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DISCOVER THE BEST NEWCOMERS TO THE DINING SCENE

OUR GUIDE TO THE TOP SHOPPING SPOTS IN THE REGION

FIND FRESH PRODUCE AND MORE AT LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS

PLUS

29

can’t-miss annual events

City Guide Discover the best local attractions, parks, dining, shopping and arts


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Contents CITY GUIDE 2020–2021

30

Features

62

NEIGHBORHOODS Columbus and its suburbs offer environs for every taste and age.

68

Explore

Shopping

Education

10 WATCH LIST

30 DISTRICTS

54 PRIVATE SCHOOLS

12 TOURS

32 UNWIND

59 COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Independent theaters with noteworthy offerings Explore the city on foot, on two or four wheels, or from the air

14 GET INVOLVED

WEEKENDER

Five Columbus notables describe their ideas of a perfect weekend in the city.

Local organizations that connect you to volunteer opportunities

16 COLUMBUS MAPS COLUMBUS City GUide

Discover the best newcomers to the Dining scene

our guiDe to the top shopping spots in the region

FinD Fresh proDuce anD more at local Farmers markets

plus

29

can’t-miss annual events

Columbus monthly’s Guide to Central ohio 2020–2021

ON THE COVER Juniper’s rooftop Photo by Tim Johnson

2

Sports 34 HOMETOWN TEAMS Local pro sports franchises

36 ATHLETES IN ACTION

Sporting events you won’t want to miss

20 GALLERIES

40 CAPITAL CUISINE

26 MUSIC

The best venues for live tunes

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Pamper yourself with these products.

Dining

Columbus as a comic-arts haven

2/19/20 2:33 PM

Where to shop for clothing, gifts, décor and more

Arts

24 AROUND TOWN

Discover the best local attractions, parks, dining, shopping and arts

C1_COVER_CG_2020.indd 1-2

A visual guide with transportation information

Franklinton vs. the Short North

City Guide

44

28 STAGE

Small-scale dance troupes

A guide to Central Ohio farmers markets

44 ALFRESCO

Kick back with a drink on these rooftops.

47 BEST BETS

Columbus Monthly’s best new restaurants

Independent and parochial programs

Higher education options

Resources 72 ANNUAL EVENTS

Festivals, holiday happenings and more

74 THE ROUNDUP

Attractions, arts organizations, food and drink options, health care, public schools, libraries and resident services

80 CAP CITY LOVE Insta-famous

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT, ROB HARDIN; BROOKE LAVALLEY; TIM JOHNSON

68


O COMING T H IN 2020 DUBLIN, O

RKET NORTH MA RK! BRIDGE PA

DMG INTERIM GENERAL MANAGER Alan Miller PUBLISHER/GENERAL MANAGER Ray Paprocki ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Rheta Gallagher

EDITORIAL

CITY GUIDE EDITOR Emma Frankart Henterly COLUMBUS MONTHLY EDITOR Dave Ghose FEATURED WRITERS Peter Tonguette, Rebecca Walters CONTRIBUTORS Heather Barr, Chris DeVille, Caleigh Harris, Heather Lofy, Brittany Moseley, Brooke Preston, Abernathy Miller Rinehart, Brittany Timmons INTERN Heather Barr

LOCAL.

FRESH.

AUTHENTIC.

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

PRODUCTION/DESIGN DIRECTOR Craig Rusnak ART DIRECTOR Alyse Pasternak ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Betsy Becker

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Sun-Mon 10am-5pm • Tue-Sat 9am-7pm (614)463-9664

EDITOR Julanne Hohbach ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR Brittany Moseley

PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO EDITOR Tim Johnson ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR Rob Hardin

ADVERTISING

ADVERTISING MANAGER Holly Gallucci ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Michelle Crossman, Tia Hardman, Kyle Nussbaum, Jackie Thiam DIGITAL SPECIALIST Steven Mace SALES ASSISTANT Samantha Belk

Race the fastest Karts on the largest indoor track in Central Ohio

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From the Editor

Contributors

Columbus, a City of Discovery changing—just look at the fabulous new restaurants that our sister publication, Columbus Monthly, highlighted in its annual roundup (Page 47). That’s what makes the unique challenge of creating a City Guide that serves both residents and visitors so fun. Whether this is your first visit to the Arch City or your 15th, or even if you’ve lived here your entire life, I bet there’s something new for you to discover in these pages. Regardless of your relationship to Columbus, I hope this issue of City Guide becomes a valued resource throughout your time here—or until next year’s edition comes out. I know it will be for me. Happy exploring!

Rebecca Walters

is a freelance writer. She wrote several stories for this issue, including one in which she interviewed five Columbus notables about their perfect weekends in the city (Page 68).

Heather Barr

is the editorial intern for Dispatch Magazines. A senior at Capital University, Heather diligently factchecked and edited pieces throughout this publication.

Emma Frankart Henterly Editor Brittany Moseley

is the assistant digital editor for Dispatch Magazines and a frequent contributor to our sister site, columbusalive.com. You can find her suggestions for live music venues on Page 26.

6

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT, TIM JOHNSON; COURTESY REBECCA WALTERS; ROB HARDIN; TIM JOHNSON

When you work for a city magazine, you learn a lot about the region you’re covering. I could navigate Easton with my eyes closed, make a restaurant recommendation for virtually any type of cuisine you could desire, or fill a book with my favorite local boutiques to find an assortment of treasures … and I’ve only lived in Columbus for 10 years, as of this summer. My husband, a lifelong resident of Central Ohio, often jokes that I know more about our city than he does. And yet, I find myself discovering new tidbits about Columbus on a regular basis. There’s always something new, surprising and exciting to explore, from indie movie theaters (Page 10) to Franklinton art galleries (Page 20) to rooftop bars that let you take in the whole city at once (Page 44). Case in point: Did you know that Columbus is something of a mecca for comic-arts fans? It’s true, and our story on Page 24 explains why. If the city’s lesser-known tidbits weren’t enough, Columbus also is constantly


PLAN A TRIP OF PREHISTORIC PROPORTIONS. Travel back in time some 228 million years ago and discover dinosaurs like never before. In collaboration with the prestigious American Museum of Natural History, this amazing interactive exhibition is proof that family fun is far from extinct – and close by at COSI in Columbus.

Get tickets at COSI.org. 333 West Broad Street, Columbus OH 43215


The Jeweler of the Short North 689 N. High St., Columbus, Ohio 43215 614-233-6666 | AlexandersColumbus.com


Explore WATCH LIST | TOURS | GET INVOLVED | MAPS | TRANSPORTATION

10 SETTLE IN

Where to catch the latest indie and art house films

PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSON

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

9


Explore WATCH LIST

Grandview Theater & Drafthouse

Screen Queens These theaters are the local grandes dames of independent and art house cinema. It’s OK to admit it, film fans: You’ve grown a little tired of Hollywood’s onslaught of remakes, reboots and movies set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Fortunately, moviegoers in search of more challenging or substantive fare can partake in the dizzying array of alternative film options to be found in Columbus. The Wexner Center for the Arts (1871 N. High St.), which has been presenting film programming since opening its Peter Eisenman-designed doors in 1989, is in many respects the epicenter of film culture in Columbus. In addition to presenting cutting-edge contemporary cinema, the center also hosts programs that take full measure of the history of the medium, including a 10

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

recent series centered on sex education films of the 1930s and ’40s and another on blockbusters made during the ’80s. Wex leaders bring not only films to the single-screen, 295-seat theater—which can show movies in digital, film and video formats—but also the artists who make them. The center has welcomed an impressive number of major-league directors through the decades—Jim Jarmusch, Martin Scorsese and John Waters among them—and has given its coveted Wexner Prize to more than a few important filmmakers, including Spike Lee. Upcoming events include a summerlong series celebrating the centennial of Italian master Federico Fellini, the director of La Strada and Variety Lights (July 9–Aug. 20).

Founded in its original incarnation in 2005, the Gateway Film Center (1550 N. High St.) is a comparatively new kid on the block, but in recent years, the venue has given the Wex a run for its money in terms of the sheer scope of its offerings. During any given week, documentaries, foreignlanguage films and movies with local connections might be screened alongside the latest blockbuster or art house sensation. One reason for the plethora of programming is the size of the Gateway: Its eight screens can handle both digital and several celluloid formats (including 35mm and 70mm). In the spring and summer, the theater will present Cinema Classics (a series of movies that no self-respecting film buff

PHOTO: COURTESY GRANDVIEW THEATER & DRAFTHOUSE

BY PETER TONGUETTE


CHILL OUT

In the heat of summer, the CAPA Summer Movie Series in the Ohio Theatre keeps it old-school cool. The series presents such oldies but goodies as Alfred Hitchcock thrillers, Frank Capra comedies and the occasional ’80s-era throwback. Each feature is preceded and followed by music emanating from the Mighty Morton Organ. This year’s edition, featuring an annual silent film presentation and the return of Fritz the Night Owl, will take place June 26–Aug. 16.

should miss), Saturday Morning Cartoons (a series featuring vintage cartoons for kids) and a trio of festivals, including Columbus Documentary Week (March 19–29). Gateway is also among the area theaters that will host the inaugural edition of Cinema Columbus (May 7–17), a new film festival sponsored by CAPA. The center also serves local Ohio drafts, and is home to the Torpedo Room cocktail bar and The Gallery at GFC, featuring artwork by Columbus artists. Among traditional movie houses, the Drexel Theatre (2254 E. Main St., Bexley) remains a reliable mainstay. The threescreen theater, which can present films digitally and using 35mm prints, can be counted on for booking the most acclaimed art house fare as well as the occasional blockbuster. The CAPA-managed theater with a new nonprofit status sticks to the tried and true when it comes to theater eats: Local beers are served, but traditional theater snacks—including popcorn that is notably buttery and dependably delicious— is available. Cinema Columbus will make a stop here as well. Owned by Eric Brembeck, the Grandview Theater & Drafthouse (1247 Grandview Ave., Grandview Heights) and Studio 35 Cinema & Drafthouse (3055 Indianola Ave.) have much in common. The two venues boast a full bar and eclectic eats, including Grandad’s Pizza at Grandview and a recently opened kitchen (featuring pizza, subs and salads) at Studio 35. One welcome change: In the past, both theaters were famous for having one screen apiece, but Studio 35 recently unveiled a new, 28-seat theater to go along with its main, 195-seat theater. Both have reclining seats—150 in Grandview, about half of which have tables for easy dining. Recurring events include monthly showings of the cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show at Studio 35 and assorted beer tastings at both venues. ◆

columbusalive.com the Arts the Eats the Community and more

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11


Explore TOURS

Immerse Yourself Tour companies offer an abundance of adventure. BY REBECCA WALTERS

Columbus City Adventures How much do you really know about Columbus’ past, present and future? Whether you’ve been here for 20 years or 20 minutes, get to know the city through Columbus City Adventures, which offers walking and bus tours of attractions, landmarks and historic neighborhoods. Get a glimpse of hidden gems on the Secret Columbus tour, explore Columbus’ robust arts scene, architecture and attractions on the Columbus Central City Tour, and hear stories of people—both famous and infamous—who have shaped the city on the Tales of the Arena District Walking Tour. Tours range from $18 to $47, with discounts available for children, fulltime students and seniors. 614-205-2964, columbuscityadventures.com Columbus Food Adventures Your taste buds are in for a treat with Columbus Food Adventures, which takes individuals and groups on culinary excursions 12

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Above, Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, a stop on the Columbus City Adventures Columbus Past, Present and Future tour; below, Columbus Food Adventures stops at Hoyo’s Kitchen during its Alt Eats Tour

PHOTOS: TOP, COURTESY COLUMBUS CITY ADVENTURES; BOTTOM, COURTESY COLUMBUS FOOD ADVENTURES

Whether you are a lifelong resident, recently relocated or just visiting Ohio’s capital city, there’s no better way to learn something new or get a feel for an area than by experiencing it firsthand. Columbus has plenty to explore and specialty tour companies abound, each offering its own take on what makes the city unique. Whatever your particular interest, there’s an adventure in store as you discover new cuisines, savor local beverages, fly through the trees and absorb the Arch City—its art, history, architecture, people and culture. The best part is that you can choose to venture out on your own or join a group of individuals who are also seeking a bit of adventure.


throughout the capital city. Tours include five to seven stops at different area eateries, where guests get to sample signature dishes and hear stories about the cuisines and establishments from an experienced guide. Any one of these tours is a must for foodies or anyone interested in expanding their palates. Tours range from Alt Eats, an ethnic food tour, to Meat Lovers to a Brunch Tour. Other themed tours focus on neighborhoods with a high concentration of restaurants, including the Short North and Grandview. Microbrewery and other adult beverageoriented tours are also available. Some tours offer vegetarian options if given advance notice. Pricing starts at $58 per person. 614440-3177, columbusfoodadventures.com

PHOTO: COURTESY GERMAN VILLAGE TOURS

SegAway Tours Glide your way around the city on a Segway i2 during a two-hour tour with SegAway Tours of Columbus. Choose from an Original City Tour or a River & Bridges Tour to learn about the city’s history and what makes it such a charming place to live and visit. As you make your way along the Scioto River with stops in

the Short North, Downtown and Arena District, your tour guide will educate and entertain with stories that will keep you rolling. Worried about staying upright? Don’t be. No experience is necessary, and training is provided. Weight, age and physical health guidelines apply. Tours are offered March 1 through Dec. 23 for $59 per person. 614-222-3005, segawaytoursofcolumbus.com German Village Tours By foot or by coach, explore the brick streets of historic German Village, an early 19thcentury urban neighborhood located just south of Downtown Columbus. History comes to life as you shop, dine and stroll through parks, learn about original inhabitants and take in the charming homes and commercial structures that have been restored over the years. Tours are guided by John Clark and Gail Stoy, two longtime German Village residents who are passionate about their neighborhood. All tours are private and can be customized to include an authentic German lunch or dinner, shopping and a private home tour, among

other options. Limited mobility tours are available as well.��������������������������� The fee for 60- to 90-minute customized walking tours starts at $15 per person with a $90 minimum. 614-6428687, germanvillagetours.com ZipZone Outdoor Adventures Soar from tree to tree with professionally trained guides for a tour you won’t forget. Located at Camp Mary Orton near the I-270 outerbelt, ZipZone has professionally guided zip line tours and a treetop obstacle course. Choose from a two-hour Canopy Tour, Zip Rush Tour or Night Flight Tour. The accompanying Adventure Park is a self-guided treetop obstacle course with a series of tree platforms connected by cables, bridges, ropes and zip lines featuring challenges of every kind and varying levels of difficulty. There’s also the Kids Park for the littlest adventurers, which is close the ground and designed for kids ages 4 to 7. Closed-toe shoes are required, and age and weight restrictions apply for certain courses. Rates start at $39 per person. 614847-9477, zipzonetours.com

German Village

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

13


Explore GET INVOLVED

Ease of Access Finding a charity to volunteer with can take time and effort; here are four organizations looking to change that. BY PETER TONGUETTE AND PHIL HESTON

Engaging Kids Clintonville resident Brandy Jemczura’s idea for a new volunteer organization sprang from her own frustration with a lack of suitable opportunities for her kids. Her solution: Seeds of Caring, which connects families

with volunteer experiences for children aged 2 to 12, who attend events in the company of a parent or other adult guardian. Through activities targeted to specific age groups, Seeds of Caring seeks to reach kids in terms they can comprehend. For example, participants under 5 might pack snacks to send to a shelter. “The youngest children … love anything that involves packing or going down an assembly line,” Jemczura says. “It keeps their little bodies engaged.” Jemczura hopes that service experiences will increase empathy—and she sees the evidence in her own children. “There was an instance of someone demonstrating a bit of road rage toward us one day,” Jemczura says. “My son was in the backseat and he goes, ‘Oh, wow. That person clearly did not go to Seeds of Caring when they were young.’ ” Learn more at seedsofcaring.org. High Impact For Matthew Goldstein, a passion for philanthropy began when he would spend weekend mornings volunteering for a suicide hotline. “Those hours on the hotline were some of my most fulfilling,” Goldstein says, describing a deep sense of connection to callers. Hoping others could find that same sense of connection, Goldstein eventu-

Columbus Gives Back volunteers sort clothing at Columbus Global Academy’s Student Success Store.

14

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Helping at a "Socktober" event sponsored by Seeds of Caring

ally began charting plans for a new kind of volunteer organization: Besa. The group now connects individuals with groups in need of assistance through event listings on Besa’s website. Jessica Schueren praises the way participants can choose their level of involvement. “As a working professional, I was also looking for flexibility, so I appreciated that I could volunteer once a quarter, once a month or once a week,” she says. Ease of signing up is the hook that draws in volunteers, but their continued participation is likely due to Besa’s emphasis on curating unique, high-impact service experiences, Goldstein says. Find Besa at givebesa.org. Tap to Volunteer As a teenager, Madison Mikhail Bush racked up almost 2,000 volunteer hours. As an adult, however, she struggled to locate volunteer opportunities—so she set about creating an app that would help volunteers find the local charities that need them. Point, which launched in April 2018, lets users select a cause that interests them to see a registry of related charities with volunteer opportunities. One of the app’s early adopters is the Alzheimer’s Association. “I love the interface; it is so easy to use,” says Jason Abady, the organization’s community engagement specialist. Mikhail Bush likes to envision a time when Point is as common as all the other apps on our phones. “Our goal is a deep cultural shift in the communities we are in,” she says. You can download Point from Apple’s App Store and Google Play or at pointapp.org. A version of this story first appeared in the 2020 issue of Columbus Monthly and Columbus CEO’s annual Giving supplement.

PHOTOS: DAN TRITTSCHUH

Making it Social In 2009, Juliana Hardymon placed a Craigslist ad to find some folks to volunteer with her. Ten people responded, and after they were done with their work at an area nonprofit, the gang went out to a bar to reflect on what they had accomplished. “That sort of birthed the concept of what we call a social twist,” says Caleb Miller, current president of Columbus Gives Back, the organization Hardymon launched in the wake of that first group experience. The combination of philanthropy and camaraderie has proven to be a winning one, especially among young, often single, professionals. Each week, Columbus Gives Back leaders contact their nonprofit partners to determine their needs. Events are posted on the group’s website; anyone—including newbies to Columbus Gives Back—is invited to sign up and show up. Find out more at columbusgivesback.org.


Explore MAP OF COLUMBUS

NORTHWEST

NORTHEAST

Dublin, Grandview Heights, Northwest Columbus, Powell, Upper Arlington and Worthington

Clintonville, Old North, Polaris, University District and Westerville

Columbus Area

EAST

Bexley, East Side, Gahanna, New Albany, Olde Towne East, Pickerington, Reynoldsburg and Whitehall

WEST

Hilliard, Hilltop and West Side

SOUTH

CENTRAL

Arena District, Brewery District, Downtown, German Village, Italian Village, Merion Village, Short North and Victorian Village

Getting Around Public Transit The Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) public transit operates throughout Franklin County. It boasts more than 300 buses traversing 48 routes, plus short wait times and amenities like real-time bus tracking, free onboard Wi-Fi and bike racks. Fares range from $2 to $2.75 for one-way trips, with daily, weekly and monthly passes available. Discounts are offered for seniors, individuals with disabilities, Medicare recipients and qualified veterans. 16

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Canal Winchester, Grove City, Groveport and South Side

BY REBECCA WALTERS

COTA’s AirConnect route runs daily between John Glenn Columbus International Airport, the Greater Columbus Convention Center and many Downtown hotels every half-hour from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. COTA’s free circulator, CBUS, travels between centercity neighborhoods every 10 to 15 minutes. The CMAX line makes limited stops, connecting Downtown Columbus passengers to the Polaris area in about an hour. cota.com

The Ohio Department of Transportation’s GoBus serves the entire state with five routes connecting 40 cities, including several in Central Ohio. GoBus is wheelchair accessible, and drivers are trained to assist those who need it. Pricing is based on distance traveled, with rates starting at $5. Children younger than 6 years old ride free. ridegobus.com Flying Central Ohio has two major airports: John Glenn Columbus International Airport and

Rickenbacker International Airport. Combined, the two offer nearly 160 daily departures to 48 destinations. Located on the East Side, John Glenn offers flights from Air Canada, Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta, Frontier, Southwest, Spirit, United and Vacation Express. Rickenbacker, situated on the South Side, is primarily a cargo hub, although Allegiant Air offers discount seasonal and year-round commercial flights. flycolumbus.com


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INGLIS AVE.

GOODALE PARK

LITTL

E AV

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REINHARD AVE.

JOYCE AVE.

ST. CLAIR AVE.

NATIONWIDE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

Key

Highway Exits Attractions Hospitals

LITTLE AVE.

33

OND R

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Cycling and Scooters Rent bikes via CoGo Bike Share, which has a network of nearly 600 bicycles at 72 stations across the city. Each 30-minute rental costs $2. Day passes offer unlimited 30-minute rides for 24 hours for $8; three-day passes are $18, and a $75 annual membership includes unlimited 30-minute trips. You can check your bike into a CoGo station every half-hour, or opt to pay for additional 30-minute increments at $2 each. cogobikeshare.com

CHAMPION AVE.

CLEVELAND AVE.

SYCAMORE ST.

SCHILLER PARK

RICHM

CHAMPION AVE.

S. FIFTH ST.

SYCAMORE ST.

German Village

70

AVE.

CHAMPION AVE.

N. FIFTH ST. N. FIFTH ST.

STON

Olde Towne East E. MAIN ST.

GRANT AVE.

WHITTIER ST.

KELTON HOUSE

PARSONS AVE.

S. HIGH ST. KOSSUTH ST.

FRANKLIN PARK CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS

LIBRARY

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E. AV ON

N VER

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E. FULTON ST.

BECK ST.

LINCOLN THEATRE

71

40

GRANT AVE.

S. FRONT ST.

ER

Brewery District

S. HIGH ST.

BROWN RD.

. DR ST RE

GREENLAWN AVE.

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AVE.

HARMON

WHITEHEAD RD.

SCIOTO AUDUBON METRO PARK

COLUMBUS MUSEUM OF ART

TOPIARY PARK

LIVINGSTON AVE.

LIVE

KING ARTS COMPLEX

THURBER HOUSE

FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY

E. MOUND ST.

LIBE

71

GRANT MEDICAL CENTER

MT

COLUMBUS COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN

COLUMBUS

E. RICH ST.

T. RTY S SHADOWBOX

COLUMBUS STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

OAK ST. METROPOLITAN

SOUTHERN THEATRE E. MAIN ST.

70 71

E.

MOUN

S. FRONT ST.

RYAN AV

D ST.

70

S. SHORT ST.

RY AVE. WOODBU E. BIAN AV COLUM AVE. NASHOBA

AVE.

AVE.

BELVIDERE

WREXHAM

E.

RD AV

SAFFO

SCI OT OR IV

315

E.

UNION AV

SCIO TO BL VD .

T AVE.

.

E. TOWN ST.

COLUMBUS COMMONS

SULLIVANT AVE.

SULLIVAN

N. THIRD ST.

E. STATE ST.

BICENTENNIAL PARK

W. RICH ST.

NA VE .

TEN ST

JAEGER ST.

D. NGTON BLV

OHIO STATEHOUSE

OHIO THEATRE

Franklinton

NAGH

E. BROAD ST.

MOHAWK AVE.

W. TOWN ST.

E. SPRING ST.

CITY HALL

PALACE SCIOTO THEATRE MILE OHIO JUDICIAL CENTER RIFFE CENTER

COSI BELLE ST.

MCDOWELL ST.

MOUNT CARMEL WEST

OD AVE.

GLENWO

GRUBB ST.

S AVE.

AVE.

COLUMBIAN AVE. NASHOBA AVE.

BELVIDERE AVE.

LECHNER AVE. WREXHAM AVE.

AVE. FAIRMONT AVE. FLORAL

ER SOUD

YALE CENTRAL

40

RODGER

E. RD AV GUILFO VE. ENS A STEV E. Z AV ULT SCH

AD ST.

W. BRO

40

CHESTNUT ST.

E. GAY ST.

NATIONAL VETERANS MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM W. BROAD ST.

D.

E. LONG ST.

S. THIRD ST.

McKINLEY AVE.

