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2016 2017 CATALOG


CULTIVATING FAITHFUL LEADERS FOR GOD’S CHANGING WORLD! Columbia Theological Seminary P. O. Box 520701 S. Columbia Drive Decatur, Georgia 30031 www.CTSnet.edu Columbia Theological Seminary is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award masters and doctorate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097 or call 404.679.4500 for questions about the accreditation of Columbia Theological Seminary. Columbia Theological Seminary is also accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada to award the following degrees: Decatur, GA — Master of Art (Theological Studies), Master of Arts in Practical Theology, Master of Divinity, Master of Theology, Doctor of Ministry, Doctor of Educational Ministry, and Doctor of Theology Kingston, Jamaica — Doctor of Ministry Questions regarding Columbia Theological Seminary’s accreditation status or adherence to ATS’s standards should be addressed to the Association of Theological Schools, 10 Summit Park Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1110 or by calling 412-788-6505. The regulations, requirements, and general information included in this catalog are official for the 2016-2017 academic year, but are subject to revision at any time and, therefore, are in no way binding upon the seminary. An electronic update of this catalog will be available on the Columbia Theological Seminary website for the 2016–2017 academic year, and will serve as the official catalog for that year. Please consult the Columbia Theological Seminary website for updates and the most current information.


CONTENTS MISSION

Our Purpose...............................................................7 Our Mission ..............................................................7 Our Mission Is Framed by Commitments ................7 Our Institutional Goals .............................................9 Our Educational Vision.............................................9

DEGREE PROGRAMS

Degree Programs ................................................... 10 Master of Divinity ................................................... 12

COMMUNITY LIFE

Master of Arts in Practical Theology ..................... 16

Awards and Prizes ..................................................58

Advanced Degrees Introduction............................. 20

Graduate Fellowships ..............................................61

Master of Theology ................................................ 20

Placement ...............................................................61

Doctor of Ministry ................................................. 23 Doctor of Theology in Pastoral Counseling ........... 32

CURRICULUM & COURSES

Application Information for International

Practical Theology Area.......................................... 75

Faculty.................................................................... 36

Interdisciplinary Courses ....................................... 83 Supervised Ministry ............................................... 85

Housing .................................................................. 42

ATA Courses .......................................................... 87

Hospitalization Insurance ..................................... 44 Scholarships for Basic Degree Students ...............45

ACADEMIC POLICIES

Advanced Degree Students ................................... 93

Summer Term 2014 ............................................... 47

All Degree Students ..............................................94

Refund Policies ......................................................49

Withdrawal from Seminary ....................................98

The John Bulow Campbell Library .........................51 Related Academic Programs .................................. 52 Programs in Other Locations ................................ 53

SERVICE

Academic Notes and Policies.................................90 Basic Degree Students.............................................91

Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges Effective

RESOURCES

Courses of Instruction ...........................................64 Historical Doctrinal Area ...................................... 70

Special Students and Auditors .............................. 35

Financial Aid ......................................................... 44

Curriculum and Courses ........................................ 62 Biblical Area ........................................................... 65

Students and Exchange Visitors.............................34

HOUSING

Orientation ............................................................ 57 Community Worship and Convocations ................ 57

Master of Arts (Theological Studies)...................... 18

Doctor of Educational Ministry............................. 28

Yearly Schedule ...................................................... 57

The Center for Lifelong Learning .......................... 55 International Theological Education ..................... 55

CALENDAR

Calendar 2015–2017 ............................................. 99

INDEX

Index.....................................................................100

DIRECTORY

Staff Directory..................................................... 102 www.CTSnet.edu

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CONTENTS MISSION

Our Purpose...............................................................7 Our Mission ..............................................................7 Our Mission Is Framed by Commitments ................7 Our Institutional Goals .............................................9 Our Educational Vision.............................................9

DEGREE PROGRAMS

Degree Programs ................................................... 10 Master of Divinity ................................................... 12

COMMUNITY LIFE

Master of Arts in Practical Theology ..................... 16

Awards and Prizes ..................................................58

Advanced Degrees Introduction............................. 20

Graduate Fellowships ..............................................61

Master of Theology ................................................ 20

Placement ...............................................................61

Doctor of Ministry ................................................. 23 Doctor of Theology in Pastoral Counseling ........... 32

CURRICULUM & COURSES

Application Information for International

Practical Theology Area.......................................... 75

Faculty.................................................................... 36

Interdisciplinary Courses ....................................... 83 Supervised Ministry ............................................... 85

Housing .................................................................. 42

ATA Courses .......................................................... 87

Hospitalization Insurance ..................................... 44 Scholarships for Basic Degree Students ...............45

ACADEMIC POLICIES

Advanced Degree Students ................................... 93

Summer Term 2014 ............................................... 47

All Degree Students ..............................................94

Refund Policies ......................................................49

Withdrawal from Seminary ....................................98

The John Bulow Campbell Library .........................51 Related Academic Programs .................................. 52 Programs in Other Locations ................................ 53

SERVICE

Academic Notes and Policies.................................90 Basic Degree Students.............................................91

Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges Effective

RESOURCES

Courses of Instruction ...........................................64 Historical Doctrinal Area ...................................... 70

Special Students and Auditors .............................. 35

Financial Aid ......................................................... 44

Curriculum and Courses ........................................ 62 Biblical Area ........................................................... 65

Students and Exchange Visitors.............................34

HOUSING

Orientation ............................................................ 57 Community Worship and Convocations ................ 57

Master of Arts (Theological Studies)...................... 18

Doctor of Educational Ministry............................. 28

Yearly Schedule ...................................................... 57

The Center for Lifelong Learning .......................... 55 International Theological Education ..................... 55

CALENDAR

Calendar 2015–2017 ............................................. 99

INDEX

Index.....................................................................100

DIRECTORY

Staff Directory..................................................... 102 www.CTSnet.edu

5


MISSION


OUR PURPOSE

Columbia Theological Seminary is an educational institution of the Presbyterian Church (USA), and a community of theological inquiry, leadership development and formation for ministry in the service of the Church of Jesus Christ.

OUR MISSION

Columbia Theological Seminary exists to educate and nurture faithful, imaginative, and effective leaders for the sake of the Church and the world.

OUR MISSION IS FRAMED BY COMMITMENTS

WE UNDERSTAND CHRISTIAN FAITH TO INCLUDE a growing love for God expressed in daily faithfulness to Jesus Christ, vibrant worship as an essential feature of life together, cultivation of the mind, and the disciplines of the Christian life;

a growing love for the Church expressed in authentic community, participation in the life of local churches, and responding to God’s call to and gifting for leadership; a growing love for Christ’s work in the world expressed in ministries of proclamation, nurture, compassion, justice, creativity, and the care of all creation.

