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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com


OPEN ENROLLMENT STARTS NOW!

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Choose from 1 of 5 conveniently located campuses!

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3474 Livingston Ave. • Columbus OH 43227 E-mail: ryoung@EdVantages.com Phone: 614-324-4585 K-8

Information Meetings will be held at each school for interested parents. April 26, 2011 • 6-8 p.m.

274 E. 1st Avenue, Suite 200 • Columbus, Ohio 43201 E-mail: jpammer@performanceacademies.com Phone: 614-318-0720

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2220 Hamilton Ct. E. • Columbus OH 43232 E-mail: mlovinguth@performanceacademies.com Phone: 614-318-1037

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www.edvantages.com ★ www.performanceacademies.com columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

3


getting started: TABLE OF CONTENTS ON THE GO 10 12 14 16 17 18 20 21 22 24 26

NEWS ON THE GO PRODUCT PIX SUMMER CAMP GUIDE EXTRA ANATOMY OF AN EASTER BASKET: make an embroidery-floss Easter egg WHAT THE WELL-DRESSED KIDS ARE WEARING: for Easter COLUMBUS PARENT PROFILE: Dublin’s Karen Barnick Pfeifer HOUSEBROKEN: Dispatch columnist Joe Blundo VITAMIN ME: Capital Style editor Kristy Eckert PEOPLE YOU SHOULD MEET: Camille Mancuso NEIGHBORHOOD SPOTLIGHT: Grandview Heights BIZ SPOTLIGHT: Trader Tots

CALENDAR:

190

THINGS TO DO THIS MONTH

HOT TOPICS: SPECIAL NEEDS 28

30 32

MARRIAGES HAVE NEEDS, TOO: Communication and community are critical SPECIAL SIBLINGS: Helping the whole family feel valued A SPECIAL KIND OF PARENTING: Parenting the developmentally-disabled adult

NEED TO KNOW

FAMILY FUN

34

44

36 38 42 43

AGE-APPROPRIATE: SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOLING AGES 5-18: Choosing the right school for a child with autism AGES 13-18: Continuing school when your child has cancer PEDIATRIC HEALTHSOURCE: from Nationwide Children’s Hospital THE GO-TO GUIDE: Companion dogs HANDY MOM: finds new uses for hairpins WHAT’S THE WORST THAT COULD HAPPEN?

46 48 50 52 53 54 56

ON THE COVER: Chiara is peeping up at peeps, wearing her Easter finest from Strasburg Children PHOTO BY DANIEL SOHNER

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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

HANDS ON: Clintonville’s Wholly Craft makes a basket from recycled newsprint COOKING WITH KIDS: Fruit smoothies at Dublin’s Whole Foods Market PARTIES: A birthday party on the Santa Maria EATING OUT WITH KIDS: Polaris’s Benihana DAY TRIPPIN’: Jungle Jim’s International Market near Cincinnati PLAYGROUND PATROL: Liberty Township’s Every Kid’s Playground WORTH THE PRICE OF A SITTER? Cooking class date night at Easton’s Sur La Table REVIEWS: Books, apps, games and a family-friendly website


One

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Ages 4 - 6

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Nothing can beat the power of Unstoppable Confidence and Super Star Self-Esteem in helping a child: • Avoid being a target for bullies • Stand up to negative peer pressure and say no to drugs • Be safe and stay safe at ALL times in their life • Be successful in school, sports and life

• Achieve great grades • Have self-discipline to make great choices for themselves everyday • Build positive friendships and relationships throughout their entire life • Develop “Superman” focus and concentration

Powell

Pickerington

Lewis Center

In the Big Bear Plaza (Corner of Sawmill Pkwy. and Powell Rd.)

773 Windmiller Dr. Suite C

95 Neverland Drive (N.W. Corner of 23 and Powell Rd.)

614-760-0000

614-920-9480

740-549-1313

Ages 7 - 12 columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

5


getting started: LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Universally Inspirational BY JANE HAWES

I’ve figured out that, over the course of my 16 years in journalism, I’ve interviewed more than 3,000 people. And though I can’t always match names to faces whenever I re-encounter one of them, I usually feel a jolt that tells me there’s a name buried somewhere in my mental hard drive to go with that face. Such was the case in February when I found myself sitting on a bench, watching a training session at the Canine Companions for Independence facility in Delaware. Teens and children who have a wide range of disabilities were partnered with their parents and learning how to work with their new companion dogs. I noticed a mom, her teen-aged son and their new companion, Ilene, a beautiful golden-haired dog. But it was mom and son with their bright, beautiful eyes whom I noticed most. “I think I know them,” I whispered to Laurel Marks, a spokeswoman for Canine Companions who was deciphering what I observed during the training session. As it turned out, I did know them. They were Janine and Derek Maher, and I had met them nine years earlier on a blustery winter day in a newly built park, just north of Powell. The Liberty Township park was the site of what would become Ohio’s first universally accessible playground. Universally accessible playgrounds are better even than Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playgrounds: At least 70 percent of UA playgrounds have to be accessible to children who use support equipment like wheelchairs and braces, whereas only 25 percent of ADA playgrounds have to be accessible. Ironically, I had already slated the Liberty Park Every Kid’s Playground as our Playground Patrol destination for this issue. But back in December 2001, Derek, a very energetic 7-year-old, was in the early stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a degenerative muscle disorder, and he ran around the bare grass fields of Liberty Park with only a mild limp as evidence of his condition. I remember also being struck by Janine’s brisk and no-nonsense approach to managing her son’s challenges. So on this particular February day, nine years later, I got to meet the energy and the no-nonsense again. Here I found a 16-year-old young man in a wheelchair and it was easy to see that his childhood energy now had an outlet in a very lively mind. How many teens do you know who can tell you

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

34 S. Third St. Columbus, Ohio 43215 614-461-8878 (voice) 614-461-8746 (fax) 614-888-8888 (classifieds) www.ColumbusParent.com PUBLISHER

Katie Wolfe Lloyd kwolfe@columbusparent.com DIRECTOR OF NICHE PUBLICATIONS

Brian Lindamood blindamood@columbusparent.com EDITOR

Jane Hawes jhawes@columbusparent.com NICHE PUBLICATIONS ADVERTISING MANAGER

Amy Bishop abishop@columbusparent.com ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Jessica Wrightsel jwrightsel@columbusparent.com DIGITAL ADVERTISING SPECIALIST

Vanessa Micic vmicic@columbusparent.com PHOTO EDITOR

Will Shilling wshilling@columbusparent.com PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR

Rebecca Zimmer rzimmer@columbusparent.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Michaela Schuett mschuett@columbusparent.com PHOTOGRAPHER

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

Daniel Sohner dsohner@columbusparent.com

that the 1980s pop tune “Come On, Eileen” (that we were joking they should sing to their new companion dog) was the work of Irish band Dexy’s Midnight Runners? Derek retrieved that bit of trivia from his brain faster than I could from mine. And Janine was just as no-nonsense and forward-thinking as ever, explaining she had first begun planning to get Derek a companion dog 10 years earlier when she met another young man, now a college graduate, who used his dog to manage daily life with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. As a journalist, I have the duty to tell the stories of some truly amazing people. But I also have the privilege to fill my mental hard drive with tales of lasting inspiration. Believe me when I say that these stories are impossible to erase, and I think you’ll find plenty of them in this month’s issue.

Follow Jane Hawes on Twitter at @Jane_Hawes

6

ColumbusParent.com

WEB PRODUCER

Elizabeth Warren ewarren@columbusparent.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Nikki Davis ndavis@columbusparent.com

CONTRIBUTORS Debbie Angelos, Joe Blundo, Olivera Bratich, Geoff Dutton, Melissa Kossler Dutton, Kristy Eckert, Anietra Hamper, Kristen Maetzold, Phil Pikelny, Elizabeth Seufer, Truda Shinker, Shawn Sines, Tracy Townsend DISTRIBUTION If you would like to receive Columbus Parent at your business, or to report delivery concerns:

John Henry 614-410-1797 jhenry@dispatch.com

Columbus Parent is published and distributed by The Dispatch Printing Company every month, available at more than 1,200 locations throughout Central Ohio. One free copy per person. Circulation: 58,000 copies. Copyright © 2011 The Dispatch Printing Company


Here Comes Peter Cottontail Aboard the Lodi Station Express! Every Saturday and Sunday, April 2-23, 2011. Take photos with the Easter Bunny and visit with Mother Goose for Story Time! Tickets are $4/person. Children 3 and under, FREE.

Plus, Join Lodi Station Outlets for its 7th Annual Bunny Breakfast to benefit Akron Children’s Hospital! Saturday, April 9 beginning @ 9 a.m. 15,000 Egg Hunt, Coloring Contest, Basket Raffle Tickets are $7/adult and $5/child. Children 2 and under, FREE. Breakfast sponsored by McDonald’s. For Tickets, call 330.948.9929 before April, 8, 2011. Limited Availability. Rain or Shine event.

LodiStation.com • I-71 N Exit 204 • 9911 Avon Lake Rd. Lodi, OH columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

7


getting started: ON THE WEB

The Westerville Public Library and

present

PRIZE PATROL Thank you to everyone who voted in our Mom of the Year contest. Response has been phenomenal, and we’d like to salute all our finalists: Samantha Bennett,

MADE POSSIBLE BY Featuring The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams

Awards

And original music by composer Lowell Liebermann ALL CONCERTS ARE FREE! SATURDAY, APRIL 30 Westerville Public Library Combined Meeting Room 10:30am, 11:30am, 12:30pm Registration required at www.westervillelibrary.org or by phone at 614.882.7277 (ext. 5006)

SATURDAY, MAY 7 Columbus Metropolitan Library Main Library, Larry D. Black Auditorium 11am No registration required

Become a part of New

SATURDAY, MAY 7 Worthington Public Library Old Worthington Library, Fireplace Room 3pm No registration required

SATURDAY, MAY 14 Columbus Metropolitan Library Karl Road Branch, Meeting Room 11am No registration required

Century CSA

(community supported agriculture), and enjoy fresh locally raised produce.

Who knows best what’s Best in Columbus for Central Ohio families? Parents, of course, and that’s why we’re launching Columbus Parent’s Best of Columbus awards! We’ve picked 50 categories and suggested some worthy nominees in each, but it’s up to you to vote and decide who wins! Just go to ColumbusParent.com and click on the link for Columbus Parent’s Best of Columbus awards. That will take you to the ballot. Vote for one of the nominees we’ve suggested or write in your own nominee. Votes will be collected (online only) during all of April. The winners will be announced and featured in our June issue.

the bulletin a we ek ly gu id e s fo r bu sy pa re nt

Produce Program Highlights • HOME DELIVERY INCLUDED • Everything from Blackberries to Zucchini • Packages for Small and Large Families

• Locally Grown • No work Involved • Prices Starting at $350

DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE For detailed information concerning our produce packages visit:

www.newcenturycsa.com New Century CSA Community Supported Agriculture Email: newcenturycsa@newcenturycsa.com

Phone: 740-207-1073 8

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

DAILY BULLETINS Our team of writers share all kinds of news you can use every weekday on ColumbusParent.com. It might be an upcoming show you need to get tickets for now, or a book, game or toy review, or maybe just a low- or no-cost idea for family fun. Bookmark us and be sure to check in every day!

tweet

tweet TWEET

And speaking of Twitter, be sure to follow @ColumbusParent and @jane_hawes. Don’t you want to find out just how badly Jane does in the office NCAA basketball pool, why Harry Potter marathons on TV try her patience, and how that crop of lettuce and spinach is doing?

AND GET READY….

In June, we’re launching something special to honor dads!

Kathy Collins, Kristen Marks, Amanda MoonThomas and Jennifer Winn. We announced our

winner online on April 1 (before press time here) and you’ll get to meet her in our May issue. In the meantime, we hope you’ve been enjoying some of the great prizes we gave away in March on ColumbusParent.com, our Facebook page and our Twitter feed: tickets to see the Columbus Children’s Theatre production of “Stuart Little,” a beautiful three-pack of aden + anais muslin swaddle cloths from Petit Green, the “Recyclogami” craft project book, and tickets to the Pleasure Guild production of “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” What will we be giving away in April? We can’t tell you now, but be sure to check ColumbusParent.com, the Columbus Parent Magazine page on Facebook AND our Twitter feed (@ColumbusParent) for more prize giveaways in April!


WE’VE OPENED A NEW DOOR TO BREAST HEALTH The James has created a revolutionary approach to your breast health. The new JamesCare Comprehensive Breast Center brings together the world’s leading breast cancer researchers and physicians in one place, on one team—yours. In this unique environment, your multidisciplinary team of James experts shares a singular focus on preventing, detecting, treating and curing your breast cancer. Open the door to better breast health. Call 1-800-293-5066 today to schedule an appointment. cancer.osu.edu

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

9


on the go: NEWS ON THE GO

FOOD ALLERGIES

and Easter

For a parent whose child has food allergies, holidays are often a minefield of dangers to be navigated. Dena Friedel of Lewis Center, who founded the “My” Food/Allergy Support Group in 2006, learned this seven years ago when her daughter Jordan, now 9, was diagnosed with a double whammy of peanut and tree nut allergies plus asthma. “It was the highest-risk combination,” Friedel said. Beyond the feelings of isolation and being overwhelmed, Friedel learned she would have to come up with new ways to safely experience holidays where food is so often a part of the celebrations. So each year the support group, which now numbers more than 150 Central Ohio families, stages its own Easter egg hunt (this year’s edition takes place on April 23) as well as a Halloween party. “We do things with all non-food items,” Friedel explained. “The eggs, for example, have little treasures inside them rather than candies, and the eggs of course are plastic because a lot of these kids are allergic to the (real) eggs themselves.” The support group, which hosts monthly meetings and has a lively Yahoo discussion group, is part of why Friedel recently was named a national winner of a community service award from The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, based in Fairfax, Virginia. She’ll accept her award

ERIC ALBRECHT/DISPATCH PHOTO

EARTH DAY Columbus

later this month at their annual conference. They also host a September Walk to raise money and awareness for food allergy treatment. For more information about “My” Food/Allergy Support Group, go to their website at foodallergyaids.com.

Here’s something else that Central Ohio is the best at — volunteer turnout for Earth Day. According to Green Columbus, the local nonprofit organization that coordinates Columbus’ annual Earth Day celebrations, we’re tops at showing up the weekend before Earth Day at work projects that repair, recycle and regenerate a variety of public spaces like playgrounds, riverfronts, community gardens and parks. In 2007, Green Columbus Director Erin Chacey said 1,300 Central Ohioans put in 2,900 person hours at 42 worksites in preparation for Earth Day. Last year, it was 3,679 volunteers, working 13,500 hours at 129 worksites. This year, Chacey said, they’re

ADOPTION HERO Nominations needed Kids, parents and community supporters of adoption and foster care will gather at COSI on June 4 for the Forever Home Adoption Celebration, a day of fun and information presented by the National Center for Adoption Law & Policy. The day will also feature the presentation of the first Adoption Hero Awards, presented by Columbus Parent. We’re now accepting nominations, and we encourage you to visit our website to let us know about a deserving person or group in any of these four categories:

10

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

• Adoption or foster-care professionals • Adoption or foster-care community advo-

Residents of Franklin, Delaware, Fairfield, Licking, Madison, Morrow, cates, including parents Pickaway and Union counties are eli• Adoption or foster-care support groups gible to be nominated; a group of and organizations community professionals will select • Youth hero: a child or young adult who has the winners. been adopted and/or spent time in the fosNominations will be collected ter-care system, and has made a significant through May 2 at different in the community ColumbusParent.com.

aiming to get 5,000 people cleaning up 150 sites. And when they’re done, everyone can party together — for free — at April 23’s Earth Day celebration on the grounds of the Franklin Park Conservatory. The worksite work will take place on Saturday, April 16, and Sunday, April 17. You can volunteer through April 15 on the Earth Day Columbus website at lightenup2011.org/worksites. Then plan to join everyone for kid-friendly activities, food, local bands and environmental education and other goodies between 11 a.m. and 10 p.m. at the Conservatory’s Scotts Miracle-Gro Community Garden Campus, located at 1777 E. Broad St. in Columbus.


at PLAY it’s a good time to cut the cord — without discouraging your child’s interest in computing and video gaming completely:

CONSIDER THE WEATHER: In Central Ohio during the spring there are plenty of good and bad weather play days. Encourage them to capitalize on the good ones and get outside.

DUBLIN’S ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE March 12, 2011

Riley Hammond and Ellie Metzler

Aiden and Keaton Sparks

I spend a large amount of my personal and professional life playing video games. It’s one of the advantages of being a game reviewer, but I also spend a lot of time being a dad. Often these two activities intersect and like most responsible parents I find myself concerned about the amount of time my kids spend online or playing electronic games. Facebook, Xbox Live!, Nintendo DS — my kids have access to so many game playing platforms that I worry they are over-exposed and are abandoning some of the activities I best remember when I was younger. They seems to spend less time wandering the neighborhood playing, reading comic books, playing with toys, writing and drawing and just hanging out with friends without playing games. While I believe video games are a great source of family entertainment (obviously), it is important that we, as parents, try to introduce our kids to the simple, nonelectronic pleasures of playing Freeze Tag or Go Fish! I don’t like to recommend absolute limits on video games — you know your own children better than some statistician. But here are a few guidelines for knowing when

AROUND TOWN

Where the happening kids just happenedDANIEL toSOHNER be PHOTOS

WATCH HOW THEY PLAY: If your child is getting excited or out of control, screaming at the game or jumping and fidgeting while playing, it’s probably a good time for a break.

PLAY WITH THEM: Nothing should be more interesting to your kids than time with you. Make sure you take the time away from the digital fun to cement that relationship. They might fight you, but in the end you make memories together. I’ve found that the application of even these simple points has both strengthened my family bonds and helped the kids to realize that despite the thrill that electronic entertainment offers, there is a world outside the realm of video games that is just as wondrous. —SHAWN SINES, COLUMBUS PARENT GAMES REVIEWER

b Johnson lyn Root, Jaco te Ka d an e op H

COLUMBUS ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE March 17, 2011

Gabe and Abby Lemon s

Shane and Nate Gardner

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

11


on the go: PRODUCT PIX

Green Tea anyone? Adding a little milk to your tea has never been easier than with this Green Toys Tea Set. The colorful 17-piece set is made entirely out of recycled milk jugs. The tea service for 4 includes a tea pot, cups and saucers, cream and sugar, and spoons to stir the imagination. If this isn’t your child’s “cup of tea,” considered the Green Toys Tool Set, also made from milk jugs. Both are available at Sprout Soup ($25). Sprout Soup, 4310 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-26-SPROUT, sproutsoup.com

1

Always wear a helmet when on wheels, but helmets OFF when on play equipment.

2

Never attach ropes, cords, strings, or pet leashes to playground equipment.

3

Always have an adult supervise kids on climbing & play equipment.

4

Never let a child ride on a lawnmower as a passenger.

5

Clear twigs, toys, tools and trash from the yard before mowing.

6

Hot This Spring Your little man will be all fired up about wearing this Fireman Raincoat ($38) from Hey Diddle Diddle in Westerville. It’s sized generously to allow plenty of room for sweatshirts and sweaters underneath. He’ll find fun pockets on the front and a fireman hat hood for his head. It even comes with a matching hanger. Available in sizes 3T-6X. Hey Diddle Diddle, 38 N. State St., Westerville, 614-818-5437, heydiddlediddle.com

Cut the grass only when it’s dry & fully light outside.

splash

of color

Add a little color to a gray rainy day with this Kids Color Changing Umbrella ($40) from online vendor Uncommon Goods. April showers turn white clouds and raindrops into colorful rainbows and sunshine. Add a sparkly handle and a dreary forecast turns bright. Also available in “big kid” sizes and styles. Available at uncommongoods.com

COMPILED BY KRISTEN MAETZOLD

12

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com


Come Celebrate National Dance Week with us! April 22 to May 1

FREE CLASSES Saturday April 30th

*New students only. *One free class per dancer

Also Receive a FREE t-shirt and class discounts for 2011-2012 Students must be pre-registered to attend FREE classes

PICK FLOWERY WORDS

Want your message to flourish? Just add dirt and water. These Unique Seeded Cards, available at Oakland Nursery locations, can be planted and come in a variety of themes to fit any occasion. A hearty mix of annual and perennial wildflower seeds are embedded in the notecard’s paper ($4). Simple directions for planting are right on the back of the card. ($4) Available at Oakland Nursery 614-268-3511 Oakland Nursery has locations in Columbus, Dublin and Delaware, 614-268-3511, oaklandnursery.com

Princess Dance Class Ages 3 & 4 2-3pm & 3-4pm *featuring ballet, tap and tumbling

Angelina Ballerina Dance Class Ages 5 & 6 2-3pm & 3-4pm

Hip Hop Dance Class Ages 6 & 7 (30min): 2pm, 2:30, 3pm, 3:30

Hip Hop Dance Class Ages 8 & 9 (30min) 2pm, 2:30, 3pm, 3:30

*featuring ballet and creative movement

*learn hot hip hop moves to current music

*learn hot hip hop moves to current music

Call to register: 740-548-4600

www.northpointedance.com 500 Orangepointe Drive, Lewis Center (Minutes from Powell off Route 23, between Home Rd. & Orange Rd.)