E BLV

S. FOURTH ST.

BATTELLE RIVERFRONT PARK

Discovery District O

MT. VERN

W. LONG ST.

CITY PARK AVE.

NORTH BANK PARK

ST.

WA SHI

670

.

Arena District

S. THIRD ST.

CONFLUENCE PARK

ING ST

ONG

NWID

N. HIGH ST.

W. L

NATIO

23

N. FRONT ST.

33

RIVER

NATIONWIDE ARENA

MARCONI BLVD.

33

W. SPR

NEIL A VE.

OLENTANGY RI

SCIOT O

VER

TWIN

D. LIN R

33

HUNTINGTON PARK

NORTH MARKET

VINE ST.

EXPRESS LIVE

GREATER COLUMBUS CONVENTION CENTER

WASHINGTON AVE.

DR.

DUB

RIVE RS

SPRUCE ST.

MAIN POST OFFICE

670

GOODALE BLVD.

315

PARK ST.

Downtown Columbus

CLEVELAND AVE.

COPELAND RD. GLADDEN RD.

OXLEY RD.

PALMER RD.

ITALIAN Short North VILLAGE Arts District

VE.

BURR AVE.

VICTORIAN VILLAGE

NEIL A

McCLAIN RD.

MULFORD AVE.

Cyclists also can opt for Lime’s limited fleet of dockless bikes, which can be found on OSU’s campus. Rides cost $1 to unlock and 15 cents per minute. Riders can locate and unlock bikes using a smartphone app. li.me Dockless e-bikes, which travel 80 to 100 miles on a single charge, can be rented through Trip Bikes (formerly Roam Bikes). The fat-tire bikes can be located and unlocked via a cell phone app and cost $1 to start, plus an additional 29 cents for each

DESHLER AVE.

minute of use. The company plans to launch 500 e-bikes in Columbus and another 200 in Dublin in spring 2020. roambikes.com Electric scooters can be rented through Lime, Spin or Bird, three companies offering a similar service and pricing—typically $1 to start and 7 to 30 cents per minute of use. Lime also offers LimePass, a $5 weekly pass that offers unlimited scooter unlocks. Scooters can be located and unlocked through each company’s respective app. li.me, bird.co, spin.app

Car- and Ride-shares If taxis aren’t your thing, Uber and Lyft both operate locally. Fares vary based on demand and driver availability. uber.com, lyft.com Zipcar, a car-share program with 10 locations from Old North Columbus to the Short North, has hourly rates ranging from $7 to $10. The membership fee—$7 per month or $70 per year— includes gas, insurance and the first 180 miles of travel per day. zipcar.com COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Arts GALLERIES | AROUND TOWN | MUSIC | STAGE

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GRACE IN MOTION

Smaller dance troupes, like the Columbus Modern Dance Co., complement the city’s larger organizations.

PHOTO BY MEEKS MEDIA

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Arts GALLERIES

A Tale of Two Arts Districts The Short North and Franklinton learn to share the spotlight as trendy, artistic neighborhoods.

Even if you don’t consider yourself an art aficionado, you probably know that the Columbus visual arts scene has long been centered in the Short North. For decades, the area has not only been home to top-flight restaurants and locally owned shops like no other, but also a smorgasbord of galleries. In recent years, though, the Franklinton neighborhood just west of Downtown has emerged as a competitor to the Short North when it comes to all things artsy. Two bustling . districts in one city? We think Columbus can handle both. Read on for a breakdown of the highlights to be found in each area. 20

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

SHORT NORTH Recently made part of the Columbus Museum of Art, the newly renamed Pizzuti Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art stands as the entry point for many gallerygoers in the Short North. Showcasing the treasures assembled by contemporary art collectors Ann and Ron Pizzuti, the venue offers regularly changing exhibits that have shined spotlights on everything from art created in Cuba to chairs that are as eye-popping as any painting (if not always functional). From April 21–26, the venue will be home to Opera Columbus and BalletMet, which will present “The Poppea Project,” a Baroque

opera that will unfold within the space and involve elements of audience participation. The Pizzuti Collection prides itself on being accessible, with $8 admission for adults, senior citizens, students and those age 4 and older; free admission for members, activeduty members of the military or veterans and those 3 and younger; and free admission for all on Sundays. Smaller galleries, however, remain the lifeblood of the Short North. Among the most notable in the area is Brandt-Roberts Galleries, which will present works by Georgia artist Kristy Hughes (June 6–28), New York artist Mark Reigelman (July 8–26)

PHOTO: MEGHAN RALSTON

BY PETER TONGUETTE


Subscribe to Subscribe or renew your annual subscription to Columbus Monthly for $18. Go to columbusmonthly.com or call 877-688-8009.

PHOTOS: COURTESY BRANDT-ROBERTS GALLERIES

Above, “Entropic” by Kristy Hughes; below, “God is Change” by Kristy Hughes, both on display this summer at Brandt-Roberts Galleries

and paintings of Ohio barns by Marianne Miller (Aug. 1–30). There’s also the outsider art-focused Lindsay Gallery, which will shine lights on tattoo artist Stoney St. Clair (April) and fabric sculpture artist Antoinette Savage (July); Hammond Harkins Galleries, which is set to present new works by Granville landscape painter Paul Hamilton (April 10–May 24); and Sherrie Gallerie, which will showcase jewelry by Sharon Meyer (May 9–30), outdoor sculptures and paintings by Russ Vogt (June–July) and mixed media works and installations by Ron Johnson (July–August). The artistically curious should consider partaking in the ever-popular Gallery Hop: On the first Saturday of each month, visitors can sample the district’s amazing group of galleries, along with street performers and shops that stay open late.

LAURA ALEXANDER

BARBARA FANT

STEPHANIE ROND

APRIL SUNAMI

WE MAKE COLUMBUS Learn about their stories and other Columbus artists, performances, exhibitions, concerts, public art and more at ColumbusMakesArt.com.

ColumbusMakesArt.com #artmakescbus

Additional support from: The Sol Morton and Dorothy Isaac, Rebecca J. Wickersham and Lewis K. Osborne funds at The Columbus Foundation. Photos: Laura Alexander and April Sunami by Chris Casella; Stephanie Rond by Meghan Ralston Design: Formation Studio

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

FRANKLINTON One of the stalwarts of Franklinton’s flourishing arts environment is the Second Sight Project. Formed eight years ago by artist Mona Gazala, programs supported by the project include artist residencies as well as neighborhoodwide endeavors, among them #AsSeenInFranklinton, in which photographers snapped shots of the community. The project recently wrapped up Saving the Crew that Matters, a combination “social-practice artwork/civic project” at the Urban Arts Center that asked why public dollars are applied to the building of a new stadium for the Columbus Crew when public school facilities need refurbishment.

PHOTOS: TOP, TIM JOHNSON; BOTTOM, COURTESY ROY G BIV GALLERY

“Blobby and Child” by Kena Ramirez Dillon at ROY G BIV Gallery


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Visitors can see and experience a wide range of art-making at The Vanderelli Room. Consisting of a 1,200-square-foot gallery and a stage space, the venue—named for founder Alicia Jean “A.J.” Vanderelli—makes itself available to a host of visual arts exhibits and performing arts groups. Recurring events that take place at The Vanderelli Room include classes for figure drawing and yoga, as well as an Alcoholics Anonymous-style meeting tailored toward the space’s uniquely art-centric environs. Like the Short North, Franklinton is also home to more traditional galleries, including three housed within 400 West Rich, a repurposed former manufacturing building that is utilized for a spectrum of creative endeavors. Inside the venue are the Promenade Gallery, Bridge Gallery and No. 2 Gallery (the last of which is curated by Vanderelli). Also of note is nearby ROY G BIV Gallery, whose focus on emerging artists is exemplified by upcoming exhibits featuring paintings and sculptures by Kena Ramirez Dillon and Wade Tullier (March 13–April 4), installation and video works by Amery Kessler and Lorena Molina (June 12–July 4) and installations by Justin Hodges and Tess Elliot (Nov. 13–Dec. 5). Franklinton has its own answer to the Short North’s Gallery Hop: On the second Friday of each month, Franklinton Fridays allows visitors to get a sense of the overall vibe of the neighborhood by hopscotching from one event to another. So, check out both districts and decide for yourself: When it comes to the arts, is the Short North still where it’s happening, or Franklinton? ◆

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Arts AROUND TOWN

Sketched Out Cartoon art in Columbus draws in fans near and far. BY PETER TONGUETTE

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Above, James Thurber’s “Dogs in the Blizzard;” below, “Pinky & Pepper Forever” by Ivy Atoms

speak while basking in the sun on the Thurber House lawn). Also of note is the presentation of the annual Thurber Prize for American Humor, which last year honored Saturday Night Live scribe Simon Rich for his essay collection “Hits and Misses.” What cartoonist wouldn’t dream of seeing her work hanging alongside the likes of, say, Edward Hopper or Pablo Picasso? Happily, the Columbus Museum of Art has gotten in on the cartoon act, too. In March, the museum concludes a major exhibit showcasing Thurber’s cartoons; and in April, wraps up a show featuring material created by car-

toonist Ivy Atoms during her 2019 Columbus Comics Residency. The cartoon-crazy among us have good reason to assume more comics-related fun in the years ahead. From Oct. 1–4, the annual Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC)—a supersized comics festival run by Bone cartoonist Smith—will return with a full complement of talks and panels, plus a cartoon marketplace to take place at the Downtown branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library. And, recognizing that most of us became familiar with comics while still in short pants, the lineup will also include the family-friendly Children’s Day. ◆

PHOTOS: TOP, COURTESY THE THURBER ESTATE, WITH PERMISSION FROM BARBARA HOGENSON AGENCY; BOTTOM, COURTESY IVY ATOMS

We all know that Columbus boasts a pair of professional orchestras, an eclectic and everexpanding restaurant scene and a certain sports team whose mascot is Brutus Buckeye. But did you also realize that the city was the birthplace of New Yorker cartoonist James Thurber, the current home of Bone creator Jeff Smith and the site of a cartoon library and museum like no other in the world? Yes, Columbus is positively mad for comics and cartoon art—a heritage that goes back to the days when a disproportionate number of major-league cartoonists hailed from Ohio, including such legends as Thurber, Milton Caniff and Billy Ireland, and continues to this very day. Columbus’ commitment to cartoon culture is exemplified by the presence of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum on the campus of Ohio State University. Located within the stately Sullivant Hall, the library and museum contains drawer upon drawer of original comic art available for study by scholars and amateurs alike. Named in acknowledgment of a former cartoonist with The Columbus Dispatch, the venue also is home to a museum with exhibits that have focused on everything from editorial cartoons commenting on the death penalty to the innovations of pioneering female cartoonist Barbara Shermund. Sure to make your inner Snoopy smile, upcoming exhibits include a survey of cartoon canines and a retrospective centered on the career of Pogo cartoonist Walt Kelly in Pogo for President: Walt Kelly and His Legacy (both June 13–Nov. 8). Thurber House, a residence-turned-museum that Thurber and his family once called home, must be counted as hallowed ground, too. Visitors can get a new perspective on Thurber’s stories and drawings by touring the house, which boasts a recreation of young Thurber’s room. On the surrounding grounds are life-size statues sculpted to resemble the cartoonist’s famous dogs. Lest anyone think that Thurber House is stuck in the past, the venue also celebrates contemporary literature with events like Evenings with Authors (in which prominent writers read from their work) and Summer Literary Picnics (in which attendees can listen to writers with Ohio links


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Arts MUSIC

For Those About to Rock Columbus has a venue to suit everyone’s musical taste, from punk rock to neo soul. BY BRITTANY MOSELEY

Our neighbors to the north might be known as the birthplace of rock ’n’ roll, but Columbus has a thriving and robust music scene. From dive bars and dance floors to arena rock venues and laundromats (yes, you read that right), Columbus does indeed have it all. The Old North neighborhood boasts six places to hear live music, all within walking distance of each other. Ace of Cups (2619 N. High St.) is a small-to-mid-size venue that plays host to punk rock and indie bands, including Caspian (April 19) and Torres (May 1). It also has a solid draft 26

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

beer list and the added bonus of Ray Ray’s Hog Pit food truck out back, which is open Thursdays through Sundays. Dick’s Den (2417 N. High St.) is a true Columbus classic—the one and only, you might say. It’s known as the place to go for jazz, but it also hosts a weekly bluegrass jam on Tuesdays. Spacebar (2590 N. High St.) regularly hosts punk rock karaoke and ’80s dance nights, as well as live music from underground rock bands. For a truly unique experience, head to Dirty Dungarees (2586 N. High St.), a

laundromat/bar/music venue. Wash your clothes, grab a pint and listen to music from bands you’ve likely never heard of. Rumba Café (2507 Summit St.) is a cozy bar that features artists usually heard on public radio, including Molly Tuttle (March 17) and Jill Andrews (June 14). Rambling House Music Bar (310 E. Hudson St.) is known for playing host to roots and Americana music, along with weekly bluegrass and old time jam nights. Order one of Rambling House’s small-batch craft sodas while you listen. Immediately to the south, the University District is home to Café Bourbon Street/ The Summit (2216 and 2210 Summit St.). Patrons can enjoy live music at these adjacent venues while sampling some dumplings from Pierogi Mountain, which has a home at Café Bourbon Street. Artists that draw larger audiences can be found at Newport Music Hall (1722 N. High St.), a historic venue that includes a little bit of

PHOTO: JOSHUA A. BICKEL

Elton John during his Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour at the Schottenstein Center


PHOTO: TOP, MADDIE SCHROEDER; BOTTOM, MEGHAN RALSTON

everything, music-wise, from Canadian rockers Theory of a Deadman (April 10) to pop-punk weirdo Yungblud (May 6) to rapper Tech N9ne (May 13). PromoWest Productions owns the Newport and three other music venues, which are all next door to each other in the Arena District. The Basement and A&R Music Bar (391 Neil Ave.) are smaller outposts catering to up-and-coming bands, while Express Live (405 Neil Ave.) draws in larger national acts including Band of Horses (March 25), Bad Religion (April 17) and Vampire Weekend (Sept. 23). Also in the Arena District is Nationwide Arena (200 W. Nationwide Blvd.). When the Blue Jackets aren’t playing, catch bands like Journey (July 10). Head to the Schottenstein Center (555 Borror Drive) on Ohio State’s campus for more big-name concerts, including Elton John (April 25) and The 1975 (May 19). Nearby Ohio Stadium hosts Buckeye Country Superfest (June 20), where Kenny Chesney, Florida Georgia Line, Kane Brown, Brett Young and Gabby Barrett will perform. The city’s newest spot for live music is Natalie’s Music Hall and Kitchen in the Fifth by Northwest neighborhood (945 King Ave.). Enjoy a sit-down dinner with your concert, whether it’s folk, blues or roots rock. The original Worthington location, Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza and Live Music (5601 North High St.), offers a similar atmosphere in a more intimate space. Three more venues to visit for live music are Big Room Bar (1036 S. Front St.), Skully’s Music-Diner (1151 N. High St.) and Woodlands Tavern (1200 W. Third Ave.). Besides hosting

Big Room Bar

a variety of dance nights—Emo night! 2000s indie night! Taylor Swift night!—Skully’s also brings in mid-size national acts including Reverend Horton Heat (March 31), Deafhaven (April 8) and AJJ (June 2). The bands that play Big Room Bar are also heard on CD102.5, the local alternative station that owns the bar; Citizen (March 22) and Beach Slang (April 11) are on the spring lineup. Woodlands Tavern is the place to go for bands that play a bit of everything: jam, reggae, country and more. Be sure to grab a bite to eat at Preston’s: A Burger Joint, which works out of Woodlands and has one of the best burgers in the city. ◆

Spacebar

THE CLASSICS

If you’re looking for classical, jazz or a bit of everything, turn to these three local organizations. CAPA was founded in 1962 to save the Ohio Theatre. Today the organization is responsible for bringing a variety of talent to the city, including Chicago (April 14) at the Palace Theatre (34 W. Broad St.), Tommy Emmanuel (April 23) at the Riffe Center’s Davidson Theatre (77 S. High St.) and Béla Fleck and the Flecktones (May 26) at the Southern Theatre (21 E. Main St.). From bagpipes to Beethoven, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra is the best bet for classical music. Bagpiper Cristina Pato performs “The Rite of Spring” (March 27–28) at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.). The Columbus Symphony Chamber Chorus will perform “Songs of Hope, Comfort and Love” (April 3) at First Congregational Church (444 E. Broad St.). The orchestra teams up with the Columbus Symphony Chorus for its season finale, “Beethoven at 250: The Ninth Symphony” (April 17–18), also at the Ohio. The Jazz Arts Group of Columbus showcases the genre’s best, from the wonderful Columbus Jazz Orchestra to international acts. The CJO will join trumpeter Tony Glausi and xylophonist Ian Finkel for “Speakeasy Hot Jazz” (March 12–15) and singer Ty Taylor for “Soul Time Machine: From Cab Calloway to Little Richard” (April 23–26), both at the Southern. Be sure to catch saxophonist Melissa Aldana (April 3) when she performs at the Lincoln Theatre (769 E. Long St.).

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Arts STAGE

All the World’s a Stage Small-scale dance troupes that are big on talent BY PETER TONGUETTE

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Columbus Modern Dance Co.

this past season, at a library and a beer tasting. Upcoming performances include the group’s annual, free Mother’s Day dance in Topiary Park (May 9–10). Conceived as the professional performing offshoot of Clintonville’s Flux + Flow Dance and Movement Center, the FluxFlow Dance Project—which describes its style as mixing dance with theatrical and visual-arts elements—counts just two “fixed members” in its ranks: co-founders (and internationally acclaimed dancers) Russell Lepley and Filippo Pelacchi. Each time the project develops a new show, other collaborators are invited to help create it. Last December, FluxFlow stepped into the spotlight for its first performance at the Wexner Center for the Arts with “Ursula.” This year, performances are scheduled for August and December. Like FluxFlow, Oyo Dance may not have the biggest roster—the company comprises four dancers—but it makes up for that in its inclusive movement style, drawing from ballet, ballroom, modern and West African dance traditions. Last fall, the company presented its inaugural holiday program, a multicultural performance titled “One Light.”

THE MAJOR PLAYERS

Burgeoning dance groups are great, but let’s not overlook the heavy-hitters in town. Led by artistic director Edwaard Liang, BalletMet has in recent seasons tested the versatility of its dancers, showcasing everything from classical masterpieces like “Giselle” and “Romeo and Juliet” to cutting-edge works such as “Cacti” and “Carmen.maquia,” and fans can always count on the annual presentation of “The Nutcracker.” Having recently changed its leadership, the Columbus Dance Theatre will enter its second full season run by recently hired artistic director Seth Wilson and executive director Jaime Kotrba Wilson. The company continues to perform original works by local choreographers, including the (married) Wilsons.

Coming up from the troupe are “Pinocchio” (May 1–2, Columbus Museum of Art) and “Parallel” (June 5–6, Columbus Performing Arts Center), which reflects the experiences of those fighting for LGBTQ rights. ◆

PHOTO: COURTESY COLUMBUS MODERN DANCE CO.

Several centuries ago, Shakespeare gave the following words to Hamlet: “The play’s the thing.” If the Bard of Avon could look around Columbus today, however, he might be tempted to rewrite that famous line as, “The dance’s the thing.” Since the turn of the millennium, numerous small and semiprofessional dance companies have sprung up in the capital city. The emerging dance troupes reflect a potpourri of styles as diverse as the city itself, including contemporary, jazz and modern. Under the lead of artistic director Melissa Gould, the contemporary jazz troupe New Vision Dance Co. is known for big and bold programming. Last year, the group—with a roster consisting of between 20 and 30 dancers—performed a full-length homage to the music of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. in “Come Dance with Me: A Tribute to the Rat Pack.” Performances this year will include the fifth edition of the annual program “Up Close and Personal” (March 13–14, Garden Theater), a concert featuring 10 years’ worth of dances created by Gould, “Retrospective III” (July 10–11, Garden Theater) and a tribute to the music of the 1980s, the appropriately titled “Like, Totally” (Oct. 10–11, Jeanne B. McCoy Center for the Arts). Xclaim Dance also derives inspiration from jazz, but artistic director Mariah Layne French is proud of her company’s diversity: Xclaim boasts nine dancers who bring with them a range of movement styles, spanning from classical to urban. On the heels of a season in which the company performed a pair of evening-length dances, the troupe will be seen for the first time in the new year in “Spirituals II” (April 17–18, Central Vineyard Church), which takes as its subject the way in which individuals can overcome injustice. Featuring a total of 13 university-trained dancers, Columbus Modern (CoMo) Dance Co. distinguishes itself in its collaborations with demanding contemporary choreographers from both within and outside of Central Ohio. The company spreads its wings at venues throughout Columbus, including,


Shopping DISTRICTS | UNWIND

30 WHERE TO SHOP

The region is home to a wealth of locally owned boutiques and shops. Here, Chelsea Cabot and Kristopher Konieczko pose in theirs, called Vernacular.

PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSON

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Shopping DISTRICTS

RH Columbus, The Gallery at Easton

From locally owned boutiques to national brands, you can find it all here. BY ABERNATHY MILLER RINEHART

Whether you’re hunting artisanal gifts, on the lookout for hard-to-find fashions, or have a serious case of mall madness, Columbus and its surrounding areas have a retail destination with just what you need. Here’s a look at the best spots to get your next dose of retail therapy. EASTON For an all-in-one shopping, dining and entertainment experience, head 15 minutes east of Downtown to Easton Town Center. With a mix of national brands and local gems, the complex is a destination for shoppers of all kinds. New to Easton is RH Columbus, The Gallery at Easton, Restoration Hardware’s 60,000-square-foot showroom offering high-end furniture and the swanky, yearround RH Rooftop Restaurant & Park, complete with a retractable atrium and crystal chandeliers. Contemporary fashion retailers Zara, Anthropologie and 7 For All Mankind have moved in alongside signature 30

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

stops like Nordstrom, Macy’s and the Legoland Discovery Center, an interactive experience with rides, workshops and more. For those interested in Ohio-born retailers, pop into Bink Davies for unique gifts, Red Giraffe Designs for handcrafted jewelry or Celebrate Local for Ohio-native décor, gourmet foods and beverages. Just east of Easton Town Center is Easton Gateway, where you’ll find outdoor retailers REI and Dick’s Sporting Goods, local décor store Elm & Iron and Saks Off 5th, among others. To the west of the complex, you’ll find discount retailers Marshall’s, HomeGoods and T.J. Maxx. POLARIS FASHION PLACE Nestled between Worthington and Westerville, Polaris Fashion Place is another premier shopping destination with a wide range of offerings. Inside, you’ll find department stores like Macy’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, Von Maur and JCPenney, as well as mall mainstays like

Abercrombie & Fitch, Express and Hollister Co. Peruse the latest gadgets at the Apple store, or head outside to browse Barnes & Noble, Destination Maternity and Forever 21 in the Polaris Lifestyle Center. For men’s and women’s fine clothing, Godfry’s is a must-stop. For fans of affordable Swedish design, the 354,000-square-foot Ikea store is just around the bend from Polaris Fashion Place, as are numerous furniture showrooms and décor retailers like Morris Home Furniture and Mattress, Ashley HomeStore and At Home. CLINTONVILLE For homegrown shops and quirky retailers, head to the enclave just north of Ohio State’s campus. Shop for one-of-a-kind estate jewelry at Village Jewel, funky consignment fashions at Rag-O-Rama or vintage home décor at Boomerang Room Vintage. Neighborhood craft supply store Wholly Craft and sister store Surprise Modern Party + Cocktail Goods have consolidated and reopened as Wild Cat Gift & Party, featuring quirky gifts, party favors, workshops and events. For handmade jewelry, indie brands, vintage gems and natural-made lipstick, swing by Dabl x The Tart Peach. DUBLIN Head west to historic Dublin and you’ll find ladies clothing at Boho 72 Boutique and Apricot Lane Boutique, all-natural skincare

PHOTO: FRED SQUILLANTE

Shopping Spree


OUTLET MALL SHOPPING

Some of the best deals are only a 15-minute jaunt to Delaware County, where you can go on a budget-conscious shopping spree at Tanger Outlets Columbus. Hitting all the outlet store favorites like Coach, kate spade new york, Vera Bradley, Michael Kors and The North Face can easily fill a Saturday. If a mini road trip sounds fun, head south on I-71 past Grove City to Tanger Outlets Jeffersonville, which has shops the other location does not, including Eddie Bauer, Bare + Beauty Bare Minerals, West Elm and Harry & David.

and customizable gifts from LaDrea, and eclectic paper goods, home accessories and artisanal jewelry at Bliss Life + Style. If you work up an appetite, stop by the Bridge Park development for sips and bites at one of its many restaurants.