BECAUSE WE ARE A CONFESSIONAL COMMUNITY OF THE CHURCH, WE believe in Christ’s reign over the whole world; articulate a missional understanding of life rooted in the rule of God’s love and justice; celebrate the goodness of God in all creation; live under the authority of Jesus Christ as witnessed in the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, in the Church throughout the ages, and in the Reformed tradition and its confessions; nurture a personal and corporate faith which takes responsibility for our choices amid the political realities, the social institutions, and the global contexts in which we live; commit ourselves to diversity and inclusivity, to ecumenicity, and to discerning the ongoing manifestations of God’s presence in human affairs; listen with openness to voices of hopelessness and hope around and within us; and acknowledge our own brokenness and need for redemption.

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Mission continued MISSION

AT COLUMBIA, WE SEEK TO WITNESS TO God’s creative power—seen in the wonder and beauty of creation; God’s reconciling love—demonstrated in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ; and God’s redemptive action and transforming justice—visible through the Church and in the broad work of the Holy Spirit in a pluralistic and interdependent world.

OUR SPECIAL MISSION IN THE SERVICE OF THE CHURCH, AND ESPECIALLY THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (USA), IS to educate women and men for leadership in ordained and lay ministries by offering graduate degrees, certification programs, and lifelong learning opportunities; to attend diligently to both text and context; to keep learning as a community of scholars and practitioners together; and to provide theological resources through an exceptional faculty, library, and campus facilities.

BECAUSE WE ARE AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION, OUR CALLING IS to prepare persons to be leaders in worship, witness, teaching, mission, and service; to pursue learning that joins mind and heart—that enlarges intellect and imagination and nurtures passion, compassion and empathy; to develop personal and professional skills for leadership in the Church; to learn from the world-wide church, from other faith traditions, from education, the arts, politics, economics, and science, and from those outside the centers of power and influence; and to consider critically from the perspective of the Christian faith, ideological, technical, and scientific assumptions—including our own—about the human situation.

IN CARRYING OUT OUR MISSION, we seek to be faithful to the gospel, and to become a living expression of the Body of Christ in the world.

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Columbia Theological Seminary


OUR INSTITUTIONAL GOALS

Columbia Theological Seminary seeks:

1. To participate with the church in the formation of students for pastoral vocations in the church and the world by providing preeminent theological education within the Reformed tradition; 2. To educate men and women for leadership in ministry through its MDiv, MA(TS) and MAPT degree programs; 3. To enhance the ministries of men and women who are currently engaged in ordained and other forms of leadership by educating them in its ThM, DMin, DEdMin and ThD programs; 4. To enhance the ministries of the PC(USA), the ecumenical church, and persons with a variety of theological interests through its Lifelong Learning programs; 5. To provide a learning community in which theological education, scholarship and formation for ministry flourish; 6. To provide a physical environment that contributes to an atmosphere for effective learning; 7. To be a good steward of its resources in order to provide quality education both in the present and the future; and 8. To foster and sustain Columbia’s connection to the PC(USA), the ecumenical church, the greater Atlanta, national and global communities.

OUR EDUCATIONAL VISION

At Columbia Theological Seminary, we seek to:

• Prepare persons to be led by God as they lead God’s people in worship, witness, mission, and service; • Cultivate lifelong spiritual practices to sustain and support ministry; • Pursue learning that joins body, mind, and heart, enlarges imagination, engages intellect, nurtures passion, and deepens empathy; • Learn from the world, both locally and globally, from other faith traditions, and from those outside the centers of power and influence; and • Interpret the Christian faith as a continuing conversation between the human situation and the gospel.

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DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS


DEGREE PROGRAMS

Columbia’s seal carries a motto which consists of the Greek words for pastors and teachers. These words are taken from the letter to the Ephesians: “The gifts he gave were that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:11-12 NRSV). Since its inception, Columbia has seen its role as training persons for leadership in the church by offering courses of study leading to both basic and advanced degrees. The MASTER OF DIVINITY (MDIV) and the MASTER OF ARTS IN PRACTICAL THEOLOGY (MAPT) are first professional degrees in theological education. The MASTER OF ARTS (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES) (MA[TS]) a basic theological degree, is academic rather than professional in orientation. Advanced degrees include the MASTER OF THEOLOGY (THM), the DOCTOR OF MINISTRY (DMIN), and the DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY (DEDMIN). Women and men from all denominations are eligible to apply for any of Columbia’s degrees. The Doctor of Theology in Pastoral Counseling (ThD) is being discontinued, and will no longer be accepting students.

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MASTER OF DIVINITY

DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

INTRODUCTION

The Master of Divinity degree is offered as a basic theological degree for those who seek to serve as the pastors, prophets, evangelists, teachers, and other leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ. The curriculum offered to MDiv students emerges from the seminary’s identity as a community of memory and hope. Claiming memory, the seminary finds its identity as part of the people of God stretching back thousands of years as it leads students to a fresh and critical appropriation of the Christian tradition for themselves and for the sake of those to and with whom they minister. Claiming hope, Columbia finds its identity in the promises of God, in the world that God will bring about, and in the opportunities still ahead for the work of the church in the midst of the work of God. In all this, the MDiv curriculum draws upon the rich resources of the church’s memory to nurture students’ hope and engage their imaginations for mission in the church and world. The Christian ministry needs persons who are possessed with a deep, informed, and personal faith and who are equipped with skills and imagination to lead the people of God in acts of compassion, proclamation, praise, confession, celebration, justice, reconciliation, and healing. Teaching and learning at Columbia exist for the purpose of equipping and forming the people who equip the saints to engage in the work of ministry. LENGTH OF PROGRAM

the director of contextual education who makes

The MDiv curriculum is designed so that a full-

a recommendation to the student about ways

time student can complete the requirements for

to optimize the student’s contextual education

the degree in three full years and is comprised of

experience while at CTS.

90 semester hour credits. A student’s program CALENDAR AND CREDIT SYSTEM

may be lengthened by a variety of factors, such as participation in internships or taking a reduced

Academic work for the MDiv is offered throughout

load in any given semester. All students must

the year. Two semester-length terms, in the fall and

complete their work within six years from the date

in the spring, anchor the academic year. Half-term

of matriculation.

courses are also offered during these terms. The calendar also includes an intensive term in January

ADVISING

12

and a summer term designed primarily for language

In theological education, students integrate their

study and supervised ministry experiences. Each

studies with their own lives. Faculty members aid

semester-length term consists of 6 weeks of

this process of integration by serving as advisers,

classes, a midterm exam and assessment period,

assisting students in their course selections

another 6 weeks of classes, and a final exam week.

each term. As a result of conversations with

The exam days enable students to complete the

their advisers, students make course selections

work for half-term courses.

that take into account areas of past experience,

identified interests and weaknesses, and the

Courses that meet for the whole term are assigned

assessments of teachers and ministry supervisors.