Turning Heads Cutie Heads Spring Collection is adorning adorable heads everywhere. Handmade locally by two moms who are also longtime friends, the whimsical hair accessories ($7-$26) are fun and fashionable and the best part, interchangeable! Girls can wear them as barrettes or slip them into a custom Cutie headband. Cutie Heads are turning heads in several local boutique stores including Fritzy Jacobs in Old Worthington. Fritzy Jacobs, 635 N. High St., Worthington, 614-885-8283, fritzyjacobs.com

THE BUZZ IS BUILDING

MARBURN ACADEMY to ially invited d r o c e r a u o Y of d the Role n a s t n e d u “ADHD St n” Medicatio t Seminar A

demy Free Marburn Aca

Community

Paren

0 pm

1 · 7:00 - 9:0 •

April 5, 201

N ADMISSIO

USE OPEN HO

:00 11 · 7:00 - 9 April 11, 20 s 1 - 12 Grade

Light up your child’s imagination with Laser Pegs, the first building toy with LEDs built in. As you snap pieces together, each piece feeds the next piece power, and the finished colorful creation flashes and glows. Purchase by the set ($25 and up), but there are no set rules; kids can put the pieces together however they choose. COSI, 333 W. Broad St., Downtown, 614-629-3109, cosi.org

PM

ol that no other scho f o w o n k e “W to offer.” org has this much burnacademy.

son@mar ents to bdavid ev th bo r fo RSVP required 33-0822 or call 614-4

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columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

13


on the go: CAMPS

2011 SUMMER AT

WELLINGTON

We hope you’ll join us this summer at The Wellington School!

Online registration available now. www.wellington.org 614-324-8882

June 13 - August 19, 2011

2011 Summer Camp Guide Extra Last month we published our guide to local summer camps (you can check out the online version at ColumbusParent.com). Here are some more options for Central Ohio families this year: BUDDY UP TENNIS, FITNESS & FUN

JOIN THE ADVENTURE!

Convenient Location for Parents Working Downtown Our goal for each camp session is to create an awareness and connection with nature in the urban setting. Experience woodlands, fields, mudflats, wetlands and discover fascinating wildlife throughout this Scioto Greenlawn Important Bird Area (IBA). Learn about ways to restore and conserve the environment in your own communities. For more information contact:

• Campers grades 1-5 & Teen Program grades 6-8

aboyd@audubon.org

• Fun and excitement in an urban outdoor setting

614-545-5486

• Week long sessions from June 20-August 19 from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

505 W.Whittier St. Columbus, OH 43215

• Leadership staff are experienced educators with proven academic success

• Before Care 7:30-9:00 a.m. & After Care 4:00-6:00 p.m.

CAMP ARCHITECTURE June 20-24, 8:45 a.m.-3:30 p.m., creative activities to enhance knowledge of architectural and educational skills under the direct supervision of local architects, field trips included. Ages: 9 to 14 Cost: $200 Camp Location: Columbus Center for Architecture, 380 E. Broad St., Columbus 614-469-1973; aiacolumbus.org

• Healthy snack provided, campers bring waste-free lunches

Register Online Now www.GrangeInsuranceAudubonCenter.org 14

Saturday mornings from 9:30-11 a.m. all summer and throughout the year. This is an adaptive tennis and fitness program for children and young adults with Down syndrome. Athletes are partnered with a buddy volunteer. Each clinic is 90 minutes in length with 60 minutes of tennis instructions and 30 minutes of fitness and conditioning. Ages: 5 and older Cost: $15 per session or $40 for a monthly package of 3. Some scholarships available. Camp Location: Wickertree Tennis & Fitness Club, 5760 Maple Canyon Ave., Columbus 614-579-8808; buddyuptennis.com

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

CAMP FRIENDSHIP IN GAHANNA Outdoor day camp. Week-long ses-

sions from June 20-Aug. 19. ACAaccredited, weekly themes, field trips, pool days and more. Ages: 5 to 12 Cost: Before April 29: $140 per week-long session for Gahanna residents, $160 for non-residents. After April 29: $180 for Gahanna residents, $200 for non-residents. Scholarships available for Gahanna residents. Pre- and after-care included in cost. Camp Location: Friendship Park, 150 Oklahoma Ave., or Hannah Park, 6547 Clark State Rd., Gahanna 614-342-4250; Gahanna.gov/departments/parks/ camp.asp

CORE – CREATING OPPORTUNITIES THROUGH RECREATION EXPERIENCES Outdoor day camp, three threeweek sessions available between June 20-Aug. 19. Focusing on leadership, mentoring and volunteerism. Held in conjunction with Camp Friendship in Gahanna. Ages: 13 and 14 Cost: Before April 29: $400 per three-week session for Gahanna residents, $240 for non- residents. After April 29: $440 for Gahanna residents, $460 for non-residents. Scholarships available for Gahanna residents.

Camp Location: Friendship Park, 150 Oklahoma Ave., Gahanna 614-342-4250; gahanna.gov/pdf/Parks/Wi%20Sp% 202011%20Gateway%20FINAL.pdf (page 14)

DELAWARE AREA CAREER CENTER SUMMER CAMP June 15-16, all day camp offering real-life experiences and projects in the areas of Law Enforcement, Information Technology, and Electronics. Ages: entering grades 6–9 Cost: Free Camp Location: Delaware Area Career Center, 4565 Columbus Pike, Delaware 740-203-2201; delawareareacc.org/ summercamp2011

ECOLE FRANCAISE June 13-Aug. 12, weeklong full- and half-day sessions. Hands-on activities, excursions, special events, visitors, picnics, and swimming. Ages: entering preschool (age 3) through Grade 5 Cost: $175/week for academic session (9 a.m.-3 p.m. each day), $205 for full-day session (7 a.m.-6 p.m.), $170 for half-day session (7 a.m.-12 noon or 1 p.m.-6 p.m.) Camp Location: Ecole Francaise, 5120 Godown Rd., Columbus 614-451-1309; education-unlimited.org


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columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

15


on the go: ANATOMY OF AN EASTER BASKET

Create a family keepsake with these

EMBROIDERY-FLOSS EASTER EGGS! BY JANE HAWES

SUPPLIES:

• large eggs • Easter basket • one bag of fake grass • strands of embroidery floss • heavy-duty hand-sewing needle • glue (craft or school glue) • toothpicks

HOW TO CREATE AN EGG:

1.

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

• With a heavy-duty hand needle (the ones for sewing canvas or sails are best), poke one small hole at the top of an egg and one slightly larger hole (no more than a quarter-inch in diameter) at the bottom.

• Dab a drop of glue on top of an emptied, dried egg, then press the circle of floss on it

• Poke the needle inside and swirl it around to break up the egg yolk • Wipe off the small hole thoroughly and blow through it (with your mouth to the egg) to force the egg contents out the bottom hole (they’ll make great scrambled eggs when you’re done!). There are kits in craft stores that do all this for you with a needle and bulb, but if you don’t feel like spending the money, this method works just fine. Just don’t eat any raw egg! • Pour some water into the emptied egg, swirl it around and then blow out the water • Let the egg dry

16

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

2. • Hold the end of an embroidery floss between your thumb and index finger • Drop a tiny dot of glue onto the floss end, then start to wrap the floss around that center point, creating a circle of wound-around floss • Stop when the circle is about a half-inch in diameter

• With a toothpick, start spreading a light layer of glue on the exposed egg shell beneath the circle, about a half-inch at a time

3.

• Begin wrapping the rest of the floss around the circle (hold the egg between your thumb and forefinger, on the top and bottom); repeat adding layers of glue • You can alternate different colors of floss (just cut the floss to end one color, and use a toothpick to place finishing and starting strands) • When you get to the very bottom, use a toothpick to help tuck the floss into place to finish


on the go: WELL-DRESSED

WHAT THE

WELL-DRESSED

KIDS

ARE WEARING FOR

EASTER

CHIARA

AGE: 6 FAVORITE FOOD: Pizza FAVORITE BOOK: My Italian-language Disney books — La Bella e la Bestia, Cenerentola, La Sirenetta and others FAVORITE GAME: Sorry Sliders FAVORITE TV SHOW: Hot Wheels Battleforce 5 FAVORITE MOVIE: Barbie & the Three Musketeers

BOOKMARK FARMS HORSE LOVER’S DAY CAMP Opens June 13, 2011 • Open to all levels • Our reputation is second to none

MARCO ON CHIARA: Pink satin hair ribbon ($16), short-sleeve 100% cotton dress in willow green with scalloped hem and pink embroidery ($90), anklet socks and white leather Mary Jane shoes ($60) ON MARCO: Boy’s 100% cotton shirt and shorts with button attachments ($60)

AGE: 11 months FAVORITE FOOD: Mom’s milk, followed by blueberries and strawberries LEAST FAVORITE FOOD: green beans FAVORITE BOOK: Toes Ears Nose (by Karen Katz) FAVORITE GAME: Find and control the TV remote, and “Beep Beep Your Nose”

Also, Mom & Dad & Me Saturday Camp - May 14th 8824 Morse Road, SW Pataskala, OH 43062

Call or go to our website for details.

740-964-2601 www.BookmarkFarms.com

FARM 2011LIBERTY SUMMER DAY CAMP JUNE 20 - AUGUST 12 Monday - Friday • 9am - 4pm

Ages 6 - 15 welcome • Horse Related Crafts • Horseback Games • Horse Husbandry • Riding Lessons • Lots of Fun! Call and sign up today!

www.libertyhorsefarm.com

614.279.0346

Home of the OSU Equestrian Team. Convenient location.

WHERE TO BUY: All clothes from Strasburg Children, Polaris Fashion Place, 1500 Polaris Pkwy., Ste. 1138, Columbus, 614-825-6006, strasburgchildren.com

• Summer Horse Lovers’ Camp • Riding Lessons • 4-H Academic Show Team • Birthday Parties • Scout Programs DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

Blacklick • 614-864-9500 | www.FieldOfDreamsEquine.com columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

17


on the go: COLUMBUS PARENT PROFILE

Karen BARNICK PFEIFER

AGE: 47 HUSBAND: Bob Pfeifer, married 7 years KIDS: We have a blended family of his, mine and ours: Amelia (22), Mary (20), Ben (19), Brennan (17), Maggie (15) and Noah (5) NEIGHBORHOOD: Dublin JOB: Principal oboist of the New Albany Symphony and the Central Ohio Symphony; private oboe teacher

Favorite thing to do for cheap family fun: Dublin bike paths — we like to ride to the ice cream store, or to Glacier Ridge Metro Park to look for jumpies (frogs) and birds.

What’s something your mom or dad did that you thought was nuts when you were a kid and now you understand: My mom woke up at 5 a.m. or earlier to get things done before we awakened.

If you had to be on a reality-TV show, which one would it be: My favorite is “The Bachelor,” but being married with six kids would probably ruin my chances!

What is the most played song on your iPod? “Panic Switch” by Silversun Pickups and “Symphonic Dances” by Rachmaninov

Which superhero power would you like to have: Time travel to meet Jesus, Mozart and my ancestors

Favorite restaurant to take the kids: Sumeno’s on Sawmill Road — yummy food and a great price for an all-you-can-eat buffet

Favorite movie that you went to see with the kids: “How to Train Your Dragon,” “Tangled,” and we love to watch “Napoleon Dynamite” for a good laugh.

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

What are the biggest differences between your children? Each child has their own interests and is truly an individual. Amelia, a born leader with awards for her volunteering, is graduating this spring from the College of Wooster with degrees in Sociology and Elementary Education. Mary is a disciplined, record-breaking runner and biology major at Wittenberg University with aspirations to become a nurse practitioner. Ben is an artist, loves technology, longboarding, and is innovative and independent; he is applying at schools to study Industrial Design. Brennan, an avid sports fan and high-school junior, is helpful, kind, and was voted MVP of his hockey team. Maggie, a freshman, is warm-hearted and wise for her years; she is a talented singer, dancer and actress, as well as a straight-A student. Noah is passionate, adorable, loving and brings such joy to our family.

My life motto: Think positive, be kind to others, work hard, and give of yourself. 18

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

Pfeifer recently received the Columbus Symphony Orchestra’s 2011 Music Educator’s Award for Community Education (other awards went to elementary and secondary school educators). The Music Educator Awards are administered by the Ohio Arts Council with funding support from the McGraw-Hill Companies, American Electric Power and Battelle.


COLUMBUS CREATURE FEATURE Hawksbill Sea Turtle

d loves ily in the wil m fa ’s y d d u B al warm tropic swimming in around g in imm sw e il h W . rs wate can fs his family the coral ree mp, ching on shri be seen mun mones. uid and ane sq s, e g n o sp

Hi, Zoo Kids. Here’s a picture of my friend Buddy. He’s a Hawksbill Sea Turtle here at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. and Buddy was found along the Texas coast with injured flippers can not be released back into the wild.

Did you know sea turtles lay their eggs on the beach? If you’re planning a· beach vacation you can help Buddy’s family by leaving turtle nest alone and keeping the beach clean.

In the past 20 years, 75 sea turtles have lived at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium and have been released back into the wild. You can adopt hawksbill sea turtle at www.columbuszoo.org.

Learn at the Zoo April: Zootots: for ages 18-36 months • Zookids: for ages 3-5 After School at the Zoo: for grades 3-7 Keeper for a Day: for ages 13-17 • Twilight Tours • Adult Workshop: photography

Looking Ahead: Family Class: Backyard Birding Summer Day Camps: for ages 3-5 and grades 1-7 To register visit : www.columbuszoo.org

Zoo Kid Corner When Hannah comes to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium she loves to go see the Polar Bears. Hannah says that they put on a funny swim show. Hannah also loves seeing the many geese around the Zoo and listening to them honk! When Hannah comes to ZooKids she loves playing with the other children, completing a fun art project and also seeing an animal visitor. Hannah’s favorite animal visitors are our Three-banded Armadillos Dozer and Sam.

Hannah G. from Dublin, OH. Age: 4

NOW OPEN

As you might have guessed, Hannah’s favorite animals at the Zoo are the Polar Bears and the many geese. When asked what she wanted to be when she grows up, Hannah enthusiastically said a Teacher!

For More Creature Feature Fun, Games & Activities Visit:

www.ColumbusCreatureFeature.com

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

19


on the go: HOUSEBROKEN

Good Timing BY JOE BLUNDO

When it comes to home improvement, I find that timing is everything. For example, you should never attempt a plumbing project on a Saturday. Why? Because if you mess it up, you’ll be left with a choice no homeowner wants to face: Either pay a plumber overtime rates on a weekend to come and finish the job, or face the wrath of your family members by making them wait until Monday to regain a working toilet. Also, people who own two-story homes shouldn’t attempt a roof repair on a Saturday.

Why? Because emergency rooms are more crowded on weekends. If you’re going to do something dangerous, midweek is best. After a tumble off a ladder, you don’t want to find yourself seventh in line at the ER behind a softball player with a broken ankle, three kids with fevers, two chest-pain cases and a guy suffering from bad chainsaw technique. Interior painting should be restricted to baseball season. Baseball is the slowest of the televised sports, and therefore the easiest to watch while slapping a coat of latex on the family-room walls. The stop-and-go action of football doesn’t lend itself to smooth paint application, and hockey fights make me want to jab rather than roll. Never organize a garage until late fall, when it’s too cold to go outside and do stuff that messes up the garage in the first place. Gardening is the worst: From April to the end of October, I’ve got a garage littered with plastic pots, tangled hoses and halffull bags of mulch. I would never

attempt to organize that mess before a good killing frost. Aug. 15 should be your cutoff date for starting really ambitious remodeling projects. I started a bathroom remodeling once in mid-August, assuring my wife it would be done way before her deadline of Christmas. And it was, with — if I’m remembering right — about 20 minutes to spare. Don’t buy power tools on a weeknight. Most people — well, most guys, at least — are physically incapable of bringing home a reciprocating saw without immediately cutting a hole in a wall. If you’re going to do that, you want to make sure you have plenty of time to clean up the mess and repair the wiring and ductwork you inadvertently sawed through. No one wants to be doing that at 2 a.m. on a workday. If you have children under 10, the best time to wash a car is Saturday, when the kids are home and will beg to help. This can result in up to an

Joe Blundo’s column So to Speak appears in the Life section of The Columbus Dispatch. Visit his blog at Dispatch.com hour of sitting in a lawn chair, supervising. (Incidentally, this trick doesn’t work on kids older than 10. In fact, no tricks work on kids older than 10.) I should also address deck-cleaning and sealing, tops on my list of jobs I absolutely hate. It’s a messy, laborious task that, at best, can make a 20-year-old deck look days or even weeks younger. In other words, there’s never a good time to do it.

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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com


on the go: VITAMIN ME

Skin

DEEPNESS BY KRISTY ECKERT

At last, the sun is beckoning! (Actually, as I type this, it’s snowing. But I’m thinking positive — a matter of survival at this point. I just took my 1-year-old to the zoo on a 33-degree day, simply because one more game of chase around our seemingly shrinking house wasn’t going to cut it for any of us. But I digress…) The impending warmth offers a good excuse to review our skin routines, right? The earth is renewing itself, and so should we. (Read: I’ll use any excuse possible to play makeover.) First, we all know the secrets to good skin, whether or not we want to accept them: Ample sleep, lots of water and no sun. Ample sleep may be an impossibility for anyone reading this publication (and for the record, if anyone is getting it, the rest of us don’t want to hear about it, thank you). But the other two are doable. My favorite skin trick (and healthful living trick, for that matter) is to chug a giant bottle of water first thing every morning. Simple concept, astounding results. And once you get the hang of hydration, keep refilling the bottle all day. As for the sun, spending time in it is actually OK, but SPF is a must. My family ribs me endlessly for my devotion to sunscreen. But it’s so important (particularly since I spent far too much time in my teen years basking in the sun, covered in baby oil). Beyond those basics, removing makeup and washing nightly should be a priority. If I skip a night — even just one — I pay a price. My favorite cleanser is the simple-andcrisp Thymes Essentials Face Wash ($20); I also like the dermatologist favorite Cetaphil Daily Facial Cleanser ($9). While I typically moisturize twice a day during the winter months (morning and night), I scale it back to mornings only as the weather warms. I worship the light-buteffective Thymes Essentials Face Lotion with

SPF 20 ($24). Next up — exfoliate. You don’t need to do it often, but you should do it occasionally, maybe once a week. You can spend a few bucks or a few hundred bucks on facial scrubs; or, you can make your own with brown sugar and olive oil. Just get the bad stuff off (and do it before bed, giving your skin all night to breathe). Once your skin is in tip-top shape (or getting there), think about your brows. Even if you don’t pay to have them professionally tamed every other week, it’s worth visiting a pro to have them properly shaped; then, you can pluck accordingly. I recommend Sunny Desai, who performs threading at the Charles Penzone Grand Salon in Dublin. She’s a goddess. Finally, few of us — no matter how pretty our skin — go without makeup. Even if you think you’re in a good routine, you may want to consider enlisting help from a pro. (It’s kind of like a bra fitting — can’t hurt.) Mukha (in the Short North) and Skin Perfect (in Worthington) both have stellar professionals who can sit down with you, apply your makeup, and tell you what colors and looks work best on you. Last but not least, smile. And get some sleep (or at least close your eyes and daydream of sunshine).

Kristy Eckert is the editor of Capital Style, a bimonthly women’s magazine published by The Dispatch Printing Company. To sign up for her weekly e-newsletter, visit Capital-Style.com

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

21


on the go: PEOPLE YOU SHOULD MEET

Camille Mancuso BY JANE HAWES

For everything that Camille Mancuso does precociously well at the age of 11 — singing and acting in touring productions of Broadway musicals, for example — it’s comforting to know the Blacklick native can get in trouble like any other 11-year-old. As a result, she now knows how to knit. “The dresser in Des Moines taught us how,” said Camille, who is touring the country in a production of “Mary Poppins” that comes to the Ohio Theatre from April 20 to May 8. “We were getting a little hectic backstage, so she decided to teach us something that would be nice and calming.” Camille shares the role of Jane Banks with another girl, and two boys share the role of their brother Michael in the iconic musical, and the foursome sometimes are rambunctious, she said. So the woman who supervised their costume changes at the Iowa stop on their tour sat the kids down and taught them how to knit.

©Disney/CML. Photo by Joan Marcus

PHOTO COURTESY THE MANCUSO FAMILY

22

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

Talon Ackerman as Michael Banks, Steffanie Leigh as Mary Poppins and Camille Mancuso as Jane Banks perform “Practically Perfect” in the National Tour Company production of “Mary Poppins”

Christina, Corinne, Vincent, Camille and Anthony Mancuso outside the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. Since joining the tour last August, Camille has been to cities like Charlotte, Omaha and Washington, D.C., but always with either her mom, Christina, or her dad, Anthony, accompanying her. Usually it’s her mom because Mr. Mancuso has

a law practice to run. The family also times their work and travel schedules to get the whole clan — which includes Vincent, 6, and Corinne, 8 — together on the road with Camille. Her contract runs until the end of September.


Ages 3-Grade 12 Coed Programs

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE!

Ä?ĆŒÄžÄšĹ?Ćš Ä?Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒĆ?ÄžĆ?

To find out when Camille is performing in “Mary Poppins� at the Ohio Theatre, visit her website at camillemancuso.com

Ä?ÄžĆŒÄ‚ĹľĹ?Ä?Ć? Ć?ĞůĨ ĚĞĨĞŜĆ?Äž ÄžÄ‚ĆŒĹŻÇ‡ Ä?ĹšĹ?ůĚŚŽŽĚ Ć‰ĆŒĹ˝Ĺ?ĆŒÄ‚ĹľĆ? Ä‚ĹŒÄžĆŒĹśĹ˝Ĺ˝Ĺś Ä‚ÄšÇ€ÄžĹśĆšĆľĆŒÄžĆ?