PHOTO: FRED SQUILLANTE

GERMAN VILLAGE Just south of Downtown, German Village offers charming brick streets as well as a mix of quaint shops, restaurants and bars. Since the 1930s, Helen Winnemore’s has offered patrons a selection of handcrafted art, jewelry and décor. Find a unique experience at nonprofit consignment shop The Golden Hobby Shop, which carries items handmade by local senior citizens. The Red Stable offers jewelry, stationery and even German nutcrackers. For the house plant fanatic in your life, stop by Stump on Thurman Avenue to shop curated plants. If you’ve got an hour—or four—to kill, venture into The Book Loft. The German Village stalwart boasts 32 rooms of books for every type of bookworm. GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS To the west of Downtown is Grandview Heights. Take a trek down Grandview Avenue and you’ll find some of the neighborhood’s favorite boutiques. Stop in Thread to peruse stylish women’s clothing and accessories. For curated lifestyle goods, home décor and more, add Vernacular and Vernacular Home to your list of must-sees. Is there a kiddo with an elevated aesthetic in your life? Cub Shrub is the spot for chic children’s clothing. No trip to Grandview is complete without a stop to favorites like Krema Nut Co. (peanuts, nut butters, jams and other treats), Peabody Papers (stationery and gifts) and Relish House (home accents).

SHORT NORTH As one of the city’s premier arts and entertainment districts, the Short North is home to some of the region’s best shopping. Fashion-conscious women looking to bulk up their wardrobe with unique pieces can visit local gems Rowe, Ladybird, Clover on High and Vamp for style-forward clothing and accessories. If ethically-made and eco-friendly is what you’re after, Jolie Occasions and Small Talk Co. offer chic styles and accessories, while Global Gifts offers fair trade gifts and jewelry. For his and hers style that’s decidedly elevated, go to Artisan DeLuxe and Tigertree; indulge your inner sneakerhead at Sole Classics, or swipe limited edition styles from high-end cult brands like Comme Des Garçons, Highsnobiety and Stone Island at Madison-USA. For discerning guys with classic taste, the best bet is Samson Men’s Emporium, custom suiting at Pursuit or national menswear retailer Bonobos. Browsing for kitschy gifts, treats and vintage picks? Chunky Armadillo and Rocket Fizz Soda Pop & Candy Shop have you covered. For antiques and home accents, Mary Catherine’s Antiques and Happy Go Lucky Her and Happy Go Lucky Home are ideal. UPPER ARLINGTON Upper Arlington’s best shopping can be found in three areas: the Kingsdale shopping center, The Shops on Lane Avenue and The Mallway at Old Arlington. Kingsdale is home to men’s and women’s clothing store Jeffrey Thomas. Find vintage bridal and custom jewelry at Argo & Lehne Jewelers or shop Barnes & Noble, both nearby. Visit The Shops on Lane Avenue for Barclay Pipe & Tobacco and jewelry shop What

on Earth. You can also browse women’s apparel at locally owned Cheesecake Boutique or at national retailers Loft and White House Black Market. The Mallway at Old Arlington is home to more local spots. Browse the latest designer women’s clothing at Leál or find inner balance with personalized jewelry, essential oils and meditation beads at Bohindi. Get a birthday card for your best friend at Fresh Crafts Gallery or find the perfect book for your favorite tiny human at Cover to Cover. WESTERVILLE Handmade items ranging from furniture to onsies can be found in Uptown Westerville. Amish Originals has offered custom Amishmade furniture for 25 years. Get handcrafted artwork, clothing and candles at Pure Roots Boutique or screen-print original tees, dish towels, onsies and other goods at Megan Lee Designs. Edwin Loy Home, known for carrying Annie Sloan Chalk Paint and providing in-store demonstrations, also carries chic home accents. Find a treat for your favorite pup—or favorite pup lover—at Captivating Canines. WORTHINGTON Feeling creative? Head to Downtown Worthington for DIY experiences and unique gifts. Make a custom candle at The Candle Lab, create your own stationery at Igloo Letterpress or learn to DIY décor at an AR Workshop class. At Branch Line Leather Co., you can customize your own leather bag; Shift Studios shares shop space and sells handcrafted jewelry. Feeling fancy? Head to Denig Jewelers for designer jewelry and watches or Worthington Jewelers for estate jewelry, bridal and custom pieces. ◆

The Golden Hobby Gift Shop in German Village COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Shopping UNWIND

Retail Therapy Go ahead—indulge in some TLC (or CBD, if you want). BY REBECCA WALTERS

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Tiki Botanicals

Fashion Place (1500 Polaris Parkway), carries the Cup O’ Coffee face mask, with kaolin clay that deep-cleans and ground coffee that exfoliates. If your hands need a pick-meup, try Lush’s Golden Handshake Hot Hand Mask. Made of fresh cupuaçu and murumuru butters, it hydrates and nourishes. Self-care shouldn’t be complicated or take too long, but it should leave you feeling luxurious, which is the philosophy you’ll find at Tiki Botanicals in German Village (529 S. Third St.), owned by husband and wife Jim and Candyce Thieken. Their handcrafted products include soaps, bath bombs, shampoos, conditioners, beard care, lotions, cool candles and an array of other products that smell as good as they work. The mindset at Penzone Salons + Spas (six Central Ohio locations) when it comes to natural beauty? Self-care is not an option— it’s a necessity. As such, the brand promises patrons will leave feeling refreshed and rejuvenated, whether they are getting an edgy cut or other service. Some locations, like the newly reopened Polaris salon, even offer onsite yoga sessions, and all have a full array of luxe products for at-home self-care. CBD, a chemical extracted from the hemp plant, has been popping up in all kinds of products lately. It’s touted to help everything from sore muscles to better skin to more restful sleep. To learn more before you try CBD yourself, look to the professionals. Columbus-based Seventh Sense Botanical Therapy, which operates a storefront at Polaris, is all about essential oils and CBD. Its line includes lotions, creams,

balms and scrubs for the entire body. Find Seventh Sense products at its Polaris shop as well as other spas and salons around town, including Penzone. Kenneth’s Salons + Day Spas (10 Central Ohio locations) also carry a full line of CBDinfused products as part of its Chakra Skin line. Choose from the High Potency CBD Body Bar, CBD Gemstone Roller and Full Spectrum CBD Lotion, among others. Other spa experiences in Columbus abound. J Bentley Hair Studio and Day Spa (8882 Moreland St., Powell) offers a full array of head-to-toe treatments in a luxurious setting, as well as an extensive retail area. If you love the products the professionals use, purchase them here to take home. Men like to be pampered, too. The Art of Shaving at Polaris takes men’s grooming to the next level with elegant and sophisticated products that keep hair tidy between barber visits. Choose among the shop’s private label straight razors, electric shavers, brushes, creams, soaps and fragrances, as well as name-brand products. For a day spa experience, Modern Male (24 Darby St., Dublin) caters to male clientele with craft and import beer offerings, massage and skin care services and personal grooming. In a similar vein, Bates & Brown Barber Chair (5033 Olentangy River Road) evokes a men’s club of old, with a cozy fireplace, custom aromatherapy oils and a variety of personal grooming services. Both have retail areas with luxe products. With all of these great options, it’s hard to say no to making time for yourself. ◆

PHOTO: COURTESY TIKI BOTANICALS

Everyone deserves to be a little spoiled. A hot stone massage, followed by an invigorating facial and pretty mani-pedi, can brighten anyone’s day. But finding hours’ worth of “me time” isn’t always in the cards. Regardless of your time constraints, shops and spas in Central Ohio have a plethora of products and services that promise to pamper, soothe and reenergize. From invigorating bath bombs to luxurious lotions, take a look at what’s available and resolve to carve out some downtime for yourself. Everything at Glean in the Short North (815 N. High St.) is handmade by local artisans and shop owner Dawn McCombs, who creates her own bath and body products in small batches. With creative scents and interesting names, each one is made with all-natural ingredients. One of her top-selling items is the exfoliating soap made with Ohio wildflower honey, rosemary and strawberry seeds. A couple of years ago, McCombs expanded her store to include more products geared toward pampering and self-love/ self-care. A few of her favorites include fullmoon bath salts with quartz and amethyst crystals, an “I am enough” positive-affirmation cuff and personal journals for bolstering inner beauty. If you’re looking to upgrade or change your beauty routine, learn from the experts and try out products at Mukha in the Short North (980 N. High St.). With a color and skin care line created by Tim Maurer, Mukha products are 100-percent mineral-based and free of oil, alcohol, fragrance and talc. With a try-before-you-buy philosophy, Bluemercury inside Macy’s at Easton Town Center (4141 Easton Loop E) is big on free samples. In addition to oxygen facials, glycolic peels and microdermabrasion services, Bluemercury has two proprietary skin care and cosmetics brands. M-61 Powerful Skincare combines dermatologist-recommended and natural ingredients, and Lune+Aster Cosmetics is a vegan-based, paraben-free makeup. Both men and women are taking a fancy to facial masks these days. Whatever your skin type—dry, oily, sensitive or sagging— there’s a mask for it. Lush, also at Easton (3988 Easton Station C-112) and Polaris


Sports HOMETOWN TEAMS | ATHLETES IN ACTION

36 READY, SET, GO

Pelotonia and other events draw participants and spectators alike.

PHOTO BY KYLE ROBERTSON

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Sports HOMETOWN TEAMS

Columbus Blue Jackets

Local professional franchises give Columbusites something to cheer for. BY CHRIS DEVILLE

The Ohio State Buckeyes aren’t the only thriving athletic enterprise in Columbus. In recent years, this town has become a burgeoning pro sports market. The Blue Jackets have come into their own, the Crew is saved with a new stadium in the works, and the Clippers just won yet another championship. The Comets and Eagles are carrying the torch for women’s sports, while Columbus Futsal and a fledgling indoor football league—set to begin play in 2021—have swung in to help fill the gap left behind by a folded lacrosse team and an arena football reboot that never got off the ground. Here’s a look at six local franchises ranging from major league to grassroots. Columbus Blue Jackets The Blue Jackets’ arrival as a National Hockey League expansion team in 2000—and the 34

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Columbus Clippers Founded in 1977, the Clippers of the International League were a New York Yankees farm team for 26 years, which ferried an insane

list of stars through Columbus—including Derek Jeter, Mariano Rivera, Deion Sanders and Bernie Williams. In 2008, they began their current arrangement as a AAA affiliate for the Cleveland Indians, bringing stars like Grady Sizemore, Corey Kluber and Carlos Santana to town. Such firepower contributed to the Clippers’ 11 Governor’s Cup championships, most recently last fall’s three-game sweep of the Durham Bulls. They’ll defend their International League title from April through Labor Day, albeit without some stars like postseason hero Bradley Zimmer, who has been called back up to the Tribe. Manager: Tony Mansolino General Manager: Ken Schnacke Affiliation: International League West Colors: Navy, light blue, gray and white Mascots: Krash and Lou Seal Record last season: 81-59 Columbus Crew SC The Crew helped usher in Major League Soccer in 1996. The league’s first franchise to build a soccer-specific stadium will become the first to build a second stadium when an Arena District facility opens in 2021. In the shorter term, the 2020 campaign at Mapfre Stadium begins in March and extends

PHOTO: KYLE ROBERTSON

Go Pro

corresponding development of Nationwide Arena and the Arena District—was a significant milestone for Columbus. After underperforming for years, the Jackets have now made three straight postseason appearances and won their first playoff series in 2019 with a historic sweep of President’s Cup winners Tampa Bay. The 2019–2020 regular season continues until April, with potential for another postseason run through June. Despite some major offseason departures, a slow start and injuries to key players—including winger Cam Atkinson—plucky underdogs like the goalie tandem of Joonas Korpisalo and Elvis Merzlikins have been leading a charge back to the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Coach: John Tortorella General Manager: Jarmo Kekäläinen Captain: Nick Foligno Affiliation: NHL Eastern Conference Colors: “Union blue,” “goal red” and “capital silver” Mascot: Stinger Record this season: 30-19-12 (as of Feb. 19)


through early October, potentially followed by a month of playoffs. After missing the playoffs in 2019, Crew SC is hoping to bounce back from a season that felt like a comedown from the euphoria of an averted move to Austin. They’ll look for help from a round of new signings led by midfield maestro Lucas Zelarayán, who fetched a club-record $8 million transfer fee. Coach: Caleb Porter President: Tim Bezbatchenko Captain: TBD Affiliation: MLS Eastern Conference Colors: Black and gold Mascot: S.C., son of original mascot Crew Cat Record last season: 10-16-8

PHOTOS: TOP, COURTESY COLUMBUS EAGLES; BOTTOM, SAM SAM FAHMI/STUDIO 79, COURTESY COLUMBUS FUTSAL

Columbus Comets Columbus has had a full-contact women’s tackle football team for 17 years. From 2003 to 2008, the Comets (known as the Flames for its first season) played in the National Women’s Football Association. Since then, they’ve been part of the Women’s Football Alliance. The Comets were national runnersup in 2007 and 2010 and have kept up their winning ways, including in 2019. Grove City Christian School will host four Comets home games between April and June. Owner/Head Coach: Hank Patterson Captains: Amanda Herbst, Tijuana Justiniani, Nita Johnson, Dionna Jackson

base continues to expand rapidly, evidenced by record season ticket memberships for two years straight. Now playing home games at Capital University, the Eagles will look to rebound from a losing 2019 during its run of matches from April to July. Coach: Matt Ogden CEO: Mark Wise Captain: Ashley Gogolin Affiliation: WPSL Ohio Valley Conference Colors: Gold, black, purple, gray and white Record last season: 4-8-2 (3-6-2 in WPSL play)

Columbus Eagles

Affiliation: Women’s Football Alliance, National Conference Colors: Blue, black and white Record last season: 6-2 Columbus Eagles The Eagles clearly filled an unmet demand when they joined the Women’s Premier Soccer League, the world’s largest pro women’s soccer organization, in 2014. The team’s fan

Columbus Futsal Peruvian father and son Ignacio and Dante Garcia founded Columbus Futsal in 2006, establishing a local stronghold for the sport, a hardcourt variation on indoor soccer. A decade later, the organization was fielding a professional team competing in the National Futsal Premier League while also overseeing multiple rec leagues and a youth academy. The pro season runs through the end of April, with home games at Columbus Global Academy. Head Coach/Sporting Director/Co-owner: Dante Garcia President/Co-owner: Malissa Galiffo Garcia Captains: Zak Boggs, Gui Karaoglan, Braxton Snavely Affiliation: National Futsal Premier League Colors: Cyan, black and white Record: 3-3 (as of Feb. 19)

Columbus Futsal

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Sports ATHLETES IN ACTION

Mark Your Calendars Sporting events you won’t want to miss BY PETER TONGUETTE

Ohio Roller Derby March 21–June 27 Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave. ohiorollerderby.com Fifteen years after it was formed—and four years after it ditched its original name, the

Ohio Roller Girls—the two-team league continues to roll right along. Fans can watch the All-Stars deploy “jammers” to power past opposing players from the Gang Green (or vice versa). No matter which side you choose to root for, expect fast and furious action, not to mention creative nicknames for players, among them “Chainsaw” of the All-Stars and “Lara Del Rage” of the Gang Green. Home games take place at the Ohio Expo Center’s Ohio and Lausche buildings. OhioHealth Capital City Half-Marathon April 25 Throughout Columbus capitalcityhalfmarathon.com On your mark, get set ... and choose your race. In addition to a half-marathon that covers 13.1 miles—and meanders through German Village, Downtown, the Short North

and the Ohio State University campus—runners can participate in a quarter marathon (6.55 miles) and the Commit to Be Fit 5K (3.1 miles). The half-marathon and quartermarathon start at 8 a.m. and the 5K at 8:30 a.m., all at High and Town streets. The Memorial Tournament June 4–7 Muirfield Village Golf Club, 5750 Memorial Drive, Dublin thememorialtournament.com What golfer wouldn’t want to pay a visit to a course designed by Upper Arlingtonborn golf legend Jack Nicklaus? Countless do each year for the Memorial Tournament, which takes place at the Nicklausdesigned, 220-acre course at Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin. The Memorial was conceived in part as a tribute to great golfers of years gone by, but it’s just

The Memorial Tournament

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

PHOTO: ADAM CAIRNS

Long before Columbus was spoken of as a hot housing market, foodie destination or arts mecca, the city was considered a sports town—and with plenty of justification. Between the Blue Jackets, Crew SC and (of course) the various incarnations of the Buckeyes, Columbus can pat itself on the back for giving fans plenty to root for on the field, on the court or in assorted arenas. Yet there is more to Central Ohio athletics than just those famous teams. As you plan your extracurricular activities for 2020 and beyond, keep slots open for some of the events, athletes and activities listed below.


as notable for attracting the top talent of today’s golf scene. In an option sure to make any would-be Tiger Woods in your family happy, youths age 18 and younger can attend free of charge when accompanied by an adult with a ticket. Pelotonia Aug. 7–9 Throughout Central Ohio pelotonia.org When bikers ride in Pelotonia, they are not just building muscle, burning calories and working up a good, old-fashioned sweat. By setting fundraising goals to support riders’ various routes—say, the 25 miles from Columbus to Pickerington or the 100 miles from Columbus to Gambier—the event has raised over $208 million for cancer research since its formation more than a decade ago. In 2019, the numbers were as inspiring as ever: 7,484 riders participated, with final fundraising proceeds amounting to over $23 million.

PHOTOS: TOP, MADDIE SCHROEDER; BOTTOM, BROOKE LAVALLEY

All-American Quarter Horse Congress Sept. 29–Oct. 25 Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave. quarterhorsecongress.com You don’t have to be an equestrian to enjoy this horse show, which is touted as the world’s largest devoted to a single breed (with around 25,000 entries each year). If you think that number is impressive, consider the approximately 650,000 guests—that is, human guests—who attend the competition and related events on an annual basis. The Ohio Quarter Horse Association hosts the show. Nationwide Children’s Hospital Columbus Marathon and Half-Marathon Oct. 20 Throughout Columbus and surrounding suburbs columbusmarathon.com For its 41st installment, the capital city’s most famous marathon will offer more of the same: A full 26.2-mile marathon that begins at North Bank Park, makes its way past the Ohio Statehouse, through Bexley and German Village before veering north past Ohio Stadium, through Upper Arlington and Grandview Heights and into the Arena District—before ending up back where it started. The 13.1-mile half-marathon is only slightly less ambitious. The most important number, though, isn’t measured in miles: That would be the more than $8 million that has been raised for Nationwide Children’s Hospital, the marathon’s beneficiary for nine years.

Above, Nationwide Children’s Hospital Columbus Marathon; below, the Arnold Sports Festival

Arnold Sports Festival Late February/early March, 2021 Throughout Columbus arnoldsportsfestival.com Movie aficionados will always think of Arnold Schwarzenegger as the Terminator. Californians consider him to be, well, the Governator. Columbus, however, has a special way of looking at the Austrian bodybuilder-turned-

actor: Among the muscle-mad in Central Ohio, Schwarzenegger is known for his role in the Arnold Sports Festival, during which 22,000 athletes hailing from 80 nations do their best to measure up in scores of events. The fitness-conscious among us can learn about new equipment and gear at the Fitness Expo. The rest of us? Well, we can just stand back in admiration. COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Dining CAPITAL CUISINE | ALFRESCO | BEST BETS

44 MOVING ON UP

Libations and small plates just taste better with a view, as at Goodale Station.

PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSON

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Dining CAPITAL CUISINE

Where—and when—to find the best local produce and handmade goods in Central Ohio BY REBECCA WALTERS

From spring through fall and even in winter, the promise of fresh produce, homemade baked goods, jams, jellies and other locally created delights await at farmers markets across Central Ohio. While everyone has a favorite they like to frequent, you might be interested in checking out something new. To make it easy, here’s a rundown — in alphabetical order — of not-to-be-missed markets in the area. For more information on these and other markets, and to see when fruits and vegetables are in peak season, visit Grow Eat Ohio at groweatohio.com. Bexley Farmers Market Nestled along a closed-off, tree-lined street, Bexley Farmers Market features 20–25 ven40

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

dors selling fruits and vegetables, meat, baked goods, salsa, honey, prepared foods, fish, flowers, dog treats, coffee, jams and jellies. Listen to live music as you stroll along and try samples. bexleyfarmersmarket.org    Location: Dawson Avenue between East Main Street and Sherwood Road; adjacent parking Open: Thursdays, 4–7 p.m., May 21 through Oct. 29 Clintonville Farmers Market Averaging 50 vendors, Clintonville Farmers Market has vegetables, fruits, flowers, breads, jam, cheese, pasta, pickles, hummus, popsicles, salsa, doughnuts, eggs, meat, fish, honey, tea and coffee. Listen to live music and look for taste tests,

cookbook signings, compost and gardening demos and a children’s garden club. clintonvillefarmersmarket.org Open: Saturdays, 9 a.m. to noon, April 25– Nov. 21 orth High Street and West DuneLocation: N������������������������������� din Road; parking at Columbus Mennonite Church and along side streets The Dublin Market at Bridge Park The Dublin Market presents a solid mix of about 90 produce, baked goods, snacks, pet needs, clothing and retail vendors, and its location is unique as it’s surrounded by fun restaurants, bars and retail establishments in Dublin’s Bridge Park development. Each market features two acoustic artists, chil-

PHOTOS: COURTESY BEXLEY, NORTH MARKET, UPPER ARLINGTON AND WORTHINGTON FARMERS MARKETS

Farmers Market Fresh


dren’s activities and monthly fitness events. thedublinmarket.com Open: Saturdays, 9 a.m.–noon, May 2 through Sept. 26 Location: Dublin’s Bridge Park, along Longshore Street; three free-parking garages and street parking   Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Farmers’ Market Franklin Park Conservatory hosts a producer-only market with about 30 vendors selling produce, baked items, specialty foods, wines and artist-made crafts. In the 2020 season, the market is hoping to add meat, chicken and dairy products. High school students taking part in the Franklin Park Conservatory Teen Corps Summer Program harvest their produce on Wednesday morning and then sell at the market. Also look for kids’ craft activities, live music and food trucks. fpconservatory.org Open: First Wednesdays, 3:30–6:30 p.m., June–September Location: 1777 E. Broad St.; free on-site parking. Market Wednesday Market Wednesday in Uptown Westerville is a midweek mini-mart featuring seasonal, farm-fresh vegetables, herbs, fruits, honey, grass-fed beef, farm-raised tilapia and artisan prepared foods, including baked goods, jams, salsa, hot sauce, pasta and sauces, cheese and roasted coffee. marketwednesday.com Open: Wednesdays, 3–6 p.m., May-October Location: Northeast corner of North State and East Home streets; street parking and adjacent free lots throughout Uptown Westerville   New Albany Farmers Market Operating year-round, the New Albany market features locally grown produce and products from more than 45 vendors. Located in a beautiful setting with a family-friendly atmosphere, the market’s four rotating food trucks, live music and wine make this the go-to place no matter the season in New Albany. healthynewalbany.org Open: Outdoor market, Thursdays, 4–7 p.m., June–September; indoor market, first Saturdays, 9 a.m.–noon, November–March Location: Outdoor market, New Albany Market Square; indoor market, Philip Heit Center for Healthy New Albany, 150 W. Main St.; adjacent lot parking for both North Market Farmers’ Market The North Market is one of the oldest and largest in Central Ohio where customers can find fresh-picked produce from local farms. North Market also features handmade and COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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vintage items, fine arts and jewelry. Enjoy live music, children’s activities or even a beer, wine or cocktail as you shop. northmarket.com Open: Saturdays, 8 a.m.–noon, June–October Location: 59 Spruce St.; paid on-site parking, street meters and Vine Street Garage

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Upper Arlington Farmers Market The UA Farmers Market, in partnership with the City of Upper Arlington, has set the refresh button for the 2020 season with a new location and hours. With 20 to 25 vendors selling produce, baked goods, pickles, pasta, meat and eggs, the revamped market will have a larger selection of products, along with old favorites. Enjoy live music, a relaxed atmosphere and plenty of parking. getfreshmarkets.org Open: Wednesdays, 4–7 p.m., May 6–Sept. 30 Location: 2850 Tremont Road; parking at Tremont Pool lot and along side streets

Upper Arlington Farmers Market

PHOTO: COURTESY UPPER ARLINGTON FARMERS MARKET

Pearl Market With 30 to 40 vendors, Pearl Market connects Ohio-fresh produce, farm products and artisan-made goods with Downtown Columbus. Enjoy live music, produce samples and classes such as pot-your-own-succulents, paper crafts and yoga. Enjoy rotating food trucks and cooking demos on the last Friday of each month. pearlmarket.org Open: Tuesdays and Fridays, 10:30 a.m.– 2 p.m., May 22–Oct. 16 Location: Pearl and Gay streets; adjacent metered parking and paid lots


Westgate Farmers Market As the only Saturday market operating on the West Side, Westgate features 15 to 20 vendors selling fresh produce, meat, dairy and homemade foods. It also features health and fitness activities. This is a homegrown event, with neighbors who have turned hobbies into businesses, offering a unique shopping experience in the Hilltop. Enjoy live music and children’s activities as you shop. westgatefarmersmarket.com Open: First and third Saturdays, 9 a.m.– 1 p.m., June–October Location: 2925 W. Broad St.; on-site and adjacent parking Worthington Farmers Market Operating year-round, Worthington Farmers Market is one of the area’s largest, hosting up to 100 vendors during peak summer months. Find locally grown produce, humanely raised meat, eggs, cheese, artisan breads, baked goods, honey, maple syrup, coffee, tea, flowers, dog treats and scratchmade candy. Stroll about, take a yoga class, listen to live music and find children’s activities. worthingtonfarmersmarket.com Open: Saturdays; outdoor market 8 a.m.–noon, May–October; indoor market 9 a.m.–noon, November–April; closed on Market Day in September and the Saturday after Thanksgiving Location: Outdoors, along High Street in Old Worthington; indoors, 7227 N. High St.; free public and handicap-accessible parking at both locations

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Dining ALFRESCO

In High Places Sip, savor and take in the view at these rooftop watering holes. BY REBECCA WALTERS

There’s no shortage of places in Columbus to indulge in adult beverages, but sipping a cocktail or craft beer while taking in views of the skyline used to be an extravagance found only in larger, hipper cities. These days you can do both, as rooftop bars have become the place to go around town. Here are a dozen that have popped up as of late, as well as some oldies but goodies.