3 credit hours. Those meeting for half the term

Early in the first year of studies, students undergo

are given 1.5 credit hours. The half-term courses

an individual supervised ministry assessment with

allow students to take more subjects in a given term

Columbia Theological Seminary

All credit is awarded in standard semester hours.


without increasing the number of classes they will carry simultaneously. CANDIDACY DISCERNMENT CONSULTATION A student’s admission to candidacy for the degree emerges from the Candidacy Discernment Consultation (CDC) and must be approved by the faculty. The CDC is a major review of the student’s work in the MDiv degree and the student’s potential for ministry and includes conversation with a small group of selected faculty and fellow students. It occurs after the student has completed at least thirty-nine credit hours of the degree requirements and three hours of a contextual education experience. At the CDC, questions of personal and professional growth and other issues are addressed. Any recommendations or stipulations that arise from the consultation are reviewed by the faculty before they award the MDiv degree.

COMPONENTS OF THE CURRICULUM

Required Courses

13

COURSES

42

CREDITS

Each of these courses must be successfully completed to earn the MDiv degree.

• Imagination and Resilience in God’s Changing World (1 course/3 credits)

• Old Testament Interpretation I & II (2 courses/6 credits) • New Testament Interpretation I & II (2 courses/6 credits)

• History and Presence I & II (2 courses/6 credits) • Christian Theology I & II (2 courses/6 credits) • Biblical Greek or Biblical Hebrew (1 course/3 credits) • Explorations (1 course/3 credits) • Supervised Ministry (1 course/6 credits) • Cross/Roads (1 course/3 credits) • Scripture Reading Practicum (1 course/0 credits) Please note that students are required to do exegetical work in the chosen Biblical language through the Old or New Testament Interpretation courses as appropriate.

Distribution Electives

7

COURSES

24

CREDITS

One course from among a specified set of elective courses in each of the following areas must be successfully completed to earn the MDiv degree:

• Christian ethics (3 credits) • Christian education (3 credits) • Christian leadership (3 credits) • Biblical exegesis using Greek or Hebrew (3 credits) • Pastoral Care (3 credits) • Preaching (3 credits) • Worship (3 credits) • Advanced Supervised Ministry or Practica courses

(courses with significant practice components) (6 credits)

General Electives

21

CREDITS

Total:

90

CREDITS www.CTSnet.edu

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MDiv continued DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF

education loans must agree to make prompt

DIVINITY DEGREE

and regular payments.

To be eligible for graduation with the Master of Divinity degree, students are required to: • Have on file with the seminary a complete and official transcript of credits showing graduation with a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university or college of liberal arts and sciences (unless admitted by special action of the faculty), a completed health form, and any required standardized test results; • Be tested for and achieve competency in English writing and speech; • Be admitted to degree candidacy through

BEYOND THE BASIC DEGREE Although the Master of Divinity program does not equip graduates with everything they will need for effective and faithful ministry, they are equipped with initial, essential tools for their ministries. Because the search for faithful answers to the challenges of the Christian life today requires an ethic of learning for the faith, many graduates return to this and other places of group learning for regular additional formal study. Further knowledge, additional insight into

the successful completion of the Candidacy

the life of faith, and strengthened practice for

Discernment Consultation;

faithful leadership result when graduates engage

• Satisfactorily complete all the requirements of the degree with a total of 90 credit hours within six years of the date of matriculation, 48 of which must be completed at Columbia (excluding cross-registration courses); • Successfully complete the Scripture Reading Practicum, a not-for-credit transcripted requirement; • Maintain a minimum overall grade point average of 2.30; • Lead community worship at least as once after having completed 66 credit hours; • Be in residence for at least four semesters (residency is defined as enrollment as a degreeseeking student and registered for classes); • Demonstrate to the faculty that they have sustained a sound moral and religious character in seminary life and give promise of useful service in the ministry or related vocations; and • Pay all bills to Columbia and give assurance

14

FURTHER THEOLOGICAL STUDY

in regular, disciplined theological study at various stages in their ministries. ADMISSION TO THE MASTER OF DIVINITY PROGRAM Persons seeking admission to the Master of Divinity program may obtain an application from the CTS website. To be considered for admission, prospective students are required to: • Have completed a baccalaureate degree, or its equivalent, at a university or college accredited by one of the six regional accreditation agencies. Applicants with degrees from educational institutions not accredited by one of the six agencies must submit a written essay response to an academic article provided by the Office of Admissions along with their applications. Applicants without a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution are not eligible to enter the MDiv program at the seminary except by special action of the faculty.

that all open accounts in the community and

When requested to do so by presbyteries

elsewhere have been satisfied. Students with

of the Presbyterian Church (USA) or other

Columbia Theological Seminary


denominations, Columbia may accept applicants without a university or college degree for a special course of study; • Furnish a) a completed application form including essays, b) statement of self-disclosure, c) transcripts from all institutions of higher education, d) three recommendations on forms produced by Columbia, e) a church endorsement from one’s home church or the church in which one serves, and f) an official criminal background check report, and g) an interview with a member of the Admissions Committee or other faculty as assigned. • Test scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test are not required. All applicants for whom English is not their first language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit the official score with application materials. Those seeking admission must score at least 550 (paper based format), or 76 (internet format)

I chose Columbia Theological Seminary because I wanted to learn in the context of relationships with God and other people. I didn’t want to go to a theological school just to study. We are making each other better to do justice to the reading of God’s word and living in God’s world. CLAUDIA FORD, MDiv Student

with minimum scores in the following areas: Reading 22; Listening 16; Speaking 16; and Writing 22. All test fees are the responsibility of the applicant. Transfer credit will only be given for courses TRANSFER CREDIT

passed with a grade of B or higher. A student

Students in good standing in other accredited

who has completed a Master of Arts (MA)

seminaries may be admitted after transcripts

degree from an ATS accredited institution may

have been evaluated and their applications

transfer in up to half of the MA degree toward

approved by the Admissions Committee.

Columbia’s MDiv degree. The determination of

Such students must secure a letter from

whether or not particular courses taken at other

their academic dean indicating that they are

institutions receive credit is made by the Office

students in good standing. Students in the MDiv

of Academic Affairs, which also determines

degree program may receive no more than 45

whether the credits will fulfill either required or

credit hours for work completed at another

elective credit hours. All petitions for transfer

Association of Theological Schools (ATS)

credit and advanced standing must be made by

accredited institution within the past five years.

the end of the student’s first academic year. www.CTSnet.edu

15


DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

MASTER OF ARTS IN PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of the Master of Arts in Practical Theology degree is to equip persons for a broad array of ministries through the practice of theological and contextual reflection. The degree program combines a core curriculum of theological studies with the study of particular ministry arts through four areas of concentration: Christian Education, Christian Leadership, Pastoral Care/Pastoral Theology, or Worship. The degree may be appropriate for ordination in those traditions that do not require a three-year Master of Divinity program, or for those lay people who desire a theological education in order to carry out their professional or volunteer ministries in congregational settings or beyond. This degree may also be used to add an area of specialization to a Master of Divinity degree. COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM

years of the date of matriculation, 30 of which

The Masters of Arts in Practical Theology requires 60

must be completed at Columbia (excluding

credit hours and can be completed in two years and

cross-registration courses);

one summer if pursued on a full-time basis. Typically the summer will be used to complete the contextual education requirement. Over the course of the 60 credit hours in this program, students will complete a core set of general courses in biblical studies, history, and doctrine totaling 21 credit hours. In addition all students will complete the Introduction to Practical Theology and Capstone Course in Practical Theology