“It can get a little crazy when you have five people crammed in a room together,� Camille said, during a recent break at home from her touring. But she has developed a fondness, she confessed, for “the hotels that have pools.� It’s not the life that the Mancuso parents expected when their oldest child first belted out a number from “Annie� in a restaurant at age 3 — “I think they gave her a free dessert because everyone stood up and applauded,� Mrs. Mancuso recalled. But, in the last three years, it has become their version of normal. “Mary Poppins� is Camille’s fourth national touring production, after a start at home that included WeJoySing classes, then shows with Imaginating Dramatics, Columbus Children’s Theatre, the Davis Performing Arts Center and the Pleasure Guild. “We try not to make it all about her,� Mrs. Mancuso said, adding that she’s finding ways to make the traveling a part of all her children’s educations. Camille is technically homeschooled now, while the younger two attends Gahanna schools at home. “We try to make it more about the experience of the city,� Mrs. Mancuso said. “I loved San Antonio and Philadelphia, and in Appleton, Wisconsin, the people were so nice.� Camille said her favorite city so far has been Washington, D.C. “Every single Monday is an off day,� Camille said, “so that’s when we do field trips. We got to stay in Washington, D.C., for a really long time, and I love every single one of the museums because the artifacts are so amazing.� She also gave two big thumbs up to the Discovery Museum in Charlotte and the Children’s Museum in Indianapolis. The toughest part of life on the road, Camille said, is “sometimes you forget what city you’re in and the days of the week get all smashed together.� But she is enjoying the experience enough to keep going. “I’d love to be on Broadway and I definitely see myself still doing this in the future,� Camille said. “The best part is getting to meet people all across the country because then sometimes you go back to a city and you meet them again, and you say, ‘Oh! I remember her!’ � Her mother, who admirably didn’t stick around to monitor her daughter during the interview, said the family’s life has been a whirlwind but it has also been rewarding to see Camille flourish. “Saturate them with opportunities and be supportive,� Mrs. Mancuso said, when asked to offer advice to other parents. “They’ll find their niche and it will be the things they don’t ever want to quit.�

LJŽĹ?Ä‚ ƉŚŽƚŽĹ?ĆŒÄ‚Ć‰ĹšÇ‡ ĆšĹšÄžÄ‚ĆšÄžĆŒ

CSG Summer Programs

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blend challenge and

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      school.

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&Ĺ˝ĆŒĆŒ Ĺ?ĹśÄ¨Ĺ˝ĆŒĹľÄ‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ĺ?ĹśÄ¨Ä¨Ĺ˝ĆŒĹľ Ĺ?Ĺś Ä¨Ĺ˝ĆŒĹľÄ‚Ć&#x; Ä‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ĺ˝ĆŒ Ĺ˝ĆŒ ƋƾĞĆ?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ? ƋƾĞĆ? Ć‹Ćľ ÄžĆ?Ć&#x; Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ć&#x;ŽŜ ĹśĆ? Ç€Ĺ?Ć?Ĺ?Ćš Ç€Ĺ?Ć?Ĺ? Ĺ?Ć?Ĺ?Ćš Ĺ?Ćš Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒ Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒ Ç ÄžÄ?Ć?Ĺ?ƚĞ Ç ÄžÄ? Ä?Ć?Ĺ? Ć?Ĺ?ƚĞ Ĺ?ƚĞ Ĺ˝ Ĺ˝ĆŒĆŒ Ä?Ä?ŽŜƚĂÄ?ƚ͗ Ĺ˝ :ĂŜĞ ZƾĚĹ?Ä?Ğů Ä‚Ćš Ď˛Ď­Ď°Í˜ĎŽĎąĎŽÍ˜ĎŹĎłĎ´Ď­ ÄžÇ†ĆšÍ˜ ĎŻĎŻĎŻ ĹŠĆŒĆľÄšĹ?Ä?ĞůΛÄ?ŽůƾžÄ?ĆľĆ?Ć?Ä?ĹšĹ˝Ĺ˝ĹŻÄ¨Ĺ˝ĆŒĹ?Ĺ?ĆŒĹŻĆ?Í˜Ĺ˝ĆŒĹ?

ĎŜĞ Ä‚ĆŒĆš ĂŜĚ žƾÄ?Ĺš ĹľĹ˝ĆŒÄžÍŠ

2011

ŽůƾžÄ?ĆľĆ? ^Ä?ŚŽŽů Ä¨Ĺ˝ĆŒ 'Ĺ?ĆŒĹŻĆ? Íť Ϲϲ ^͘ ŽůƾžÄ?Ĺ?Ä‚ ǀĞŜƾĞ Íť ŽůƾžÄ?ĆľĆ?Í• K, Ď°ĎŻĎŽĎŹĎľ

www.csgsummerprograms.org

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

23


on the go: NEIGHBORHOOD SPOTLIGHT POWELL

Grandview Heights

WESTERVILLE

DUBLIN

WORTHINGTON

NEW ALBANY NORTHWEST SIDE

NORTH SIDE HILLIARD

EASTON

UPPER ARLINGTON

GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS

CAMPUS

GAHANNA

SHORT NORTH WHITEHALL

ARENA DOWNTOWN DISTRICT

WEST SIDE

BREWERY DISTRICT

OLDE TOWNE EAST

REYNOLDSBUR

BEXLEY EAST SIDE

GERMAN VILLAGE PICKERINGTON SOUTH SIDE

GROVE CITY

STORY BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON PHOTOS BY DANIEL SOHNER

Although Grandview Heights might be best known for great restaurants where grown-ups can find fine dining and adult beverages, it also has plenty of opportunities for family fun. It’s a Columbus suburb with a small-town feel, said Michelle Wilson, executive director of the Grandview Area Chamber of Commerce. “It’s Mayberry-esque … in a modern way,” she said. Residents can always count on running into someone they know while out and about, added Analisa Trares, a Grandview mother of three. “You’re on a first-name basis with the mayor,” she said. “You have total access to anyone you need.” The Clay Cafe, a paint-your-own pottery studio, is a great place to take kids. They love working on the art projects that make fabulous one-of-a-kind gifts for parents and grandparents.

Families can experience professional art at the kid-friendly Ohio Craft Museum. The museum features rotating exhibits, plus offers classes and camps for children. Another unique art experience is the Open Door Art Studio, which offers classes and creativeenrichment opportunities for people with disabilities. The studio, located in an alley along Grand-

24

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

view Avenue, sells affordable and interesting works of arts made by students. Grandview Avenue, one of the city’s main roads, is best explored on foot like the locals do. Get your caffeine fix at Stauf’s Grandview and wander around the bustling downtown. Kids will enjoy making candles at The Candle Lab. Candle creators can combine a variety of

scents to create a unique-smelling soy candle. Be sure to see what’s playing at the recently restored and locally-owned Grandview Theatre, which tries to offer movies and special events for kids and adults. Indulge your sweet tooth with a visit to Jeni’s Ice Creams, the local chain that specializes in fresh ingredients and unique flavors. For more traditional ice


Discover The Gardner School, an award-winning academically focused preschool for ages 6 weeks through private kindergarten.

Please join us for ‘Camp Gardner’

ENROLLING NOW!

The Gardner School of Dublin cream treats, visit the Grandview Dairy Queen. The Grandview Heights Public Library is a short walk from downtown and has an inviting children’s area with computer games, nooks for reading, and a cozy play area. The library offers regular story hours and numerous free events each month. For some outdoor fun, visit Wyman Woods where kids can walk through the woods or climb on the playground equipment. The park also is home to one of Central Ohio’s best sledding hills. Trares likes Buck Park for its recycled tire surface in the playground area. She takes her kids there when the weather has been rainy because she said the surface means kids won’t get muddy. Grandview also is home to a large number of resale and consignment shops, many of which are located along Fifth Avenue. Trader Tots, which opened more than 20 years ago, sells second-hand kid clothes and baby items. Second Chance Consignment Boutique and Coco Couture specialize in upscale ladies’ clothes. Other stores include one more time, a 9,000-square-foot store that sells used women’s and men’s

6145 Emerald Parkway Dublin, OH 43016 Phone: (614) 717-9677

www.TheGardnerSchool.com

My own ROOM Where Columbus has shopped for Nurseries and Children’s Furniture for 16 Years clothing; one more time plus, which carries plus-size clothes, one more time etc., a used-furniture store, and Fresco Furnishings, an upscale used-furniture shop. Buckeye fans will want to sample the fare at the Buckeye Hall of Fame Grill. The sports restaurant features memorabilia, photographs and a ‘Block O’-shaped fire pit. Menu options range from hamburgers to prime rib to fish. For lighter appetites, try Jason’s Deli, which serves soups, sandwiches and salads, with a focus on organic ingredients. Kids can finish off their meal with free soft-serve ice cream. For a fun mother-daughter day, visit the Cambridge Tea House. Kids and moms can sip tea or hot chocolate out of fancy cups and sample scones and finger sandwiches.

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Bunk Beds from $229

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(614) 487-8992 www.myownroomfurniture.com columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

25


on the go: SHOP SPOTLIGHT

At Clothes Mentror We Buy and Sell:

www.CLOTHES - MENTOR.com

6 Columbus Area Locations

Dublin • Columbus • Gahanna • Grove City • Reynoldsburg • Westerville

Hours: M-S 10am to 8 pm • Sunday NOON to 5pm

When it comes to kids stuff, we’re number onesie. We Pay $$$ on the spot for gently used clothing, toys furniture and equipment your kids have outgrown. Plus low prices on what they need now For Store Information and directions, please visit

www.onceuponachildcolumbus.com 26

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

Michelle Salisbury OWNER, TRADER TOTS Michelle Salisbury and her business partner Anne BushCassady opened Trader Tots resale shop in Grandview Heights nearly 22 years ago because they wanted jobs that would allow them to bring their children to work. “Owning the store allowed us to both be involved in our kids’ lives,” Salisbury said. “If you want to be a room mother and you work a regular job, you can’t tell your boss you need every holiday off. It’s just allowed us to take care of the things we thought were important.” —MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

How has the downturn in the economy impacted your business?

What information does a person need to know if they want to sell clothing Things are a lot worse for at your shop?

a lot more people. We’re having more sales. We have more things priced for less. Where some stores’ prices have gone up, our prices have gone down.

What attracts people to your shop? Because of our location in Grandview — being near Upper Arlington and Bexley, we get a lot of high-end clothing. That means parents who shop here can dress their kids really well for less.

Our best sellers are sizes 18-months to a size 7-8. We’re looking for freshly laundered clothing — particularly name brands. We’re not looking much for things purchased at Target or WalMart.

What other children’s items do you carry? No car seats. We take all the other assorted items — swings, strollers, high chairs, Pack ’n Plays and ExerSaucers. Cribs have become

an almost impossible area to deal with since the recall of drop-sided cribs.

Do you ever have sales? At the end of the season, we mark stuff down to $1, $2 or $3 — most things go to a dollar. Every year on the first Saturday of August we have a bag sale, where shoppers can fill a grocery bag for $12. People are always amazed by the amount of clothing they can stuff in a bag.


on the go: NEIGHBORHOOD MAP

Grandview Heights

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BUCK PARK Goodale Blvd. and Quay Ave. 614-481-3111 grandviewheights.org

FRESCO FURNISHINGS 1744 W. Fifth Ave. 614-586-1963 frescofurnishings.com

ONE MORE TIME PLUS 1515 W. 5th Ave. 614-486-3728 onemoretimeplus.com

BUCKEYE HALL OF FAME GRILL 900 Goodale Blvd. 614-299-6639 buckeyegrill.com

GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS PUBLIC LIBRARY 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778 ghpl.org

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CAMBRIDGE TEA HOUSE 1885 W. Fifth Ave. 614-486-6464 cambridgeteahouse.com

GRANDVIEW THEATRE 1247 Grandview Ave. 614-486-5750 grandviewtheatre.net

CLAY CAFE 1644 W. Fifth Ave. 614-486-5815 claycafecolumbus.com

JASON’S DELI 775 Yard St., Ste. 190 614-291-7246

SECOND CHANCE CONSIGNMENT BOUTIQUE 1803 W. 5th Ave. 614-488-3006 secondchancegrandview.com

JENI’S ICE CREAM 1281 Grandview Ave. 614-488-2680 jenisicecreams.com

STAUF’S 1277 Grandview Ave. 614-486-4861 staufs.com

THE CANDLE LAB 1251 Grandview Ave. 614-488-2009 thecandlelab.com

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DAIRY QUEEN 1512 W. 5th Ave. 614-486-0011 dairyqueen.com

ONE MORE TIME 1521 W. 5th Ave. 614-486-0031 onemoretime.com

OPEN DOOR ART STUDIO 1365 Grandview Ave. 614-486-4919 opendoorartstudio.org

TRADER TOTS 1828 W. 5th Ave. 614-488-8687 tradertots.com WYMAN WOODS Goodale Blvd. and Grandview Ave. 614-481-3111 grandviewheights.org

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columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

27


hot topic: SPECIAL NEEDS

Special Marriages Communication and community are key

BY ANIETRA HAMPER

Just hours after Susie and Grahm Jones welcomed their daughter Ella into the world, they received news that would forever change their family dynamic. “They came into the room at 1 a.m. and gave us a status update,” Mr. Jones said. “Then they said they were seeing some signs for Down syndrome.” Ella was born 6 weeks early, so the Joneses’ primary concerns were the multitude of medical issues that accompany a low birth-weight baby. The diagnosis of Down syndrome did not actually sink in until after they took Ella home, and the doctors and nurses were gone. “That was the scary part when they handed her over for us to bring her home where we didn’t have doctors and nurses 24/7,” Mrs. Jones said. Mr. Jones added, “Every sigh or whimDANIEL SOHNER PHOTO Grahm, Ella and Susie Jones at home per during the night had us tripping over each other to get in tough decisions about jobs and managing medical care. mented by physical and speech there to check on “What is supposed to be a very joyous time becomes the therapy sessions, schooling, supElla.” end of hopes and dreams,” McCullough said. “They are port groups, parent classes and Like many couples pulled into a world of hospitals, doctors, medications and many doctor appointments. And who face the sudden sometimes forced to manage care at home.” that is just the beginning for the challenge of a child All of these stressors, McCullough said, are not concouple who both work full time. with special needs, the ducive to nurturing a marriage. “There is always something Joneses were under a McCullough said couples have to be advocates for their additional,” Mrs. Jones said. GRAHM JONES PHOTO “That’s where it gets a little hard tremendous amount marriage. It becomes too easy to divert all their energy and Ella, still an infant, grasps Grahm’s bracelet of stress that most attention to their child and have nothing left for each other. juggling all of it.” new parents do not have to endure. Their sense of “normal” “Even little things, like holding hands, remind each Lori McCullough, a social worker for the Child Developwas jostled. And they were forced to arrive at a new kind of spouse how valuable that relationship is,” McCullough said. ment Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, sees many normal for their child and for their marriage. Advocating for the marriage begins with communication. couples with a special-needs child struggle as they face the Ella is now 21 months old. The family routine is suppleThe Joneses, married for 11 years, are both quiet people. fear of financial difficulties, medical bills, insurance and

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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com


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After Ella’s diagnosis they said they had to learn how to openly communicate their feelings and their individual needs to each other. “I feel like we are more proactive bringing things to the table about Ella and about everything,” Mrs. Jones said. “We make sure we are both on the same page and know how each other feel.” While the Joneses still have frustrations, they say they also have perspective and now face their challenges together. “It’s not like you get handed a handbook — ‘Down Syndrome 101,’ ” Mr. Jones said. “When we get frustrated with something or somebody is at their wit’s end, it has nothing to do with Down syndrome; it has to do with a cranky baby or just general kid stuff.” While the Joneses consider their marriage a best-case scenario, Dr. Cynthia Gerhardt, a pediatric psychologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, said not all couples are as successful. Gerhardt’s research on the risk and resilience factors in families with children with chronic conditions shows how essential it is that couples reach out for help. That could be in the form of counseling or, for the Joneses, support groups. “Couples who reach out for support see the most success and resiliency,” Gerhardt said. “Those families tend to be able to make sense of their child’s condition and that allows them to see the silver lining.” Some couples, Gerhardt said, can build a stronger marriage by facing this together. The Joneses are one of those couples. Grahm and Susie Jones acknowledge that their world changed with the news that little Ella had Down syndrome. But they say it also opened their eyes to a world they never would have seen without her.

The Joneses said the stress of becoming sudden experts on Down syndrome was overwhelming, and that it was a daunting task to sort through all of the information available and prioritize what was most important and relevant to them. Through a network of support, however, the Joneses identified key organizations and resources that have been invaluable. Nationwide Children’s Hospital also has a vast support system for parents of children with chronic conditions including therapy for specific conditions, support groups and counseling resources for couples. The information provided is a starting point of resources. Each organization can direct parents to more specific information about their child’s condition. CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY PROJECT OF COLUMBUS: cap4kids.org/columbus NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL:

nationwidechildrens.org MUMS NATIONAL PARENT-TO-PARENT NETWORK: www.netnet.net/mums NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR RARE DISORDERS: rarediseases.org OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH HELP ME GROW INITIATIVE:

www.ohiohelpmegrow.org

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29


hot topic: SPECIAL NEEDS

Special Siblings Helping the whole family feel valued BY DEBBIE ANGELOS PHOTOS BY DANIEL SOHNER

Sophia and Henry Hess, of Columbus, are like any other sister and brother. They laugh, tease and have the occasional squabble. It’s a normal relationship, except for one thing: Henry, 10, has autism and Sophia, 13, does not. While raising a specialneeds child is a challenge for the entire family, it can have a profound effect on siblings in particular. Because of Henry’s diagnosis, Sophia has had to tackle some tough decisions from a young age, explained her mother, Amy. And her father, Tom, agreed. “She’s had to be an extra parent in a lot of ways,” Mr. Hess said. With much of parent’s attention going towards the disabled child, it’s easy to see why typical siblings of special-needs children sometimes grapple with a difficult feelings, said Dr. Tom Fish, Director of Employment and Family Services at The Nisonger Center at Ohio State University, where sibling-support groups have been offered for over 30 years. “It’s natural to be embarrassed, to feel resentful of increased responsibilities or that the special-needs child gets more attention,” Fish said. At the other end of the spectrum, Fish said, siblings may act “too” good, attempting to shield parents or the disabled sibling from extra stress. Or they’ll become

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overly helpful in an effort to receive attention. They may also struggle with guilt over being the “healthy” child or worried about how others will treat or view their sibling. Sophia knows some of these feelings well but has taken them in stride. “The most difficult part is to see people being mean to Henry because they don’t know who he is,” Sophia said. “Autism is just what he (has), not who he is.” Siblings of children who develop chronic or life-threatening illnesses can also struggle with a range of emotions. “Illnesses create a lot of unknowns,” said Karen McHugh-Fornadel, Child Life Specialist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “It could be as simple as a child coming home from school and not knowing who is going to be there or if something will happen to their sibling.” Siblings may also engage in magical thinking — relating events that don’t correlate with their sibling’s illness, such as blaming themselves for the sickness because they got upset at their sibling the day before, explained McHugh-Fornadel.

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

Henry, Sophia, Amy and Tom Hess at Bartelt Dancers studio where the siblings take a hip-hop class together each week.

KEEPING THE BALANCE Dr. Fish offered three suggestions for what parents can do to help their non-disabled children combat fears and feel valued: • First, give siblings correct and age-appropriate information about the disability and discuss it often. Children may not know how to ask the right questions or may have preconceived notions about the condition that are incorrect.

• Second, allow children opportunities to express how they feel through a variety of ways including talking, artwork or role-playing. The Hesses have found this to be particularly helpful. “We’ve always been very honest, very open with one another,” Mrs. Hess explained.

• Third, give children opportunities to be meaningfully involved in their disabled sibling’s life. Every couple of weeks the Hesses have a team meeting with Henry’s therapists and aides. Sophia is always invited. “We’ve always asked for her input because she lends a different perspective as a sibling and we value her feedback,” said Mr. Hess. She also takes a dance class with her brother.


ACCENT ON THE POSITIVE Growing up in a special-needs environment can provide many benefits as well: • Special-needs siblings tend to be emotionally and socially mature, said Dr. Fish. • They also tend to be very tolerant, compassionate, dependable and empathetic, qualities Sophia’s parents certainly see in her. “She’s learned how to do things for herself and then turn around and become a teacher for others,” said Mrs. Hess. “She’s just such an amazing kid.” • These strengths often make siblings one of a special-needs child’s greatest advocates. “It’s significant that you know your sibling for a longer time than anyone else. They can be a great support both as children and as adults and possibly future caretakers,” said Dr. Fish.

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31


hot topic: SPECIAL NEEDS

A Special Kind of Parenting Parenting the developmentally-disabled adult BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

CAREGIVING TIPS FOR SPECIALNEEDS FAMILIES

Carol Peifer wishes she didn’t worry so much about her daughter Ashley Barrow’s future, but the Sunbury mother knows that the 24-year-old, who was born with Down syndrome, will always need someone to advocate for her. “I think so much more than I want to think about it,” Peifer said. Raising a child with special needs poses a unique challenge. Many of these children will never be able to live independently. Those that can may require close supervision. The most successful special-needs parents are those who learn what options are available to their children and advocate for their needs, said Peggy Martin, a family advocate with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. “You want to be the best advocate for your son or daughter by educating yourself,” Martin said. Parents of special-needs children must have a plan for when their children fin-

32

BE INFORMED • Take time to learn about your family member’s condition and special need requirements. • Talk to health care providers and other health professionals that work with families with special needs. • Understand the needs of you and your family, and work together to make good choices about housing, schools, health services, and more. • Be aware of signs of mental or physical abuse. Notice how others care for the person with special needs.