BrewDog Franklinton BrewDog inhabits an old auto mechanic’s shop and exudes an edgy, urban, industrial feel with high ceilings, a street-level patio and an impressive rooftop terrace and bar. With nearly 50 taps and a full menu, the Scottish brewer doesn’t disappoint. Its tried-andtrue headliner beers include the spiky, tropical and hoppy Punk IPA and the citrusy, zesty and bright Dead Pony Club, among others. From the kitchen, sample small bites, tacos, sandwiches and salads, and be sure to check out the cauliflower “wings.” 463 W. Town St., Franklinton, 614-908-3077, brewdog.com Callahan’s At one of Columbus’ original rooftop establishments, you can literally dance on the rooftop—or on any of its other levels. Get your groove on any day of the week or show up for nightly themes, such as college night and ladies’ night. Enjoy beer, wine and 44

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

BrewDog Franklinton

cocktails from the bar, and nosh on classic American appetizers, sandwiches, salads and pizza. 520 Park St., Short North, 614-223-1200, callahanscolumbus.com Goodale Station Located on the 12th floor of the new Canopy by Hilton Columbus Downtown Short North, Goodale Station is named after Dr. Lincoln Goodale, the first doctor of Columbus and one of the city’s founding fathers. “Goodale Station is elegant but comfortable and inviting, which offers the perfect backdrop for an evening out,” says Alan Assaf, CEO of Indus Hotels. “Design elements of the space tell the history of Dr. Goodale and his impact on Columbus.” The rooftop showcases two patios with fire pits and views of Downtown, while interior spaces and an expansive bar are located beneath a glass ceiling. The cocktail menu features classic and unique concoctions

Fancy Nancy cocktail at Goodale Station

PHOTOS: TOP, TIM JOHNSON; BOTTOM, COURTESY GOODALE STATION

Antiques on High Brought to you by Seventh Son Brewing Co., Antiques on High is so named for its location in a former antique mall. Its rooftop bar features exposed brick, a snazzy fireplace and covered seating for groups or intimate gatherings. The rooftop is partially exposed spring through fall and enclosed during winter. Antiques on High specializes in sour and wild beers, hazy IPAs, pale ales and some tantalizing cocktails, including the Doppelganger and Pinky Tuscadero. 714 S. High St., Brewery District, 614-725-2070, antiquesonhigh.com


PHOTO: CHRIS CASELLA/COURTESY CAMERON MITCHELL RESTAURANTS

such as the Loose Cannon and Fancy Nancy. 77 E. Nationwide Blvd., Downtown, 614-227-9400, goodalestation.com 

hood favorite thanks in part to its cozy second-story patio with exposed brick and great views. This place rocks with lots of live music, themed DJ nights and a huge selection of craft beers and fun cocktails. 944 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614-824-5602, littlerockbar.net

Juniper Perched atop the old Smith Bros. Hardware Co. building, Juniper is a sight to behold with more than 12,000 square feet of restaurant and event space. An express elevator transports guests to the top, where they’ll find an art-deco-meets-industrial vibe with a large fireplace, ample covered and open-air seating and spectacular views. A retractable roof and heated floor make for year-round use. The bar features gin-based cocktails, like the Tropical Knees or the 50/50, both of which start with Watershed gin. 580 N. Fourth St., Downtown, 614-464-3333, juniperrooftop.com Lincoln Social Rooftop Specifically designed as an urban rooftop lounge, Lincoln Social features a retractable roof and fire pit that make it great for viewing the skyline in any weather. Guests enjoy sweeping views with a beverage in hand and stay for a flavorful bite. Cocktails of note include the Hibiscus Mule and the B.R.B. “Lincoln Social is an energetic gathering place complete with a rose ivy wall to take

Mandrake One of the newest rooftop bars in the city is Mandrake, opening atop the new Moxy Columbus Short North hotel in early May. With a modern, sleek and swanky feel, Mandrake features craft cocktails inspired by history and flavors from around the world, an extensive wine/Champagne/sake list and a limited beer selection. Music is a mix of hits from the ’70s to today. 810 N. High St., Short North, mandrakerooftop.com Snowdrift cocktail at Lincoln Social

the perfect Instagram picture,” says spokesperson Katie Lundy. 711 N. High St., Short North, 614-300-9494, lincolnsocialrooftop.com Little Rock Bar Launched in summer 2017, Little Rock has one of the latest rooftop bars to hit Italian Village. It has quickly become a laid-back neighbor-

Novak’s Tavern & Patio Since the early 2000s, Novak’s third-story rooftop bar, which faces west and overlooks the Arena District, has been the perfect place to watch the sunset while sipping a Strawberry Press or Frozen Aperol Spritz. With a laid-back, contemporary atmosphere, the rooftop patio is open mid-April through November. Patrons can enjoy DJ music on weekends or the occasional acoustic night.

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Villa Nova Ristorante, Pizzeria & Bar

Serving great food for over 40 years!

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Open Daily at 11:00

5545 N. High St. Columbus

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A proven track record over 25 years 46

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

“Novak’s is kind of the underdog of rooftops, with all the new and impressive rooftop patios that have gone up the past few years, but I think people appreciate it for it being a staple for all these years,” says Greg Tishkoff, who co-owns Novak’s with Kathleen Summers and Eric Goodman. 475 N. High St., Short North, 614-224-8821, novakstavern.com Platform Beer Co. Platform expanded from Cleveland in 2016 when it opened its Downtown Columbus location, an industrial-chic taproom with a ground-floor patio and rooftop deck providing a great view of the city skyline. Head brewer Phil Blundred churns out experimental and barrel-aged beers at Platform, where you can choose from 100-plus tasting room offerings and a rotating selection of craft beers. 408 N. Sixth St., Downtown, 614-826-2285, platformbeer.co Seventh Son Brewing Co. An Italian Village staple, Seventh Son unveiled a rooftop patio in spring 2018. With a retract-

able glass roof and lots of long tables with benches, the added space is great for large gatherings. With an in-house brew operation, namesake craft beers include Humulous Nimbus Strong Pale Ale, The Scientist IPA and Stone Fort Oat Brown Ale. 1101 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614-421-2337, seventhsonbrewing.com Vaso If you’re looking for a rooftop bar in the ’burbs, then Vaso, perched atop the AC Hotel Columbus Dublin in the Bridge Park development, fits the bill. A glass elevator transports patrons to the eighth floor, where they’ll find a contemporary dining and bar area leading to the outdoor patio with another bar, a fire pit and spectacular views of the Scioto River and historic downtown Dublin. Inclement weather need not ruin a good time, thanks to the geodesic domed “igloos” available by reservation. Enjoy specialty cocktails, boutique wines, craft beers and small plates that can be shared. 6540 Riverside Drive, Dublin, 614698-2525, vasodublin.com

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP, TIM JOHNSON (3); RENDERING COURTESY MOXY COLUMBUS SHORT NORTH

Clockwise from top, Novak’s, Vaso, Seventh Son, a rendering of Mandrake


Dining BEST BETS

COLUMBUS MONTHLY

New to Know

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Best New Restaurants

BeST New reSTaUraNT S

Each February, Columbus Monthly publishes a list of the best restaurants to hit the scene in the previous year. While the original write-ups are mouth-wateringly enticing (find them at columbusmonthly.com), we created a short guide to help you start sampling sooner.

HOUSeHOLder aNd THe

COMPILED BY EMMA FRANKART HENTERLY

Ampersand Asian Supper Club 940 N. High St., Short North, 614-928-3333, ampersandasiansupperclub.com Traditional Asian dishes get a contemporary reimagining at this fusion-focused eatery that also serves up creative cocktails.

Nosh on High 149 S. High St., Downtown, 614-929-3373, noshonhigh.com Reinventing old favorites is the name of the game here, though care is given to honor to the dishes that inspired this restaurant’s inventive takes.

Del Mar SoCal Kitchen 705 N. High St., Short North, 614-300-9500, delmarcolumbus.com The latest from restaurateur Cameron Mitchell is seafood-centric, with inventive vegetarian and land-based options to boot.

The Old Spot 1097 W. First Ave., Grandview Heights, 614-914-8057 American-meets-British tavern fare—with serious carnivorous leanings—is the star at chef Rick Lopez’s latest venture, a collaboration with The Butcher and Grocer.

Gemüt Biergarten 734 Oak St., Olde Towne East, 614-725-1725, gemutbiergarten.com This hip spot honors Columbus’ German roots and offers modern takes on traditional dishes alongside steins of Germanstyle beers brewed in-house. Don’t miss the backyard beer garden.

Satori Ramen Bar 59 Spruce St., Short North, 614-914-8799, satoriramenbar.com Head to this North Market noodle bar for a comforting, authentic bowl of ramen in one of five varieties; vegetarian and gluten-free options are available.

Geordie’s Restaurant 1586 S. High St., Merion Village, 614-674-6004, geordiesrestaurant.com Filling a void in the city’s English pub-style dining scene, Geordie’s offers some American elements … but the menu is decidedly focused on classic British fare.

PHOTO: TIM JOHNSON

The Lox Bagel Shop 772 N. High St., Short North, 614-824-4005 Bagels? Yes, bagels. Featuring a recipe that blends New York City and Montreal traditions, the near-perfect carb-bombs here are topped with a slew of house-made ingredients.

Goodale Station 77 E. Nationwide Blvd., Downtown, 614-227-9400, goodalestation.com This rooftop restaurant sits atop the new Canopy by Hilton Columbus-Short North hotel and features a carefully crafted, smallbut-mighty menu of globally inspired cuisine.

Seigo Nishimura, founder and head chef of Satori Ramen Bar

feBrUarY 2020

Alqueria Farmhouse Kitchen 247 King Ave., Campus, 614-824-5579, alqueriacolumbus.com The complex yet approachable fare from two veteran chefs is the real star here, with familiar dishes given new twists and a fine selection of charcuterie and small plates.

February 2020

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Speck Italian Eatery is one of 15 newcomers on our list

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SeeSaw 906 N. High St., Short North, 614-502-0020, seesawcolumbus.com The much-anticipated establishment offers bar-food sharables and a selection of wood-fired entrées; the upstairs space serves as a nightclub. SOW Plated 1625 W. Lane Ave., Upper Arlington, 614-8260028, sowplated.com SOW stands for “sustainable, organic, wellness,” and that’s just what you’ll find on the California-influenced, farm-to-table menu here. Speck Italian Eatery 15 E. Winter St., Delaware, 740-417-4074, speckrestaurant.com Veritas owner Josh Dalton has opened a congenial Italian gem that’s well worth the drive. The daily menus perfectly honor the simplicity of Italian cuisine. Woodhouse Vegan Café 851 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614-390-2410 The mother-and-daughters team behind Woodhouse present plant-based junk and comfort food—call it stoner-casual—that even the staunchest of carnivores will love. Xi Xia Western Chinese Cuisine 1140 Kenny Centre Mall, Northwest Side, 614-670-7736, xixiawesterntogo.com Proving that some of the best hidden gems can be found in strip-mall environs, Xi Xia serves up Ningxia-style cuisine, with an emphasis on lamb dishes and house-made noodles. G.A. Benton, Nicholas Dekker and Erin Edwards contributed to this story. COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Restaurant Showcase SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT SECTION

101 Beer Kitchen

Alqueria Farmhouse Kitchen

Food & beer—and, more precisely, the pairing of the two—is at the core of what 101 Beer Kitchen is all about. Whether you start with our seasonal, chef-driven menu or your favorite beverage, we’ll help you find its perfect complement. Open seven days a week for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch! Check out our website or follow us on social media to see our cravable classic 101 dishes and exciting new creations for the season.

Chef-owned and -operated, Alqueria is a newcomer to the vibrant Columbus food scene. The first venture by local chefs Patrick Marker and Jacob Hough combines their passion for comfort food with Midwestern sensibilities. Located in the University District, Alqueria focuses on seasonally sourced, Ohio-produced foods combined with exciting world flavors. The refined rustic cuisine, an approachable wine list, local craft beer and craft cocktails lend to a relaxed dining experience.

7509 Sawmill Rd., Dublin 397 Stoneridge Lane, Gahanna 817 Polaris Pkwy., Westerville 101beerkitchen.com

Basi Italia

247 King Ave., Columbus 614-824-5579 alqueriacolumbus.com

ALQUERIA

farmhouse kitchen

G. Michael’s Bistro & Bar

Open for lunch Friday-Saturday seasonally Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

G. Michael’s is committed to serving local, seasonal food and to sourcing as much pork, beef, produce and dairy from Central Ohio growers and producers as possible. Our changing seasonal menu showcases Chef David Tetzloff’s brand of lowcountry cuisine, unique to Columbus. Located in historic German Village, G. Michael’s is committed to providing guests with consistently exceptional food, drink and service.

811 Highland St., Columbus 614-294-7383 basi-italia.com

595 S. Third St., Columbus 614-464-0575 gmichaelsbistro.com

Along an alley just on the edge of the Short North lies a hidden gem: Basi Italia. Simple, honest flavors are the core at Basi. Sit inside the cozy interior or outside on a warm, inviting terrace to share steaming plates of sumptuous food, visit with friends and drink good wine.


Restaurant Showcase SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT SECTION

High Bank Distillery Co.

Hofbräuhaus Columbus Brewery & Restaurant

High Bank Distillery is a micro-distillery featuring a full-service bar, restaurant and game area with elevated, casual food offerings, an emphasis on locally sourced ingredients and a balance of both indulgent and healthy options. High Bank also offers a distinguished craft cocktail menu that features both classic cocktails and our own in-house creations. If cocktails are not your thing, don’t worry—we have plenty of beer, wine and non-alcoholic options as well.

Hofbräuhaus Columbus is a place where family and friends can enjoy great biers, great food and fun times. It starts with a wide selection of traditional bier that’s brewed on-site and adheres to Germany’s strict purity law. The award-winning menu ranges from traditional German favorites to one of the best burgers around! The vibrant environment features authentically decorated rooms, live music and one of Columbus’ best outdoor biergartens—all just minutes from Downtown. We’re a great place for all types of group outings and events. No matter the occasion, THIS PLACE IS WUNDERBAR!

1051 Goodale Blvd., Columbus 614-826-5347 highbankco.com

800 Goodale Blvd., Columbus 614-294-2437 hofbrauhauscolumbus.com

Jeff Ruby’s Steakhouse, Columbus

Lindey’s

The nationally-acclaimed Jeff Ruby Experience is the unique combination of U.S.D.A. Prime steaks, the freshest seafood & sushi and absolutely impeccable service. Join us tonight and enjoy what Travel + Leisure, USAToday, Food Network, Wine Spectator and so many others consider to be one of the top fine dining experiences in the country. Cheers!

Featuring an award-winning patio and located in historic German Village, Lindey’s has been consistently voted one of Columbus’ top restaurants for the past 38 years, earning honors in 614 magazine reader’s polls from 2010-2016 and 2018 and in The Columbus Dispatch’s reader’s poll in 2017 and 2018. The fine-dining establishment has been featured in The Washington Post, USA Today, The New York Times, Gourmet magazine and the book “As the Tables Turn” by Sue Doody and Michael Rosen.

89 E. Nationwide Blvd., Columbus 614-686-7800 JeffRuby.com

169 E. Beck St., Columbus 614-228-4343 lindeys.com


Restaurant Showcase SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT SECTION

Lineage Brewing and Restaurant

Mac’s, a proper pub

Lineage is a Clintonville brewery and eatery offering an ever-changing variety of beer styles and a seasonal food menu. From our hand pies to our beer, everything is made from scratch with fresh ingredients. Enjoy it on our patio or just enjoy the open garage door during warm weather. Stay as long as you like in a relaxing atmosphere that focuses on community and conversation. Happy hour, 4-7 p.m. Tue-Fri, $1 off drinks and $2 off shareable apps; brunch, 11 a.m.2 p.m. Sat-Sun

Since 1988, Mac’s has been a comfortable place to land in the trendy Short North. It’s where friends catch up after a long day. Where Scotch and traditional spirits are revered. Where beer flows as freely as conversation. And where people know their way around a Scotch egg. Simply put, if you’re looking for a proper pub, it’s Mac’s.

693 N. High St., Columbus 614-221-6227 macsproperpub.com

2971 N. High St., Columbus 614-461-3622 lineagebrew.com

Min-Ga Korean Restaurant

The Old Mohawk

Hot stone-pot meals, bibimbop, grilled fish and other authentic and excellent Korean dishes are always served in a friendly setting at Min-Ga Korean Restaurant. Year after year voted one of Central Ohio’s best Korean restaurants. Conveniently located in Olentangy Square Shopping Center on Bethel Road, right off of OH-315. Open Sun-Thu, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m., and Fri-Sat, 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.

Experience a Columbus staple that has enlivened German Village since 1933. Enjoy our famous Turtle Soup, legendary Mother Mohawk sandwich and bratwursts from the renowned Carle’s of Bucyrus. A historical landmark steeped in Prohibition-era history that has been a neighborhood gathering place for over a century. A one-time speakeasy featuring spirits reminiscent of the past. Fine foods, timely tunes and familiar faces. Open Thurs-Sat, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. and Sun-Weds 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

800 Bethel Rd, Columbus 614-457-7331 mingakorean.com

819 Mohawk St., Columbus 614-444-7204 theoldmohawk.com

Korean Restaurant

A German Village Classic


Restaurant Showcase SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT SECTION

Pies & Pints

Portia’s Café

At Pies & Pints, we craft all of our signature dishes with the highest quality ingredients, sourced locally when possible and with sustainability and ethical treatment practices in mind. Our pies are hand-stretched and baked directly on the stone, which creates a crust that is both crisp and chewy. In addition to craft pizza, we offer garden fresh salads, oven-toasted sandwiches, award-winning wings, decedent desserts and more than 30 craft beers on tap. GET SOME! Open daily for lunch and dinner!

Nestled in Clintonville with an adjacent coffee shop, super-cozy Portia’s Café offers a wide variety of delicious, plant-based, made-from-scratch, hearty meals, wraps, soups, salads and desserts. We are dedicated to satisfying a variety of taste buds and providing the highest quality organic, local, gluten-free, whole foods and have many options for special diets. You’ll be amazed at what we can do, and our made-fresh daily creations will leave you feeling great! And visit our sister store, Portia’s Diner, at 3269 N. High St. for your breakfast and lunch comfort food fix, without the guilt!

4205 Weaverton Lane, Easton 614-478-7437 7227 N. High St., Worthington 614-885-7437 piesandpints.net

4428 Indianola Ave., Columbus 614-928-3252 portiascafe.com

Schmidt’s Sausage Haus Und Restaurant

Service Bar at Middle West Spirits

In the heart of historic German Village, the 5th generation of the Schmidt Family serves up their own family recipe sausages, desserts and of course, great German beers. Enjoy live polka music Wednesday through Saturday evenings. Come see why Schmidt’s is consistently voted the best place to take out-of-towners!

At the Service Bar, you’ll find dishes that are based on familiar favorites. We’ve elevated the flavors, but haven’t lost the sentiment. It’s food that feels rich without being fancy and innovative without being overdone. Chef Barua creates each item, influenced by a Midwestern upbringing and shaped by the bold flavors of his Bangladeshi roots that translate into inventive dishes for all to enjoy. Open 5-11 p.m. Wed-Thu, 5 p.m.-midnight Fri-Sun; closed Mon-Tue.

240 E. Kossuth St., Columbus 614-444-6808 schmidthaus.com

1230 Courtland Ave., Columbus 614-947-1231 servicebarcolumbus.com


Restaurant Showcase SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT SECTION

Starliner Diner

Texas de Brazil

Since beginning its operation in 1995, Starliner Diner has been a local favorite. Its eclectic menu and kitschy décor provide a unique dining alternative to chain restaurants. The Cuban-inspired menu includes American and Southwestern influences and features popular dishes such as Creole Macaroni and Huevos Rancheros. This one-of-a-kind restaurant is most often celebrated for its breakfast and has won several awards—including Best Breakfast in Columbus, Best Hangover Breakfast in Columbus and Best Diner in Columbus—as voted on by the readers of Columbus Monthly and Columbus Alive. Visit and see what everyone is talking about!

In southern Brazil, local cowboys—called gauchos— prepare legendary feasts in a tradition known as churrasco. They slow-roast meats over open flames, bringing them to each group’s table and carving them in a show of skill and festive offering. At Texas de Brazil, we continue this treasured tradition. Treat yourself to a wide array of chef-crafted salads, roasted vegetables, imported cheeses and charcuterie. Turn your card to green, and expert carvers generously serve you sizzling beef, lamb, pork, chicken and Brazilian sausage. Located in Easton Town Center.

4121 Main St., Hilliard 614-529-1198 starlinerdiner.com

4040 Easton Station, Ste. E 105, Columbus 614-472-4072 texasdebrazil.com

The Thurman Café

The Top Steak House

The Thurman Café has been a landmark in historic German Village since 1942. Regularly awarded “Best Burger” awards throughout Columbus, the famous Thurmanator burger also has been featured on Travel Channel’s Man vs. Food show. We deliver! Order online at skipthedishes.com. 183 Thurman Ave., Columbus 614-443-1570 Thurman To-Go 14950 E. Broad St., Pataskala 614-626-4067 thethurmancafe.com

Celebrating 65 years serving Columbus! Take a step back to a more indulgent time, when steaks were bigger, drinks were stronger and we all lived like Mad Men. The Top Steak House is a Columbus restaurant icon. We’ve been serving juicy charbroiled steaks, jumbo lobster tails, slowly roasted ribs, seafood and gin martinis since 1955. And we only get better with age.