• Maintain a minimum overall grade point average of 2.30; • Be in residence for at least three long terms (residency is defined as enrollment as a degreeseeking student and registered for classes), unless having already attained a Master of Divinity or Master of Arts degree;

(6 credit hours) and a contextual education course (6 • Demonstrate to the faculty that they have sustained a sound moral and religious character credit hours). Courses in the area of concentration (Christian Education, Christian Leadership, Pastoral

in seminary life and give promise of useful service

Care/Pastoral Theology or Worship) and general

in the ministry or other church vocations; and

electives will constitute the remaining 27 credit hours. • Pay all bills to the seminary and give assurance REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE • Have on file with the seminary a complete and official transcript of credits showing graduation with

that all open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. Students with education loans must agree to make prompt and regular payments.

a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university or college of liberal arts and sciences, a completed health form, and standardized test results; • Be tested for and achieve competency in English writing skills; • Satisfactorily complete all the requirements of the degree with a total of 60 credit hours within five

16

Columbia Theological Seminary

ADMISSION TO THE MASTER OF ARTS IN PRACTICAL THEOLOGY PROGRAM Persons seeking admission to the Master of Arts in Practical Theology program may obtain an application from the CTS website. To be considered for admission, prospective students are required to:


• Have completed a baccalaureate degree, or its

following areas: Reading 22; Listening 16; Speaking 16;

equivalent, at a university or college accredited

and Writing 22. All test fees are the responsibility of the

by one of the six regional accreditation agencies;

applicant.

applicants with degrees from educational institutions not accredited by one of the six

TRANSFER OF CREDIT AND DUAL DEGREE

agencies must submit a written essay response

OPTION

to an academic article provided by the Office of

A student may receive no more than 18 credit hours for

Admissions along with their applications. Under

work completed within the past five years towards an

special circumstances some applicants, who are

unearned degree at another Association of Theological

deemed to possess the requisite academic skills

Schools (ATS) accredited institution. Transfer credit

and abilities due to their life experience, may be

will only be given for courses passed with a grade of

admitted in a provisional status to pursue this

B or higher. The determination of whether or not

degree. Such applicants must also submit a written

courses taken at other institutions may receive credit

essay response to an academic article provided by

is made by the Office of Academic Affairs, which also

the Office of Admissions.

determines whether the credits will fulfill either required or elective credit hours. All petitions for transfer credit

• Furnish a) a completed application form including

essays, b) statement of self-disclosure, c) transcripts and advanced standing must be made by the end of the student’s first academic year. from all institutions of higher education, d) three recommendations on forms produced by Columbia, e) a church endorsement from one’s home church

A student who has completed a Master of Arts (MA) degree from an ATS accredited institution may transfer in up to half of the MA degree toward Columbia’s MAPT

or the church in which one serves, –OR- a letter

degree, but in no case more than 30 hours. A student

of endorsement from one’s sponsoring Christian

who has completed an MDiv at Columbia or at another

organization and f) an official criminal background

ATS accredited institution, may also apply up to 30 hours

check report, and g) an interview with the MAPT

toward the MAPT degree. Applied credit will only be

Program Director, a member of the Admissions

given for courses passed with a grade of B or higher. The

Committee or other faculty as assigned. • Test scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test are not required.

determination of whether or not courses taken at other institutions may receive credit is made by the Office of Academic Affairs, which also determines whether the credits will fulfill either required or elective credit hours.

All applicants for whom English is not their first

A student may pursue the Master of Divinity

language must take the Test of English as a Foreign

and Master of Arts in Practical Theology in a dual

Language (TOEFL) and submit the official score

degree format. Both degrees are awarded at the same

with application materials. Those seeking admission

commencement, after the student has earned 120

must score at least 550 (paper-based format), or

credits and met the requirements of both degrees.

76 (internet format) with minimum scores in the

COMPONENTS OF THE CURRICULUM

21

GENERAL COURSE CREDITS

6

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY COURSE CREDITS

6

CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION COURSE CREDITS

27

AREA OF CONCENTRATION & ELECTIVE COURSE CREDITS

Total:

60

CREDITS www.CTSnet.edu

17


MASTER OF ARTS

DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

(THEOLOGICAL STUDIES) INTRODUCTION

The Master of Arts (Theological Studies) (MA[TS]) is a two-year flexible degree program that provides theological studies for persons who are exploring career options, preparing for doctoral studies, church leadership positions, or specialized forms of lay ministry. The MA(TS) program is also for those persons who wish to engage theological issues of faith and the modern world in relation to their professions. While this program is not designed to prepare persons for the practice of ordained ministry, it may be useful for those ministers who serve in traditions that do not require a degree in divinity for ordination, but who nevertheless wish to develop their formal knowledge of theology. COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM Because students enroll in the MA(TS) program for a wide variety of reasons, they enjoy an extremely flexible schedule. Indeed, the only class they must all take is the MA(TS) Seminar, normally during the fall of their first year at the seminary. Among its primary purposes, this seminar helps them to clarify their plans for the

and do original work, and to write at a masters’ level. Ordinarily, MA(TS) students shall only take one independent study (which is I600). Students specializing in Old Testament must take Hebrew; likewise, students specializing in New Testament must take Greek. The other courses in the discipline may be chosen from among any offered to basic degree students at Columbia.

degree, structure their coursework accordingly at

To help round out their education, MA(TS)

the seminary, and choose a faculty advisor within

students must choose a different discipline than

their area of specialization. The seminar will also

their area of specialization and take any 9 credit

help students in their exploration of various career

hours in it. Additionally, they must take at least

options.

three hours in yet a third discipline. Beyond

MA(TS) students must choose one of five disciplines as an area of specialization: Old Testament, New Testament, Theology, Church History, or Ethics. They will each take 15 credit hours in this discipline, three of which are met in I600 MA(TS) Independent Study, which is done

these requirements, students are invited to take any course in the curriculum provided that they do not take more than 9 credit hours in the Practical Theology area. Courses that are either Interdisciplinary or in Supervised Ministry allowed with the prior approval of the MA(TS) Director.

under the direction of a faculty member in that discipline. Taken near the end of their degree work, I600 requires the production of a 25-35 page major research paper and provides students with the opportunity to deeply explore a critical issue in their field, thus revealing the ability to do in-depth and independent research, to critically engage and analyze that research, to think constructively

