LL w/FP & bar/mini kitchen! Woodwork is beyond compare! Amazing built-ins! Impressive quality. $999,000. 22 Wiveliscombe. COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Donna Vichinsky (614) 204-3559 donnavichinsky@ hotmail.com MAGNIFICENT & ELEGANT - 10,000+ SF situated on 1.5 ac. w/2+ ac. reserve & pond! Views of Serene nature w/walls of windows! True craftsmanship prevails! 1st flr guest suite w/priv. BA! Huge 2nd flr mstr w/priv. balcony overlooks pond! $1,350,000. 2658 Swisher Creek. COLDWELL BANKER KING THOMPSON

Wouldn’t you like to be looking at your home? Ask your Realtor to market your home in the Executive Living section of Columbus Monthly! Have them call Anthony Kramer at (614) 583-5796 or e-mail at akramer@dispatch.com

147_151_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 149

11/13/13 11:45 AM


• Divorce • Divorce • Dissolution • Dissolution • Legal • Legal separation separation • Child • Child support support • Child • Child custody custody • Support • Support • Property • Property division division • Temporary • Temporary orders orders • Post • Post decree decree matters matters

William William L.L. Geary Geary

Family Family Law Law and and Litigation Litigation

Suite Suite 101101 Waterford Waterford Tower Tower • 155 • 155 W. W. Main Main St. St. Columbus Columbus • (614) • (614) 228-1968 228-1968 www.columbusfamilylawyer.com www.columbusfamilylawyer.com

$ 10% 10%up upto to$500 500Off* Off*

Call Call 614-444-7663 614-444-7663 to schedule. to schedule. Must Must present present coupon coupon at at time time of initial of initial consultation. consultation. Limited Limited time time offer. offer.

ROOFING ROOFING • SIDING • SIDING • WINDOWS • WINDOWS • MASONRY • MASONRY • &• MORE & MORE

147_151_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 150

11/13/13 10:35 AM


Columbus Monthly Classifieds

614-583-5760 HAULING/DUMPSTER RENTAL

AUCTIONS

Absolute

AUCTION

Mobile Home Park & Marina 2.9 Ac. 21 Home Sites & Houses Sandusky Bay, Marblehead Ohio

Dec. 5 @ 1 PM

www.8696Bayshore.com Len@LenPartin.com

Jack Bradley Realty Co. Port Clinton, Ohio

AUTOS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

12/31/13 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

HELP WANTED

YOUR DRIVE and CREATIVITY FARMS FOR SALE

+

OUR PRODUCTS

=

MAGIC PLUMBING

The Dispatch Media Group is more than just The Dispatch. Join us as an Advertising Account Executive and you’ll see. From glossy magazines, to award-winning websites, to events (and, yes, The Dispatch itself), we have everything you need to make your clients (and yourself) happy.

HOLIDAY ENTERTAINMENT VACATION RENTALS

Ambitious? Positive? Experienced? Tell us about yourself at dispatch.com/careers. Equal Employment Opportunity Employer.

147_151_ADS_DEC_CM.indd 151

11/13/13 10:35 AM


trending

Neighborhood Trees

Clintonville turn lane debate

’Rithmetic Neighborhood Activists Neighborhood Cranks

Columbus sChools attendanCe data Writing

outlet mall wars

Reading

Cheap Merchandise

Cheap Real Estate

year in review

Charting the stories that shaped Columbus in 2013 –Brian Lindamood Optimism

Breweries Patience

Growlers

Bobrovsky blue JaCkets Fans

Beards

Presidents CuP Golf Rain

152

Columbus Monthly • December 2013

CraFt beer sCene


C2_C4_DEC_CM.indd 3

11/13/13 11:36 AM


Artistry in Iron. How can something so beautiful be so strong? Come see our iron bed collection, featuring hand-crafted, made in the USA quality, with meticulous attention to detail, hand poured casings and welding for superior, one-piece construction available in over 30 hand-applied finishes. They’re the perfect balance of strength and beauty and now surprisingly affordable.

Come shop the Bedroom Superstore, featuring over 70 gorgeous bedroom collections from the world’s finest manufacturers, the area’s largest collection of youth bedrooms, our new Iron and Upholstered Bed galleries and luxurious mattresses. Dreams don’t have to stop just because you’re awake.

C2_C4_DEC_CM.indd 4

The bedroom superstore. POLARIS: 8701 LYRA DR. | 614.896.2700 TUTTLE CROSSING: 5770 BRITTON PKWY. | 614.339.8700

11/13/13 10:37 AM

Columbus Monthly - December 2013  

Columbus Monthly navigates the city’s arts, culture and restaurant scenes with comprehensive guides, authoritative reviews and in-depth news...

Columbus Monthly - December 2013  

Columbus Monthly navigates the city’s arts, culture and restaurant scenes with comprehensive guides, authoritative reviews and in-depth news...