Carol Peifer (r.) works with Sarah Grigis, Natalie Schlaterand her daughter Ashley Barrow (l. to r.) to make jambalaya ish high school, Martin added. The main issues parents need to consider are housing, social activities and personal growth, said Martin, who has a daughter with mental-health and mentaldevelopment issues. Finding the right housing situation can be a long, complicated process that often involves putting a person’s name on a waiting list. Par-

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

ents should explore options with their children’s caseworker long before they would be ready for a move. “Know what you want for your son or daughter,” she said. “There’s a range of options.” Martin’s 34-year-old daughter has her own apartment and loves her independence. “She loves not having mom and dad’s

rules,” Martin said. Peifer’s daughter lives with her parents but the couple’s long-term plan involves moving her into her own place. Parents also need to help their special-needs adult children develop a social life, Peifer said. “We always made it a priority to make sure Ashley has friends,” she said. As parents, “you plan

parties, activities, trips to the movies and involve her peers.” The need to organize social outings often increases once the child graduates from school, Martin said. The end of school often means the end of a structure and routine the young person enjoyed. It also may mean less time for socializing with peers. As a result,

this is a time when some individuals with special needs may develop depression issues. Finding social activities is critical to a special-needs adult’s mental and physical health, Martin said. “(It’s) the need to have what is real,” she said. “What is real is peer relationships.” Another key to success is planning for the individual’s


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growth and development. When Ashley was finishing school, Peifer wanted her to continue to grow and learn. Many of the programs she found focused on crafts or learning job skills, but not on academic learning. “There were a lot of options that would watch her during the day and entertain her during the day,” she said. Peifer wanted something different for Ashley. So she and a friend started The Alternative Center, a day program in Westerville that offers an education curriculum, centered on math and reading, for individu-

als with disabilities. “If given the opportunity, they want to learn,” she said of her clients. Peifer encourages parents to talk to the son or daughter about what they want for the future. “Listen to (your) adult child and see what they want,” she said. It’s important that parents of adults with disabilities not make every decision for their kids, Peifer explained. “We think because they’re disabled we need to make every decision for them,” she said. “They need to be encouraged to make the decisions that they can make.”

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need to know: AGE APPROPRIATE: SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOLING

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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

How to Choose? Educational Options for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Making choices about your child’s education is one of the most important and far-reaching, not to mention stressful and complex, tasks a parent faces. For families with children who have autism spectrum disorders, the decision-making process is even more intricate. With a variety of public and specialized-school options available to children with autism, how do families choose what is best for their situation? “Central to the decision is the family’s primary goal for the child,” said Dr. Jacquie Wynn, director of the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “And then it comes down to preferences on the part of the family.” “Reflect on your child’s needs and personality,” advised Wynn. “You know your child best.” Wynn suggested making a list of pros and cons of all your options. Then, once the decision has been made, closely monitor your child’s education. “Ask yourself, ‘Is my child happy to go to school each day and showing growth? Or is he/she showing a high level of anxiety about school?’ ” Wynn said. “You’ll know if your child is in the right environment.” Columbus Parent talked to two families who have been through this process to find out how they made their decision:

BY TRUDA SHINKER

8 5Y-E1 ARS

THE PUBLIC SCHOOL OPTION:

THE SPECIALIZED SCHOOL OPTION:

The Worthington family chose to send their son, Clay, now a sophomore, to Dublin public schools. “Our goal was to place Clay in a setting that would be with his peers and would allow him to thrive,” explained Clay’s mom, Michele Worthington. “He takes many classes with his peers, all of which are staffed with support for him. He also takes some classes in a smaller setting that work on more functional skills, as well as a program that allows him to work outside the school.” “Clay is very happy,” added Worthington. “He enjoys going to school each day. He has many friends, attends after-school activities, and is involved in school clubs. Dublin does an amazing job of working as a team to create the best environment for the child.”

The Webb family of Columbus chose to send their son, Vincent, to the Summit Academy, a state-funded school that specializes in working with children with high-functioning autism and related disorders. “I felt like there was so much my son was capable of learning, yet I knew it wouldn’t happen for him in a traditional environment,” said Gerle Webb, Vincent’s mother. “I knew with one-on-one guidance, he would be much more successful.” The Webbs also liked Summit Academy’s community where Vincent, 17, is now a junior. “My biggest concern was Vincent being teased or harassed,” said Mrs. Webb. “These kids are already fighting the odds when it comes to drug and alcohol addiction. I wanted to give him an environment where he would feel comfortable being exactly who he is.”

Michele and Clay Worthington

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

THE BOTTOM LINE The Worthingtons and the Webbs agreed that a high level of involvement is required for success. Michele Worthington summed it up: “Check out all your options and recheck them each year. Keep positive relations with your school and advocate for an education that will provide your child with the best possible outcome for their future.” NEED MORE INFORMATION? Central Ohio has a ton of great resources for families whose children have autism. Be sure to check out The Autism Puzzle insert in this month’s issue of Columbus Parent.


need to know: AGE-APPROPRIATE: SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOLING

The Learning Doesn’t Need to Stop BY ELIZABETH SEUFER

Hitting the books while battling cancer Being a teenager is complicated enough without adding cancer into the mix. Christina O’Bryan, now 18, was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma in 2005, about a month after becoming a teenager. The Lancaster resident began treatment immediately and couldn’t return to public school because her immune system would not be up to the challenge while undergoing treatment. Keeping up with schoolwork was difficult, but Christina graduated from Virtual Community School Ohio, an online charter school, last spring. Christina said she couldn’t have done it without the help of teacher Tifanie Rose. Rose is a Columbus City Schools teacher who works with longterm patients at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, where O’Bryan is still a patient. Rose said people often feel that school is the last thing a child receiving cancer treatment should worry about. “What they don’t understand is that it provides children with a hope for the future, while promoting a sense of normalcy during a scary and chaotic time,” Rose said. Christina said it’s difficult to do schoolwork when you don’t feel well. Treatment side effects she’s experienced include hair loss, nausea, weakness and pain. She also was paralyzed for a year after receiving her first type of chemotherapy. “I’d sit down with the

books and help her,” said Lisa O’Bryan, Christina’s mother. “A lot of times, I would write for her because she couldn’t even hold a pencil.” Christina tried home instruction, tutors and online schooling. She caught up on schoolwork during summer breaks, when needed. She returned to AmandaClearcreek High School for a few months during the ninth grade, hoping to feel normal again. “You can’t be a normal kid when you’re going to school wearing a mask … you know, kids say stuff,” Christina said. “I had to wear the mask. What is something little to them could kill me.” Christina said she’s made new friends and lost some as well. “You lose friends that you thought were your friends forever,” she said. Despite the obstacles, Christina said it felt amazing to graduate. “I’m proud of her,” her mother said. “I’ve always been real supportive of her. And I’ve never lied to her. She’s known from day one what she’s had.” Lisa O’Bryan said she feels it’s also important to let children going through cancer treatment take time to have fun. “It can’t be all school, school, school, or you’ll drive yourself crazy,” O’Bryan said. Christina encourages children to continue pursuing their goals. “If you set your mind to it,” she said, “you can do it.”

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www.JanesAcademy.com 1375 Francisco Rd., (NW Columbus near Upper Arlington) 457-6404 contact@janesacademy.com

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Arlington Childrens Center • Caring for children 6 wks through 12 yrs. • Full-time / Part-time / Preschool / Pre-K / Latch-key / Hourly Programs • 6:45-6:00 M-F • Latch-key “Plus” w/transportation to local schools • Summer Camp w/Arts & Crafts, on-site Pool + Field Trips • Convenient to 315/0SU/downtown • Enrolling for our “Shore to Shore Summer Camp” 1033 Old Henderson Rd. Columbus, 43220

451-5400 contact.acc4kids@yahoo.com

PRINCIPLES BUILDING A LIFETIME FOUNDATION SUMMER ACADEMIC CAMP June 6 - Aug. 26 2 week trial available

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTO

HOW CANCER TREATMENT AFFECTS SCHOOLWORK • Cancer treatment can affect learning. Students who used to earn A’s might work very hard to earn C’s. They may have trouble reading, keeping up with new material, figuring out math problems, planning, organizing and paying attention. • Despite this, cancer treatment and cancer typically do not affect creativity and the ability to learn through hearing. SOURCE: AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY WEBSITE

• Toddler Classes (18mo - 36mo) • Preschool (3yr - 5yr) • School ages up to 3rd grade • Extended Care 7:30am - 6pm • Low Child-Teacher Ratio • 1 week vacation credit Winner Of Best Of Columbus Award 2009

Summer Accepting istration & Fall Regw! No

2855 Snouffer Road Columbus, OH 43235

614-761-2727

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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need to know: PEDIATRIC HEALTHSOURCE

EXPERTS FROM NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL ANSWER COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT HEALTH AND SAFETY Is it necessary to get a vaccination for chickenpox? I’ve always heard it’s more effective if your child actually catches it because then they’ll have immunity for life.

Do you have a child with an autism spectrum disorder (Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder or PDD-NOS)? Or do you suspect such a disorder?

Is your child age 4–11? Are you interested in a nutritional intervention aimed at core autism symptoms? If so, your child may be eligible for a clinical research study for children with autism spectrum disorders being conducted by Ohio State’s Nisonger Center. All evaluations and treatments are free, and some reimbursement is provided. For information, please call Stacey Moone, Study Coordinator, at 614-292-3971 or e-mail Stacey.Moone@osumc.edu. psychmed.osu.edu

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There are many reasons why the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Dr. Robert Seese is a Centers for Disease Control and Nationwide Children’s Hospital recomgeneral pediatrician mend vaccination against the chickenpox, an illness caused by the varicella in Ambulatory Medivirus. cine at Nationwide Although the majority of children have a mild illness when they conChildren’s Hospital tract chickenpox naturally, serious complications can arise. The disease and spends most of usually produces many painful and itchy blisters. These can lead to scarring his time at the Linden and serious secondary infections of the skin from bacteria such as methiand Northland Close cillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. to Home centers. Before use of the chickenpox vaccine, there were about 100,000 annual hospitalizations of children for varicella-related illnesses. These included severe skin infections, brain swelling (encephalitis) and severe pneumonias. In addition, there were between 100 and 150 deaths in previously healthy children from chickenpox prior to routine use of immunization. Vaccination prevents these serious illnesses. It is true that infection with natural viruses often results in superior immunity to the chickenpox virus. The length of protection from the chicken pox vaccine is not currently known, but ongoing studies show that patients vaccinated 25 years ago in Japan still have significant levels of immunity to the virus. The vaccine will grant immunity from chickenpox without the risks of serious complications from the natural illness, and therefore helps protect the safety of children.

I can’t tell if my son may have seasonal allergies or something more severe like asthma. The symptoms of each seem so similar. What are the differences, and what is the treatment for each? You are correct — a lot of common symptoms exist between allergies and asthma. Allergies are the result of immune over-response to something the person is “sensitive to.” Common symptoms include runny, stuffy nose, itchy, watery eyes, sneezing and occasionally rash. Sometimes allergic reactions are so severe that a person’s throat may tighten, leading to difficulty breathing. Unlike previously mentioned symptoms, difficulty breathing is usually an emergency. Allergic reactions may be seasonal, or they may be year-round and result from triggers that are constantly present, such as dust and pet dander. Asthma may or may not be allergic in nature, but it is always characterized by inflammation and swelling in the bronchial tubes (lungs). Because it constricts the airway and restricts breathing, all asthma severity levels are potentially life-threatening. Non-allergic asthma triggers are irritants such as bad air quality, smoke or exercise. Parents may notice asthma flare-ups in response to weather changes or even if their child is laughing or crying. The most common asthma trigger for children is a viral infection. Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Allergy and Asthma Clinics have a range of coordinated services to determine which condition your son has and to determine an appropriate treatment plan. We offer consultations, allergy testing, comprehensive asthma management plans and allergy shots for all patients from birth through 21 years of age.

Dr. Karen McCoy is Chief of the Section of Pulmonary Medicine at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University College of Medicine.


Are You Concerned About Your Child’s Development?

To learn more about Nationwide Children’s Hospital, visit www.NationwideChildrens.org

Our daughter, who is 13 and in the seventh grade, has had a tough time socially in school this year. It seems like a lot of her friendships are changing and she’s getting left out. I’m worried that she may be getting depressed because she’s crying more often but doesn’t want to talk about things. What signs should I be looking for and, if they’re there, what should I do? Nearly 5 percent of children and adolescents suffer from depression at any time. The teen years can be especially difficult for girls. Negative peer interactions and academic challenges can add to normal self-esteem issues, contributing to high stress levels that can lead to the development of depression. Signs that may indicate depression include reduced energy, sadness or irritability, social isolation, a change in concentration or memory, increases or decreases in appetite, weight, or sleep, and a loss of interest in activities previously enjoyed. Physical symptoms may include chronic headaches or stomach aches, and some girls may begin self-injurious behavior such as cutting. If you suspect your daughter is depressed, you should consult your primary care physician for a diagnosis and to determine appropriate treatment options. Best results are usually obtained from a combination of therapy and antidepressant medication. Our licensed, trained professionals here at Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Behavioral Health Services offer a wide range of comprehensive services to address the needs of children, adolescents and young adults through behavioral, psychiatric and psychological services. With the right treatment plan, your daughter can get through this difficult time successfully. You may specifically request a referral from your primary care provider, or contact an NCH Behavioral Health intake worker at 614-355-8080.

TIP OF THE MONTH Spring is here along with warm weather and sunshine! Grab the family and try these fun, healthy activities: PLANT A GARDEN. Teach your kids how to plant flowers or vegetables, water them and watch them grow throughout the summer. RIDE A BIKE. If your kids don’t know how to ride a bike, now is a great time to teach them! Be sure to wear a helmet. GO FOR A WALK. This is a great way to teach kids about their surroundings. Make a game out of it by trying to find certain things along the way, such as a type of flower, car or house.

Dr. Barbara Gracious is Principal Investigator at the Center for Innovation in Pediatric Practice at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at The Ohio State University.

The Sensory Learning Program has been proven effective for a multitude of diagnoses including Acquired Brain Injury, ADD/ADHD, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, Learning Disabilities, Developmental Delay as well as Sensory Dysfunctions that may present in the form of:

• Speech and Language delays • Self-stimulating or Aggressive behaviors • Sensitivities to sounds, textures, touch, etc. • Learning or Perceptual problems • Poor balance, coordination, and motor planning • Lack of Body Awareness • Poor Attention/Inability to focus Call today to schedule your FREE experiential appointment

614-545-3312 Vision Performance Center of Columbus with Steven J. Curtis, OD, FCOVD Shelley Ullom, MOT, OTR/L 3600 B Olentangy River Rd., Columbus, OH

www.SensoryLearning-Columbus.com Sensory Learning Program, Sensory Learning Center and Sensory Learning Institute are SM’s & TM’s of Sensory Learning Technologies, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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need to know: THE GO-TO GUIDE

companionDOGS

BY JANE HAWES

We know them by a variety of names: companion dogs, pilot dogs, seeing-eye dogs, assistance dogs. But whatever title they go by, these remarkably smart, well-trained animals have a very important job — to make the world a more manageable place for their human partners. This month, Columbus Parent’s Go-To Guide looks at companion dogs — who trains them and who uses them — because these canines are an integral part of many special lives in Central Ohio. Derek and Janine Maher receive their new companion dog Ilene at Canine Companion’s February 2011 graduation ceremony, held at Dublin’s Abbey Theatre

WHAT’S A COMPANION DOG?

At Canine Companions for Independence , a non-profit national organization whose North Central Regional Center is located in Delaware, carefully bred and trained dogs (Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers or a mix of the two breeds) are matched with individuals who have disabilities. Only about 40 percent of the dogs, who are bred in California, make it all the way through training to become a companion dog; temperament and medical problems are the usual reasons for release from training. Those that don’t are called “release dogs” and are adopted, often by police and fire departments or government agencies for detection work. A companion dog works for about seven to 10 years before retiring (into adoption and a comfortable, non-working life).

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WHAT DOES A COMPANION DOG DO? The dogs are trained to perform one of four roles: • SERVICE DOGS: help independent adults perform tasks like opening doors, retrieving objects, turning lights on and off.

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

HOW IS A DOG TRAINED? • At the age of 8 weeks, a puppy is placed with a volunteer puppy raiser. • Until about the age of 18 months, the puppy raiser teaches the dog a variety of skills and commands. The puppy raisers pay for all of the dogs’ care.

• SKILLED COMPANION DOGS: work with a child or adult who has an able-bodied adult partner.

• The raiser hands the dog over to a training center where, for the next 6 to 9 months, the dog learns up to 50 commands.

• HEARING DOGS: help the hearing-impaired by alerting them to sounds like doorbells, a baby’s cry or an alarm clock.

• When this training is complete, dogs are paired with their future partners during a two-week Team Training period.

• FACILITY DOGS: work with an able-bodied adult who is a professional caregiver or educator for disabled individuals.

• At the end of the training period, a graduation ceremony is held, symbolically passing the dogs from their puppy raisers to their new partners.


HOW DOES SOMEONE GET A COMPANION DOG?

Laurel Marks, a spokeswoman for Canine Companions, said there is a two-year wait, on average, for a companion dog from their organization. Disabled individuals receive the dogs for free after applying to Canine Companions, which raises money from private sources and corporate grants. The new partners assume the costs of care for their dog. After receiving a dog, the new partners receive follow-up support services and must participate in ongoing training.

WHO CAN BE A PUPPY RAISER?

Puppy raisers are a special breed themselves! Canine Companions’ center in Delaware benefits from the services of more than 130 puppy-raising households in a 14-state region. Many are families with children. Leslie Young of Galena Township decided to raise her first puppy six years ago and is now on her fourth. “I had just lost my pet dog and I just love puppies, who doesn’t?” Young said of her decision to become a puppy raiser. “But now I sometimes wonder who’s learning more — me or the puppy.” Young estimated that paying for all of a puppy’s food, medical and transportation costs has cost about $1,000 for each dog; some of these costs may be tax-deductible as charitable contributions. The toughest part of being a puppy raiser, said Young, is handing the puppy over when his early training period is over: “It’s something you know and agree to, going in, but it’s hard.” The graduation ceremony at the conclusion of each two-week Team Training period is a very emotional event. The puppy raisers present the new partners with scrapbooks from their dog’s puppy days, and a slide show honors the puppy raisers and the time they spent with each dog. Then the puppy raiser formally walks their dog up to the stage and hands him over to the new partner.

WHO DO COMPANION DOGS HELP?

Though companion dogs originally were best known for helping the visually impaired, they now are used to help people with a wide variety of physical, developmental and emotional challenges. Some of these challenges include: spinal-cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, spina bifida, arthritis, cerebral palsy, hearing and visual impairment. Companion dogs also are used with patients in medical rehabilitation and psychiatric programs, and residents of assisted-living facilities. Derek Maher, 16, and his mother Janine Maher have welcomed companion dog Ilene into their Lewis Center home. Derek, a sophomore at Olentangy High School, has a muscle-degenerative disorder. “One of the biggest things is the companionship aspect,” said Mrs. Maher. “We’re going to try to teach her a ‘go get Mom’ command.” Derek said his mother had been planning to get him a companion dog for quite a while. “She knew a boy who had Duchenne muscular dystrophy like me and he had a dog,” Derek said, then turned to ask his mother, “Is he in college now?” “I think he just graduated from Wright State,” Mrs. Maher replied.

HOW DO I ACT AROUND A COMPANION DOG? If the dog does not belong to you, you should always ask his human partner first what would be appropriate. If a dog becomes used to being petted by others, it could distract him from doing his job and jeopardize the safety of his partner. You should also never feed a companion dog: They have specialized diets that they need to stick to in order to maintain a healthy weight. FOR MORE INFORMATION:

CANINE COMPANIONS FOR INDEPENDENCE – NORTH CENTRAL REGIONAL CENTER 4989 State Route 37 East, Delaware 740-548-4447 (Voice/TTY) cci.org

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Call Poison Center 1-800-222-1222 (TTY 1-866-688-0088)

Never leave your child alone around water

Have working smoke de

Seat belts and car seats save lives

PREVENTION & TREATMENT

CAR SAFETY

 Fifty (50) kids are backed over by cars each week in the U.S.; most are run over by a family member. Walk around your car before getting in, and always check in all directions when pulling in or out of a driveway or parking space. Kids are short, and can be missed in the rearview mirror. Have someone else outside the car check for you too.  Teach kids to never play in or around cars. They could get run over.

PLAY EQUIPMENT  Never hang ropes on play equipment because kids can get tangled or trapped.  Always wear your helmet when you are on wheels. Wear your pads (elbow, wrist and knee) when on skates and skateboards. Helmets off before you play on the playground!  Make sure there is a soft surface on the ground at least 6 feet in all directions around swing sets and playground equipment.  Have kids play on playground equipment that is right for their age group.  Check that all equipment is anchored safely in the ground and in good condition: smooth edges, nothing to trip over, no missing pieces, and guardrails on all platforms and ramps. “S” hooks on swings should be closed.  Questions about a playground’s safety? Contact the owner or the Ohio Department of Health at http://www.odh.ohio.gov

Children can easily FALL out of WINDOWS!

CALL 911 IF THE INJURED PERSON IS OR HAS ANY OF THESE: • • • • • • •

Unconscious Seizures Unable to move a part of the body Blood or watery fluid oozing from ears or nose Headache or stiff neck Vomiting, or feeling like vomiting Irritable, fretful, anxious, or grouchy

• Not behaving like themselves • Trouble walking • Blurred or double vision • Very sleepy or hard to wake up

 DO NOT MOVE THE PERSON UNLESS THEY ARE IN DANGER.  If you need to move the person and they cannot walk, keep their head, neck and back in line with each other.

 Keep bouncy seats, portable swings or any baby seat or carrier on the floor, NOT on the counter, table, washer or dryer.  Keep one hand on babies when they are on a changing table, bed, or couch.  Always strap infants in when they are in an infant carrier.  Don’t use baby walkers.  Keep kids from falling down the stairs: put up wall-mounted safety gates at the top and bottom of stairs.

BROKEN BONES ALL BROKEN BONES NEED MEDICAL TREATMENT!  For all broken bones: • Put ice wrapped in cloth on the area. • Keep the hurt body part in the SAME POSITION YOU FIND IT. • Keep the hurt body part still. Use a splint if you have one; a piece of cardboard works well.

• •

Look for other injuries. Do not stand, walk on or use the hurt body part until you are seen by a doctor.

CALL 911 AND KEEP PERSON LYING DOWN: • If you think the person hurt their head, neck or back. • The hurt body part is blue or very pale. • If a broken bone comes through the skin, DO NOT PUSH THE BONE BACK IN OR WASH THE BODY PART.