2891 E. Main St., Columbus 614-231-8238 thetopsteakhouse.com


Education PRIVATE SCHOOLS | COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

59 GET SCHOOLED

There’s a higher ed program for every lifestyle and area of study, including many at Ohio State University.

PHOTO BY JO MCCULTY, COURTESY OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Education PRIVATE SCHOOLS

Columbus School for Girls

School Choice The area is home to dozens of private schools, including parochial and independent programs. BY BROOKE PRESTON

Bishop Hartley High School 1285 Zettler Rd., Columbus (Linwood); 614-2375421; bishop-hartley.org Affiliation: Catholic Grades: 9–12 Enrollment: 709 Average student-teacher ratio: 15-to-1 54

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Tuition: $9,700 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association Bishop Ready High School 707 Salisbury Rd., Columbus (West Side); 614-2765263; brhs.org Affiliation: Catholic Grades: 9–12 Enrollment: 500 Average student-teacher ratio: 20-to-1 Tuition: $10,000 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association Note: Information listed is from the 2018–19 school year. Bishop Watterson High School 99 E. Cooke Rd., Columbus (Clintonville); 614268-8671; bishopwatterson.com Affiliation: Catholic Grades: 9–12

Enrollment: 879 Average student-teacher ratio: 11-to-1 Tuition: $9,990–$11,440 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association Bridgeway Academy 2500 Medary Ave., Columbus (University District); 614-262-7520; bridgewayohio.org Grades: Pre-K–12 (ages 3–22) Enrollment: 200 Average student-teacher ratio: Range from 1-to-1 to 1-to-3 Tuition: $20,000–$35,000 Accreditation: Ohio Department of Education Autism Scholarship Provider Note: Serves students with special needs, including autism spectrum disorders. Clintonville Academy 3916 Indianola Ave., Columbus (Clintonville); 614267-4799; clintonvilleacademy.org

PHOTO: COURTESY COLUMBUS SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

Central Ohio parents have no shortage of choices when it comes to private schools, from institutions with religious affiliations or single-gender learning to independent, college-prep programs. Several schools are tailored to students with special needs. Our list features 34 of the area’s largest and most notable private schools that offer programs for kindergarten level and above. Information was provided by each school. Data shown is for the 2019–20 school year unless otherwise noted; annual tuition does not include fees, available scholarships or discounts.


Active learning fuels curiosity On our 231-acre campus, academics merge all modes of creativity — building and coding, drawing and sculpting, music-making and performing, exercising and playing. Students are guided by teachers who believe that children have the capacity to create new breakthroughs and discoveries every day. In our multidimensional learning community, self-expression builds self-esteem, inspiring children to take their curiosity further.

This is the Academy experience.

Young students throw and catch scarves while exploring high and low sounds in Music, Movement and Drama class with teacher Michelle Schroeder-Lowrey. Cultivating active minds by promoting active bodies is an essential tenet of learning at Columbus Academy.

Visit our campus! Contact our Admissions Team at admissions@columbusacademy.org or 614-509-2220.

Columbus Academy, 4300 Cherry Bottom Road, Gahanna, Ohio • Age 3–Grade 12, coeducational, independent


Education PRIVATE SCHOOLS Grades: Pre-K–8 Enrollment: 117 Average student-teacher ratio: 13-to-1 Tuition: $9,400 Accreditation: n/a

Columbus Jewish Day School 150 E. Granville Rd., New Albany; 614-939-5311; cjds.org Affiliation: Jewish Grades: K–6 (shifting to K–5 for 2020–21 academic year) Enrollment: 60 Average student-teacher ratio: 5-to-1 Tuition: $17,200 Accreditation: Independent Schools Association of the Central States Columbus Montessori Education Center 979 S. James Rd., Columbus (Eastmoor); 614-2313790; columbusmontessori.org Grades: Infant–6 Enrollment: 260 Average student-teacher ratio: 1-to-3.5 (infant/toddler); 9-to-1 (Children’s House); 22-to-1 (elementary) Tuition: $3,540–$9,940 Accreditation: National Association for the Education of Young Children; Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education Columbus School for Girls 65 S. Drexel Ave., Bexley; 614-252-0781; columbusschoolforgirls.org Grades: Pre-K–12 Enrollment: 540 Average student-teacher ratio: 8-to-1 Tuition: $14,470–$27,890 Accreditation: Independent Schools Association of the Central States Note: All-girls school Columbus Torah Academy 181 Noe Bixby Rd., Columbus (East Side); 614-8640299; torahacademy.org Affiliation: Jewish Grades: K–12 Enrollment: 213 Average student-teacher ratio: 11-to-1 (lower 56

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Columbus Academy

school); 8-to-1 (upper school) Tuition: $11,805–$19,639 Accreditation: Independent Schools Association of the Central States Cristo Rey Columbus High School 400 E. Town St., Columbus (Downtown); 614-2239261; cristoreycolumbus.org Affiliation: Catholic Grades: 9–12 Enrollment: 386 Average student-teacher ratio: 14-to-1 Tuition: $250–$2,500 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association Delaware Christian School 45 Belle Ave., Delaware; 740-363-8425; dcschool.org Affiliation: Christian Grades: Pre-K–12 Enrollment: 328 Average student-teacher ratio: 24-to-1 Tuition: $1,806–$6,830 Accreditation: n/a Gahanna Christian Academy 817 N. Hamilton Rd., Gahanna; 614-471-9270; gahannachristianacademy.com Affiliation: One Church Grades: Infant–8 Enrollment: 154 (K–8 only) Average student-teacher ratio: 19-to-1 (K–8 only) Tuition: $5,500–$9,000 Accreditation: n/a Genoa Christian Academy 7562 Lewis Center Rd., Westerville; 740-965-5433; genoachristianacademy.org Affiliation: Genoa Baptist Church Grades: Pre-K–12 Enrollment: 380

Average student-teacher ratio: 9-to-1 Tuition: $5,152–$7,613 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International Note: Tuition listed is for the 2020–21 school year. Grace Christian School 7510 E. Broad St., Blacklick; 614-861-0724; gcsblacklick.org Affiliation: East Side Grace Brethren Grades: Pre-K–8 Enrollment: 380 Average student-teacher ratio: 21-to-1 Tuition: $2,856–$5,900 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International Note: Tuition listed is for the 2020–21 school year. Grove City Christian School 4750 Hoover Rd., Grove City; 614-875-3000; grovecitychristian.org Affiliation: Church of the Nazarene Grades: Discovery K–12 Enrollment: 661 Average student-teacher ratio: would not disclose Tuition: $5,400–$6,400 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International; Cognia Note: Tuition listed is from the 2018–19 school year. Harvest Preparatory School 4595 Gender Rd., Canal Winchester; 614-382-1111; harvestprep.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Christian Grades: Pre-K–12 Enrollment: 680 Average student-teacher ratio: 15-to-1 Tuition: $4,100–$6,700 Accreditation: n/a

PHOTO: CYNTHIA WILSON

Columbus Academy 4300 Cherry Bottom Rd., Gahanna; 614-475-2311; columbusacademy.org Grades: Preschool–12 Enrollment: 1,149 Average student-teacher ratio: 7-to-1 (lower school); 17-to-1 (middle school); 14-to-1 (upper school) Tuition: $12,000–$28,700 Accreditation: Independent Schools Association of the Central States


Liberty Christian Academy 10447 Refugee Rd., Pataskala; 740-964-2211; libertychristianacademy.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Christian Grades: Preschool–12 Enrollment: 400 Average student-teacher ratio: 14-to-1 Tuition: $5,100–$5,600 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International Madison Christian School 3565 Bixby Rd., Groveport; 614-497-3456; mcseaglesoh.org Affiliation: Madison Christian Church Grades: Preschool–12 Enrollment: 545 Average student-teacher ratio: 15-to-1 Tuition: $5,400–$6,725 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International Marburn Academy 9555 Johnstown Rd., New Albany; 614-433-0822; marburnacademy.org Grades: 1–12 Enrollment: 300 Average student-teacher ratio: 8-to-1 (lower and middle schools); 16-to-1 (high school) Tuition: $28,370–$29,830 Accreditation: Independent Schools Association of the Central States Note: Serves students with special needs, including dyslexia and ADHD Northside Christian School 2655 Schrock Rd., Westerville; 614-882-1493; ncslions.org Affiliation: Calvary Bible Church Grades: Pre-K–12 Enrollment: 182 Average student-teacher ratio: 9-to-1 Tuition: $2,810–$6,900 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International Oakstone Academy 900 Club Dr., Westerville; 614-899-2838; ccde.org Grades: Pre-K–12 Enrollment: 568 Average student-teacher ratio: 8-to-1 (elementary); 14-to-1 (high school) Tuition: $1,350–$2,100 Accreditation: Ohio Department of Education Autism Scholarship Provider Note: Serves students with autism spectrum disorders alongside typically developing peers Note: Enrollment, student-teacher ratio and tuition are from the 2018–19 school year. COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Education PRIVATE SCHOOLS

St. Brendan School 4475 Dublin Rd., Hilliard; 614-876-6132; stbrendans.net/school Affiliation: Catholic Grades: K–8 Enrollment: 465 Average student-teacher ratio: 25-to-1 Tuition: $3,100–$5,950 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association St. Brigid of Kildare School 7175 Avery Rd., Dublin; 614-718-5825; stbrigidofkildare.com Affiliation: Catholic Grades: Preschool–8 Enrollment: 650 Average student-teacher ratio: 12-to-1 (kindergarten); 14-to-1 (1–8) Tuition: $1,900–$7,100 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association St. Charles Preparatory School 2010 E. Broad St., Columbus (Near East Side); 614252-6714; stcharlesprep.org Affiliation: Catholic Grades: 9–12 Enrollment: 571

Average student-teacher ratio: 14-to-1 Tuition: $10,295–$10,625 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association Note: All-boys school St. Francis DeSales High School 4212 Karl Rd., North Side; 614-267-7808; sfdsstallions.org Affiliation: Catholic Grades: 9–12 Enrollment: 875 Average student-teacher ratio: 17-to-1 Tuition: $9,825–$10,375 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association St. Joseph Montessori School 933 Hamlet St., Italian Village; 614-291-8601; sjms.net Affiliation: Catholic Grades: Pre-K–8 Enrollment: 216 Average student-teacher ratio: 12-to-1 Tuition: $11,400 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association St. Matthew Catholic School 795 Havens Corners Rd., Gahanna; 614-471-4930; cdstmatthew.org Affiliation: Catholic Grades: Pre-K–8 Enrollment: 600 Average student-teacher ratio: would not disclose Tuition: $3,800–$5,850 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association St. Michael School 64 E. Selby Rd., Worthington; 614-885-3149; stmichaelworthington.org

St. Francis DeSales High School

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Affiliation: Catholic Grades: Pre-K–8 Enrollment: 375 Average student-teacher ratio: 17-to-1 (kindergarten); 22-to-1 (1–8) Tuition: $6,712 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association Note: Enrollment and tuition are from the 2018–19 school year. Tree of Life Christian Schools 2141 Indianola Ave., Columbus (University District); 614-299-4906 2900 Martin Rd., Dublin; 614-792-2671 935 Northridge Rd., Columbus (North Linden); 614-263-2688; tolcs.org 2150 E. Powell Rd., Columbus (Polaris); 614-4316888; pcalions.com (formerly Polaris Christian Academy) Affiliation: Nondenominational Christian Grades: Preschool–12 (varies by location) Enrollment: 626 across all campuses Average student-teacher ratio: varies by location Tuition: $1,910–$9,105 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International; Cognia The Wellington School 3650 Reed Rd., Columbus (Northwest); 614-4577883; wellington.org Grades: Pre-K–12 Enrollment: 651 Average student-teacher ratio: 8-to-1 Tuition: $12,500–$25,900 Accreditation: Independent Schools Association of the Central States Welsh Hills School 2610 Newark-Granville Rd., Granville; 740-5222020; welshhills.org Grades: Infant–12 Enrollment: 116 Average student-teacher ratio: 8-to-1 Tuition: $9,975–$12,000 Accreditation: Independent Schools Association of the Central States Worthington Christian Schools 6675 Worthington Galena Rd., Worthington; 614431-8215; worthingtonchristian.com Affiliation: Grace Brethren Church of Columbus Grades: K–12 Enrollment: 930 Average student-teacher ratio: 14-to-1 Tuition: $4,699–$11,205 Accreditation: Association of Christian Schools International; Cognia

PHOTO: COURTESY ST. FRANCIS DESALES HIGH SCHOOL

St. Andrew School 4081 Reed Rd., Columbus (Northwest); 614-4511626; standrewschool.com Affiliation: Catholic Grades: Preschool–8 Enrollment: 435 Average student-teacher ratio: would not disclose Tuition: $775–$6,500 Accreditation: Ohio Catholic Schools Accrediting Association Note: Enrollment is from the 2018–19 school year.


Education COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Columbus State Community College

Degrees, Granted Postsecondary options run the gamut from two-year technical schools to doctoral programs. BY BRITT TIMMONS

Higher education opens minds to big ideas and opens doors to better lives. Central Ohio is rich with opportunities for those looking to head off to college for the first time—or the second or third. Information listed is for the 2019–2020 school year; tuition rates are for in-state undergraduate students and do not include fees or room and board, unless otherwise noted.

PHOTO: COURTESY COLUMBUS STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Public

Central Ohio Technical College 1179 University Dr., Newark; 740-366-9494; cotc.edu Founded: 1971 Enrollment: 3,471 Tuition: $2,328/semester; $194/credit hour Central Ohio Technical College has four campuses—Newark, Pataskala, Coshocton and Mount Vernon—and online classes. It offers associate degrees and certificates in more than 50 programs, including business and information technology, engineering technology, public services and safety, and health care, as well as associate of science and associate of arts transfer degrees. Columbus State Community College 550 E. Spring St., Downtown; 614-287-5353; cscc.edu Founded: 1963 Enrollment: 45,000 Tuition: $4,738/year; $158/credit hour

Columbus State Community College, a twoyear institution, is located in Downtown’s Discovery District, with another campus in Delaware County and learning centers in southwest Columbus, Dublin, Grove City, Reynoldsburg and Westerville. A student can earn an associate degree in arts, science or applied science in a multitude of areas, plus many more certificates. The $33 million Mitchell Hall for the culinary arts and hospitality management department opened in fall 2019. It features a professionally managed, student-staffed restaurant and bar, along with a retail café and bakery. Ohio State University 281 W. Lane Ave., University District; 614-2926446; osu.edu Founded: 1870 Enrollment: 61,391 (Columbus campus only) Tuition (including basic fees): $11,084/year; graduate school, $12,425/year Ohio State University, Ohio’s land-grant university, occupies more than 1,600 acres north of Downtown Columbus and has the third-highest student enrollment in the country. It offers more than 200 undergraduate majors, 171 master’s degrees, 113 doctoral programs and nine professional programs. According to the university, it has the most comprehensive health-sciences

institution in the nation: a top-rated academic medical center with a premier cancer hospital and research center, along with colleges of dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, public health and veterinary medicine—all on a single campus. Ohio University 6805 Bobcat Way, Dublin; 614-793-5634; 12933 Stonecreek Dr. NW, Pickerington; 740-654-6711; ohio.edu Founded: 1804 (Athens campus) Enrollment: Dublin Integrated Education Center, 380; Pickerington Center, 96 Tuition: Pickerington, $5,674/year; medical school, $37,620 The home of Ohio University is in Athens, about 70 miles southeast of Columbus, but it has expanded its reach into Central Ohio. Several years ago, OU opened a Dublin campus for its Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, and that location now also houses the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs and some programs from the colleges of business, fine arts, and health sciences and professions. The Pickerington Center, part of the university’s regional campus in Lancaster, allows students to take general courses and then finish their degree online or at the Lancaster or Athens campuses. COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Education COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Columbus College of Art & Design 60 Cleveland Ave., Downtown; 614-224-9101; ccad.edu Founded: 1879 Enrollment: 1,093 Tuition: $35,880/year CCAD, located in the Discovery District, was ranked the No. 1 illustration school in the Midwest by Animation Career Review in 2019, and Fashionista listed the college among the top 25 fashion design schools in the world for the same year. Students can concentrate in one of 12 areas while earning their bachelor of fine arts, including comics, animation and film. CCAD also offers two master’s degrees. Denison University 100 W. College St., Granville; 740-587-6276; denison.edu Founded: 1831 Enrollment: about 2,300 (undergraduate) Tuition: $52,620/year Denison University, in the quaint town of Granville east of Columbus, is ranked No. 43 among the nation’s best liberal arts colleges by U.S. News & World Report. It offers 53 academic programs, including data analytics and global commerce, and four preprofessional programs. About 80 percent of the student body engages in some form of international learning. DeVry University 1350 Alum Creek Dr., Berwick; 614-253-7291; devry.edu Founded: 1931 Enrollment: 1,500 (includes campuses in Columbus, Cincinnati and Cleveland) Tuition: starting at $514/credit hour With more than 45 locations across the nation, DeVry is known for providing busy people with a practical pathway to a career through such areas of study as accounting, business, liberal 60

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

CCAD

arts, health care, media arts and technology. The school offers four types of certification programs, five associate degrees, 17 bachelor’s degrees and eight master’s programs. Franklin University 201 S. Grant Ave., Downtown; 614-797-4700; franklin.edu Founded: 1902 Enrollment: about 5,000 Tuition, per credit hour: $398; graduate, $670; doctorate, $748 Franklin University, located in Columbus’ Discovery District, was founded by the Columbus YMCA based on the idea that education should be possible for everyone. It has expanded to locations throughout the Midwest and partners with schools in Europe and the Middle East. Franklin offers 35 bachelor’s programs, 19 master’s programs and four doctoral degrees, and many courses are offered online. Hondros College of Nursing 4140 Executive Pkwy., Westerville; 855-906-8773; hondros.edu Founded: 2006 Enrollment: 1,572 Tuition: LPN program, $17,568; associate degree, $25,742 Hondros College, a for-profit institution, advertises that it will train students for a nursing career without the wait. It offers a 12-month program to become a licensed practical nurse or, for those who already have their LPN, a 15-month program to earn an associate degree in nursing to become a registered nurse. It has partnered with other institutions to offer an online bachelor’s degree, as well. Mount Carmel College of Nursing 127 S. Davis Ave., Franklinton; 614-234-5800; mccn.edu Founded: 1903 Enrollment: 946 Tuition: starting at $14,372/year Mount Carmel College of Nursing, located

west of Downtown, is the largest private, four-year nursing college in Ohio. Students can opt for a bachelor of science in nursing, an online RN-BSN completion program, a 13-month accelerated BSN program for students who already hold a bachelor’s degree in a different area, four different master’s of science degrees, or an online doctorate in the practice of nursing (DNP). Ohio Dominican University 1216 Sunbury Rd., East Side; 614-251-4500; ohiodominican.edu Founded: 1911 Enrollment: 1,641 Tuition: $31,100/year; graduate, $538–$823/ credit hour Ohio Dominican University is a four-year Catholic institution a few miles northeast of Downtown. It prides itself on small class sizes and upholding Catholic ideals of study, action and service. Students can choose from 40 undergraduate majors, nine graduate programs and 25 certificates, licensures and endorsements. Ohio Wesleyan University 61 S. Sandusky St., Delaware; 740-368-2000; owu.edu Founded: 1842 Enrollment: 1,497 Tuition: $46,870/year Ohio Wesleyan University, located just north of the I-270 outerbelt, was founded at the urging of a local Methodist minister and today supports students of all faith traditions. OWU students can choose between more than 90 undergraduate courses of study; about 27 percent of students personalize their education by double-majoring, according to the school. Otterbein University 1 S. Grove St., Westerville; 614-823-1500; otterbein.edu Founded: 1847 Enrollment: about 3,000 Tuition: $32,024/year Otterbein University is a four-year institution combining liberal arts and professional studies in Westerville, northeast of Columbus. It was among the first coed institutions with women as both students and faculty. Students can choose among more than 70 undergraduate programs, including in the renowned Department of Theatre and Dance, and seven graduate programs. The university says that students donate more than 70,000 community service hours annually through its Center for Community Engagement and 90 service-learning courses.

PHOTO: COURTESY COLUMBUS COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN

Private

Capital University 1College Ave. and E. Main St., Bexley; 614-2366101; capital.edu Founded: 1830 Enrollment: about 3,200 Tuition: $36,552/year Capital University, centered in contemporary Lutheran values, is a four-year liberal arts and sciences institution in Bexley. Along with more than 60 undergraduate majors and a Conservatory of Music, it offers graduate and professional degrees in law (at a separate Downtown Columbus location), education, nursing, business and music education. Additionally, Trinity Lutheran Seminary at Capital University offers a variety of master’s programs.