18

Columbia Theological Seminary

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF ARTS (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES) DEGREE To be eligible for graduation with the MA(TS) degree, students are required to: • Have on file with the seminary a complete and official transcript of credits showing graduation


with a bachelor’s degree from an accredited

• Furnish a) a completed application form

university or college of liberal arts and sciences,

including essays, b) statement of self-

a completed health form, and any required

disclosure, c) transcripts from all institutions

standardized test results;

of higher education, d) four recommendations

• Be tested for and achieve competency in English writing skills; • Satisfactorily complete all the requirements of the degree with a total of 48 credit hours within five years of the date of matriculation, 27 of which must be completed at Columbia (excluding cross-registration courses); • Maintain a minimum overall grade point average of 2.30; • Be in residence for at least three long terms (residency is defined as enrollment as a degreeseeking student and registered for classes); • Demonstrate to the faculty that they have

on forms produced by Columbia, e) a church endorsement from one’s home church or the church in which one serves, and f) an official criminal background check report, and g) an interview with the MA(TS) Program Director, a member of the Admissions Committee or other faculty as assigned. • Test scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test are not required. • All applicants for whom English is not their first language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit the official score with application materials. Those

sustained a sound moral and religious character in

seeking admission must score at least 550

seminary life and give promise of useful service in

(paper-based test) or 76 (internet-based test)

the ministry or other church vocations; and

with minimum scores in the following areas:

• Pay all bills to the seminary and give assurance

Reading 22; Listening 16; Speaking 16; and

that all open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. Students with

Writing 22. All test fees are the responsibility of the applicant.

education loans must agree to make prompt and regular payments. • Details of the program are available from the director of the Master of Arts (Theological Studies) program.

TRANSFER CREDIT A student may transfer no more than 15 credit hours in the five fields of the program from work completed before admission. The credit must be earned from regionally accredited or

ADMISSION TO THE MASTER OF ARTS (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES) PROGRAM Persons seeking admission to the Master of Arts (Theological Studies) program may obtain an application from the CTS website. To be considered for admission, prospective students are required to: • Have completed a four-year baccalaureate

ATS accredited institutions. No transfer credit may be obtained for work done more than 36 months before admission. Transfer credit will only be given for courses passed with a grade of B or higher. The determination of whether or not courses taken at other institutions may receive credit is made by the Office of Academic Affairs. All petitions for transfer credit and advanced

degree, or its equivalent, at a regionally

standing must be made by the end of the

accredited university or college of arts and

student’s first academic year.

sciences; www.CTSnet.edu

19


ADVANCED DEGREES DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

Columbia offers four programs leading to an advanced degree. They include the MASTER OF THEOLOGY, DOCTOR OF MINISTRY, DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY, and DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY IN PASTORAL COUNSELING. The ThD degree is no longer accepting applicants and will be discontinued once current students complete the degree. Each of these advanced degrees builds on the work completed in the MDiv, MAPT, or MA(TS) degrees. In addition to the resources of the faculty and library on Columbia’s campus, advanced degree students are expected to draw upon the resources of the Atlanta area. The ThD programs are administered by the Graduate Professional Studies Committee of the Atlanta Theological Association (ATA), which coordinates and augments the resources of: Columbia; Candler School of Theology of Emory University, the Interdenominational Theological Center, Erskine Theological Seminary in Due West, South Carolina, and Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, South Carolina. ThM degree students may also include in their program studies at these seminaries. Resources within the Atlanta community are also available to Columbia’s advanced degree students. Accredited programs of clinical pastoral education and pastoral counseling are available in many settings. Numerous national and regional offices of denominational and interdenominational agencies are located in Atlanta. Other educational opportunities are available at Emory University, Georgia State University, and area colleges.

MASTER OF THEOLOGY INTRODUCTION The Master of Theology (ThM) is designed for persons already holding the MDiv degree or its equivalent who wish to deepen their mastery of one area or discipline of theological study through reflection, research, and writing for the service of the Church. The distinctive element of Columbia’s ThM program is the opportunity to work closely with faculty mentors in research of mutual interest. Students pursue a one-year course of full-time study that includes coursework in relevant curricular areas; a seminar in research methods; close work with a faculty mentor; the production of a publishable research thesis project; and, by application to the faculty, the opportunity to serve as a research or teaching assistant. OVERVIEW OF REQUIREMENTS Students must earn at least 12 credit hours, in addition to 18 credit hours for the ThM thesis preparation (reading and writing) in the area of specialization. ThM students participate in an intensive oneweek Research Seminar in the late summer and

20

Columbia Theological Seminary

a one semester writing colloquium in the spring with other students in the program. The intensive late summer session focuses on research methods, and the fall focuses on research and the beginning of thesis writing. During the spring semester, students present and discuss work they are doing on their thesis.


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE To be eligible for graduation with the ThM degree, students are required to: • Have on file with the seminary a complete and official transcript of credits showing graduation with the MDiv degree (or its equivalent) from an accredited institution, a completed health form, and standardized test results; • Satisfactorily complete all the requirements of the degree with a total of 30 credit hours (at the advanced level) within two years of the date of matriculation, 18 of which must be completed at Columbia (excluding cross-registration courses);

ThM THESIS Students complete a ThM thesis. The thesis is worth 12 semester hours of credit, 3 credit hours for focused reading and research, 3 credit hours for writing a literature review and 6 credit hours for writing the thesis. The progress of the writing and the provisional and final approval of the thesis are overseen by the student’s advisor and the ThM director in consultation with the Academic Affairs Office.

Summer

Fall term • Thesis research (3 credits) • Literature review (3 creidts) • 2 electives (6 credits)

January term • 1 elective (3 credits)

Spring term • Thesis writing (6 credits) • 1 elective (3 credits) • ThM colloquium (3 credits)

(Registered as fall) • Research seminar (3 credits) • August 15-19

• Complete a ThM thesis; • Complete the ThM Research Seminar; • Be in residence for at least two long terms (residency is defined as enrollment as a degreeseeking student and registered for classes); • Maintain a minimum overall grade point average of 3.00; • Demonstrate to the faculty that they have sustained a sound moral and religious character

ADMISSION TO THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM Persons seeking admission to the Master of Theology program may obtain an application from the CTS web site. To be considered for admission,

in seminary life and give promise of useful

prospective students are required to:

service in the ministry or other church

• Have completed the MDiv degree, or its

vocations; and • Pay all bills to the seminary and give assurance that all open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. Students with education loans must agree to make prompt and regular payments. Students in the ThM degree program are assessed an administrative extension fee if they do not finish within the academic year in which the student matriculated.

academic equivalent, at an accredited seminary or divinity school. In certain cases a Master of Arts or a Master of Theological Studies degree in the appropriate area may be accepted as a substitute, but additional preparatory work may be required; ordinarily, a B average in an applicant’s college and seminary program is considered a minimum standard for admission. Applicants shall have official transcripts of all work since high school sent directly from the institution;

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21


ThM continued DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

• Have a knowledge of both the Hebrew and Greek languages if they seek to do their ThM in biblical studies; • Submit three references (on reference forms provided by Columbia): two academic references from seminary or other graduate school professors and one character reference from a person who is familiar with the applicant’s ministry or professional ministry; • A scholarly writing sample may be requested in addition to the application; • Submit the application for the ThM degree by March 1 for the following academic year; • Indicate to the admission office within thirty

days after receiving notification of admission whether or not they will accept admission; and • Begin their course of study only in the fall semester. All ThM applicants for whom English is not their first language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the TOEFL score must be from a test date that is two years or less from the date of application to Columbia Theological Seminary. A minimum score of 575 (paper-based test) or 86 (internet-based test) is required, with the following minimum scores required in these areas: Reading 22; Listening 20; Speaking 20; and Writing 24. All test fees are the responsibility of the applicant.