© 2011 Nationwide Children’s Hospital

K e e p c o r d s f o r b l i n d s a n d c u r t a i n s o u t o f c h i l d r e n ’s r e a c h

y 614-355-0662

HEAD AND NECK INJURIES

nc

 Any other injuries to teeth, go to a dentist or emergency room right away.

K.I.S.S. Your Kids (Kohl’s Is Sold on Safety) is a seasonal safety education program that features coloring contests and free activity books. Nationwide Children’s Hospital is able to provide this service through the generous support of Central Ohio Kohl’s Department Stores. The new “Play it Safe” video game, based on the activity books is now on line! Anyone can build a character and learn about safety at home, the pool, the park and at school by traveling through the safety adventures! For more about this program, go to www.NationwideChildrens.org/KISS, contact KISS@NationwideChildrens.org or call (614) 355-0679. All coloring pages and activity books are also available to freely download and print. To find a doctor or medical service, visit www.NationwideChildrens.org or call (614) 722-KIDS.

A l w a y s p u t ba

Set & enforce rules to keep children’s play away from patio doors and windows.

right away. • Bite on a gauze pad or piece of clean cloth to stop bleeding and pain. • Get to a dentist or emergency room RIGHT AWAY!

®

If a child can climb it, keep it away from the windows! ONLY open windows kids CANNOT reach.

Screens can keep insects out, not children in.

• Find the tooth and try to put the tooth back in the space it got knocked out of right away. Have the person hold the tooth in place. • Hold the tooth by the crown (shiny, smooth part), NOT the root (part that stays in the gums). If the tooth is dirty, gently rinse with water before putting it back in.

ife thre eme atening rgen • If the tooth cannot be put cies! back in, put it in COLD MILK

es to sleep on their backs

Keep upstairs windows closed: if opened, open from the top, not the bottom

Prevent Falls: If it’s high up, it’s high risk!

Call 91 for l 1

DENTAL INJURIES Losing a permanent tooth is a dental emergency.  If a permanent tooth is knocked out:

TIPS

K.I.S.S. Your Kids and Keep Them Safe!

bi

S e n d y o u r b a b y s i t t e r t o B a s i c B a b y s i t t e r Tr a i n i n g 6 1 4 - 3 5 5 - 0 6 6 2

.Nat www

KEEP and POST :: From Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Kohl’s :: Broken Bones, Head, Neck and Dental Injuries

tectors and carbon monoxide detectors on every floor of your home

ad wnlo o d e to pies r websit /KISS o c xtra t ou s.org For e rint, visi Children or p ionwide

Ta k e a f i r s t a i d a n d C P R c l a s s s o y o u k n o w w h a t t o d o i n c a s e o f a n e m e r ge

5301

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need to know: HANDY MOM

The Hairpin Got a baby ballerina in the house? Then chances are you’ve also got hairpins just about any place a hairpin can hide. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing because that also means you’ve got a handy tool under your seat cushions, carpets and kitchen appliances, just waiting to be used for all sorts of everyday tasks! The double-point hairpin (also called the bobby pin) is believed to have originated in China in the third century A.D. Besides securing hair, some other handy uses for this ingenious, bent-over bit of metal include:

LOCK PICK: Possibly the best-known

CHIP-BAG CLIP: Instead of paying for

“other” use for hairpins. Just unbend, insert and wiggle around (and then call a locksmith because, if you’re like Handy Mom, this never works).

one of those fancy plastic clips, just use a hairpin or two to close an open bag of chips.

PAGE MARKER: Keep your local librarian happy by not dog-earing the pages of books to mark them. Instead use a hairpin to mark your spot.

STRAIGHT-PIN SUBSTITUTE: If you’re like Handy Mom, then you have definitely pricked your fingers on straight pins when you’re hemming or hand-sewing. Use hairpins instead to secure the fabric.

MINI-SCREWDRIVER: Scrape off the little bulbs of plastic at the points, and then use the flat end as a screwdriver to tighten eyeglass frames or open those tiny battery packs on electronic gadgets. —JANE HAWES

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need to know: WHAT’S THE WORST THAT COULD HAPPEN?

My Kid JUST ATE

DIRT

LET’S FACE IT: Half the parenting job is managing the dumb things our kids do (the other half, thankfully, is accepting their hugs and kisses for doing so). But parents need to pace themselves because we can’t afford to freak out every time we face a kid-engineered act of dumbness. So, to that end, Columbus Parent unveils its latest feature — What’s the Worst That Could Happen? — where we pose this question to the experts who can allay our fears and keep us focused on getting these kids happily and healthily to the doorstep of adulthood (when they can then start taking care of us). This month we consider the challenge of a child who just ate dirt.

FEAR: My kid is going to develop some horrible disease from digesting dirt. Or maybe something’s psychologically wrong with my kid. FACT: “We know all kids are going to sample things with their mouths,” said Dr. Kathleen Lemanek, a pediatric psychologist with Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “It’s part of learning and having curiosity about their surroundings.” This “oral” behavior is quite normal for children ages 2 and younger, Lemanek said, and more often than not, they will spit out most of any non-food item if it doesn’t taste good. There are also cultures where eating certain nonfoods like clay or baby powder is quite normal (they’ll be used like stomachsoothing lozenges during pregnancy or illness, Lemanek said). But for something like dirt or sand, if the sampling continues past age 3 or becomes secretive, there may be physical or psychological reasons that you should consult the family doctor about. A craving for non-foods like dirt may signal a type of iron-deficiency anemia,

and adding iron to the diet should eliminate the craving: This condition is known as pica (pronounced “PEYE-kuh”). But you should do that only with a doctor’s guidance. If there aren’t nutritional deficiencies, then there could be a sensory-stimulation need or possibly an underlying obsessive-compulsive disorder. In those cases, there probably will be other oral behaviors like nail biting or hair eating, or there may be a family history of such behaviors. To figure out if your child is ingesting other things he or she shouldn’t, Lemanek advised parents to “look in the toilet” and, if you see something that shouldn’t be in the stools, talk to your family doctor. As for contracting diseases from dirt, your child probably won’t swallow enough dirt to get ill, but if they do, it would happen quickly and you would get

them to a doctor. However, for most kids who have sampled mud pies, just administer plenty of fluids to help wash it through the system. —JANE HAWES

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family fun: HANDS ON

Recycled Woven Organizers BY OLIVERA BRATICH

Get green with this crafty project made from all recycled materials! Bring the family together to weave newspaper strips into decorative containers and use the finished product to organize your craft supplies. Spring cleaning and organizing was never so fun!

WHAT YOU NEED • last month’s issue of Columbus Parent • invisible tape • scissors • ruler • rubber band • an empty cereal box • tube-shaped container (coffee can, potato-chip can, etc.)

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

HOW YOU DO IT

10. When you reach the top, remove the rubber band. Carefully slide out the container.

1. Open up the newspaper and cut into strips approximately 5 inches wide and 22 inches long. The number of strips depends on the size of your tube — one coffee can-sized container will require 12-14 strips.

11. Fold any excess length on the strips inside and secure down with tape. 12. Open your cereal box so the cardboard lies flat. Trace the bottom of your woven container on the cardboard and cut out the circle about one quarter-inch inside your tracing line. Fit this circle inside your woven container to help secure the bottom.

2. Fold each strip lengthwise until they are approximately 1 inch wide. Secure each end and the middle with a piece of invisible tape, so that it doesn’t come unfolded. 3. Lay one strip across another to form a plus sign. Secure the strips together using invisible tape. 4. Lay two strips in an “X” formation over the plus sign to create an asterisk shape. Secure all the pieces together with invisible tape. Note: for a wide container, like a coffee can, add another “X” shape to create a 12-sided asterisk shape. 5. Make sure the strips are well secured with the invisible tape. The center of the asterisk shape will be the bottom of your container. The more tape you use, the more secure the container will be. 6. Put your tube-shaped container in the center of the asterisk shape you have formed with the strips. Pull the strips up to the top and secure with a rubber band.

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13. Repeat this process to create as many containers as you need to store your excess craft supplies! 7. Take a strip of newspaper, lay it horizontally and secure with tape to the underside of one of the vertical strips around the can. Pull tightly and weave the strip over and under the vertical strips around the can. When you reach your starting point, cut the horizontal strip and tape it to the underside of the starting vertical strip. 8. Take another loose strip and start your next horizontal weave one vertical strip to the right of your first starting point. Make sure it fits snugly next to the horizontal strip you just finished and secure with tape if necessary. This will prevent any holes in your weave. 9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 until you reach the rubber band at the top of the can. Use invisible tape liberally to secure the weaves.

WHO THOUGHT THIS UP

OLIVERA BRATICH owns Wholly Craft, 3169 N. High St. The Clintonville shop features handmade goods from more than 100 crafters and artists, including clothing, jewelry, accessories, paper goods and more! Hours: 1-8 p.m. weekdays, 12-7 p.m. Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Sundays, closed Tuesdays. For information, go to whollycraft.net.


TM

HERE COMES SUMMER!

Baby& Kid Sale Bonanza Sunday, April 17, 1 – 3 p.m. We are taking two great sales and combining them into one awesome event. Here’s your chance to do a little Spring cleaning and sell your gently-used children’s items (newborn – 12 years) in a community garage sale setting. Additional information at http://dublin.oh.us/recreation/preschool. Space is limited so register early! No commercial vendors please. If you are just interested in attending the sale, there is no entrance fee but bring plenty of cash for lots of great deals. Doors open at 1 p.m. Family Biking at its Best Saturday, April 23, 1 – 3:30 p.m. Kick-off Bike Month and get ready for a great season of family bicycling with Consider Biking. Learn the quick and easy way to ensure your bike is safe and ready to ride, reviewing basic maintenance and safety equipment. We discuss bike etiquette and how to ride together safely and joyfully on the road and bike path. HELMETS ARE REQUIRED. If you don't have a bike and want to learn what would best suit your needs, sign up, but skip the ride. Ages: 12 & up Class CR SDR/NR Fee 246101.01 $25 $35 Individual 246101.02 $40 $50 Family (up to 4 people)

For more information or to register visit: www.dublin.oh.us/recreation or call 614-410-4550

Think differently.

Creative Summer Workshops at CCAD 27 different one- and two-week adventures for first through twelfth grades.

Creative Summer Workshops are generously supported by

Visit www.ccad.edu for all the details. Registration opens March 1, 2011!

Upcoming Events & Programs

Peter & the Wolf and The Frog Prince Saturday, Apr. 2 – 11 a.m. Peter and the Wolf performed to Sergei Prokofiev’s beautiful musical story and The Frog Prince set to the lively music of Dmitri Kabelevsky. Performed with “large-as-life” marionettes. Recommended for ages 6 & up. Tickets: $7 adults; $5 children and seniors Click Clack Moo Saturday, Apr. 9 – 11 a.m. A hilariously "moo-ving" new musical about compromise, based on the award-winning book by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin and presented by the national touring company, THEATREWORKS USA. Recommended for ages 4 & up. Tickets: $7 adults; $5 children and seniors

facebook.com/DublinOhio

twitter.com/DublinOhio

dublin.oh.us/enews

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family fun: COOKING WITH KIDS

SMOOTH

operation BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

Jan Bonner knows kids like to smash up food. That’s why the cooking demonstrator at Whole Foods Market likes to teach them how to make smoothies. The cold fruit drinks also are a safe option because they involve a blender rather than a stovetop or oven, said Bonner, who hosts regular cooking demonstrations for kids at the Whole Food’s Dublin location. The good thing about fruit smoothies is you can tailor the recipe to a kid’s likes and dislikes, Bonner said. It’s also a way to encourage kids to try new fruits, she said. During a recent smoothie demo, she added mango and kiwi — fruits that not every kid has tasted — to the blender. “I always try to get kids to try new things,” said Bonner, who tries to pair new foods with familiar ones. “You can always get an unknown down them, if there’s a known something.” She usually makes her smoothies with one firm fruit and one juicy fruit but encourages parents to use whatever fruits they have in the house. “People always have that banana that’s overripe,” and is

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perfect for a smoothie, she said. Sonya Brunner eagerly sampled the drink after watching Bonner prepare it in the produce section of Whole Foods. “I taste apple,” the 4-yearold Clintonville resident said. Sonya attended the smoothie demonstration with her mother, Leslie, and 2-year-old brother Luke. Leslie Brunner, who makes smoothies all the time, wanted to see how her recipe compared to Whole Foods’. Brunner uses yogurt where Bonner added juice. Bonner avoids dairy during her demos in case kids have allergies or follow a vegan diet. Brunner said she intends to stick with yogurt. “I like adding that calcium punch,” she said. She also likes to serve the drinks to her kids after they go swimming at the indoor pool at Ohio State University. “I needed something that I could pack that would immediately fill them up,” she said.

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

SURPRISE SMOOTHIE INGREDIENTS: • 1 cup of juice (or yogurt) • 1 cup of ice • 1 cup of a juicy fruit • 1 cup of a firm fruit DIRECTIONS: 1. GROWNUP: Measure the juice. 2. KID: Pour juice into the blender. 3. KID: Fill a one-cup measuring container with ice and dump into the blender. 4. KID AND GROWNUP: Peel and cut up the fruit, removing any seeds. 5. KID: Add fruit to blender. 6. GROWNUP: Blend the ingredients to the desired thickness. Pour the beverage into a glass. Serve and slurp up immediately!

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

Luke, Sonya and mom Leslie Brunner making smoothies at home


Columbus Parent is looking for the Best Â… and we need your vote!

From dining out and shopping to arts, activities and fun things to do, we want your picks for the best places for local parents and kids.

Click to ColumbusParent.com to vote for your familyÂ’s favorites.

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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family fun: PARTIES

H o o H Yo

Bottle of Fun!

and a

BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

It’s hard to imagine kids excited about cleaning, but hand them a mop, call it “swabbing the deck,” and they’re all over it. Washing the deck is just one of many fun chores and adventures that await kids attending a birthday party on the Santa Maria. The wooden ship, which really is designed to be a replica of the vessel Christopher Columbus used to sale to the Americas, regularly gets stormed by pirates. The ship holds pirate-themed birthday parties to raise money and increase interest in the Downtown feature.

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

It was just the venue that Will and Alex Olah were looking for their fourth birthday. The twins love playing pirate and encouraged their party guests to dress for the occasion. Many showed up in stripes, flannels and other seaworthy attire. “The pirate theme is so great,” mom Erin Olah of New Albany said. “They were just so excited.” She also liked that the ship provides the cake, goodie bags and the

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entertainment. Olah provided a piñata full of extra pirate booty for the youngsters, and every guest also received an authentic-looking pirate hat from the Santa Maria. The Olah twins had two party helpers assigned to their gathering. One led the crew on a tour of the ship while the other set up the cake and drinks. The guide offered bits of age-appropriate history of the ship, including details about what early

sailor did when they had to go to the bathroom. (The youngsters were delighted to learn what pirates used for toilet paper. It involves rope and sea water.) The kids also received a quick lesson about the starboard and port sides of the boat. Party guests hunted for treasure — fake coins hidden in the ship’s belly — and pushed on the rudder to steer the mighty vessel. They also heard pirate tales and


Santa Maria played games provided by the Santa Maria. The tour and the games took kids all over the ship, which is permanently docked behind Columbus City Hall. The kids enjoyed visiting the various levels of the ship. A few parents looked nervous as the little ones scampered up and down the ladders located throughout the vessel. But the parents, many of whom said they had never visited the Santa Maria, also enjoyed learning about the ship.

25 Marconi Blvd., Downtown 614-645-8760 santamaria.org COST: $295 for 90 minutes and 20 guests. $15 for each additional guest.

DETAILS: The Santa Maria’s 2011 season opens April 1 and runs through Oct. 23. Any child under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. The birthday parties are geared toward children, ages 5-8, but can be modified to suit younger or older guests.

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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family fun: EATING OUT WITH KIDS BENIHANA

Benihana

8781 Lyra Dr., Polaris Fashion Place 614-436-3705 benihana.com PRICE: Entrees served at the teppan table include soup, salad, shrimp appetizer, steamed rice and tea, $17.60-$36.60; kids entrees include soup or salad, shrimp appetizer, steamed rice and ice cream, $9.25-$13.25. HOURS: 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5-9:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5-10 p.m. Friday, 12-10 p.m. Saturday, 12-9 p.m. Sunday

THE MOM SAYS

FOOD:

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SERVICE:

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

THE KID SAYS

Before we went to Benihana, I was expecting I would have to order my food and it would be delivered to my table like any other restaurant, but instead what was delivered was a chef with a cart with everything he needed to cook right at our table. The table had a big, flat metal grill in the middle, and we sat around it. For the kid’s meal, I had to order either soup or salad first. I ordered the salad but I didn’t like the dressing. It was a little too sweet in a bitter way. But I tried my dad’s soup, my mom’s soup and my sister’s soup. I ate it all and I still wanted more. It’s a very hard taste to explain. It was an onion soup, but it tasted mellow for an onion soup, and I really liked it. For a drink I got a fruit punch from the kid’s menu ($3.25), and I don’t even know the fruits it had in it, but it was very good. I think there was strawberry in it. For my meal, I got shrimp and steak from the kid’s menu ($13.25). The shrimp is amazing. The steak I ordered medium rare for my first time. I was absolutely amazed. I think it was the best way to start ordering steak medium rare because it was juicy, tender and easy to chew, and I should know because my braces were just tightened again. The service was amazing. Our chef Yoshi was really cool. Out of four cracked eggs, he made the shape of a chicken on the grill and what I thought was an egg, but he turned it into the chicken’s wing and put it on the chicken. And he made a heart out of rice, put his spatula under it and made it beat. I also thought it was really cool the way he could spin the spatula and the knife. The bathroom was very clean, normal, casual, but probably not big enough for a lot of people. I would like to go back now. Hint hint. —COLIN HAWES

BATHROOM:

Photos courtesy Benihana

Growing up on New York State’s Long Island, I was right in the cradle of the Japanese-steakhouse-as-dining-entertainment phenomenon (which started in the 1960s but really caught fire in the ’70s), but for some reason my parents never took us to one. Well, after finally trying Benihana with my family, I can honestly say I’ve got something else to be miffed at my parents about. Our dinner was flat-out fantastic: It was two hours of slow eating, some new and delicious tastes, lots of good conversation and my kids ate all their vegetables. What’s not to love? We went on a weeknight and were seated right away without a reservation. Most tables feature eight seats around one teppan grill, so you usually end up sharing the table with another dining party. But that wasn’t intrusive on our own conversation. The meal goes in slow-paced phases: First a light onion soup and a wellchilled salad with ginger dressing (that had a tart, granular texture). The show begins when your table’s chef shows up and starts juggling knives, dinging spice cans, flamboyantly dicing meats and vegetables and otherwise giving young boys very questionable ideas about how to prepare a meal. And yet I have no objections because my son ate his zucchini. My daughter and I split the monthly special of filet mignon and chicken ($42, a price that includes everything except drinks). When we go back (and we will), I’ll probably just get the filet, because I barely touched the chicken (not that it wasn’t tasty, but the filet was that much better). My husband had the Hibachi Tuna Steak ($22.60, also all-inclusive) which was melt-in-yourmouth great. Lots of people were flashing birthday certificates, which they got from signing up for The Chef’s Table program. It’s a popular incentive for patrons ages 13 and older and earns you $30 off your bill and a birthday serenade in Japanese (you should sign up at least a month in advance to get your certificate e-mailed to you in time). The service was fantastic, not the least bit cheesy or overbearing for a restaurant that relies so heavily on entertainment as part of its concept. And finally, the bathrooms were very Zen-garden lovely. All in all, a great meal and well worth the price. —JANE HAWES

FAVORITE BITE:

FILET MIGNON

FILET MIGNON


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SUNDAY BRUNCH AT THE MILLER’S SERVED FROM 10AM to 2:30PM FEATURING: Omelet Station • Eggs Benedict • Scrambled Eggs • Home Fries • Bacon Sausage • French Toast Flatbreads • Pasta • Fresh Fruit • Salads • Desserts • Pastries Weekly Chef Specials – Adults $14.95 – Kids 10 and under $6.95 6725 Avery-Muirfield Drive Dublin, Ohio 43016 • 614-799-9100 | 1400 Grandview Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43212 • 614.754.1026

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columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

51


family fun: DAY TRIPPIN’

JUNGLE JIM’S International Market BY JANE HAWES

Before there was Sam’s Club or Costco, before Whole Foods or Wild Oats, there was Jungle Jim’s International Market, a surreal outpost of food and fun on the north side of Cincinnati.

JUNGLE JIM’S INTERNATIONAL MARKET The business first opened as a roadside market in Fairfield in 1974 (beating Sam by nine years). It has since grown into a sprawling, six-acres-under-one-roof establishment and is famous in foodie circles for its low prices on everyday, domestically produced groceries and a breathtaking array of fare from international locales. If you’ve got some serious shopping to do for Easter or Passover, this would be a great place to go. The market is also wildly entertaining for its decor, which is what makes it a great family-fun desti-

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nation. Literally around every corner is something that elicits an ooh, an ahh or a belly laugh. A life-size replica of the S.S. Minnow (from Gilligan’s Island fame) at the seafood counter? It’s flanked by a multitude of live-fish tanks that kids will enjoy peering into. A fake outhouse done up in King Henry VIII style that you can take your picture in? Right next door to the “award winning restrooms,” whose doors look like entrances to portopotties.