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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, ERIC ALBRECHT; DORAL CHENOWETH III; JOSHUA A. BICKEL; MADDIE SCHROEDER; COURTNEY HERGESHEIMER; TIM JOHNSON

NICE TO MEET YOU


Columbus and its suburbs offer environs for every taste and age, from millennials to empty nesters. BY HEATHER LOFY

Columbus Neighborhoods Beechwold and Clintonville Head north on High Street from Ohio State Uni� versity and you will find yourself in these adjacent neighborhoods. It��������������������������������� ’�������������������������������� s a happy medium for those want� ing a quaint community that is still close to the city, which explains why so many different groups call this area home, from young families to retired profes� sors. More young professionals seem to be moving north over the last few years, which may explain the increase in hip taco spots, breweries and trendy, niche restaurants. Dine: Blunch Don’t miss: Columbus Park of Roses, featuring more than 12,000 of its namesake blooms

PHOTOS: TIM JOHNSON

Berwick and Eastmoor Berwick is a small neighborhood south of Bexley. In the late 1930s, a golf course was built that would later be replaced by 145 ranch homes, a style that remains popular today. Nearby Eastmoor was settled between Bexley and Whitehall after World War I. One of the neighborhood’s claims to fame is as home to twotime Heisman Trophy winner and Ohio State all-star Archie Griffin, who graduated from Eastmoor Acad� emy High School. Dine: The Top Steak House Don’t miss: The Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus’ stellar programming, including several annual productions by house theater troupe Gallery Players, performing for more than 70 years, and the Columbus Jewish Film Festival each November Brewery District This area is located just south of Downtown’s bustling business district. It gets its name honestly: It was once home to five pre-Prohibition breweries, the first being City Brewery, which was opened by a German immi� grant in 1836. Now, the area boasts urban, red-brick architecture and is a popular residential area for young professionals as hip watering holes make their debuts. You will likely see a crowd heading to Shadow� box Live, a performance venue with a sketch comedy, rock ’n’ roll singing troupe. Dine: Ambrose and Eve Don’t miss: Scioto Audubon Metro Park, 120 acres of greenspace in the middle of the city

Downtown With major employers such as Nationwide, Huntington Bancshares and JPMorgan Chase & Co., and its status as the state capital, Downtown is Columbus��������� ’ ������� govern� mental and business hub. It’s also home to a multitude of arts spaces, including the Columbus Museum of Art, the Columbus College of Art & Design, MadLab The� atre, Ohio State University’s Urban Arts Space, several independent galleries and the Ohio, Palace and South� ern theatres. There’s plenty of greenspace nearby, thanks to the Scioto Mile and John F. Wolfe Columbus Commons park, which feature activities and events for Downtown workers and suburbanites alike. Dine: Veritas or Wolf’s Ridge Brewing, named the top two restaurants in the city by Columbus Monthly in 2019 Don’t miss: A touring Broadway production or original performance by BalletMet or the Columbus Symphony Orchestra at the historic Ohio Theatre Franklinton Franklinton, once called The Bottoms due to its lowlying areas, is becoming one of Columbus’ most sought-after neighborhoods for both residents and business owners. The city built a floodwall on the Sci� oto River in 2004, which has encouraged more inter� est in the area. Because it is still an up-and-coming neighborhood, the cost of living is lower than other popular areas around town. There’s also a strong arts presence, with independent galleries, theaters and 400 West Rich, a factory-turned-arts complex with rent� able studio space, a monthly handmade goods market, exhibitions and more. Dine: Strongwater Food & Spirits Don’t miss: National Veterans Memorial and Museum German Village, Merion Village and Hungarian Village History abounds in these districts south of Downtown. They’re full of charming old homes and brick streets where early settlers put down their roots. German Vil� lage, immediately south of Downtown, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is home to Schil� ler Park, a favorite gathering spot for local residents (and their dogs). South of that is the up-and-coming Merion Village, which has a similar vibe. Further south still is Hungarian Village, which was filled with immigrants from Hungary, Croatia and Italy 100 years ago. Dine: Lindey’s Restaurant & Bar Don’t miss: The annual German Village Haus und Gar� ten Tour, highlighting the area’s unique architecture Hilltop The Hilltop’s original name was Sullivant’s Hill in honor of Lucas Sullivant, a surveyor for the federal govern� ment who was gifted the land in exchange for his civic service. The name remains today as one of the main roads through this part of town: Sullivant Avenue. There is a mix of old and new family homes today; prices are below average for Columbus because the area has struggled with crime and poverty throughout its his� tory. Summer Jam West is the neighborhood’s annual arts and music festival featuring bands, local food trucks COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

63


and a children’s art zone. The July event is dedicated to bringing music and permanent, public art to the area. Dine: La Super Torta Don’t miss: Hollywood Casino Columbus, with slots, table games, a range of dining options and a robust live entertainment lineup

Italian Village Head north on Fourth Street from Downtown and you will find yourself in an urban hamlet. Italian Village is home to the former Wonder Bread Factory (which was converted to high-end loft apartments), as well as trendy breweries and gastropubs such as Seventh Son Brewing Co. and Hoof Hearted Brewery & Kitchen. Locals and tourists flock to the area to visit Stump, a curated plant shop that will make you want to develop your green thumb. Dine: Cosecha Cocina Don’t miss: The Columbus Italian Festival’s Mediter� ranean delights King-Lincoln District This area just east of Downtown was the cultural and busi� ness hub of the city����������������������������������� ’���������������������������������� s affluent African American commu� nity in the 1930s and ’40s. In the 1960s, construction of the highway interchange cut the district off from Downtown, 64

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

fueling an economic downturn. In 2001, then-Mayor Michael B. Coleman announced efforts to revitalize the area. The historic Lincoln Theatre was renovated and reopened; it now hosts the Jazz Arts Group of Columbus and Thiossane West African Dance Institute. Dine: Creole Kitchen Don’t miss: A show at the Lincoln Theatre or The King Arts Complex

Linden and Northland East and southeast of Clintonville, Linden is divided by Hudson Street into North and South Linden, with the latter situated just east of Mapfre Stadium and the Ohio History Center. Cleveland Avenue, the main thorough� fare through Linden, is home to a number of ethnic restaurants, especially from African countries. The Northland area provides a wealth of shopping oppor� tunities along Morse Road, including several furni� ture warehouse stores and even more ethnic eateries. Crime historically has been an issue in these neighbor� hoods, but attention from civic leaders, residents and organizations like the Greater Linden Development Corp. are working to change that. Dine: Addis Restaurant or Hoyo’s Kitchen Don’t miss: Linden Farmers Market for fresh produce, locally made crafts and live music

PHOTOS: TOP, BARBARA J. PERENIC; MIDDLE LEFT, MEGHAN RALSTON; MIDDLE RIGHT, KYLE ROBERTSON; BOTTOM, ROB HARDIN

Top, Summer Jam West at Westgate Park; above left, La Michoacana Market, both in the Hilltop; above right, Urban Meyer’s Pint House in Dublin


Northwest Columbus Nestled between Upper Arlington to the south, Dublin to the northwest and Worthington to the northeast, this primarily residential neighborhood also features a number of strip malls on Bethel, Henderson and Sawmill roads. Here you���������������������������������� ’��������������������������������� ll find some of the city��������� ’�������� s tasti� est (and most authentic) Asian restaurants, includ� ing Vietnamese, Japanese and Korean fare. Work off all those extra calories at the Anheuser Busch Sports Park, on the bike trails that wind through the east� ern edge of the neighborhood or by strolling around Antrim Lake. Dine: Akai Hana Don’t miss: The ethnic groceries along and near Bethel Road Olde Towne East With a mix of renters and homeowners comprising sin� gles, couples and families, Olde Towne East has seen a recent resurgence in both residents and new businesses. There are more than 1,000 homes in this area, some dating back to the 1830s. A drive through the neighbor� hood will showcase more than 50 architectural styles, including Italianate, Queen Anne and Victorian. Dine: Olde Towne Tavern Don’t miss: Wine tasting at Camelot Cellars, an awardwinning local winery

PHOTOS: TOP, ISTOCK.COM/ANSONSAW; BOTTOM, TIM JOHNSON

Short North Arts District The Short North has long been known as Columbus’ trendiest neighborhood. This eclectic mix of old and new businesses on High Street, from Fifth Avenue south to Vine Street, is ever-changing; construction is a constant in this area, whether it is for new housing, restaurants or a boutique hotel. The district is named for its abundance of independently owned galleries, but it also features a plethora of public art installations and a high concentration of quality restaurants and hip, locally owned boutiques. Dine: Most restaurants are winners, but the new Lin� coln Social Rooftop also offers great views Don’t miss: Gallery Hops on the first Saturday of each month, for shopping, dining, street performers and gallery-perusing University District and Old North Columbus The tiny University District—less than 3 miles along High Street between the Short North and Clinton� ville—is one of the most densely populated areas of the city, thanks to Ohio State University. Many students live in the area’s apartments and duplexes, though bordering neighborhoods like Glen Echo and Wein� land Park tend to have more young professionals and families. The district also is home to the Wexner Center for the Arts, Gateway Film Center and tons of intimate live music venues. Just north of Lane Avenue is Old North, with even more quality live music ven� ues catering to a range of genres. Dine: NE Chinese Restaurant‘s authentic Dongbei fare Don’t miss: A concert at the Newport Music Hall, the country’s oldest continuously running rock club

Victorian Village and Harrison West Bordered by the Short North on the east, Downtown on the south, Grandview Heights on the west and the University District on the north, it’s no wonder these mostly residential areas are among Columbus’ most popular neighborhoods. A bit farther from High Street, Harrison West’s home prices can be lower than Victorian Village’s, for those who want the aesthetic without the price tag. Dine: Basi Italia (ask for a table on the lush patio) Don’t miss: Goodale Park’s ComFest

Suburbs Bexley This quaint suburb is just minutes from Downtown. Residents range from students at Capital University and Trinity Lutheran Seminary to families searching for more yard space close to the city. It doesn’t hurt that two of Central Ohio’s most prestigious private schools—Columbus School for Girls and the all-boys St. Charles Preparatory School—are in the area, too. Main Street is the entertainment hub of Bexley, packed with restaurants, fitness studios and the his� toric Drexel Theatre. Dine: Giuseppe’s Ritrovo Don’t miss: Walking trails in the natural woodland of Jeffrey Park Canal Winchester Drive 15 miles southeast of Columbus and you’ll find yourself in this historic city that still maintains a rural feel despite recent growth. It’s home to Bergstresser Bridge, the only remaining wooden covered bridge in Franklin County. The historic downtown district is a draw for residents and visitors alike. Dine: Harvest Moon Craft Kitchen Don’t miss: DogTap Columbus, BrewDog������������������ ’����������������� s first U.S. res� taurant and its brewery, which offers tours and has a beer-themed hotel on-site Dublin This city is a mix of old and new. There are tree-lined brick streets in the historic downtown area, as well as countless housing developments featuring mod� ern homes in the city’s further reaches. Perhaps the most popular houses are in the neighborhood sur� rounding Muirfield Village Golf Club, built by golf star (and Central Ohio native) Jack Nicklaus in 1974, where the Memorial Tournament is hosted every year. The city is proud of its Irish heritage, receiving its name from John Shields, an early surveyor and native of Dublin, Ireland. Each summer, the Dublin Irish Festival draws thousands of visitors from across the country (and world). Dine: Urban Meyer’s Pint House, a restaurant from the former Ohio State University football coach and Corso Ventures Don’t miss: Bridge Park, the city’s new hot spot, with a rooftop bar and restaurant, an arcade bar and a duck� pin bowling alley COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

65


Grandview Heights First settled in 1842, this suburb maintains an urban feel thanks to its position just northwest of Downtown. Grandview Avenue is home to locally owned boutiques such as Thread and Vernacular, eateries like Spagio and The Avenue Steak Tavern, and a number of breweries and tap rooms. Salons, spas and fitness studios abound in this tiny city, as do higher-end consignment shops. Dine: Watershed Kitchen & Bar Don’t miss: A beer tasting at Grandview Theater & Drafthouse Grove City What used to be wooded greenspace now is a bustling city with a great business environment and lovely resi� dential options. Grove City was named for the remain� ing trees after the area was cleared in the early 1800s. Head to Stringtown Road for shopping centers, res� taurants and medical facilities, or to the historic Town Center for quaint retail and dining, plus annual events like September’s Arts in the Alley. Dine: 3 Brothers Diner Don’t miss: Little Theatre Off Broadway, which hosts two musicals, two comedies and two dramas each season Groveport Between Canal Winchester and Downtown Columbus lies the small, quiet city of Groveport. It boasts of hav� ing the most parkland per capita in Franklin County, including a 32-acre greenspace nestled in the Grove� port Commerce Center. The city’s proximity to major Columbus corridors also makes it an ideal home for industrial parks and businesses. Downtown Groveport features unique shops in historic brick buildings. Dine: Little Italy Pizza Don’t miss: Motts Military Museum Hilliard This sprawling suburb just south of Dublin on the county’s western edge has transformed from a little railroad hub to an extensive network of subdivisions and shopping centers. With excellent schools and plenty of parks, Hilliard is a great draw for young families. Interested in the city’s railroad roots? Check out the artifacts, including the original train station, in Weaver Park. Dine: Starliner Diner Don’t miss: The city’s DORA, or Designated Outdoor Refreshment Area, where residents and visitors can 66

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

open-carry alcoholic beverages from area businesses during select events

New Albany Though founded in the 1830s, this once-rural outpost found its stride in the past 20 years as one of the area’s most affluent suburbs—filled with lavish homes and its signature white horse fences—thanks in part to the area’s largest investor, Les Wexner, resident of the city and founder of L Brands. New Albany also is home to corporate offices of brands such as Abercrombie & Fitch and Justice. Dine: Hudson 29 Don’t miss: The New Albany Community Foundation’s Jefferson Series, featuring well-known speakers on myriad topics Pickerington Located southeast of Columbus, the city was declared the Violet Capital of Ohio by the state legislature for the prolific purple blooms that settlers found when mov� ing to the area in the early 1800s. The annual Picktown Palooza celebrates the city’s charm and hospitality with carnival rides, food vendors, live entertainment and more. Historic Olde Pickerington Village has plenty of shops and a seasonal farmers market. Dine: Thai Paradise Don’t miss: The family-friendly Friday Night Flicks sum� mer movie series at Sycamore Creek Park Amphitheater Powell Just north of Dublin and Worthington, Powell was a sleepy suburb until the last few decades. Now the historic downtown bustles with residents and visi� tors drawn to its eclectic collection of antique and home décor shops and excellent dining options. Like neighboring Dublin, Powell has a variety of housing stock and quality schools, through the Olentangy Local district. Dine: Prohibition Gastro Lounge Don’t miss: Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, home to nearly 10,000 animals, and Zoombezi Bay, the zoo’s on-site, 22-acre water park Reynoldsburg Birthplace of the first commercial tomato, this city east of the I-270 outerbelt commemorates the red fruit with the annual Reynoldsburg Tomato Festival. Blacklick Woods Metro Park has one of the best remain� ing beech maple forests in the area, as well as a but� tonbush swamp and plenty of trails. The diverse city is religiously inclusive, with churches and synagogues representing a variety of denominations. Dine: The Hickory House Don’t miss: The Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum Upper Arlington Golf legend Jack Nicklaus was born in this idyllic sub� urb, which also served as the setting for the 1980s sitcom Family Ties. Real estate is in high demand in this landlocked, affluent community. The Kingsdale

PHOTOS: TOP, MEGHAN RALSTON; BOTTOM, JODI MILLER

Gahanna This mostly residential city east of Columbus along Big Walnut Creek was settled in 1849. The waterway now lends its name to Creekside, a development in Olde Gahanna that’s home to hip restaurants, bars, retail and residences. In recent years, the city has grown from a sleepy suburb to a highly sought-after place to live among young professionals and families. Dine: 101 Beer Kitchen Don’t miss: Creekside Blues & Jazz Festival, featuring local and regional acts on four stages, a kids zone and more


PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, ADAM CAIRNS; JOSHUA A. BICKEL; TESSA BERG; JODI MILLER

Clockwise from left, Grandview Heights Municipal Pool; the Upper Arlington Labor Day Arts Festival; Prohibition Gastro Lounge in Powell

shopping center, the Shops on Lane Avenue and the Mallway at Old Arlington offer tons of great shopping and dining, with a mix of chains and local favorites. If you’re in the area for the Fourth of July, watch out: The upper-middle-class residents take this holiday seri� ously, often staking out parade-watching spots days in advance. Dine: Lupo on Arlington Don’t miss: The Labor Day Arts Festival, featuring live entertainment and visual arts on display and for sale

Westerville In the northeast corner of Franklin County, just beyond the I-270 outerbelt, lies a pretty little city that blends the old and the new. (The name isn��������� ’�������� t direc� tional, but a nod to early settlers—the Westervelt family.) Historic buildings are interspersed with more modern renovated storefronts in the Uptown area, and the schools are highly rated. The city also is home to Otterbein University and the Anti-Saloon League Museum, located inside the Westerville Public Library; Westerville was at the forefront of the Prohi� bition movement in the early 1900s. Dine: Asterisk Supper Club Don’t miss: 4th Fridays, an Uptown summer series featuring street vendors, live music and kids activities

Whitehall Tucked between Bexley and Reynoldsburg, with John Glenn Columbus International Airport immediately north, Whitehall is a farm-community-turned-mid� dle-class-melting-pot. The diverse suburb was the nation’s fastest-growing city in the 1950s and today has the tagline of “opportunity is here.” Though the city has struggled with crime and poverty through its history, engaged leaders are committed to raising the bar, and young homebuyers are recognizing the area’s potential. Dine: Indochine Café Don’t miss: The summertime Music in the Park concert series in John Bishop Park Worthington Charming downtown Worthington has a historic, quaint, New England feel thanks to its walkability and numerous shops, restaurants and churches. Village Green is great for families, with a summertime concert series and a giant Christmas tree during the holidays. The historic Rush Creek Village is worth a visit as well; it was designed by disciples of Frank Lloyd Wright. Dine: The Whitney House Don’t miss: Worthington Farmers Market, held on Vil� lage Green May through October and in The Shops at Worthington Place from November through April COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Scioto Mile

Central Ohio has so many options for things to do, it can be hard to decide on just one. To help you frame what can be tackled in a matter of days, we asked five Columbusites to share their ideas of a perfect weekend in the city.

AS TOLD TO REBECCA WALTERS

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

PHOTO: FRED SQUILLANTE

My t c e f r e P d n e k e e W


Flower Child Vintage

The Foodie

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, FRED SQUILLANTE; ROB HARDIN; TIM JOHNSON; ROB HARDIN

Orcan Turkay continues to climb the hospitality ladder. He landed in Columbus in 2016 as the general manager of the AC Hotel by Marriott Columbus Dublin and its rooftop eatery, Vaso, in Dublin’s Bridge Park development. These days, he is the corporate director of food and beverage operations for Shaner Hotel Group, parent company of the AC.

The Musician

Showcasing at the 2020 South by Southwest Conference and Festivals for the first time, artist and songwriter Angela Perley says her latest album, 4:30, is aptly named because that’s the time she usually goes to bed. Most weekends, Perley and her bandmates are on the road, so a weekend at home is always viewed as a treat.

I love starting off Saturday with friends—for sure with [bandmate] Chris Connor—at Fox in the Snow Café, where I get a New Orleans iced coffee. Then we might hit Flower Child, my favorite vintage clothing store. From there we catch a film at an indie theater, or go to Eat Purr Love Cat Café, this adorable place where I can get my cat fix and jot down lyrics while enjoying herbal tea and cookies. Dinner and drinks would be a food truck and Seventh Son Brewing Co. I love Kitty Paw, a hard seltzer that’s fruity without a weird aftertaste. We’d end the day with a local late-night show at Rumba Café or Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza and Live Music. I would kick off Sunday with a healthy Breakfast Smoothie—the original—at Alchemy, and then bike or run to the Scioto Mile and catch a festival or head to the Scioto Audubon Metro Park and work on songs. If it’s cold, I like the Columbus Museum of Art and the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, where it just feels so tropical. Sunday evening might involve tea at Stauf’s Coffee Roasters or Queen City Cajun ice cream, a spicy chocolate, at Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams—or maybe both!

If I’m not working, my perfect weekend starts at Rebol with a Bulletproof coffee and breakfast bowl with chorizo. But I’m usually working, so I combine work with play by checking out other restaurants and bars. My go-to is Watershed Kitchen & Bar, where I get Chef Jack [Moore]’s Pickledillies and Pork Cheeks. From there I’ll hit Comune and get Crispy Fried Rice and a cocktail. After that, I’m bar-hopping for good conversation and drinks. My new favorite place is Law Bird, owned by dear friends Annie and Luke [Pierce]. All of Annie’s cocktails go down super easy—too easy! I never sleep in, but on Sunday I like to chill by calling family and friends and watching Turkish TV channels. If it’s soccer season, then I’m definitely dedicating two hours to watch Galatasaray play. If I have my daughter, Emory, 6, then it’s all about her and whatever she wants—the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, watching TV, shopping at the American Girl doll store.

Crispy Fried Rice from Comune COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Otherworld

The Entrepreneur

Often described as a “serial” entrepreneur—a term she embraces—Tanisha Robinson is well into her next adventure after two years as BrewDog USA’s CEO. Her latest startup is W*nder, a CBD- and vitamin-infused sparkling water brand that launched in January. The canned drinks are selling online and in local retailers, restaurants, spas and coffee shops.

Olentangy Trail

Mouton

The Performer

Like most entertainers, Andrew Levitt, who performs as drag queen Nina West, is usually on the road during weekends. In February, we caught up with Levitt as he was wrapping up a United Kingdom tour, The Magnificent Nina West, a magic show based on his time on season 11 of RuPaul’s Drag Race. 70

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My perfect Columbus weekend starts with pancake balls or the Mazatlan sandwich at Katalina’s in Harrison West, right down the street from my house. Then I’ll wander around the Short North or hop on the Olentangy Trail and go for a jog. In the afternoon, I’m playing board games—usually Sorry—at Kingmakers with Adam Yates and Tyler Cummings. I also love Scrabble with Patricia Taylor. She usually wins. Later it’s the Gateway Film Center, my favorite place to catch a movie. For dinner, Cap City Fine Diner for sure. I always get the Bleu Cheese Potato Chips for an app, and then head to Jeni’s for the Cream Puff ice cream. If I’m out on the town, I’ll go Axis or the Union Café. Sunday morning it’s a workout at CrossFit, an iced coffee—I’m so boring—from Starbucks, and then a walk around the neighborhood with Edgar and Felicity, my Berger Picards. Then afternoon is family time with my parents, most always at Northstar Café in Clintonville. I’d get a fish sandwich and chopped salad. Later in the evening, I love to get lost in the Book Loft or grab a coffee. I used to love Sunday Showtunes at Union Café, but I haven’t been in a while.

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, MEGHAN RALSTON; ROB HARDIN; ADAM CAIRNS; TIM JOHNSON; ROB HARDIN

My ideal Saturday starts with my wife, Michelle Heritage, and I walking to brunch at The Table. I like a hardcore mimosa with just a whiff of orange juice for color. In summer, we ride the Olentangy Trail, stop at the Clintonville Farmers Market and load up our bike saddlebags. Dinner would be at The Refectory’s Dinner Music Series, to hear a phenomenal band and have a phenomenal meal. If it’s a wild night, we would go to Mouton afterward and meet up with some friends. I would have a classic Manhattan with Woodford bourbon or a mezcal Negroni. On Sunday, Michelle and I, along with our friend, Carlie Snyder, would go to Club Pilates and hit Ambrose and Eve or Third & Hollywood for brunch. If it’s summertime, we’d go to Goodale Park’s music series and just chill. In winter, we might go to Otherworld, an insane immersive art installation. My wife is an amazing cook, so Sunday evening I like to wind down over dinner with friends before I start prepping for the week ahead.


The Politician

Columbus City Councilmember Elizabeth Brown is all about broadbased economic prosperity that includes business growth and poverty reduction. A council member since 2015, she serves as president pro tempore, and she is the executive director of the Ohio Women’s Public Policy Network. She and husband Patrick Katzenmeyer have two children: Carolyn, 4, and Russell, 1.

For me, the perfect weekend in Columbus happens during summer. One of the great things about my job is being able to combine community duties with being a mom. A Saturday morning visiting Westgate Farmers Market or attending Milo Fest allows me to be present for both. Some Saturday afternoons, I get together with other moms and kids for our international eating club to experience the diversity of foods in Columbus. We recently tried Hoyo’s Kitchen in the Northland area. Sundays consist of completely unscheduled time with family, starting with an endless pot of coffee and great banana pancakes that my husband makes. We might take in a Clippers game, and it’s fun when the kids run the bases at the end of a game. The weekend was successful if I get the kids to bed early so Patrick and I can relax with a glass of wine, get ready for the week ahead and then fall asleep with a good book. I just finished “Ask Again, Yes” by Mary Beth Keane.