TRANSFER OF CREDIT

I truly believe that although a big portion of the education we provide at Columbia occurs in the classroom, another part of it takes place in the relationships students have with each other, with faculty, and with staff. By the way we live out our lives as staff: by showing kindness, by offering hospitality to all people, by challenging the students who work with me to love others, by creating a safe space where those who walk through my office door can be themselves, I know I am shaping the current and future ministries of students.” REV. CLAUDIA AGUILAR, MDiv ’11 and Associate Dean, Student Services Administrator

22

Columbia Theological Seminary

In planning the student’s program with her/ his adviser or the ThM program director, a student may request the transfer of limited credit for work done prior to entry or at another institution while enrolled in the ThM program at Columbia. Ordinarily, the number of hours of transfer credit will be limited to three semester hours, or the equivalent of one elective course at Columbia. The work must have been done at a comparable graduate level within the last five years. A grade of B or better must have been earned for the course. The student must be able to show that the work is relevant to the ThM program and that the course work was not credited toward a degree which was received. Final approval regarding transfer of credit resides with the Office of Academic Affairs.


DOCTOR OF MINISTRY AIMS OF THE PROGRAM The Doctor of Ministry degree program is designed for persons now engaged in ministry, who have completed basic theological studies (the Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent), and at least three years of full-time service in the practice of ministry after their MDiv studies. Persons from other countries may be eligible to apply, and in certain instances, be admitted.

The program provides a course of graduate study for ministers of the people of God in the

Church of Jesus Christ. It requires disciplined reflection upon, and perhaps further specialization within ministry. The program focuses on the critical engagement between the biblical, historical, theological, and pastoral disciplines of ministry. By helping students integrate ministerial theory and practice with basic faith commitments, the program strengthens ministers to exercise a critical kind of teaching role in the church and to increase their competency and faithfulness in practice.

Because the program seeks to help students strengthen a holistic ministry in community, the

program is largely generalist in character, involving questions of personal ministerial identity and of the nature of the church and its mission in a postmodern world. A doctoral project requires students to focus this integrated approach in a particular context.

Students enter the DMin program through one of three approaches: Church and Ministry,

Christian Spirituality, and Gospel, Culture and the Transformation of the Church.

CHURCH AND MINISTRY APPROACH

GOSPEL, CULTURE, AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE CHURCH

The Church and Ministry approach leads ministers

APPROACH

in an experience of collegial learning with a primary focus on the ministry and mission of the

Designed by a group of Columbia faculty members,

local congregation.

the Gospel and Culture approach asks pastors to

engage questions about the mission of the Church

Students examine their ministry settings and

describe their present practice of ministry. On

in contemporary culture. Through the introductory

the basis of shared readings and critical reflection,

seminar, the various elective classes, the doctoral

students seek to develop a new vision for church

practicum, and the doctoral project, students

service, which becomes the perspective from

work with a faculty group representing a rich blend

which elective courses, supervised practice, and

of diverse, theological and cultural perspectives.

the DMin project are undertaken. The Church and Students are challenged to develop their own Ministry approach offers students the opportunity

analyses and directions for the faithful ministry of

to reshape ministry for the sake of their leadership

the Church in a context variously described as post-

in the church. Normally, the introductory

enlightenment, post-modern, post-Christian.

seminar for this approach is taught every fall from

September to December -- students are required

in subsequent studies, students and faculty are

to participate in two full days of classes for each

engaged with the writings and the analyses of

month from September to December as specified

theologians, sociologists, philosophers, cultural

each year.

anthropologists, and historians. Participants reflect

In the initial introductory seminar, and then

in some depth upon the concrete manifestations

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23


DMin continued DEGREE PROGRAMS

of culture—the art and artifacts, the products,

& ADMISSIONS

technologies, entertainments, institutions, and

engages students in academic and experiential

The Christian Spirituality Concentration

movements that characterize daily life. They

study of spirituality. Students study historical

examine the major fault lines within the Church

theological scholarship and social ethical research

about the meaning of Christian faith and the

regarding spirituality as an academic field of

ways Christians read the theological signs of the

study in the introductory seminar. In subsequent

time. Finally, students are asked to think through

coursework, students pursue their particular

their practice of ministry in the light of their

research interests in preparation for completion

studies and to develop a doctoral project that will

of the final project. The Practicum provides

both strengthen their own ministry and make a

students the opportunity to do experiential

critical and constructive contribution to the faith

learning in their ministerial contexts or to

and practice of the Church. A number of DMin

complete a Certificate in Spiritual Direction in

students from Jamaica and the Caribbean may

conjunction with the Life Long Learning Program

participate in this introductory seminar along

of Columbia Seminary.

with one faculty from the United Theological College of the West Indies, adding a rich layer of

COURSE FORMATS

conversation on the topic of Gospel, Culture, and

Classes are taught in one of three formats: 1)

the Transformation of the Church.

intensive two-week course at the seminary; 2)

A significant part of this approach will include

hybrid format where students will take classes

topics and themes related to the issues of church

on campus for one-week and complete the

planting and church transformation. These areas

remainder of the course online; 3) fully online

will include reflective and analytical investigation

course. Classes are offered over a three-to four-

of our theological, missiological and ecclesiological

year period of the degree, but students will do

assumptions that send the church into the

most of their studies, their practicum, and project

world. It will also reflect on ministerial and public

in their own ministry setting in consultation with

leadership styles in relation to entrepreneurial and

the faculty.

transformative congregational ministry. DMIN PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY APPROACH

The DMin program operates under the

Equipping leaders to foster spiritual renewal in the

supervision of Columbia’s Advanced Degrees

lives of individuals and in congregations, focusing

Committee and is administered by a faculty

on congregational leadership, students will explore

member serving as associate dean for advanced

God’s relationship to persons, the community of

professional studies. The program cooperates

faith and the world, including the ethical and social

with the other member schools of the Atlanta

dimensions of spirituality. The Doctor of Ministry

Theological Association (ATA). Students may

in Christian Spirituality deepens leadership skills

take courses in the DMin programs of other ATA

and offers fresh approaches to planning and

member schools through cross registration.