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

Photos courtesy Jungle Jim’s International Market

figures playing music all over the place. Probably my favorite visual joke was over in the Biopond area where live fish are cultivated. As I stood on the platform peering down into those tanks, I glanced over and noticed other tanks in the shadows. Printed on one of them in faux-Cyrillic lettering were the words “Chernobyl Nuclear Facility.” It takes a lot to make me LOL, but that did it. Now be forewarned that Jungle Jim’s is not a playground for kids. It’s more of a “strap ’em into the shopping cart and let them ogle

5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield 513-674-6000 JUNGLEJIMS.COM HOURS: 8 a.m.-10 p.m. daily TIPS: Tours are available by reservation but probably wouldn’t keep the attention of young children. You could make a meal of the food samples, but there are also food counters and restaurants on site (including a sushi bar, sub shop and Starbucks). There are also family-friendly cooking classes monthly (reservations required). There’s a replica of a treasureladen tree interior from Sherwood Forest (in the British Isles aisle, naturally) that you walk under to view. And there are animatronic

their surroundings” destination, which, if you combine it with a trip to Cincinnati’s Zoo, the Newport Aquarium or even King’s Island, might be about all they need for the couple of hours it will take you to navigate the store. One suggestion that a friend had is to devise a scavenger hunt for the kids. Ask for a map at the entrance (the greeters are very friendly): It has drawings of all the unusual sites in the store. Then let the kids shout out when they see them and mark them on the map. When they find everything, circle back to the Candy Spot (with Elvis the Singing Lion) and let them pick out a treat.


family fun: PLAYGROUND PATROL

Liberty Park EVERY KID’S PLAYGROUND BY JANE HAWES

Hidden in the wide open is the Liberty Park Every Kid’s Playground. Hidden because it’s tucked way in the back of this sprawling Delaware County park, without any signage to guide you to it. Wide open because it truly is, surrounded by soccer fields and undulating walking paths.

LIBERTY PARK EVERY KID’S PLAYGROUND

April 14 –24, 2011 Lincoln Theatre

2507 Home Rd., Powell 740-881-5432 libertytwp.org HOURS: 9 a.m. to dusk daily, closed major holidays

769 E. Long Street, Columbus, Ohio

Ticke

t

11-21 s

$

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

So remember: when you turn into Liberty Park off Home Road, just keep going past the first two playgrounds you see until you reach the end of the winding road. Once there, you will be amply rewarded for your efforts. The playground, opened in 2006, is

the first and still only universally accessible playground in Ohio (at least 70 percent of the site is accessible to kids using wheelchairs, braces and other support equipment; an Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playground requires only 25 percent).

There’s a double-seater see-saw, a “Sway Fun” big rocking toy, plenty of ramps and swings of all types, and a great digging toy and sand play area. But it’s the shelter house and eating area that strike me as a step above the usual accessible amenities: a broad and covered picnic patio, picnic tables built to accommodate wheelchairs, and spacious bathrooms (with diaper-changing stations in the women’s and men’s bathrooms). You can truly make a comfortable day of it at the playground. The site is a bit exposed to north winds when they’re blowing, but the landscaping is beautiful and in time should provide more shelter. Just watch for safety pins on the ground; they’re residue from all the cross-country running races staged in the park each fall. Cell-phone reception is very good, and seating for spectators is decent. And be aware that there is a fishing pond just north of the playground, so don’t let little ones wander away on their own.

JOIN THE FUN! Costumes are encouraged! 3 Ways to Purchase Tickets: Call CCT at 614-224-6672 Call CAPA at 614-469-0939 Visit TicketMaster.com

Music by Richard Rodgers Book and Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II Recommended for everyone age 5 and older 90 minutes + Intermission

CCT Academy offers theatre classes for ages 3-16. For more information visit our website.

www.ColsChildrensTheatre.org columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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family fun: WORTH THE PRICE OF A SITTER?

Cooking Class BY GEOFF DUTTON & MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

You’ve watched Emeril and Rachel Ray transform the drudgery of dinner preparations into an exotic, swashbuckling adventure. You’ve marveled and scoffed at over-the-top concoctions by the kitchen celebrity wannabes of “Top Chef.” So, are you ready for primetime? Sign up for a cooking class and find out. Or just approach it as dinner and live entertainment all in one. It makes a successful date night as easy as boiling water. MELISSA: Cooking fancy dinners — it’s something Geoff and I used to do together all the time before kids. I really miss the intimacy of preparing a meal together and then enjoying the food with a nice glass of wine. Since we rarely are in the house alone together, I figured our best chance at cooking together would be at a class. I signed us up for a fish cooking class at Sur La Table at Easton. I usually leave fish preparation to Geoff and thought this class might make me more comfortable with finned food. GEOFF: We had taken a few classes together in the past while traveling, and always enjoyed them. Class participation varies. For some, the chef does the work. Others invite you to chop, stir or measure the ingredients, and play with professional kitchen appliances and knives. Either way, you eat well. At Sur La Table, everybody donned aprons, diced vegetables and seasoned fish. MELISSA: Geoff and I enjoyed a good meal, had time to talk without the kids interrupting, and discovered three great new recipes. We learned a lot and were motivated to start cooking. We prepared two of the recipes — blackened catfish with a Tabasco butter sauce, and salmon with ratatouille — within a week of taking the class. Luckily for us, our kids are adventurous eaters. GEOFF: This would be a great Mother’s Day present. This particular class was a bit pricey — $79 per person — but it was entertaining, informative and included an impressive menu. There are classes everywhere from your local high school to upscale grocery stores. There’s also a wide range of prices — starting at about $30. Some include wine and beer. Sur La Table served iced tea and coffee.

SEVERAL OTHER CENTRAL * Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., 614-645-8733, fpconservatory.org OHIO VENUES OFFER COOKING * The Hills Market, 7860 Olentangy River Rd., 614-846-3220, thehillsmarket.com CLASSES, INCLUDING:

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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

SUR LA TABLE 3990 New Bond St., Easton 614-473-1196 surlatable.com

DANIEL SOHNER PHOTOS

THE FINANCIALS: Cooking class, $79 per person Babysitting fees

$158 $30

TOTAL COST OF THE EVENING $188

THE RATING SYSTEM AND VERDICT: Whatever it takes Book a sitter now Only if Grandma is available Candyland, anyone?

VERDICT:

* Upper Arlington LifeLong Learning Division, locations vary, 614-583-5333, uaoh.net/lifelonglearning * Whole Foods Market, 3670 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., 614-760-5556, wholefoodsmarket.com


IS

YOUR CHILD THRIVING IN SCHOOL? Online public schooling means you have choices. Sometimes, an individualized approach is what it takes to unlock a child’s full potential. With the support of passionate, experienced teachers, online schooling offers today’s students an interactive, media-rich, individualized education that meets their specific learning needs. This innovative education option brings learning to life for students, and gives you a choice in how your children are educated—from a school where your child struggles to fit in, to a school that fits your child.

ENROLLMENTS FOR THE FALL ARE BEING ACCEPTED NOW. K12 is America’s leader in delivering high quality, tuitionfree, public online schooling for grades K–12. The K12 program is available for Ohio students in grades K–12 through Ohio Virtual Academy.

GET FULL ENROLLMENT DETAILS AND A LIST OF UPCOMING EVENTS

K12.com/OH 866.339.9074 columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

55


family fun: MEDIA REVIEWS “Across The Universe”

s k o o b S FOR

KID

BY BETH REVIS This attention-grabbing, heart-pounding, thought-provoking science fiction novel is a glorious masterpiece about the lives of two young girls. Amy is about to be cryogenically frozen for a trip to the far reaches of the known universe with her parents. Elder is learning how to become the leader of the deepspace colony she has known her entire life. Amy is torn between going with her parents and staying with her first love. Elder is unsure if she is prepared for the sacrifices and secrets of being a leader. How will it all end, and why do their two stories coincide? FOR TEENS.

“LOOK! A BOOK!” BY BOB STAAKE This picture book is packed with chaotically fun illustrations, rhymes and “I Spy” games on nearly every page. Children will enjoy looking at the pictures for hours on end, and parents can have fun with a book and pictures that works tremendously well with word play and storytelling. A great start for any parent who wants to work Ready to Read skills into their child’s day. FOR AGES 2 TO 6.

“SIX SHEEP SIP THICK SHAKES: AND OTHER TRICKY TONGUE TWISTERS” BY BRIAN P. CLEARY, ILLUSTRATED BY STEVE MACK It’s just like the title says — tricky tongue twisters! Each and every page has a silly tongue twister that will make the whole family laugh and challenge everyone’s tongues. Test those tenacious tongue-twisting skills today with this great book. FOR AGES 4 TO 8.

“SCIENCE ROCKS” PUBLISHED BY DK No matter if science-fair projects are behind you now or if your children just want some chaos in the form of science, this DK book leaves nothing out. Each page provides a fun, safe and exciting science experiment that can be done at home as a family activity. Create everything from Elephant’s Toothpaste to Balloon Hovercrafts, all with supplies that you may very well have in your house. FOR AGES 6 TO 12.

“THE BOOK OF TOTALLY IRRESPONSIBLE SCIENCE” BY SEAN CONNOLLY In case one book of awesome science facts and experiments wasn’t enough for you, here is a second! This title provides even more fun and thrilling science activities for your young mad scientist. Put together in a manner that is highly appealing to mischievous children, there is plenty here for them to make a mess outside or create “controlled chaos” indoors. FOR AGES 6 TO 12.

“THE GENIUS FILES”

Dustin Jolivette, Homework Help Center Coordinator, South High branch, Columbus Metropolitan Library

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BY DAN GUTMAN This first installment of “The Genius Files” follows Coke and Pepsi McDonald as they vacation across America to fulfill their To Do list of things they wish to accomplish before they turn 13. Of course this list did not include jumping off a cliff, being trapped in their burning school, or discovering a government plot to exploit Young American Geniuses (YAGs for short). An amazing book, capable of capturing the attention of even reluctant readers, with all the twists, turns and exciting discoveries. FOR AGES 8 TO 14.


GAMES WEBSITE Teen Advice teenadvice.about.com They are teens, and they have questions: What to do about having a crush, dating, their friends and more, and they just might like to hear it is all OK from someone who is not their parent. This site is created for teens and to be used by teens to seek answers to all those difficult teen questions. Parents should sit down for the first time with their teen to browse this site, and then let their teen know that it is a great place to help them find answers that either the parent isn’t sure of, or they just want to keep to themselves. —DUSTIN JOLIVETTE

“VIRTUA TENNIS 4”

FAMILY APPS

($50, Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360) Sega’s long-running tennis sports game gets a bit more active this year with support for PlayStation Move, Kinect and Wii Motion Plus control schemes. Featuring players from the professional tennis league and highlighting some of the most famous courts, “Virtua Tennis 4” ups the home tennis game with a new seamless first-person view built to follow player movement. RATED E FOR EVERYONE.

“ALBERT HD”

Albert HD ($1.99 for iPad and iPhone) features 14 games in one app. Children play to collect 18 different treasures. The basic idea is to spend a day with Albert and help him do such chores as catching raindrops, picking out his favorite toast or sorting his socks into pairs. This app has a unique look generated by the developer handcrafting 1,000 pieces of cardboard that were then converted to animated graphics. The games make full use of the iDevice — everything from tilting and rotating the device to speaking into the microphone.

“CANDY RUSH”

Do you remember comedienne Lucille Ball and the classic TV episode where she works in a candy factory and has to manage a constantly moving conveyor belt of chocolate candies? Welcome to the world of Candy Rush (99-cents for iPad and iPhone). Your child gets to fill orders at Katie’s Candy Shop. Paws, a very friendly cat, will be there to help. The task is to sort candy into gift boxes. The menu includes truffles, chocolate strawberries, candy canes, caramel apples and much more split into 60 game levels. The goal is to fill boxes with four of the same candy, two and two, or a special order. —PHIL PIKELNY

“CARNIVAL GAMES: MONKEY SEE MONKEY DO” ($50, XBOX 360) Carnival Games made a splash on the Wii a few years ago thanks to its fun and simple mini-games but this year the title makes its Xbox 360 Kinect premiere with more than 20 games built specifically to leverage the consoles’ unique motion-control system. RATED E FOR EVERYONE. —SHAWN SINES

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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april 2011

OUT&ABOUT We’ve customized our daily calendar of events to highlight events that are FREE!

FRIDAY 1

SATURDAY 2

Imagination Movers What would happen if the Beastie Boys collaborated with Mr. Rogers? The answer is the Imagination Movers. Indeed, the Movers sing about things they know: messy rooms, healthy snacks, sibling rivalry, and other topics that relate to being a little kid, but yet their musical style would sound right at home on MTV. In concert, they teach high-energy dances, play games with the audience, and make music on their one-of-a-kind trashcan drum set as they live the Movers motto to “reach high, think big, work hard, and have fun!” 34:30 p.m. & 6:30-8:30 p.m. $16-$36. Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St., Downtown. 614-469-0939.

FREE! Adventure Around the World Kids will explore fascinating cultures around the globe as they create cool crafts, play fun-filled games, and more! Lakeshore Learning, 2148 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8461710. Colored Pencil Workshop Intensive: Bird Nests and Butterflies The Conservatory’s plant collections and exhibition serve as both inspiration and subject matter for beginning and experienced students. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $45. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733.

Preschool Picassos Create crafts that little hands can easily construct. Children ages two to six are welcome (adult participation required). 9-10 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333.

Gardening with Children Learn how to create a backyard garden that is both beautiful and fun for children, how to encourage children to grow their own plants, and create garden projects. 10:30-11:30 a.m. $20. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733.

Rhythmic Gymnastics Invitational Spring Fling See gymnasts from around the globe participate during this international competition. Rhythmic gymnastics is an Olympic sport that combines the strength of gymnastics, the beauty, flexibility and expression of dance, and externals apparatus ranging from ribbons to hoops. This is the only event of its kind in the Midwest. $5$30. Greater Columbus Convention Center, 400 N. High St., Downtown. 614-733-0818.

FREE! Gym Skills Open House Bring the whole family to see what Gym Skills has to offer. Stop by for a free introductory gymnastics and boot camp class, and jump around in the bounce house. Enjoy a complimentary massage, health screenings, and beauty services. Fight childhood obesity with your purchase of a t-shirt. Have your picture taken with the Easter bunny! Enjoy awesome savings on spring break classes and summer classes. 3-5 p.m. Gym Skills, 920 Science Blvd.

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DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM THE POLAR FRONTIER Thursday, April 14, and Saturday, April 16 — On two different evenings, from 6:30-9 p.m., the Zoo hosts a unique, grownups only “business casual” event at the Polar Frontier. First there’s a Keeper Talk about the Zoo’s polar bears at 6:30 p.m., followed by a buffet dinner, then a 7:45 p.m. presentation by Robert W. Buchanan, president and CEO of Polar Bears International. Tickets are $35 each for Zoo members ($40 for non-members) and should be purchased in advance. Call 614-724-3745 for more information.

EARTH, PAWS AND CLAWS Friday, April 22 from 5-8 p.m. and Saturday, April 23 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. — What do you get when you put Easter and Earth Day together? Earth, Paws and Claws! The animals get eggs to play with, the kids have treat stations to visit, a caravan of costumed characters will go marching by, and the Zoo’s ride region kicks off its 2011 season (with $8 all-you-can-ride bracelets in the Jungle Jack’s Landing area).

ECOTHON AT THE WILDS Saturday, April 30 — Head out to Cumberland and The Wilds for their annual Ecothon trail runs. They’ve got 10K and 5K trail run courses, plus a 5K trail walk event on their beautiful crosscountry course. You do need to pre-register by April 22, and Zoo and Wilds members get $5 off their entry fee (which is $35 after April 1). Go to reservations/thewilds.org to register.

www.columbuszoo.org


ON STAGE FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME!

### #! A perfect piece of musical theater.

SUPER HIT!

MAGIC AL

–NY Post

You’ll have the time of your life!” –Liz Smith

A roof-raising, toe-tapping, ENTERTAINMENT! high-flying EXTRAVAGANZA!” –NY Daily News

“A N E Y E - P O P P I N G

DELIGHT!

Filled with surprises, lots of laughs

and superb production values.” –The Hollywood Reporter

TICKETS FROM $22.50!

614-469-0939 OHIO THEATRE

columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

©Disney/CML

APRIL 20 – MAY 8 ONLY!

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april 2011 614-537-2172. metamorphosismarketing.com. FREE! How to Design a Sportsthemed Bedroom Join us at the Pottery Barn to learn how to design a child’s sports-themed bedroom. Learn easy ways to decorate your child’s space with accessories, bedding, wall decals, lighting, and more. Wish to place an order online or from the catalog? Let us do it for you in the store. Children are welcome! 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8803948. FREE! Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. FREE! Short North Gallery Hop Monthly cultural gathering showcasing the district’s trendy boutiques, newest restaurants latest gallery exhibitions, and much more. 4-10 p.m. Short North District, Along North High Street between Fifth Avenue and Nationwide Boulevard. 614-299-8050. shortnorth.org. FREE! Spring/Summer Clothing, Toy and Equipment Sale Presented by the East Columbus Mothers

of Multiples, expect LOTS of gently used toys, clothing for infants, toddlers and older, baby equipment, and much more (including a bake sale). You can’t afford to miss this! 9 a.m.-noon. $2 donation to shop at 8:30 a.m. (free at 9 a.m.). Messiah Lutheran Church, 1200 Waggoner Rd., Reynoldsburg. 614-395-0606. ecmom.org. FREE! Story Times: Saturday Story Stomp (2-5 years) No registration required. 11-11:30 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. The Ohio Roller Girls vs. Hard Knox Roller Girls 5 p.m. $10-$17. Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave., Fairgrounds. 614-859-6474. ohiorollergirls.com.

p.m. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd. 614-268-2472. ciskids.org. Jazz Arts Group’s Inside Track Series: Trombone Shorty Rare is the artist with the virtuosity to draw the unqualified respect of some of the most iconic legends in jazz while delivering a high-energy, funk-rock show capable of mesmerizing international rock stars. Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews and his band, Orleans Avenue, will deliver an explosive, homegrown combination of funk, rock, R&B, jazz, and hip-hop they call “Supafunkrock.” Columbus’ own Stretch Lefty opens the show. 7:30-10 p.m. $15-$50. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 614-294-5200.

MONDAY 4

SUNDAY 3 Columbus Blue Jackets Hockey vs. St. Louis Blues 5 p.m. $20$100. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd. 614-246-2000. Communities in Schools and the Columbus Blue Jackets If you’ve been waiting to go to a Columbus Blue Jackets hockey game this season, make plans to attend the St. Louis Blues game to support the Communities in Schools! Go to our website, click on the link to order pre-selected seat tickets, and use the promotions code, “school.” Communities in Schools of Central Ohio will benefit from each ticket sold (lower or upper bowls). Bring your friends, co-workers and family to see the Blue Jackets play. 5-8

Beginning Cooking During this hands-on cooking class, learn basic techniques from slicing and dicing to sautéing and roasting. You’ll soon be cooking with confidence. 6-8 p.m. $35. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733. Better Body Boot Camp for Women A great new fitness class for women with two locations in Grandview and Gahanna. Classes run in four-week sessions every month. Lose weight, body fat, inches, increase strength, and tone at this fun, total body conditioning class. Maximize your calorie output and increase your strength, heart, and lungs while revving up your metabolism so you burn calories

hours after your workout. 6-7 p.m. Habeeba’s Dance of the Arts, 1145 Chesapeake Ave. 614-747-1704. foreverfitbynancy.com. FREE! Captain Underpants Party Unleash your inner superhero and join us for games and activities based on Dav Pilkey’s popular, and very silly, series! For grades K-3. 2-3 p.m. Columbus Metropolitan Library, Northwest Branch, 2280 Hard Rd., Worthington. 614-8072626.

TUESDAY 5 FREE! After School Attack: Art, Science or Snack! You never know which treat you’ll get during this monthly hands-on, activity-filled program for kids ages 8-10. All materials are provided. Registration required. 4-5 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-8827277 ext. 5006. FREE! Cornerstones of Genealogy This workshop will provide the beginning genealogist (or family historian) the scope, understanding, and source information used to prepare a family tree or family history, while establishing the foundation for all further genealogical research. Please pre-register by April 2 by calling 836-3333. 7 p.m. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-8363333. Creative Minds Art Studio Art studio experience geared towards small hands using both free-play and guided crafts. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special

focus on creating a space for children ages six and under. Reservations are encouraged. 1-3 p.m. $8/reserved; $10/drop-in. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614890-8202.

along with vegan food samples. (This event was originally scheduled in February but was cancelled due to weather.) 6:30-8:30 p.m. Whetstone Public Library, 3909 N. High St., Clintonville. 614-377-0232.

Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers sharing this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333.

FREE! Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-4813778.

FREE! Pottery Barn Kids Story Time 11-11:30 a.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8803948. FREE! Quick & Easy Meals Think eating a healthy vegan diet is a challenge? Think again. With the help of Del Sroufe, vegan chef and co-owner of Wellness Forum Foods, you’ll be able to explore quick and easy vegan meal options. During his cooking demo, Del will also answer questions and impart wisdom on both cooking (and transitioning) to a healthy vegan diet. With so many widely acknowledged benefits to a vegan diet, it’s no wonder that more Americans are ditching animal products for plant-based foods. Turn over a new leaf this by resolving to explore vegan foods. Your body will thank you! Free Vegetarian Starter Kits will be distributed,

WEDNESDAY 6 Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333. FREE! La Leche League of Gahanna La Leche League of Gahanna is reactivating. Mothers with their nurslings (and mothers-to-be) interested in breastfeeding, are welcome to attend. Breastfeeding...it makes a difference. 7 p.m. Columbus Metropolitan Library, 310 Granville St., Gahanna. 614-2697181. llli.org. FREE! Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778.

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FREE! Story Times: Family Story Time (2-5 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006.