Hoyo’s Kitchen

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, TIM JOHNSON (2); ADAM CAIRNS

Clippers game at Huntington Park

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annual events 2020–2021

COMPILED BY EMMA FRANKART HENTERLY

Ohio State Fair

For more than 25 years, Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens’ recurring annual exhibit has offered visitors the chance to walk among hundreds of butterflies in the flora and fauna of the Pacific Island Water Garden. fpconservatory.org

MAY 8 CCAD Fashion Show Student

designers at the Columbus College of Art & Design showcase runway collections ranging from athleisure to haute couture in this annual show that supports CCAD student scholarships. ccad. edu/fashion-show

MAY 23–24 Asian Festival This event

celebrating pan-Asian cultures draws more than 100,000 attendees to Franklin Park for cultural performances, cuisine and more. asian-festival.org

JUNE 12 Tour de Grandview Cycling Classic  Each year, hundreds of cyclists from around the

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world race through the streets of Grandview as residents and visitors alike cheer them on. tourdegrandview.com

Visitors also can enjoy wine and cocktail tastings, family activities and rides, and much more. creeksidebluesandjazz.com

JUNE 12–14 Columbus Arts Festival 

JUNE 26–28 ComFest Celebrate local art

JUNE 19–21 Columbus Pride Festival 

JULY 3 Red, White & Boom Downtown

Peruse a massive, alfresco art gallery along the banks of the Scioto River while enjoying live entertainment, activities for the whole family and tasty bites. columbusartsfesival.org

For nearly 40 years, the Columbus community has celebrated LGBTQ pride each summer. The event’s signature parade tours the Short North and Downtown on Saturday; the festival lasts all weekend along the Scioto Mile. columbuspride.org

JUNE 19–21 Creekside Blues & Jazz Festival  The area’s best blues and jazz musicians, plus some national acts, take the stage for this three-day event at Creekside Plaza in Gahanna.

and community organizations at Goodale Park. Frolickers at this “party with a purpose” enjoy crafts, art and music while uniting as a community. comfest.com Columbus comes alive for this memorable, morethan-fireworks event, now in its 40th year. Live music, a children’s park and other activities add up to a full day of partying before the big evening display. redwhiteandboom.org

JULY 4 Doo Dah Parade This comedic

and often satirical parade celebrates freedom of speech as it moves through the Short North Arts District. Stay after for a block party with live music. doodahparade.com

PHOTO: ADAM CAIRNS

MARCH 14–JULY 5 Blooms & Butterflies 


Tell Us About It

To share information about your upcoming events (they should be open to the public and of general interest), visit columbusmonthly.com/calendar and click on "Promote your event." JULY 11–12 Westerville Music & Arts Festival Live musical performances on two stages merge with a wealth of artists displaying and selling their wares at Heritage Park. westervillechamber.com

JULY 18–25 Franklin County Fair  Enjoy rides, games, fried food, live music and more at the Franklin County Fairgrounds in Hilliard. fcfair.org

JULY 24–26 Jazz & Rib Fest This

summertime Columbus tradition honors the classic jazz-and-ribs pairing. As musicians serve up three days of music on two stages, pit masters grill ribs, chicken and other tasty morsels. hotribscooljazz.org

JULY 29–AUG. 9 Ohio State Fair 

Concerts, other live performances and a plethora of food, animals, attractions and rides make up the quintessential fair experience. Not so quintessential but equally beloved: the butter cow. ohiostatefair.com

JULY 31–AUG. 2 Dublin Irish Festival This festival in Dublin (Ohio,

SEPT. 11–13 Columbus Oktoberfest 

AUG. 8–9 Festival Latino Downtown

SEPT. 13 New Albany Walking Classic This 10k “walking race” is the largest

of course) is one of the largest three-day Irish cultural gatherings in the world. Entertainment includes hundreds of performers, plus food, music, games and vendors. dublinirishfestival.org

Columbus’ Genoa Park swells with Latin-American music, dance, art and cuisine during this family-friendly fest. festivallatino.net

AUG. 14–15 Columbus Food Truck Festival This is the largest food truck festival in the Midwest. Alongside the rows of trucks and stalls, foodies also can enjoy live musical performances. columbusfoodtruckfest.com

SEPT. 4–7 Greek Festival This Labor

Day weekend tradition offers an authentic experience of Greek culture with an agora, music, dance, cuisine and more. columbusgreekfestival.com

SEPT. 7 Upper Arlington Labor Day Arts Festival Works from some 200

diverse artists are on display and up for sale at Northam Park. Activities and music make for an all-around community event. upperarlingtonoh.gov Red, White & Boom

Shop the Art & Craft Marktplatz and Merchant Market, dance the polka and sample the tastes of Germany at this classic celebration. Signature events include the Stone Toss and Cream Puff Stuff. columbusoktoberfest.com

walking-only event in the nation; proceeds benefit Healthy New Albany, a nonprofit that promotes healthy living. newalbanywalkingclassic.com

SEPT. 19–26 Delaware County Fair 

Typical fair fun—from amusement rides to finger-licking foods—is supplemented with an array of entertainment, such as the famous Little Brown Jug harness-racing event. delawarecountyfair.com

SEPT. 26–27 Columbus International Festival Celebrate the diversity

of Central Ohio’s many cultural communities with a variety of ethnic cuisines and cooking demonstrations, live entertainment, a daily Parade of Nations and more. columbusinternationalfestival.org

SEPT. 27–OCT. 3 Fashion Week Columbus A full week of fashion

shows and other events highlights emerging fashion designers in Columbus, which ranks third in number of resident fashion designers in the U.S. fashionweekcolumbus.org

OCT. 23–24 HighBall Halloween 

The city’s most elaborate costume party fills the Short North with revelers enjoying one wild weekend marked by a fashion show and a public costume contest. highballcolumbus.org

OCT. 9–11 Columbus Italian Festival  Thousands flock to Italian Village for this Columbus Day weekend event filled with Italian culture, kids activities and, of course, the delicious tastes (and sips) of Italy. columbusitalianfestival.com

The annual Wildlights display at the Columbus Zoo is efficiently powered by AEP and, in some cases, choreographed to holiday songs. The millions of lights illuminating the zoo have been a Central Ohio staple for more than 30 years.

PHOTO: LEFT, JOSHUA A. BICKEL; RIGHT, ISTOCK.COM/THERACHELKAY

NOV. 20–JAN. 3, 2021 Wildlights at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium  At this fan-favorite holiday light show, the Columbus Zoo morphs into a winter wonderland aglow. Come early to see the animals before many hunker down for the evening. columbuszoo.org

DATES TBD The Nutcracker 

This Columbus holiday tradition has been delighting families for decades. Join BalletMet dancers as Clara, the Sugarplum Fairy and all the rest at the Ohio Theatre in December. balletmet.org

DEC. 31 First Night Ring in the new year at COSI with fun for the family, including live music and educational shows, plus a fireworks display at midnight. firstnightcolumbus.com

Franklin County Fair

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The Roundup ATTRACTIONS | ARTS | FOOD & DRINK | RESIDENT SERVICES

Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Columbus Zoo and Aquarium With more than 10,000 animals in its care and welcoming more than 2.2 million guests a year, the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium offers fun for the whole family. Whether you choose to feed a giraffe or watch playful polar bears dive, you’re sure to connect with the world’s amazing wildlife and create lifelong memories. 4850 Powell Rd., Powell, 614-645-3400, columbuszoo.org COSI This top-rated science museum has hands-on activities for the youngest patrons and mind-expanding exhibitions for everyone. The American

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Museum of Natural History Dinosaur Gallery, in partnership with the venerable New York City institution, features life-size models and interactive elements. Its companion, the American Museum of Natural History Special Exhibition Gallery, rotates curated special exhibits from the museum. 333 W. Broad St., Downtown, 614228-2674, cosi.org Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Explore plant habitats from the desert to tropical islands in biomes bursting with color and life. Help youngsters reconnect with nature at the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden. Have lunch at

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

the Garden Café and browse Botanica, the conservatory’s superlative gift shop. 1777 E. Broad St., East Side, 614-715-8000, fpconservatory.org Hollywood Casino Columbus Come for the 2,200 slots and 70-plus bigtime table games; stay for the live entertainment. Explore an array of restaurants, including Final Cut Steak & Seafood, 32 big screens in O.H. Sports Bar & Grill, and more. 200 Georgesville Rd., West Side, 614-308-3333, hollywoodcolumbus.com Kelton House Museum & Garden Step inside the well-preserved world of abolitionists and Columbus notables Fernando Cortez and

Sophia Stone Kelton at this 19th-century Italianate house. Docent-led tour options for groups include one with a historical interpreter playing the role of Sophia Kelton, who gives visitors a personal look at her home. Self-guided audio tours are also available every day except Sundays, when guided tours are available. 586 E. Town St., Downtown, 614-4642022, keltonhouse.com Metro Parks This network of 19 natural areas, parks and preserves offers a variety of educational opportunities, naturalist-led events and hikes, camps and more. Throughout Central Ohio, 614-8910700, metroparks.net

National Veterans Memorial and Museum Lauded as the first national museum honoring all U.S. military veterans, Columbus’ newest cultural institution preserves and shares the stories of the men and women who have served our nation through an interactive, multimedia experience. 300 W. Broad St., Downtown, 614-362-2800, nationalvmm.org North Market The North Market was founded in 1876, but a whirlwind of changes in the last couple of years prove it’s hardly over the hill. Just about everything you need to make dinner at home can be found at the grocery stands, or let market vendors do

the cooking for you in nearly any culinary style. A second location, North Market Bridge Park, is set to open in Dublin’s Bridge Park development in summer 2020. Bridge Park, 6750 Longshore Dr., Dublin; main location, 59 Spruce St., Short North; 614-4639664, northmarket.com Ohio History Center and Ohio Village Explore archaeology, natural history and more at the Ohio History Center. This state museum is home to the Ohio History Connection, a public organization dedicated to preserving and sharing Ohio stories. During the summer months, visit Ohio Village and learn about life in the 1890s from shop owners, community leaders

PHOTO: GRAHM S. JONES, COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM

Attractions


and other villagers. 800 E. 17th Ave., Northeast Side, 614-297-2300, ohiohistory.org Ohio Statehouse Tours of the Statehouse are free and offered daily. Ticketed seasonal events—including the Halloween-appropriate Haunted Statehouse tours—are worth the price, too. The lower level of the Statehouse is a treasure trove of interactive exhibits about Ohio government and the building itself. Pick out a piece of Ohio memorabilia in the Statehouse Museum Shop. 1 Capitol Sq., Downtown, 614-7529777, ohiostatehouse.org Otherworld This immersive, interactive art installation on the city’s East Side is unlike any other in Columbus. Explore the “mixed reality playgrounds” in multiple rooms by day, or take in a concert or dance party by night. 5819 Chantry Dr., East Side, 614-868-3631, otherworldohio.com Scioto Mile A jewel that was years in the making, the Scioto Mile now is a magnet for residents and visitors in all seasons. At the south end, splash in the fountains or take in a concert at Bicentennial Park. Enjoy the swings that line the walk north and admire the artful metalwork fish that gush water in tranquil fountains. Downtown, along the Scioto River; sciotomile.com Thurber House The historic home of humorist and cartoonist James Thurber, Thurber House offers year-round programming for both adults and children, including a well-known summer camp, writing workshops and two popular author series. 77 Jefferson Ave., Downtown, 614-4641032, thurberhouse.org

Arts Actors’ Theatre of Columbus Summer isn’t summer in German Village without Shakespeare, and Actors’ Theatre has satisfied that desire for more than 35 years. The Schiller Park performances are free (but bring cash to contribute to the cause when the hat is passed) and include other classics in addition to the Bard. 1000 City Park Ave., German Village, 614-444-6888, theactorstheatre.org BalletMet Hailed as a top professional company by Dance USA and winner of two regional Emmy Awards in 2017, this Columbus-based organization is under the artistic direction of Edwaard Liang. Drawing from classics and new works alike, a season at BalletMet is always energetic and surprising. The annual performance of “The Nutcracker” is a Columbus staple. 322 Mount Vernon Ave., Downtown, 614-2294860, balletmet.org Beeler Gallery at the Columbus College of Art & Design CCAD’s main public exhibition venue is a contemporary art space with experimental programming, including exhibitions, workshops, lectures, conversations and screenings from the most exciting international artists, designers, thinkers and writers. All programming is free and open to the public. 60 Cleveland Ave., Downtown, 614-2223270, beelergallery.org CAPA The Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA) is synonymous with the arts in the city. The nonprofit organization owns the historic Ohio, Palace and Southern theaters, manages

seven others, provides administrative services to seven local arts and culture organizations, presents more than 60 national touring artists each season (including Broadway in Columbus in partnership with Broadway Across America), produces Festival Latino and the CAPA Summer Movie Series, and creates educational performing arts experiences for thousands of students each year. 55 E. State St., Downtown, 614469-0939, capa.com CATCO CATCO, Central Ohio’s professional equity theater company, and its CATCO is Kids branch for young theatergoers provide quality theater and educational programs for all ages year-round. 77 S. High St., 549 Franklin Ave., Downtown, 614-4610939, catco.org Columbus Jazz Orchestra The Columbus Jazz Orchestra has a fiercely loyal—and growing—following. Just one electric performance under the leadership of Byron Stripling will show you why. 400 S. Fifth St., Ste. 103, Downtown, 614-2945200, jazzartsgroup.org Columbus Museum of Art The grande dame of art museums in Columbus features American and European works from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the world’s largest collections of work by Columbus artists Aminah Robinson, George Bellows and Elijah Pierce. A host of family- and kid-friendly activities transform areas of the museum from “no touching” to hands-on. Its latest acquisition, the Pizzuti Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art, showcases works from the private collection of Ron and Ann Pizzuti. CMA, 480

E. Broad St., Downtown; Pizzuti Collection, 632 N. Park St., Short North; 614-221-6801, columbusmuseum.org Columbus Symphony Orchestra Helmed by maestro Rossen Milanov, Central Ohio’s only full-time professional symphony offers an array of innovative programming. Its Masterworks series showcases world-class guest artists from around the globe, while its Pops series features in-demand touring artists and Columbus’ beloved annual tradition, Holiday Pops. Summers sizzle with the CSO’s outdoor concert series, Picnic with the Pops, and Popcorn Pops, an outdoor series for children aged 3–12 that offers free popcorn and pre-concert activities. 55 E. State St., Downtown, 614-2289600, columbus symphony.com King Arts Complex The King-Lincoln District has produced some of Columbus’ most influential black cultural, civic and arts figures. It’s fitting that the King Arts Complex is so beautifully dedicated to exhibiting new artworks and celebrating arts and culture on the stage. Visit for artist talks, musical performances, kids’ activities or to browse the gift gallery. 867 Mount Vernon Ave., King-Lincoln District, 614-645-5464, kingartscomplex.com Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery The gallery, established in 1989, is dedicated to exhibiting works by Ohio artists and pieces from in-state collections and museums. Admission is always free in this gallery maintained by the Ohio Arts Council, a state agency that funds and supports the arts. 77 S. High St., First Floor, Downtown, 614-644-9624, riffe gallery.org

Opera Columbus Opera Columbus brings the full grandeur of opera to Columbus stages with lush mainstage productions that celebrate emerging talent, inclusivity, fresh perspectives and modern technology. The group advances the experience and the art of opera with innovative productions and groundbreaking collaborations, such as the 2019 world premiere of The Flood, co-produced with ProMusica Chamber Orchestra. 55 E. State St., Columbus, 614-4618101, operacolumbus.org OSU’s Urban Arts Space Ohio State University’s free Downtown art gallery features works from students and local, national and international artists. Programs include children’s and family activities, lectures, performances and visual arts exhibitions. 50 W. Town St., Downtown, 614-292-8861, uas. osu.edu ProMusica Chamber Orchestra Founded in 1979, ProMusica’s 37 artists perform at the Southern Theatre as they work to redefine what it means to be a chamber orchestra. The group honors both classical and contemporary works, with a strong focus on new works and premieres. 620 E. Broad St., Suite 300, Downtown, 614-464-0066, promusicacolumbus.org The Wexner Center for the Arts As much a place for art to be seen as it is for art to be created, the Wexner Center stands alone for contemporary artwork in Columbus. It brings dozens of performances, events, screenings, concerts and exhibitions to town each year, always reaching for the leading edge of contemporary art in any medium. Many of

these artistic creations are born within the center’s walls by artists in residency. 1871 N. High St., University District, 614-292-3535, wexarts.org

Food & Drink

Below are editors’ picks for top restaurants and those mentioned in this issue; for a complete guide to dining in Central Ohio, check out Columbus Monthly’s Restaurant Guide. Dining Key: B — breakfast BR — brunch L — lunch D — dinner 3 Brothers Diner Mexican/American | 3090 Southwest Blvd., Grove City, 614-3177798. This familyfriendly spot combines American, Mexican and Cuban diner fare on one menu. BLD $ 101 Beer Kitchen Gastropub | 7509 Sawmill Rd., Dublin, 614-210-1010; 397 Stoneridge Ln., Gahanna, 614-9345501; 817 Polaris Pkwy., Westerville, 614-7764775. At this expertly executed gastropub, craft brews are paired with made-fromscratch, seasonal dishes. BRLD $$ Addis Restaurant Ethiopian | 2750 Cleveland Ave., North Side, 614-269-8680. Addis Restaurant brings Ethiopian to a part of town otherwise dominated by Somali restaurants. The injera here is about as good as it gets. LD $$ Akai Hana Japanese | 1173 Old Henderson Rd., Northwest Side, 614-451-5411. This entertaining Japanese bento shop boasts some of the city’s best sushi and a wide range of Japanese and Korean entrées. LD $$

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Alchemy Café Café/Juicery | 625 Parsons Ave., Schumacher Place, 614-305-7551. A fast-casual, all-day café featuring a wholesome mix of breakfast and lunch fare alongside coffee and smoothies. BLD $ Alchemy Kitchen Café/Juicery | 1439 Grandview Ave., Grandview, 614-725-0255. A fast-casual, all-day café featuring a wholesome mix of breakfast and lunch fare alongside coffee and smoothies. This location also serves weekend brunch. BBRLD $ Alqueria Farmhouse Kitchen Contemporary American | 247 King Ave., University District, 614-824-5579. Rustic yet refined, this neighborhood restaurant is the work of two veteran chefs; dishes are Spanish in name but frequently Ohio in origin. LD $$$ Ambrose and Eve Contemporary American | 716 S. High St., Brewery District, 614-725-2080. A dinner party-themed restaurant in a former antique shop, Ambrose and Eve’s menu features elevated comfort foods. BRD $$$ Ampersand Asian Supper Club Asian | 940 N. High St., Short North, 614-9283333. Sister restaurant to Asterisk, Ampersand serves inventive ramen, donburi rice bowls, craft cocktails, a variety of sakes and more. LD $$ Antiques on High Bar Fare | 714 S. High St., Brewery District, 614-725-2070. This sour-beer-focused outpost from Seventh Son features a rotating selection of food trucks and an excellent rooftop patio. LD $ Asterisk Supper Club American | 14 N. State St., Westerville,

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614-776-4633. Teatime and suppertime are set in a bibliophile’s dream atmosphere, with craft cocktails served at a handsome bar, and an eclectic menu that leans on comfort foods. BRLD $$ The Avenue Steak Tavern Steakhouse | 94 N. High St., Dublin, 614-5919000; 1307 Grandview Ave., Grandview, 614485-9447. Cameron Mitchell’s homage to the steakhouses of yore features a retro design and clubby atmosphere, teamed with a menu boasting all the classics: oysters Rockefeller, creamed spinach and, of course, numerous cuts of beef. BRD$$$$ Basi Italia Italian | 811 Highland St., Victorian Village, 614-294-7383. Serving clean, simple Italian fare with innovative twists in an intimate setting and one of the city’s best patios. BRD $$$ Blunch American | 2973 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-641-7501. This bright and friendly eatery covered in murals from Columbus artists offers creative breakfast dishes until mid-afternoon. BBRL$ BrewDog Franklinton Bar Fare | 463 W. Town St., Franklinton, 614-9083077. This spot boasts a two-level outdoor space, 48 beer taps and a menu of sandwiches and small bites. LD $

wine tastings, flights and an osteria-style menu of small plates, artisan pizza and pasta. LD $$

Scotland-based brewery’s pub fare and IPAs, and stay for the arcade games, shuffleboard and patio. LD $$

Cap City Fine Diner & Bar American | 6644 Riverside Dr., Dublin, 614-889-7865; 1301 Stoneridge Dr., Gahanna, 614-478-9999; 1299 Olentangy River Rd., Grandview, 614291-3663. Cameron Mitchell’s stylish diner serves comfort food with an upscale twist. BBRLD $$

Eat Purr Love Cat Café Café | 3041 Indianola Ave., Clintonville, 614852-3521. Coffee shop with vegan and gluten-free treats from Pattycake Bakery and roaming, adoptable cats to play with. LD$

Comune Contemporary American | 677 Parsons Ave., Schumacher Place, 614947-1012. Featuring a plant-based approach to upscale dining, Comune’s seasonal and globally inspired menu fills a void in Columbus. LD $$ Cosecha Cocina Mexican | 987 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614-369-1129. Here, diners will find a contemporary twist on regional Mexican cuisine, with tacos, tortas and enchiladas. Don’t miss the agave-based cocktails. BRLD $$ Creole Kitchen Cajun & Creole | 1052 Mount Vernon Ave., East Side, 614-3723333. Chef Henry Butcher serves up authentic, savory Creole food—po’boys, alligator, gumbo—in hearty portions. BLD$

Callahan’s Bar Fare | 520 Park St., Arena District, 614223-1200. Known for its dance parties and rooftop patio, Callahan’s also serves a small menu of apps, sandwiches and pizza. D $

Del Mar SoCal Kitchen American | 705 N. High St., Short North, 614-300-9500. Inspired by Southern California, this Cameron Mitchell restaurant focuses on seafood, with burgers and steaks also available. BRD $$$

Camelot Cellars Italian | 901 Oak St., Olde Towne East, 614-441-8860. The self-described “urban boutique winery” features a retail shop,

DogTap Columbus Bar Fare | 96 Gender Rd., Canal Winchester, 614-908-3051. BrewDog USA’s headquarters includes this spacious brewpub. Go for the

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Fox in the Snow Café Café & Bakery | 210 Thurman Ave., German Village; 1031 N. Fourth St., Italian Village; 160 W. Main St., New Albany. A bakery and coffee shop offering pastries made in-house daily and coffee from Tandem Coffee Roasters. BL $ G. Michael’s Bistro & Bar Low Country | 595 S. Third St., German Village, 614-464-0575. This historic German Village eatery promises fine dining with a low country influence. Preparations and ingredients change with the seasons. D$$$

to Columbus, with Cornish pastries and a full English breakfast on the weekends. BRD $$ Giuseppe’s Ritrovo Italian | 2268 E. Main St., Bexley, 614-235-4300. This unfussy, chefowned Bexley restaurant is the place to go for classic Italian pasta dishes and outstanding craft cocktails. LD $$ Goodale Station Contemporary American | 77 E. Nationwide Blvd., Downtown, 614227-9400. Boasting a handsome rooftop patio, the restaurant’s soaring views are complemented by high-end cocktails and dishes that hint at the chef’s Southern roots. D $$$ The Guild House Contemporary American | 624 N. High St., Short North, 614-280-9780. Cameron Mitchell goes contemporary with a smart collection of small plates, house-made pasta and many dishes crafted with locally sourced ingredients. BBRLD $$$

Gallerie Bar & Bistro Contemporary American |401 N. High St., Short North, 614-484-5287. More than your average hotel restaurant, Gallerie’s creative menu showcases Ohio’s agriculture through seasonal and locally sourced ingredients. BLD $$$

Harvest Moon Craft Kitchen American | 7 N. High St., Canal Winchester, 614-834-8100. A gem in historic Canal Winchester, this full-service restaurant specializes in grass-fed bison burgers, fresh salads, soups, sandwiches and craft beer. BLD $$

Gemüt Biergarten 734 Oak St., Olde Towne East, 614-725-1725. Honoring the old-school fare of the German immigrants that helped forge Columbus, featuring fast-casual service and house-brewed, German-style beers. BRLD $

The Hickory House Barbecue | 550 Officenter Pl., Gahanna, 614-428-7427; 7051 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, 614-861-5962. Homemade barbecue is served in an authentic smokehouse setting featuring rustic décor. LD $$

Geordie’s Restaurant Irish & British Pubs | 1586 S. High St., Merion Village, 614-674-6004. Chef-owner Glen Hall-Jones brings the flavors of his native northeast England

Hoof Hearted Brewery & Kitchen Gastropub | 850 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614-401-4033. This cheeky spot represents all of the good things happening in Columbus

right now: lots of craft beer and locally sourced food in a cool, modern space. Head to the pool on the back patio in the summer months. BRLD $$ Hoyo’s Kitchen Somali | 5788 Columbus Sq., North Side, 614-899-8800; 59 Spruce St., Short North, 614-745-3943. Hoyo’s, meaning “mother’s,” serves up authentic dishes inspired by the owner’s mother’s home cooking. The Short North location has a fast-casual setup with the option to build your own bowl, salad or wrap. LD $ Hudson 29 American | 260 Market St., New Albany, 614-859-2900; 1600 W. Lane Ave., Upper Arlington, 614-4870622. This Cameron Mitchell restaurant looks to bridge the gap between Napa-inspired, California-fresh cuisine and Texas-style comfort food, with simple approaches to dishes like flatbreads, steaks, sushi and knife-andfork sandwiches. BRLD $$$ Indochine Café Asian | 561 S. Hamilton Rd., Whitehall, 614-2317357. Classic Vietnamese and Laotian fare is presented in a colorful, photo-filled menu at this traditional momand-pop eatery. LD $ Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams Desserts | 2156 E. Main St., Bexley, 614-2315364; 4247 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-4470500; 160 S. High St., Downtown, 614-8675512; 1 W. Bridge St., Dublin, 614-792-5364; 3998 Gramercy St., Easton, 614-4765364; 900 Mohawk St., German Village, 614-445-6513; 1281 Grandview Ave., Grandview, 614-488-2680; 59 Spruce St., Short North, 614-228-9960; 714 N. High St., Short North, 614-294-5364;


8 N. Liberty St., Powell, 614-846-1060. Jeni’s creative and seasonal ice cream flavors are renowned across the nation; the Downtown location is open AprilSeptember. LD $ Juniper Contemporary American | 580 N. Fourth St., Downtown, 614-464-3333. Offering perhaps the best views of Downtown from its glass-walled rooftop and patio, Juniper serves up gin-focused cocktails, small plates and contemporary entrées. BRD $$$$