leading retreats, developing small groups for spiritual discovery and direction, and providing

24

ADVISING

spiritual guidance to those who seek discernment

Each student is guided by an adviser who is

of God’s will in their lives.

assigned during the introductory seminar. The

Columbia Theological Seminary


student is responsible for consulting with the adviser to develop a plan of study. When the student is ready to submit a proposal for his or her project, first and second readers are chosen. The adviser may serve as either the first or second reader for the project, however, the first reader will become the new advisor of record. The first and second readers assist the student in developing a project proposal and evaluate the student’s written project report. COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM The thirty-six-hour program comprises: • INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR (6 credit hours), required at the outset of the program. Students take part in an intensive seminar to explore interdisciplinary perspectives around contemporary issues of ministry and professional development. In this seminar students begin interdisciplinary integration and clarify an operative theory of ministry to guide their development of a study plan. • ELECTIVE COURSES (15 credit hours) The program requires a plan of study involving the integration of three dimensions: the biblical and theological norms of Christian faith; critical attention to the contemporary human situation; and the practices of ministry and church mission. In consultation with an adviser, each student draws up a course of study to achieve the aims of both the student and the doctoral program. • INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODOLOGIES (1.5 credit hours) is a seminar designed to introduce to the students the basic rudiments of qualitative and quantitative research methods and research design that students will need to know in order to design their final DMin projects. The seminar is offered in the afternoons when

other DMin courses are offered in the mornings so that students can take the seminar along with another DMin elective. This seminar together with the Project Proposal Workshop offered near the end of the students’ course work are offered to prepare the students to articulate a well designed project proposal before writing their final projects. • DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PRACTICUM (3 credit hours), a supervised activity in ministry. This practicum can also take place in settings as diverse as business, governmental, community, or church agencies where appropriate supervision and learning opportunities with peers are available. In any case, the practicum normally takes place in the student’s ministry context, providing new perspectives on self, theology, profession, and the needs and challenges of other persons and institutions. A unit of Clinical Pastoral Education or the Preaching practicum course may be used to meet this requirement. • PROJECT PROPOSAL WORKSHOP (1.5 credit hours) Toward the end of the program coursework, each student participates in a project development and design seminar to clearly articulate the topic and design of his or her final DMin project. This seminar together with the Introduction to Research Methodologies offered near the beginning of the students’ program are offered to prepare the students to articulate a well designed project proposal before writing their final projects. • LITERATURE REVIEW (3 credit hours) After students successfully complete their project proposals they will work on critically reviewing the relevant literature for their project with the careful guidance of their first readers. The culmination of the literature review may be the

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25


DMin continued DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

completion of the chapter on the theoretical and theological framework of the student’s project. The student must receive satisfactory evaluation from his or her first and second readers in order to pass the course. • DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT (6 credit hours). Elements of the course of study converge in the Doctor of Ministry Project. The student must complete a project

• Complete the Introduction to Research Methodologies and the Project Proposal Workshop; • Complete the DMin project; • Maintain a minimum overall grade point average of 3.00; • Demonstrate to the faculty that they

and a written project report that interprets

have sustained a sound moral and religious

this project to the seminary community and

character in seminary life and give promise of

the larger church. So that the project can be

useful service in the ministry or other church

an integrating focus for the entire course of

vocations; and

study, students should start thinking about the proposal for the project early in the program. Ordinarily, students conduct the project in their usual ministerial setting. Students enrolled in the Doctor of Ministry degree program are required to request an extension if they have not completed the degree requirements within four years of the date of matriculation. The extension request must be sent to the registrar, indicating in the request an expected graduation date. If the request is approved an extension fee will be charged by the Business Office. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY DEGREE To be eligible for graduation with the DMin degree, students are required to: • Have on file with the seminary a complete and

• Pay all bills to the seminary and give assurance that all open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied; students with education loans must agree to make prompt and regular payments. ADMISSION TO THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROGRAM Persons seeking admission to the Doctor of Ministry degree program are required to have a MDiv or an equivalent degree with a superior academic record (a B average or higher) from a school of theology accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (or an equivalent accrediting body outside the United States and Canada). In addition, applicants are required to have completed at least three years of full-time work in ministry with demonstrated superior professional performance; normally this work must have been completed after the applicant

official transcript of credits showing graduation

received the MDiv degree.

with the MDiv degree (or its equivalent) from

To be considered for admission to the DMin

an ATS accredited institution;

program, applicants are required to supply the

• Satisfactorily complete all the requirements of the degree with a total of 36 credit hours within four years of the date of matriculation,

26

30 of which must be completed at Columbia;

Columbia Theological Seminary

Office of Advanced Professional Studies with: • An application for admission, including a personal statement;


• Verification of three years of experience in ministry after completion of the MDiv degree; • Official transcripts of all work completed after high school, sent directly from the appropriate institutions; and • Three letters of recommendation (on forms provided by Columbia): one academic reference from a seminary or other graduate school professor and two character references

from persons who are familiar with the applicant’s ministry; in some cases, the associate dean for advanced professional studies may request a personal interview with the applicant. All DMin applicants for whom English is not their first language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Internet-based test (iBT), and the iBT TOEFL score must be from a test date that is two years or less from the date of application to Columbia Theological Seminary. Normally a minimum total iBT TOEFL score of 86 is required, with the following minimum required scores in the areas: Reading 22; Listening 20; Speaking 20; and Writing 24. All test fees are the responsibility of the applicant. International applicants to the DMin program

“Looking at Christianity from a global perspective humbles me. Christianity is prevalent in the United States: this is a country where Christians can practice and express their faith freely. That is not the case all around the world. I have seen and met people who have been and are being persecuted because of their faith. I can no longer believe that Christian persecution is historical. It is current and it is real. My exposure to Christianity around the world has made me much more of a proponent for a theology of liberation and a seeker of justice for all people. Through my exposure to Christianity around the world with the international programs at Columbia, including a recent trip to India, I now claim the authority to question and challenge oppressive systems outside of my daily context.”

must first contact the International Programs

MILLICENT THOMSON, MDiv/MAPT ‘17

Office (intlprog@ctsnet.edu) for application information. TRANSFER CREDIT With prior approval from the Office of Academic

be considered for transfer credit. A course

Affairs, a student may receive up to 6 hours of

submitted for advanced standing must have

transfer credit from another ATS accredited

been taken no more than five years before

institution. Each course must be at the advanced

entrance into the program. Students may not

degree level and the grade must be at least a B

receive credit for academic work applied toward

(3.0 on a scale of 4.0). Independent studies

another degree.