THURSDAY 7 Advanced GED Classes Are your academic skills a bit rusty? Join us for GED practice sessions this spring. Our instructor will work with you and help develop the skills you need in order to pass the GED test. Sessions include four, two-hour lessons covering reading, writing, math, science, and social studies. Register and pre-pay by April 1 by calling 836-3333. Town Hall accepts cash, checks, and Visa/MasterCard. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. FREE! Autism Awareness Do you have an autistic child in your life? Would you like to know more about this developmental disorder? April is National Autism Awareness Month. Please join Dr. Angela Denny and Kathi Machle of the Autism Society of America Central Ohio, as they discuss the many facets of autism. A question and answer session will follow. Registration required. 6:30-8 p.m. Wester-

ville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 2186. Complexions Contemporary Ballet Founders Desmond Richardson and Dwight Rhoden, along with their New York Citybased company of dancers, have awakened audiences to a new, exciting genre that combines the best of athleticism, lyricism, and technical training and experience. The company’s foremost innovation is that dance should be about removing boundaries, not reinforcing them. 8 p.m. $21-$31. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 800-745-3000. Preschool Rock ‘n Rollers Musicand movement-based program for children up to age six. The class introduces activities for music and movement on alternating weeks that the parent/caregiver will enjoy with the child. Each class is offered on a drop-in basis; pre-registration is not required. 9-10 a.m. $3 per child. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333. FREE! Three Bags Full Kids Consignment Sale Croton What you will find: infant to juniors and maternity clothing, strollers, cribs, high chairs, electronic games, books, bedding, and much more. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Hartford Fairgrounds, 614-325-0063. threebagsfull.info. FREE! Tween Ink: Journal Writing for Tweens The theme of the second session in this three-part series is called Imaginative Starters. During this workshop, kids in grades four through six will get ideas for

fun topics that will make their journals one-of-a-kind. 4-5 p.m. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-807-2626. FREE! Warrior Cat Training Day Based on Erin Hunter’s popular Warriors series, children in grades four through six will discover their clan, practice their feline skills, and prove they’re no kitty pet during this program of games, crafts and activities. 2-3:30 p.m. Columbus Metropolitan Library, 2280 Hard Rd., Worthington. 614-807-2626.

FRIDAY 8 Complexions Contemporary Ballet Founders Desmond Richardson and Dwight Rhoden, along with their New York City-based company of dancers, have awakened audiences to a new, exciting genre that combines the best of athleticism, lyricism, and technical training and experience. The company’s foremost innovation is that dance should be about removing boundaries, not reinforcing them. 10 a.m. & 8 p.m. $21-$31. Capitol Theatre, 77 S. High St., Downtown. 800-7453000. Jerry Seinfeld 7 p.m. $46-$77. Ohio Theatre, 55 E. State St., Downtown. 800-745-3000. Preschool Picassos Create crafts that little hands can easily construct. Children ages two to six are welcome (adult participation required). 9-10 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333.

FREE! Three Bags Full Kids Consignment Sale Croton What you will find: infant to juniors and maternity clothing, strollers, cribs, high chairs, electronic games, books, bedding, and much more. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. & 6-9 p.m. Hartford Fairgrounds, 614-325-0063. threebagsfull.info.

Mother Nature.” Expect more than 300 varieties of daffodils in specimen displays, floral designs, and show-theme displays. Visitors will also have the opportunity to order their own daffodil bulbs for planting in the fall. 1-7 p.m. College Town House, 334 E. Broadway, Granville. 740-587-4848. granvillegardenclub.org.

SATURDAY 9

FREE! Groveport Wellness Fair The ninth annual fair will feature a variety of alternative and traditional wellness practices. Learn about the benefits of acupuncture, massage therapy, and reflexology. Don’t forget to take advantage of free health screenings from local wellness providers. Please bring a canned food item to benefit the Groveport Madison Food Pantry. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333.

Columbus Blue Jackets Hockey vs. Buffalo Sabres 7 p.m. $20$100. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd. 614-246-2000. FREE! Design Your Dream Nursery Join us at Pottery Barn for classes on how to decorate your dream nursery. Work personally with our interior design specialists as we help you design your child’s nursery. Attendees will receive a discount of 10% off an in-store purchase that day. Please call the store to reserve your spot and time. Wish to place an order online or start a registry? Let us do it for you instore. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8803948. Family Fun Day Enjoy free family activities and crafts with Conservatory admission. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free with $6 - $11admission. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733. FREE! Granville Daffodil Show Celebrate the arrival of spring in The Village of Granville during the Granville Garden Club’s 66th annual daffodil show, “The Wonders of

FREE! Kids Consignment Sale Shop the largest consignment sale of its kind in Columbus. Over 150 sellers will present spring and summer children’s and baby clothing (infant to child size 18), strollers, car seats, toys, books and games, music and movies, bedding and bath, and maternity clothes. Cash or check only; no credit cards. Bring a large shopping bag (but please no strollers, wagons, or carts). Doors open at 8 p.m. for special power hour. Presented by the Columbus Mothers of Twins Club. Shop one hour early for a $2 donation to the March of Dimes. 9 a.m.-noon. Hilliard Darby High School, 4200 Leppert Rd., Hilliard. 614-459-5004. cmotc.org.

FREE! Mad About Madison Expo We will have 20+ vendors, door prizes, face painting, and special door prizes for the kids. This is for the community, so please come out and join us. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Asbury Elementary School, 5127 Harbor Blvd. 614-837-6980. FREE! Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. FREE! Spring Chick Children will make and decorate their own spring chick using colored feathers, wiggly eyes, dot painters, and more! 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Lakeshore Learning, 2148 Polaris Pkwy. 614-846-1710. Spring Container Gardening Learn how to create a container garden that will thrive in Ohio’s questionable spring temperatures. 1:30-3:30 p.m. $20. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733. PBJ & Jazz Series: Joe Hunter PBJ & Jazz concerts are hour-long interactive events designed to introduce jazz and American music to young children and their families. Featuring some of Columbus’ finest musicians and ensembles, PBJ & Jazz concerts are hosted by former Columbus Music Hall owner (and retired music educator) Rebecca Ogden, and are a great introduction to live music for the youngest audience member. One of Cleveland’s most popular and busiest jazz

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april 2011 pianists is Joe Hunter. He’s a favorite at many Tri-C JazzFest events, and co-host with Bill Rudman of “The Song is You” series. Hunter has also taught with the Tri-C Jazz Studies Program for several years, and is a popular performer throughout the greater Cleveland area, including such nightspots as Nighttown, and the Inn at Turner’s Mill. Joe is also a featured player with Ernie Krivda’s Fat Tuesday Big Band, and has performed with national artists Conti Condoli, David Fathead Newman, Tito Puente, Eddie Henderson, and Scott Hamilton. Children receive a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, juice and a cookie. 11 a.m.-noon. $5 each ($20 family max). Jazz Academy at Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., King Lincoln. 614-294-5200. FREE! Three Bags Full Kids Consignment Sale Croton What you will find: infant to juniors and maternity clothing, strollers, cribs,

high chairs, electronic games, books, bedding, and much more. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hartford Fairgrounds, 614-325-0063. threebagsfull.info. FREE! Worthington Park’s Wild Safari! You’re in for a wild time at this fun event, where stories, songs, and a special craft will get you moving! 10:30-11:30 a.m. Worthington Park Library, 1389 Worthington Centre Dr. 614-807-2626.

SUNDAY 10 FREE! Granville Daffodil Show Celebrate the arrival of spring in The Village of Granville during the Granville Garden Club’s 66th annual daffodil show, “The Wonders of Mother Nature.” Expect more than 300 varieties of daffodils in specimen displays, floral designs, and show-theme displays. Visitors have the opportunity to order their own daffodil bulbs for planting in the fall. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. College Town House, 334 E. Broadway, Granville. 740587-4848. granvillegardenclub.org. How to Make Strudel Marilou Suszko will teach you how to make fresh phyllo dough, and the apple

G OR SIBLIN K E WEE L P I T MUL TS

UN

DISCO

varieties needed for delicious strudel. Participants should bring two large cookie sheets and a pastry brush for four freezer-ready, take-home strudels, along with a package of phyllo dough for home use. 4-5:30 p.m. $65. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733. The Lee Brothers: Cooking as a Family Siblings Matt and Ted grew up in Charleston, South Carolina. When they left to attend colleges in the Northeast, they so missed the foods of their hometown they founded The Lee Bros. Boiled Peanuts Catalogue, a mail-order catalogue for southern pantry staples like stone-ground grits, fig preserves, and, of course, boiled peanuts. 2:30-4:30 p.m. $15/$20/$25. Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts, 100 W. Granville St., New Albany. 614245-4701.

MONDAY 11 Rain Barrels and Composting Rain barrel water collecting, and backyard composting, are both great ways to save money and have

a “greener” yard. Installing a rain barrel to your house can save you money by collecting water for auto cleaning, window washing and plants. Backyard composting can help regenerate poor soils, and reduce the need for fertilizers and pesticides. Join us for an information session on these “green” additions you can make to your home this spring. To register and pre-pay, please call 836-3333. 7-8:30 p.m. $7 Residents/$8 Non-Residents. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614836-3333.

TUESDAY 12 FREE! Before You Build Do you need a permit? What about an architect? How do you locate water and electrical lines? Find out all you need to know for your home remodeling project before you build. Chief building official, Stephen Moore, will explain the Village of Groveport’s building regulations during this evening program. Registration is required. Please call 836-3333 by April 8 to reserve your space. 7 p.m. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333.

Creative Minds Art Studio Art studio experience geared towards small hands using both free-play and guided crafts. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages six and under. Reservations are encouraged. 1-3 p.m. $8/reserved; $10/drop-in. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614890-8202. Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333. FREE! Junk Drawer Jewelry Use beads, buttons, pop tabs, ribbon, and more to make fun jewelry, lanyards and zipper pulls! For grades five and up. No registration required. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778.

FREE! Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-4813778.

WEDNESDAY 13 FREE! Frames for Fido It’s time to create crafts representing your favorite four-legged companion. Join us as we make crafts showcasing your love for your pet: dog bone frames, pet-themed Scrabble tile pendants, and marble magnets. 68:30 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 2186. Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult partici-

Summer time Fun!

Ages 3 to 6 Monday to Friday AM or PM sessions Gymnastics, Trampoline, Music, Parachute, Games, Bubbles, Snacks & More!

Ages 6 and up Monday to Friday 1/2 day or Full day Full Day • 9:00-4:00 Gymnastics • 9:00-12:00 Activity • 12:15-4:00 Past Activities include: Miniature Golf, Crafts, Bowling, Swimming, Park Trip

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FREE! Pottery Barn Kids Story Time 11-11:30 a.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8803948.

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

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*Available at participating locations only. Rules and restrictions apply. See school for 0-5-year-old and 6-12-year-old summer offer details and restrictions. Sessions, programs, field trips, and hours vary by school. CODE: Use current summer offer disclaimers and code(s).

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Kid’s Specials Every Sunday

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Only $20 One coupon per table. Not valid with any other offer. Dine-in only. Valid Sunday to Thursday with coupon. Valid at all El Vaquero locations. Expires 6/30/11 - Cols Par

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MARCH FOR BABIES Sunday, May 1 — The March of Dimes organization supports research and programs that help moms give birth to healthy babies. And the annual Marches for Babies that take place all across the country are one of their biggest fundraisers. This year’s Columbus edition (a five-miler) takes place on Sunday, May 1, starting at The Sports Barn at 3599 Chiller Lane, Columbus (that’s the one near Easton).

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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

Registration starts at 9 a.m. and the March itself begins at 10 a.m. Participants are encouraged to either join or form a team, and you can get all the information ahead of time at their website, marchforbabies.org. Or call 614-865-4513.

april 2011 pants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333. Slate Painting This April, paint beautiful spring flowers onto slate with instructor, Natalie Terry. Perfect for a gift, or keep for yourself! The two-week class starts Wednesday, April 13. To register and pre-pay, please call 836-3333 by April 11. Town Hall accepts cash, checks, Visa or MasterCard. 7-8:30 p.m. $22 Residents/$23 Non-Residents. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614836-3333.

FREE! Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Story Times: Family Story Time (2-5 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten-minute read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614882-7277 ext. 5006. The Russian National Ballet: Chopiniana In the timeless tradition of classical Russian ballet, invigorated with exciting new developments in dance from around the

world, The Russian National Ballet Theatre presents a timeless example of stylization which grew out of Chopin’s Seventh Waltz. 8 p.m. $15$65. Midland Theatre, 36 N. Park Pl., Newark. 740-345-5483.

THURSDAY 14 FREE! Kitty Krafts Celebrate National Pet Month by making toys your cat will love! Materials (and help) will be provided as you pick between the following projects: Crocheted Bouncy Door Hanger, Kitty Wand, Crocheted Catnip Balls, Catnip Whale, and a Kitty Chaser. Registration required. 6-8:30 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-8827277 ext. 2191.

Preschool Cooking: Butter-flies Children ages four to five (and their favorite adult) will learn how easy it is to make homemade butter. We’ll whip up butter from local Snowville cream and use the buttermilk to make whole grain pancakes with seasonal fruit. 11 a.m.-noon. $20. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614645-8733. Preschool Rock ‘n Rollers Music and movement-based program for children up to age six. The class introduces activities for music and movement on alternating weeks that the parent/caregiver will enjoy with the child. Each class is offered on a drop-in basis; pre-registration is not required. 9-10 a.m. $3 per child. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333.


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columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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april 2011 Quartet Toujour The Music @ The MAC Thursday Night Concert Series continues with Quartet Toujour. The evening’s program will consist of Chamber Music Connection Competition ensembles featuring Quartet Toujours, along with additional chamber groups from CMC. Quartet Toujours includes: Heeyeon Chung, Thomas Worthington HS; Kaho Sugawara, Hilliard Davidson HS; Eva Kennedy, Linworth AP/TWHS, and Ruthie Cordray, Columbus Academy. All four were featured as part of Octet Abbraccio performing Mendelssohn’s famous String Octet airing nationally on NPR’s From the Top. They came together from two quartets to create one after graduating members went off to college this fall. Their previous quartets (Accelerando and Arcobaleno) were Bronze medalist’s (2010 and 2009) in the Saint Paul String Quartet Competition, a national competition exclusively for string quartets. 8-10 p.m. $8 adv; $10 door. Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center of Worthington, 777 Evening St. 614-4310329. Simple Solutions for Spring Cleaning Give spring cleaning a new meaning this year! Learn how to effectively clean out the clutter, and organize your living space with this class by Simple Solutions. Please call 836-3333 by April 11 to register and pre-pay. Town Hall accepts cash, checks, Visa or MasterCard. 10-11:30 a.m. $5 Residents/$6 Non-Residents. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. FREE! Tween Ink: Journal Writing for Tweens The theme of the second session in this three-part series is called Imaginative Starters. During this workshop, kids in grades 4-6 will get ideas for fun topics that will

make their journals one-of-a-kind. 4-5 p.m. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-8072626.

protect planet Earth as you make your own tote bag, learn about recycling, and much more! Lakeshore Learning, 2148 Polaris Pkwy. 614-846-1710.

FRIDAY 15

FREE! Charlottesville at the MAC Meet Goodwill Art Studio & Gallery artist, Charlotte McGraw, as she welcomes you to her town Charlottesville where she’ll introduce you to her friends that live there. Charlotte will share with you how she creates her artwork and stories, then Goodwill Art Studio & Gallery staff will lead the group in working with Charlotte to create a collaborative image and story. 1-3 p.m. Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center of Worthington, 777 Evening St. 614431-0329.

Art Classes for Adults Explore a variety of mediums including watercolor, oil, pastels, and more during this four-week class. Artist Teresa Satola will instruct students of all skill levels. Please call 8363333 by April 13 to register, and pre-pay. Town Hall accepts cash, checks, Visa or Mastercard. 10 a.m. $10 Residents/$12 Non-Residents. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. Preschool Picassos Create crafts that little hands can easily construct. Children ages two to six are welcome (adult participation required). 9-10 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-8363333. FREE! The Earth & Me Children ages two to six will celebrate Earth Day with stories, songs, and a craft project using recycled materials. 11 a.m.-noon. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-8072626.

SATURDAY 16 Banking Basics for Adults Do you use a check-cashing service for payroll and other checks you receive? Do you buy money orders each month to pay your rent and other expenses? If you have never had a checking account because you thought it was too expensive or difficult to use, this class was created just for you! In this class you, will learn the many benefits of having a bank account and how easy it is to open and maintain it. Call by April 15 to register and pre-pay. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $10 Residents/$12 Non-Residents. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. FREE! Celebrating Earth Day Discover fun-filled ways to explore and

Columbus Crew Soccer vs. Kansas City Wizards 7:30 p.m. Columbus Crew Stadium, One Black & Gold Blvd., East Side. 614-4472739. Columbus Walk MS Join the movement at the Columbus Walk MS. Friends, family, and co-workers come together to walk to create a world free of MS. Participants will walk the beautiful grounds of the Columbus Zoo and enjoy a celebration breakfast together. All funds raised from Walk MS help provide programs and services to the 20,000 Ohioans living with MS. Money raised also helps fund research to find a cure, much of which is being done here in Ohio at The Ohio State University MS Center and the Cleveland Clinic. 7:30 a.m.-noon. Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, 9990 Riverside Dr., Powell. 614-515-4609. msohiowalk.org. Family Fun Day Enjoy free family activities and crafts with Conservatory admission. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free with $6 - $11admission. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733. FREE! Meet Your Personal Designer Join us at Pottery Barn for a chance to meet one-on-one with our PBK Interior design specialists.

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SUBMIT YOUR EVENT To add an event to Columbus Parent Magazine’s Out & About calendar, submit information by email to calendar@columbusparent.com or online at ColumbusParent.com. Please submit calendar events by the 7th day of the preceding month.


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columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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THE PETER COTTONTAIL EXPRESS

MY SUMMER TO-DO LIST: Make new friends Learn something new Go to the Columbus Zoo Make summer a blast with Camp Primrose. Explore the great outdoors or go on a wacky science adventure. Primrose provides The Right Foundation to Build Active Minds, Healthy Bodies, and Happy Hearts . ®

Primrose School of Dublin

614.408.3732 Primrose School of Johnstown Road

614.775.0899 Primrose School of Lewis Center

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614.575.9930 Primrose School at Polaris

614.899.2588 Each Primrose School is privately owned and operated. Primrose Schools; The Right Foundation to Build Active Minds, Healthy Bodies, and Happy Hearts; and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2011 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved.

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April 2-23 — Every weekend in April, kids and their parents will be able to ride the Peter Cottontail Express at Lodi Station Outlets, up in Burbank, Ohio (just off I-71, about 95 miles northeast of Columbus). Children will be able to hop aboard the Peter Cottontail Express along with their parents at Grand Central Station near the food court after purchasing tickets at one of the ticketing kiosks or at guest services. The special excursion will run from 12 noon to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and 12 noon to 3 p.m. on Sundays. Once aboard, guests will take a train ride through Lodi Station Outlets and stop at the Easter Bunny room for a visit & photos with the Easter Bunny and story time with Mother Goose! Cost for tickets will be $4; children 3 and under ride free with a parent. For more information, go to lodistation.com

april 2011 Bring pictures, swatches and ideas, and let us help you design the perfect child’s space. Attendees will also receive a discount of 10% on a purchase that day. Interested in placing an order online or starting a registry? We can do that too. Come by the store and we’d love to help. This is an appointment-only event, so please call to reserve your time spot and designer. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-880-3948. Money Power for Teens Most teens are experts at spending money, but how many can create and manage a budget, set realistic goals, and stick to spending limits?

Created for teens ages 14 and older, this class will help them gain the money management skills they will need and use for the rest of their lives. The skills learned during this two session class will be reinforced through group discussions and interactive activities. Call 836-3333 by April 14 to register and pre-pay. 2-5 p.m. $10/$12. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. FREE! Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. FREE! Save the Earth Tote Bag Children will make an Earth-friendly tote that they can decorate themselves to use again and again! 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Lakeshore Learning, 2148 Polaris Pkwy. 614-846-1710.

Small Space Gardening Learn about small-space garden design, planting to scale, space-saving solutions, and compost and rain barrels. 1:30-3:30 p.m. $20. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733. FREE! Spring Fling Help us welcome spring back into our community! Enjoy free activities like music, spring crafts, and fun games. Come out and enjoy the new season with the entire family. Don’t forget to register for the Mini Mile fun run! Noon-3 p.m. Hannah Park, 6547 Clark State Rd., Gahanna. 614-342-4350. gahanna.gov. FREE! Story Times: Saturday Story Stomp (2-5 years) No registration required. 11-11:30 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Yoga Storytime Children ages two to six (and their caregivers) will hear stories, telling them


Let our Family Care for Yours Homewatch CareGivers has been helping people with special needs for over 30 years. We are dedicated to providing high quality, community-based supports to children and adults with developmental disabilities. We provide a variety of in-home services and are licensed by Medicaid and the ODODD, and our services are individually tailored to meet each child’s needs. Homewatch CareGivers isn’t just another care provider; we are a family-owned business whose administrative staff all has years of direct care experience. We don’t think of caregiving as a business, we consider it a passion. Homewatch CareGivers accepts the I/O, PDP, and Level 1 waivers as well as private pay. Call us today to learn more about how we can help your child thrive. (614) 545-0316. You can also learn more about our company at www.homewatchohio.com, or check out our Facebook page at facebook.com/homewatch.caregiverscolumbus

Contact us today for a FREE EVALUATION:

(614) 545-0316 • homewatchohio.com columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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april 2011 through basic yoga poses and stretches. No previous yoga experience is needed! 10:30-11:30 a.m. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-807-2626.

SUNDAY 17 Banking Basics for Adults Do you use a check-cashing service for payroll and other checks you receive? Do you buy money orders each month to pay your rent and other expenses? If you have never had a checking account because you thought it was too expensive or difficult to use, this class was created just for you! In this class you, will learn the many benefits of having a bank account and how easy it is to open and maintain it. Call by April 15 to register and pre-pay. Noon-2 p.m. $10 Residents/$12 Non-Residents. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333. FREE Easter Egg Hunt Familyfriendly, fast-paced, Easter celebration featuring costumed characters, face painting, balloons, free pictures with the Easter bunny, and more than 50,000 treat-filled eggs. For preschoolers, elementary-aged children and their families 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Grove City Church of the Nazarene, 4770 Hoover Rd. 614875-2551 ext. 343. Money Power for Teens Most teens are experts at spending money, but how many can create and manage a budget, set realistic goals, and stick to spending limits? Created for teens ages 14 and older, this class will help them gain the money management skills they will need and use for the rest of their lives. The skills learned during this two session class will be reinforced through group discussions and interactive activities. Call 836-3333 by April 14 to register and pre-pay. 2-5 p.m. $10/$12. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St. 614-836-3333.