Little Italy Pizza Italian | 619 Main St., Groveport, 614-8363056. A family-owned pizzeria that’s been serving standard ItalianAmerican fare to the Groveport community since 1979. LD $

614-732-4660. Chic and simple bar focusing on high-quality cocktails alongside artisan cheese and charcuterie plates. D$$ Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza and Live Music Pizza | 5601 N. High St., Worthington, 614436-2625. Pies topped with imported cheeses and high-quality meats are cooked in an ultra-high-heat coal oven for an especially charred crust. True to its name, expect live music nearly nightly. BRD $$

Little Rock Bar Bar Fare | 944 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614954-7554. Outsliders serves up beef, poultry, fish and vegetarian sliders, as well as sides and entreés, from a window in this music-themed bar. D $

Natalie’s Music Hall and Kitchen Contemporary American | 945 King Ave., Fifth by Northwest, 614-436-2625. The second outpost of Natalie’s Coal-Fired Pizza features a larger space for music and an expanded menu with Italian and Japanese influence. D $$$

La Super Torta Mexican | 721 Georgesville Rd., West Side, 614-928-9079. This hidden gem specializes in tortas, tacos, gorditas and more. BLD $

The Lox Bagel Shop Café & Bakery | 772 N. High St., Short North, 614-824-4005. Kevin Crowley’s cute shop sells house-made bagels that are boiled and then baked over a live fire. BL $

N.E. Chinese Restaurant Chinese | 2620 N. High St., Old North, 614-725-0880. Head here for authentic Dongbei-style Chinese dishes in a no-frills environment. LD $

La Tavola Italian | 1664 W. First Ave., Grandview, 614-914-5455. Chef Rick Lopez owns this popular Old World Italian restaurant featuring food that’s simple and rustic. D $$

Lupo on Arlington Spanish | 2124 Arlington Ave., Upper Arlington, 614-914-5455. Chef Rick Lopez takes on tapas and seasonal small plates featuring Spanish and Italian influences. LD $$

Law Bird Bar Fare | 740 S. High St., Short North. Wine and cocktail bar with a tight menu of bar snacks and sharables. D $$

Momo Ghar Nepalese | 59 Spruce St., Short North, 614-495-6666; 1265 Morse Rd., North Side, 614-749-2901. Phuntso Lama’s modest lunch counters inside North Market and Saraga International Grocery specialize in momos, the handmade dumplings that she and her crew make by the hundreds, weekly. LD$

Northstar Café Contemporary American | 4241 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-784-2233; 4015 Townsfair Way, Easton, 614-532-5444; 951 N. High St., Short North, 614-298-9999; 109 S. State St., Westerville, 614-394-8992. This beloved neighborhood spot places a healthful emphasis on organic ingredients, with an excellent mix of meat- and plant-based entrées. BBRLD $$

Katalina’s Soup & Sandwiches | 3481 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-689-8896; 1105 Pennsylvania Ave., Harrison West, 614-294-2233. A café serving an eclectic menu of Latin-leaning scratch items, including some of the best sandwiches in town and the beloved stuffed pancake balls. BBRL $

PHOTO: TIM JOHNSON

Lindey’s Restaurant & Bar American | 169 E. Beck St., German Village, 614-228-4343. A Columbus institution, this upscale restaurant with Upper East Side New York flair is a favorite, no doubt due to its classic and consistently good fine-dining fare and lush patio. BRLD $$$

Lincoln Social Rooftop Small Plates | 705 N. High St., Ninth Floor, Short North, 614300-9494. Cameron Mitchell’s first rooftop lounge offers impressive views of the city, cocktails and beachy small plates. D $$

Mouton Small Plates | 954 N. High St., Short North,

Nosh on High American | 149 S. High St., Downtown, 614929-3373. Reinventing old favorites is the name of the game at this modest-sized eatery that specializes in “American tapas.” LD $$$

can | 906 N. High St., Short North, 614-5020020. Well-executed bar food staples and wood-fired entrées star at this restaurant and nightclub. D $$$

SeeSaw

Novak’s Tavern & Patio Bar Fare | 475 N. High St., Short North, 614-224-8821. Burgers, sandwiches, wraps and pub grub from Barley’s Brewing Co. make up most of the menu here. D $$ The Old Spot Gastropub | 1099 W. First Ave., Grandview, 614-914-8057. Chef Rick Lopez’s newest venture teams up with The Butcher & Grocer to provide elevated pub fare. BRLD $$ Olde Towne Tavern Bar Fare | 889 E. Oak St., Olde Towne East, 614-252-2955. OTE’s convivial bar brings beer to a once-thirsty neighborhood, as well as gourmet grilled cheese and pizza in the style of Youngstown’s beloved Brier Hill. BRLD $$ Pistacia Vera Café & Bakery | 541 S. Third St., German Village, 614-2209070; 59 Spruce St., Short North, 614-221-1001. The crème de la crème of Columbus desserts, with macarons, Pistachio Mascarpone Dacquoise torte and Chocolate Bombe. BL $ Platform Beer Co. Pub Fare | 408 N. Sixth St., Downtown, 614-826-2285. The local taproom of Cleveland-based Platform Beer Co. serves

food via rotating food trucks. D $ Prohibition Gastro Lounge Gastropub | 21 W. Olentangy St., Powell, 614-840-9100. A hip spot in quaint downtown Powell serving craft cocktails and elevated bar food such as truffle fries, duck tacos and scallop mac ’n’ cheese. D $$ Rebol American | 6608 Longshore St., Dublin, 614-389-4751. This “non-GMO café” focuses on healthconscious fare and special diets such as keto. BLD $ Refectory Restaurant & Wine Shop French | 1092 Bethel Rd., Northwest Side, 614-451-9774. Columbus’ iconic French restaurant might put more kitchen effort into a single plate than an ordinary restaurant does into an entire menu. Expect impeccable service and a world-class wine cellar. D $$$$ Satori Ramen Bar Japanese | 59 Spruce St., Short North, 614914-8799. Tokyo native Seigo Nishimura runs this ramen spot in the North Market, serving a variety of ramen as well as gyoza, karage and more. LD $$ SeeSaw Contemporary Ameri-

Service Bar Contemporary American | 1230 Courtland Ave., Short North, 614-947-1231. Executive chef Avishar Barua’s playful menu offers a mix of shareable plates and entrées that express his command of modern techniques and sense of nostalgia. D $$$ Seventh Son Brewing Co. Bar Fare | 1101 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614-421-2337. This industrial-chic space features two great patios and quality craft beers; daily rotating food trucks keep bellies full. D $ Skully’s Music-Diner Diner | 1151 N. High St., Short North, 614-291-8856. The hip Short North bar focuses on DJ parties, plus local and national live acts. It’s a popular indie hangout serving diner fare like breakfast all day, burgers, pizzas and more. BLD $ SOW Plated American | 1625 W. Lane Ave., Upper Arlington, 614-8260028. SOW stands for “sustainable, organic, wellness,” and that’s what you’ll find at this health-conscious restaurant with a plantforward menu. LD $$ Spagio European | 1295 Grandview Ave., Grandview, 614-4861114. A varied palette of dishes—from well-executed comfort food to up-to-theminute trends—matches the varied décor at this Grandview restaurant. D $$$ Speck Italian Eatery Italian | 15 E. Winter St., Delaware, 740-417-

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Starliner Diner Diner/Latin American | 4121 Main St., Hilliard, 614-529-1198. This funky diner serves giant helpings of zesty, Latin-leaning comfort food at breakfast, lunch and dinner. BLD $ Stauf’s Coffee Roasters Coffee & Doughnuts | 350 Mt. Vernon Ave., Downtown, 614-549-0039; 1277 Grandview Ave., Fifth by Northwest, 614-486-4861; 421 W. State St., Franklinton, 614-549-0088; 627 S. Third St., German Village, 614-221-1563; 59 Spruce St., Short North, 614-456-7685; 1334 Neil Ave., Victorian Village, 614928-3993. Columbus’ oldest micro-roaster continues to grow; go for the excellent coffee selection and low-key atmosphere. BLD $ Strongwater Food & Spirits Contemporary American | 401 W. Town St., Franklinton, 614-9283170. Vegetarianfocused cuisine is paired with omnivorepleasing entrées at this bar/restaurant inside artist collective 400 West Rich. LD $$ The Table Contemporary American | 21 E. Fifth Ave., Short North, 614-291-4555. Offering build-your-own meatand-cheese boards, sandwiches, salads, baked goods and grab-and-go options with a focus on local ingredients. BRD $$ Thai Paradise Asian | 1268 Hill Rd. N, Pickerington, 614-920-6005. Hearty

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Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles 844-644-6268, bmv.ohio.gov

and delectable Thai, Korean and Chinese dishes served in an elegant pan-Asian setting. LD $

Ohio Civil Rights Commission 30 E. Broad St., Fifth Floor, Downtown, 888278-7101 or 614-4662785, crc.ohio.gov

Third & Hollywood American | 1433 W. Third Ave., Grandview, 614-488-0303. This trendy haunt serves upscale American fare and a Sunday jazz brunch in an exposedbrick setting. BRD $$$ The Top Steak House Steakhouse | 2891 E. Main St., Eastmoor, 614-231-8238. For more than 60 years, this palace of beef has offered award-winning, high-end cuisine in a 1960s-looking haunt. D $$$$ Union Café Contemporary American | 782 N. High St., Short North, 614-4212233. A high-energy, LGBTQ-friendly bar and popular brunch spot with a hip, urban feel. BRLD $ Urban Meyer’s Pint House Bar Fare | 6632 Longshore St., Dublin, 614-551-3639. Admire memorabilia from former OSU football coach Urban Meyer’s impressive career while enjoying pub-style apps, entrées or pizzas. LD $$ Vaso Spanish | 6540 Riverside Dr., Dublin, 614-698-2525. Enjoy small plates and a large bar selection atop the AC Hotel by Marriott Columbus Dublin as you admire sweeping views of the Scioto River and historic downtown Dublin. D $$ Veritas Contemporary American | 11 W. Gay St., Downtown, 614-745-3864. Chef Josh Dalton’s modern, tasting-menu-style restaurant celebrates the art and science of cooking while offering one of the finest

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Ohio Department of Health 614-466-3543, odh.ohio.gov Woodhouse Vegan Café

dining experiences in town. D $$$$ Watershed Kitchen & Bar Contemporary American | 1145 Chesapeake Ave., Ste. D, Fifth by Northwest, 614-3571936. Executive chef Jack Moore’s menu emphasizes quality product and shareable plates; dishes are probably best explored via the chef’s tasting menu. D $$$ The Whitney House American | 666 High St., Worthington, 614-396-7846. Casual enough for the whole family yet upscale enough for date night, the sleek Whitney House takes familiar American classics up a notch. BRLD $$$ Wolf’s Ridge Brewing Contemporary American | 215 N. Fourth St., Downtown, 614-429-3936. Frenchand California-cuisineinspired Wolf’s Ridge is a truly delightful marriage of high-end cooking and pints of house-crafted beer. BRLD $$$ Woodhouse Vegan Café American | 851 N. Fourth St., Italian Village, 614-390-2410. The Woodhouse family offers plantbased comfort food that’s tasty enough to convince even the staunchest carnivores. D $$

Woodlands Tavern Bar Fare | 1200 W. Third Ave., Fifth by Northwest, 614-2994987. Preston’s: A Burger Joint runs the kitchen in this intimate live music and entertainment venue. D $ Xi Xia Western Chinese Cuisine Chinese | 1140 Kenny Centre Mall, Northwest Side, 614-670-7736. Xi Xia offers an authentic tour of flavors from the Ningxia autonomous region in north-central China. LD $$

Ohio Department of Insurance 50 W. Town St., Ste. 300, Downtown, 800686-1526 or 614-6442658, insurance.ohio.gov Ohio Department of Public Safety publicsafety.ohio.gov Ohio Department of Taxation tax.ohio.gov Ohio Housing Finance Agency 57 E. Main St., Downtown, 888-3626432 or 614-466-7970, ohiohome.org Ohio Voter Registration sos.state.oh.us/ elections/voters/register

Resident Services

Severe Weather Awareness weathersafety.ohio.gov

Columbus Public Health 240 Parsons Ave., Olde Towne East, 614-6457417, columbus.gov/ publichealth

The Supreme Court of Ohio and the Ohio Judicial System 65 S. Front St., Downtown, 614-387-9000, supremecourt.ohio.gov

Golden Buckeye Senior Discount Card 800-422-1976, aging. ohio.gov/golden buckeye

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES Columbus Springs East 2085 Citygate Dr., East Side, 614-362-3884, columbussprings.com

Office of the Ohio Consumers’ Counsel 65 E. State St., Seventh Floor, Downtown, 877-742-5622 or 614-466-9467, occ. ohio.gov Ohio Association of Free Clinics 35 N. Fourth St., Ste. 350, Downtown, 614-914-6458, ohiofreeclinics.org

Columbus Springs Dublin 7625 Hospital Dr., Dublin, 614-368-8048, columbussprings.com Diley Ridge Medical Center 7911 Diley Rd., Canal Winchester, 614-8387911, dileyridgemedical center.com

Hometown Urgent Care 2880 Stelzer Rd., East Side, 614-472-2880; 1100 Sunbury Rd., #706, Delaware, 740-363-3133; 3813 S. Hamilton Rd., Groveport, 614-8350400; 4400 N. High St., Northwest Columbus, 614-263-4400; 5677 Scioto Darby Rd., Ste. 200, Hilliard, 614-9210648; 4300 Clime Rd., West Side, 614-2721100; hometownurgent care.com Mount Carmel East 6001 E. Broad St., East Side, 614-234-6000, mountcarmelhealth.com Mount Carmel Grove City 5300 N. Meadows Dr., Grove City, 614-6635300, mountcarmel health.com Mount Carmel Hilliard 4674 Britton Pkwy., Hilliard, 614-210-4500, mountcarmelhealth.com Mount Carmel Lewis Center 7100 Graphics Way, Ste. 2400, Lewis Center, 740-953-4000, mountcarmelhealth.com Mount Carmel New Albany 7333 Smith’s Mill Rd., New Albany, 614-7756600, mountcarmel health.com Mount Carmel St. Ann’s 500 S. Cleveland Ave., Westerville, 380-8984000, mountcarmel health.com Mount Carmel Urgent Care 6495 E. Broad St., East Side, 614-986-7752; 3000 Meadow Pond Ct., Ste. 200, Grove City, 614-871-7130; mountcarmelhealth.com Mount Carmel West 793 W. State St., Franklinton, 614-2345000, mountcarmel health.com Nationwide Children’s Hospital 700 Children’s Dr.,

PHOTO: ROB HARDIN

4074. Chef Josh Dalton has filled the former Veritas space with his take on Italian cuisine. The frequently changing menu showcases fresh ingredients and a thoughtful beverage program. D $$


Downtown, 614-7222000, nationwide childrens.org

Columbus, 614-5665000, ohiohealth.com/ riverside

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Close to Home Centers with Urgent Care 700 Children’s Dr., Downtown, 614-722-4329; 7901 Diley Rd., Ste. 150, Canal Winchester, 614-355-9050; 7450 Hospital Dr., Ste. 100, Dublin, 614-355-7000; 6435 E. Broad St., East Side, 614-355-8100; 4363 All Seasons Dr., Ste. 100, Hilliard, 614-355-5900; 100 Colemans Crossing Blvd., Marysville, 937-578-7600; 433 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville, 614-3558300; nationwide childrens.org

OhioHealth Urgent Care 1710 Columbus Pike, Delaware, 740-5492700; 6905 Hospital Dr., Ste. 130, Dublin, 614-923-0300; 895 W. Third Ave., Fifth by Northwest, 614-4370278; 5610 N. Hamilton Rd., Gahanna, 614-775-9870; 2030 Stringtown Rd., Grove City, 614-883-0160; 4343 All Seasons Dr., Ste. 160, Hilliard, 614-541-2676; 1120 Polaris Pkwy., Polaris, 614-847-1120; 2014 Baltimore-Reynoldsburg Rd., Reynoldsburg, 614-522-6900; ohiohealth.com

OhioHealth Doctors Hospital 5100 W. Broad St., West Side, 614-544-1000, ohiohealth.com/doctors OhioHealth Dublin Methodist Hospital 7500 Hospital Dr., Dublin, 614-544-8000, ohiohealth.com/ dublinmethodist OhioHealth Grady Memorial Hospital 561 W. Central Ave., Delaware, 740-6151000, ohiohealth.com/ grady OhioHealth Grant Medical Center 111 S. Grant Ave., Downtown, 614-5669000, ohiohealth.com/ grant OhioHealth Grove City Methodist Hospital 1375 Stringtown Rd., Grove City, 614-5669000, ohiohealth.com/ grovecity OhioHealth Rehabilitation Hospital 1087 Dennison Ave., Victorian Village, 614544-4455, ohiohealth rehab.com OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital 3535 Olentangy River Rd., Northwest

Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry 880 Greenlawn Ave., South Side, 877-4046852, ohiohospitalfor psychiatry.com Select Specialty Hospitals of Columbus 181 Taylor Ave., Sixth Floor, King-Lincoln District, 614-6851703; 1430 S. High St., Merion Village, 614-456-0300; 2000 Tamarack Rd., Second Floor, Newark, 220564-2600; select specialtyhospitals.com WEXNER MEDICAL CENTER AT OSU wexnermedical.osu.edu Brain and Spine Hospital 300 W. 10th Ave., University District, 614-366-7744 Dodd Rehabilitation Hospital 480 Medical Center Dr., University District, 614-293-5275 OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center – The Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute 460 W. 10th Ave., University District, 800-293-5066, cancer.osu.edu

OSU Harding Hospital 1670 Upham Dr., University District, 614-293-9600 Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave., University District, 888-293-7677 or 614293-7677 University Hospital 410 W. 10th Ave., University District, 614-293-8000 University Hospital East 181 Taylor Ave., King-Lincoln District, 614-257-3000 LIBRARIES Columbus Metropolitan Library System 96 S. Grant Ave., Downtown (main branch), 614-645-2275, columbuslibrary.org Local branches: 3909 N. High St., Clintonville; 3434 E. Livingston Ave., Eastmoor; 850 N. Nelson Rd., East Side; 1061 W. Town St., Franklinton; 1467 E. Long St., King-Lincoln District; 1113 Parsons Ave., Merion Village; 1422 E. Livingston Ave., Near East Side; 4093 Cleveland Ave., Northeast Side; 5590 Karl Rd., North Side; 2223 Cleveland Ave., South Linden; 3540 S. High St., South Side; 2740 Lockbourne Rd., South Side; 1423 N. High St., University District; 511 S. Hague Ave., West Side; 115 Franklin St., Canal Winchester; 75 N. High St., Dublin; 310 Granville St., Gahanna; 3980 S. Hamilton Rd., Groveport; 4500 Hickory Chase Way, Hilliard; 200 Market St., New Albany; 1402 Brice Rd., Reynoldsburg; 4445 E. Broad St., Whitehall

ware, 740-362-3861, delawarelibrary.org

Gahanna, 614-471-7065, gahannaschools.org

Grove City, 614-8013000, swcsd.us

Grandview Heights Public Library 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview, 614-4862951, ghpl.org

Grandview Heights City School District 1587 W. Third Ave., Grandview, 614-4854015, ghcsd.org

Upper Arlington City School District 1950 N. Mallway Dr., Upper Arlington, 614487-5000, uaschools.org

Pickerington Public Library 201 Opportunity Way, Pickerington, 614-8374104, pickerington library.org

Groveport Madison School District 4400 Marketing Pl., Ste. B, Groveport, 614-4922520, gocruisers.org

Westerville City School District 936 Eastwind Dr., Ste. 200, Westerville, 614797-5700, westerville. k12.oh.us

Plain City Public Library 305 W. Main St., Plain City, 614-873-4912, plaincitylib.org

Hamilton Local School District 775 Rathmell Rd., Hamilton Township, 614-4918044, hamilton-local. k12.oh.us

Southwest Public Libraries 3959 Broadway, Grove City, 614-875-6716, swpl.org

Hilliard City School District 2140 Atlas St., West Side, 614-921-7000, hilliardschools.org

Upper Arlington Public Library 2800 Tremont Rd., Upper Arlington, 614486-9621, ualibrary.org

Metro Schools 1929 Kenny Rd., University District, 614-259-6639, themetroschool.org

Worthington Libraries 820 High St., Worthington, 614-807-2626, worthingtonlibraries.org

New Albany-Plain Local School District 55 N. High St., New Albany, 614-855-2040, napls.us

City of Columbus Division of Fire 614-221-3132 (nonemergency), columbus. gov/public-safety/fire

Ohio School for the Deaf 500 Morse Rd., Clintonville, 614-728-4030, ohioschoolforthedeaf. org

City of Columbus Division of Police 614-645-4545 (nonemergency), columbus. gov/police

PUBLIC SCHOOLS Bexley City School District 348 S. Cassingham Rd., Bexley, 614-2317611, bexleyschools.org Big Walnut Local School District 110 Tippett Court, Sunbury, 740-9653010, bigwalnut.k12. oh.us

Ohio State School for the Blind 5220 N. High St., Clintonville, 800-310-3317, ossb.oh.gov

Canal Winchester Local School District 100 Washington St., Canal Winchester, 614837-4533, canalwin chesterschools.org

Olentangy Local School District 7840 Graphics Way, Lewis Center, 740-6574050, olentangy.k12. oh.us

Columbus City School District 270 E. State St., Downtown, 614-365-5000, ccsoh.us

Pickerington Local School District 90 N. East St., Pickerington, 614-833-2110, pickerington.k12.oh.us

Bexley Public Library 2411 E. Main St., Bexley, 614-231-2793, bexleylibrary.org

Dublin City School District 5174 Emerald Pkwy., Dublin, 614-764-5913, dublinschools.net

Reynoldsburg City School District 7244 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, 614501-1020, reyn.org

Delaware County District Library 84 E. Winter St., Dela-

Gahanna-Jefferson Public School District 160 S. Hamilton Rd.,

South-Western City School District 3805 Marlane Dr.,

Whitehall City School District 625 S. Yearling Rd., Whitehall, 614-4175000, whitehall cityschools.org Worthington City School District 200 E. Wilson Bridge Rd., Worthington, 614-450-6000, worthington.k12.oh.us SAFETY Emergencies 911

County Sheriffs 614-431-5500, buckeyesheriffs.org Ohio State Highway Patrol #677, statepatrol.ohio. gov UTILITIES American Electric Power (AEP) Ohio 1 Riverside Plaza, Downtown, 800-6722231, aepohio.com Columbia Gas of Ohio 290 W. Nationwide Blvd., Downtown, 800344-4077, columbia gasohio.com Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) 180 E. Broad St., Downtown, 800-6867826 or 614-466-3292, puco.ohio.gov

COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

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Closing CAP CITY LOVE

Insta-Love

If a picture's worth a thousand words, then the creativity of Columbus locals and visitors on Instagram could fill a thousand novels. We rounded up some of our recent favorite shots from followers, influencers and our own staffers to showcase some of the best visual inspiration the city has to offer. —Emma Frankart Henterly

Otherworld • @verbalmelange

Downtown Columbus • @brewsco

Lincoln Social Rooftop • @aekordy

Mapfre Stadium • @trentmmiller

Easton Town Center @faithfirst.fashionsecond Huntington Park • @verbalmelange Columbus College of Art & Design @joeloliphint

Antiques on High • @egedwards Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams cart @brittanymoseley

Otherworld • @tjones_rn Ohio Stadium • @minty_the_merle_corgi

RH Columbus, The Gallery at Easton @cupofcourtney Ballantrae Park • @lunalovegoodpoodle

Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens • @klengelphoto

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COLUMBUS MONTHLY CITY GUIDE

Columbus Pride Parade • @verbalmelange


Profile for The Columbus Dispatch

Columbus Monthly City Guide 2020-21  

City Guide is a special annual publication from Columbus Monthly that highlights our vibrant city, including the arts, entertainment, retail...

Columbus Monthly City Guide 2020-21  

City Guide is a special annual publication from Columbus Monthly that highlights our vibrant city, including the arts, entertainment, retail...