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this tale of King Arthur, his knights, and ladies-in-waiting. For ages five and up. 7-8 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. Spring Break Acting Camp 9 a.m.4 p.m. $190. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733.

TUESDAY 19 Creative Minds Art Studio Art studio experience geared towards small hands using both free-play and guided crafts. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages six and under. Reservations are encouraged. 1-3 p.m. $8/reserved; $10/drop-in. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com. Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333. FREE! Pottery Barn Kids Story Time 11-11:30 a.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8803948. FREE! Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-4813778.

WEDNESDAY 20

MONDAY 18

FREE! Child Check ECRN will offer developmental screenings (called Child Check) for children ages one month through five years old. The screenings are in the areas of gross motor, fine motor, speech, language, and personal/social skills. Hearing screenings are also provided, as well as vision screenings for children over three years. 9:30 a.m.1:30 p.m. Hilltop Lutheran Church, 12 S. Terrace Ave., West Side. 614543-9000 ext. 216.

FREE! Joust The young actors at Imaginating Dramatics will perform

Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children

(through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333. FREE! Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Story Times: Family Story Time (2-5 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006.

THURSDAY 21 Preschool Rock ‘n Rollers Musicand movement-based program for children up to age six. The class introduces activities for music and movement on alternating weeks that the parent/caregiver will enjoy with the child. Each class is offered on a drop-in basis; pre-registration is not required. 9-10 a.m. $3 per child. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333.

FRIDAY 22 Earth Day Event In celebration of Earth Day 2011, bring any used bedding or blanket set in good condition to the Pottery Barn Kids Store. Items will be donated to charity, and you will receive a discount of 10% towards a purchase of new bedding or blankets made that day in-store, or online via our store computers. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614880-3948. Preschool Picassos Create crafts that little hands can easily construct. Children ages two to six are welcome (adult participation required). 9-10 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614-836-3333.


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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

*Dine In Only *Only one meal per customer Prime Rib Fridays and Saturdays

Now Delivering Large Bulk Orders! Call for more details!

(614) 890-2061 www.montecarloitaliankitchen.com Parkview Center 610 W. Schrock Road Westerville (By Kinkos) AT the Corner of Cleveland Ave. & Schrock

april 2011 SATURDAY 23 FREE! Bunny Basket Children will create their own big-eared bunny basket just in time for Easter! 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Lakeshore Learning, 2148 Polaris Pkwy. 614-846-1710. Earth Day: Exploring Energy What does our energy future hold? Meet scientists and engineers working to meet our energy needs, and find out how you can make a difference. These amazing hands-on activities are included with your general admission (or COSI membership). Go deeper with COSI’s Earth Day Family Workshop for an additional fee. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $9$15. COSI Columbus, 333 W. Broad St., Downtown. 614-228-2674. FREE! Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006.

SUNDAY 24 Easter Brunch Enjoy a delicious brunch in the beautiful surroundings of the John F. Wolfe Palm House with fresh, made-fromscratch items creatively prepared by Conservatory catering. Reservations required. Noon-3 p.m. Adults: $55; Children ages 4-10: $20; Free for children under 4. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-1756.

TUESDAY 26 Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333.

FREE! Pottery Barn Kids Story Time 11-11:30 a.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8803948. FREE! Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-4813778.

WEDNESDAY 27 Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333. FREE! Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Story Times: Family Story Time (2-5 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006.

THURSDAY 28 2nd Annual Taste of Powell Spend an evening sampling menu items from some of Powell’s finest restaurants and vendors, while enjoying entertainment by Arnett Howard. 6-9 p.m. $25. Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, 4850 W. Powell Rd., Powell. 614-888-1090. tasteofpowell.com. Kids Cooking: Quick Breads Kids ages six and older will learn to make baked goods from scratch, including apple oat muffins and blueberry pancakes. 6-8 p.m. $25. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733.


Spectacular Family Affordable Prices Starting At $11! Additional fees may apply.

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May 12-15 1-800-745-3000 • Ringline.com columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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april 2011

a.m.-2 p.m. & 5-8 p.m. Delaware County Fairgrounds, 236 Pennsylvania Ave. 614-325-0063. threebagsfull.info.

Preschool Rock ‘n Rollers Musicand movement-based program for children up to age six. The class introduces activities for music and movement on alternating weeks that the parent/caregiver will enjoy with the child. Each class is offered on a drop-in basis; preregistration is not required. 9-10 a.m. $3 per child. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333.

FREE! Buzzy Bee Children will get busy building a bumblebee, complete with wings that really flap! 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Lakeshore Learning, 2148 Polaris Pkwy. 614-846-1710.

FRIDAY 29 Jazz Arts Group’s Inside Track Series: The Birth of the Cool feat. Mark Flugge and Jim Powell This collaborative multimedia event between the Jazz Arts Group and CCAD President, Denny Griffin, will reinterpret the1949-1950 recording sessions of Miles Davis’ iconic, “Birth of Cool” via a retrospective of midcentury art, design, and music. 8-10 p.m. $25-$30. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., King Lincoln. 614-4690939. Preschool Picassos Create crafts that little hands can easily construct. Children ages two to six are welcome (adult participation required). 9-10 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333. FREE! Three Bags Full Kids Consignment Sale Delaware What you will find: infant to juniors and maternity clothing, strollers, cribs, high chairs, electronic games, books, bedding, and much more. 9

SATURDAY 30

Columbus Crew Soccer vs. Vancouver Whitecaps 7:30 p.m. Columbus Crew Stadium, One Black & Gold Blvd., East Side. 614-4472739. FREE! How Does Your Garden Grow? Pro-planet projects and activities will show kids in grades K3 how they can go green and make a difference. 4-5 p.m. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-807-2626.

FREE! Saturday Tales Bring the entire family to the library for stories, songs and rhymes! Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 11-11:30 a.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. Successful School Gardens School garden leaders will learn how to utilize their PTO, neighbors, and neighborhood organizations to sustain the garden through the summer. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $20. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614645-8733.

Jazz Arts Group’s Inside Track Series: The Birth of the Cool feat. Mark Flugge and Jim Powell This collaborative multimedia event between the Jazz Arts Group and CCAD President, Denny Griffin, will reinterpret the1949-1950 recording sessions of Miles Davis’ iconic, “Birth of Cool” via a retrospective of midcentury art, design, and music. 8-10 p.m. $25-$30. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., King Lincoln. 614-4690939.

The RoadRunner Run Emphasizing family wellness, nutrition and exercise, this event includes a 5K run/walk, a one-mile fun run, and a toddler trot. Music and entertainment along the race course will keep you motivated! Professional chip timing courtesy of the Hilliard Bradley High School Athletic department. Stick around for the post-race party! A portion of proceeds benefit SON ministries. Prices include a tshirt, race goodie bag and raffle entry (except Toddler Trot). 10 a.m.1 p.m. 5K run/health walk ($15); One-mile fun run ($12), Toddler Trot: free. Ridgewood Elementary School, 4237 Dublin Rd., Hilliard. 614-4993326. theroadrunnerrun.info.

Ride4Autism April is Autism Awareness Month, and the community is encouraged to Ride4Autism. Designed for novice to expert riders, participants can choose from three routes in 10-, 30-, and 75-mile increments. Proceeds will benefit Nationwide Children’s Hospital Autism Center. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Cyclist Connection, 200 Winchester Ceme-

FREE! Three Bags Full Kids Consignment Sale Delaware What you will find: infant to juniors and maternity clothing, strollers, cribs, high chairs, electronic games, books, bedding, and much more. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. & 5-8 p.m. Delaware County Fairgrounds, 236 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware. 614-325-0063. threebagsfull.info.

NURTURING FAMILIES NEEDED... Youth Advocate Services is recruiting foster families for children and teens in need of short and long-term care. Training, reimbursement, and 24 hour support is provided. Training classes begin soon.

For more information, contact Marnita Asher at masher@yasohio.org or 614-258-9927, or visit our website, www.yasohio.org

74

tery Rd., Canal Winchester. 614-9756816. ride4autism.com.

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

EARTH DAY COLUMBUS Saturday, April 23 — Celebrate the Earth on its special day! The Green Columbus organization will be hosting Earth Day 2011 on the grounds of the Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus. From 11 a.m. until 10 p.m., you can wander around (for free) and enjoy kids’ activities, purchase eco-friendly art from local artists, learn more about being a good steward of our planet at cooking, recycling and gardening demonstrations, rock out to some great local bands and more! For more information, visit their website at lightenup2011.org

Summer Camp 2011 Little Lambs Children’s Center • Camp Weeks June 6–August 19 with choice of weeks • Weekly themes and field trips with outdoor and indoor play • Nutritious Meals (included in tuition) • Weekly Visits to Library and Pool • Camp Hours 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (with extended care 6:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. included) Child Care for children starting at age 6 weeks. Christian School and Preschool enrolling now for fall.

614.471.9269 425 S. Hamilton Rd. Minutes from 270 in Gahanna

www.shepherdchristian.org


Is your child on the right track?

Now enrolling for summer camp Dublin & Worthington’s Favorite Child Care Center! 1123 Bethel Rd. Columbus, 43220 614.451.5200

See this Month’s Movie Reviews at

3480 Snouffer Rd. Columbus, 43235 614-792-8700

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1-866-826-3889 columbusparent.com | April 2011 |

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april 2011 SUNDAY MAY 1 Columbus Great Strides Annual walk-a-thon for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation where ninety percent of every dollar raised at the event will go towards finding a cure for cystic fibrosis.1-5 p.m. No registration fee. Goodale Park, 120 W. Goodale Blvd., Victorian Village. 614-846-2440. greatstrides.cff.org.

Urgent Need, Urgent Care Affordable Cost

The Animal Hospital of Polaris is open, available and equipped to treat your sick or injured pet.

Come visit our vaccine clinic (3rd Sunday of every month) from 1-4pm

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Open M-F 7:30am - 10pm; Sat 8am - 8pm; and Sun 10am- 8pm Call 614-888-4050 • www.animalhospitalofpolaris.com

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FREE! Three Bags Full Kids Consignment Sale Delaware What you will find: infant to juniors and maternity clothing, strollers, cribs, high chairs, electronic games, books, bedding, and much more. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Delaware County Fairgrounds, 236 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware. 614-325-0063.

TUESDAY MAY 3

Did you know? • Our services cost 1/3 less than local dedicated emergency facilities • Our Vets have extensive experience working in emergency-only practices. • We’re staffed to provide 24-hour, on-site care

20%

The Arthritis Walk in Central Ohio At 10 a.m., hundreds of participants will begin walking and running to show their support for the more than 486,000 people in Central Ohio, and 11,500 children statewide who have arthritis. Come together with family and friends to form a team of 10 or more people to walk. Those who raise $100 or more receive the 2011 Walk t-shirt and a goodie bag. Let’s move together! 8:30-11:30 a.m. Donations accepted. The Sports Complex, 325 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614876-8200. letsmovetogethercentralohio.kintera.org.

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

THE AUTISM PUZZLE Wednesday, April 13 — Watch the latest show in The Autism Puzzle series at 7 p.m. NBC4 in Columbus presents this live program with resources and information for families whose children have autism. Columbus Parent is a proud sponsor of The Autism Puzzle. For more information, go to wcmhblogs.com/autism/about (or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333.

(or caregivers share this experience with their children) often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 9-10:30 a.m. $3. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333.

FREE! Pottery Barn Kids Story Time 11-11:30 a.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy. 614-8803948.

FREE! La Leche League of Gahanna La Leche League of Gahanna is reactivating. Mothers with their nurslings (and mothers-to-be) interested in breastfeeding, are welcome to attend. Breastfeeding...it makes a difference. 7 p.m. Columbus Metropolitan Library, 310 Granville St., Gahanna. 614-2697181. llli.org.

FREE! Story Times: Tales for Toddlers (18-36 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-4813778.

FREE! After School Attack: Art, Science or Snack! You never know which treat you’ll get during this monthly hands-on, activity-filled program for kids ages 8-10. All materials are provided. Registration required. 4-5 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614-8827277 ext. 5006.

WEDNESDAY MAY 4

Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents

Grow with Me Preschool Programs Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents

FREE! Story Times: Baby Games (6-17 months) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778. FREE! Story Times: Family Story Time (2-5 years) 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave. 614-481-3778.

FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors New reader? Just need practice? Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s tenminute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Public Library, 126 S. State St. 614882-7277 ext. 5006.

THURSDAY MAY 5 Preschool Rock ‘n Rollers Music and movement-based program for children up to age six. The class introduces activities for music and movement on alternating weeks that the parent/caregiver will enjoy with the child. Each class is offered on a drop-in basis; preregistration is not required. 9-10 a.m. $3 per child. Groveport KidSpace Building, 630 Wirt Rd. 614836-3333.


NOW WITH MORE TIME TO DECIDE AND BUY! LD ALWAYS BE THIS EASY. U O H S Y E N O M G N I V At BigDealColumbus.com, we’re thrilled with how many of you have SA purchased Big Deals and saved 50% or more at Columbus businesses.

Some of you have told us that you wished you had more time to take advantage of these deals. We’ve listened and we’re pleased to announce that Big Deals are now available for at least two days. Deals announced on Mondays will be available Monday and Tuesday; deals announced on Wednesdays will be available Wednesday and Thursday; and deals announced on Fridays will be available for purchase throughout the weekend.

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PARENTS CLUBS Mocha Moms Support group for stay-at-home moms of color. For more information email columbusmochamoms@yahoo.com

MOGIS: Mothers of Girls in Sports Free group seminars for moms and daughters. New local group called Moms of Girls in Sports (MOGIS) meets the first Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at Wyandotte Athletic Club. Moms, come with your female athletes to get questions answered from Margaret on a variety of topics including nutrition, strength and conditioning, injury prevention and marketing for scholarships. Share stories and learn from other moms with girls in sports. E-mail Margaret if you plan to attend, margaret@femaleathletesfirst.com. Mommies of Miracles M.O.M is a growing Ohio support community of mothers who have children (of any age) with complex medical issues or disabilities. Our mission is to eliminate the isolation mothers of exceptional needs children experience on a daily basis by providing an extended network of confidential and compassionate emotional support. Join us for monthly meetings, fun family events, couples’ enrichment activities, and advocacy initiatives. For more information on events, resources and more, go to mommiesofmiracles.com Mommies Time Out Online Support Group A fun group of moms who provide support and social activities for stay-at-home and working moms in the Columbus area. Includes playgroups, play dates, meet-ups, moms’ nights out, message boards and more. MommiesTimeOut.Proboards105.com. MOMS Club of Clintonville A fun social and support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Playgroups, field trips and monthly moms’ nights out. 10 a.m. on the second Wednesday of each month (locations vary). For membership information, contact Carrie at 614-447- 0567, email clintonvillemomsclub@yahoo.com, or visit our website clintonvillemomsclub.yolasite.com. MOMS Club of Delaware A fun, social support group for stay-at-home moms and their children with playgroups, field trips and monthly moms’ nights out. Meets at 10 a.m. the first Monday of every month. For membership information, email at momsclubofdelaware@hotmail.com.

MOMS Club of DublinWest MOMS Club of Dublin West offers a variety of activities each month including a monthly meeting, mom and tot activities, play groups, parties, and a moms’ night out. For more information, call 614-873-9672 or email momsclubofdublinwest@gmail.com MOMS Club of Dublin Southeast Support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Playgroups, monthly calendar of events, moms’ night out, service projects. Contact Membership VP at momsclubofdublinse@yahoo.com for more info.

| April 2011 | columbusparent.com

MOMS Club of Pickerington North Support group for stay-at-home moms. Also serves Reynoldsburg and Pataskala. E-mail Rachel at argillaspie@yahoo.com.

MOMS Club of Gahanna East Support group for stay-at-home moms. Also serves Blacklick. Contact Liz at 614-668-0916 or momsclubgahannaeast@gmail.com

MOMS Club of Pickerington South Support group for stay-at-home moms living south of Refugee Rd. in Pickerington or Canal Winchester. 10 a.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at Peace United Methodist Church, 235 Diley Rd. Go to Pickerington Moms.tri-pod.com.

MOMS Club of Gahanna West Support group for stay-at-home moms. Gahannamoms@yahoo.com.

MOMS Club of Powell Support group for stay-athome moms. E-mail Stacie at powellmoms@yahoo.com.

MOMS Club of Hilliard Northeast A social and support group for stay-at-home and part-time working moms and their children. Playgroups, field trips and moms’ nights out. 9:45 a.m. on the first Thursday of the month at Scioto Ridge United Methodist Church, 4343 Dublin Rd. mchilliardnorth@yahoo.com.

MOMS Club of Sunbury A social and support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Meets for business the last Thursday of each month. Monthly activities include play dates, local outings, cooking club, book club and moms’ night out. Contact Amy at 740-513-6267, or sunburymomsclub@yahoo.com for more information.

MOMS Club of Hilliard-Northwest A social and support group for stay-at-home and moms working part time and their children. We offer playgroups, field trips, mom’s nights out and much more. A general business meeting with a speaker on a topic of relevance is held the first Monday of each month. For more information, email momsclubhilliardnorthwest@yahoo.com

MOMS Club of Westerville South Support group for stay-at-home moms. We have play groups, craft days, and a monthly moms’ night out. Meetings are at 10 a.m. on the last Thursday of each month at Grace Lutheran Church, 100 E. Schrock Rd., Westerville. Contact momswestervillesouth@yahoo.com for more information.

MOMS Club of Lewis Center Northeast A social and support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Activities include playgroups, moms’ night out, service projects and more. The original chapter has since split to accommodate the great number of stay-at-home moms in our area. We are actively seeking moms living within the designated boundaries east of S. Old State Rd., south of Lewis Center Rd., north of Orange Rd., and west of Africa Rd. For membership information, call Liz at 740-657-1473 or visit lewiscentermomsclubne.org. MOMS Club of Lewis Center Southeast A nonprofit support group for stay-at-home moms. Actively seeking new members who live south of Orange Rd., east of S. Old State Rd., and north of Lazelle Rd. For membership information contact Gail at Moms_Club_Membership@yahoo.com or lewiscentermomsclub.org.

MOMS Club of Dublin Central Support group for stay-at-home moms. 9:45 a.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Vineyard Church, 5400 Avery Rd. Contact Mandy Skinner at amandaskin- MOMS Club of New Albany Support group for ner2@gmail.com, or 614-940-9392. Or go to Geoc- stay-at-home moms. Contact ities.com/momsclubdublincentral NAMOMSclub@yahoo.com.

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MOMS Club of Northwest Columbus & Upper Arlington Support group for stay-at-home or part-time working moms. Meets on the second Wednesday of each month. Call 614-388-9410, or go to ColumbusMOMSClub.com.

MOMS Club of Worthington Support group for stay-at-home moms. Meets on the third Tuesday of the month atWorthington Presbyterian Church. E-mail prospectivemember@worthingtonmoms.org for more information. MOPS Dublin Fellowship support group for moms with newborns through kindergarten. The first Thursday of every month, meet at Radiant Life Church from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and the third Thursday is moms’ night out. For more information call Lindsay at 614-571-2995. MOPS Newark Fellowship and support group open to all moms with children ages birth-5. Meets at 9:30 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at First United Methodist Church, 88 N. Fifth St. Call 740-349-7020, or e-mail mops@firstumcnewark.org. MOPS Upper Arlington Lutheran Church A wonderful opportunity to meet other moms with young children. The group meets every first and third Tuesday at 9 a.m. at the Upper Arlington Lutheran Church, 2300 Lytham Rd. The cost per

meeting is $5 and childcare is $2 per child. For more information, call 614-451-3736. Mothers & More Chapter 51 Non-profit dedicated to improving the lives of mothers through support, education and advocacy. St. John’s Episcopal Church, 700 N. High St., Worthington. Call Janet at 614-888-4702, or email tsalmon11@yahoo.com. Mothers of Multiples East Columbus Support and social group for mothers of multiples. 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month. Church of the Redeemer United Methodist, 235 McNaughten Rd. Email: ECMom.org. Mothers of Preschoolers Meeting Join our MOPS group the first Tuesday of every month, September through May from 6-8:15 p.m. at the Beechwold Christian Church, 280 Morse Rd. Come for dinner, listen to a speaker and join a small discussion group to share your ideas, thoughts and experiences with other moms. Call Beechwold Christian Church at 614-888-1734, or visit gobcc.com for more information. Mothers Swapping Skills Group Online notice board helps bring moms together who would like to exchange skills and services such as cooking, tutoring, babysitting, cleaning, carpooling and coaching. Group is actively seeking women leaders for guidance. Register at Groups.google.com/group/mothersswappingskills. “My” Food-Allergy Support Group A group for parents of children dealing with life-threatening food allergies. We offer monthly meetings, occasional non-food family activities and a private email group for additional support, sharing of concerns, successes, coping strategies, resources and tools. E-mail Dena Friedel at dfriedel@insight.rr.com. New Moms’ Group An opportunity for new mothers and their babies to meet others and share information. Meets from 1-2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Elizabeth Blackwell Center, 3635 Olentangy River Rd., Columbus. Free. 614-5664446. Online Nanny Group An online group for Columbus-area nannies that helps to grow friendships and makes play dates. Go to groups.yahoo.com/group/ohionannies/. Perinatal Outreach & Encouragement (POEM, Inc.) We are moms who have survived prenatal or postpartum depression (PPD) so we understand like no one else can. POEM is the Ohio Coordinator of Postpartum Support International (PSI), the leading authority on perinatal mental health. For more information call 614315-8989 or poemonline.org.


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| April 2011 | columbusparent.com


Columbus Parent April 2011