and enhanced basic degree courses will not

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27


DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY AIMS OF THE PROGRAM The goal of the Doctor of Educational Ministry degree program is to enhance the practice of and theological reflection on educational ministry for persons who hold their first professional degree in religious education or its equivalent and have engaged in educational ministry leadership for at least three years of full-time service in the practice of Christian educational ministry after their studies. Persons from other countries may be eligible to apply, and in certain instances, be admitted. The program affords a course of graduate study for educators who serve the people of God in the Church of Jesus Christ. The program focuses on (a) an advanced understanding of the nature and purposes of educational ministry, (b) enhanced capacity to reflect theologically on issues and practices related to educational ministry, (c) acquisition and refinement of skills and competencies for more effective ministry, (d) an understanding of emerging models in educational ministry and ability critically to evaluate those models, and (e) continued growth in spiritual maturity. The Doctor of Educational Ministry program

• Significant interdisciplinary learning

provides advanced-level study of the theological,

experiences that provide integration of

educational, and administrative disciplines

theological understanding and ministerial

including:

practice, require thoughtful use of the

• An advanced and critical study of Christian formation from theological and historical perspectives as well as behavioral and social science perspectives; • An advanced and critical study of organizational and leadership development, and the social contexts for ministry; • An advanced and critical study of educational theory and practice as it relates to congregational and other ministry contexts; and • The development of skills and competencies

student’s ministerial context as a learning environment, and cultivate reflective practice of educational ministry; • Opportunities for personal and spiritual growth; and • Opportunities to learn how to engage in educational ministry in culturally and racially diverse contexts. Like the DMin program, the DEdMin program includes the design and completion of a doctoral level project. Such a project addresses the

nature and practice of educational ministry and necessary for research, planning, and evaluation should be of sufficient quality that it contributes of the practice of educational ministry in both to the student’s and the profession’s congregations or other settings.

The program also provides a variety of learning opportunities, including: • Peer learning and evaluation as well as selfdirected learning experiences;

28

Columbia Theological Seminary

understandings of the practice of educational ministry. The ministry project demonstrates the candidate’s ability, under supervision, to identify an educational ministry need, organize and carry out research methods that address that need, interpret the data, and implement and evaluate


any ministry model that emerges from the

COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM THE

research. While the first reader for the report will

45-HOUR PROGRAM COMPRISES:

likely be one of the faculty members in Christian

• INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR (6 credit

education, the second reader must come from outside the field of Christian education. Columbia also requires a public presentation, in which the candidate demonstrates an advanced capacity to reflect theologically on the practice of educational ministry, to identify critical issues in the context of the ministry project, and to think constructively and imaginatively about the educational and administrative aspects of congregational life and other contexts of educational ministry practice. DEDMIN PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION The DEdMin program operates under the

hours), required at the outset of the program. Students take part in an intensive seminar to explore educational theory and practice. • EDUCATIONAL CORE COURSES (15 credit hours) are instrumental to the plan of study in the DEdMin program. These courses include 1) advanced study in the theology, history and philosophy of educational ministry, 2) advanced study in human development, 3) advanced study in curriculum theory and curriculum development, and 4) advanced study in teaching theory and teaching methods. • ELECTIVE COURSES (9 credit hours). To

supervision of Columbia’s Advanced Degrees

fulfill the degree requirement of significant

Committee and is administered by the associate

interdisciplinary learning experiences that

dean for advanced professional studies. Students

provide integration of theological understanding

enter the program through an introductory

and ministerial practice, students take three

seminar offered at Columbia. Students may

elective courses from the broader offering of

also take courses in other schools of the Atlanta

DMin electives. Only one elective may be from

Theological Association.

the practical theology area.

ADVISING Each student is guided by an adviser who is one of the professors of Christian education. This assignment takes place after the introductory seminar. This adviser works with the student to develop a plan of study. When the student is ready to submit a proposal for his or her project, the adviser becomes the first reader and a second reader is chosen. The first and second readers comprise the doctoral committee that administers the qualifying examination, assists the student in developing a project proposal, and evaluates the student’s written project report.

• DEVELOPMENT OF A CURRICULUM DESIGN (3 hours) - An original curriculum design is produced, tested, and assessed by the student. • DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY PRACTICUM (6 credit hours), a supervised activity in educational ministry. The practicum takes place outside the student’s ordinary work situation, providing new perspectives on self, theology, profession, and the needs and challenges of other persons and institutions. It can take place in settings as diverse as business, governmental, community, or church agencies where appropriate supervision and learning opportunities with peers are available.

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29


DEdMin continued DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

• PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND

• Have on file with the seminary a complete and

DESIGN WORKSHOP (non-credit). Toward

official transcript of credits showing graduation

the end of the program coursework, each

with the first professional degree in religious

student participates in a project development

education (or its equivalent) from an ATS

and design seminar to foster integration and

accredited institution;

to prepare for qualifying examinations and subsequent project proposal development and writing. • DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY PROJECT (6 credit hours). Elements of the course of study converge in the Doctor of Educational Ministry Project.

• Satisfactorily complete all the requirements of the degree with a total of 45 credit hours within four years of the date of matriculation, 39 of which must be completed at Columbia; • Complete the Project Development and Design Workshop;

The student must complete a project and a

• Complete the DEdMin project;

written project report that interprets this

• Maintain a minimum overall grade point average

project to the seminary community and the larger church. So that the project can be an integrating focus for the entire course of study, students should start thinking about the proposal for the project early in the program. Ordinarily, students conduct the project in their own educational ministry setting. January 15 is the deadline for provisional approval of the written draft by the project committee; February 15 is the deadline for final completion of the project. Students enrolled in the Doctor of Educational Ministry degree program are required to request an extension if they have not completed the degree requirements within four years of the date of matriculation. The extension request must be sent to the registrar, indicating in the request an expected graduation date. If the request is approved an extension fee will be charged by the Business Office. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY DEGREE To be eligible for graduation with the DEdMin degree, students are required to:

of 3.00; • Demonstrate to the faculty that they have sustained a sound moral and religious character in seminary life and give promise of useful service in the ministry or other church vocations; and • Pay all bills to the seminary and give assurance that all open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied; students with education loans must agree to make prompt and regular payments. ADMISSION TO THE DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY PROGRAM Admission to the degree program requires the possession of an ATS-approved first professional degree in educational ministry (i.e., M.R.E., MACE, MA(TS) with a concentration in Christian education, MDiv with demonstrated coursework in educational ministry). Ministerial experience cannot be considered an alternative to or a substitute for the professional master’s degree in educational ministry, nor can other master’s degrees in education that do not have a comprehensive exposure to the theological disciplines. Applicants with appropriate course work may be considered eligible for advanced standing.

30

Columbia Theological Seminary


COMPONENTS OF THE CURRICULUM

6

Applicants for admission shall be required to

demonstrate ability to engage in the practices of educational ministry, superior academic aptitude,

INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR

and capacity both to contribute to the program and benefit by participation in it.

9

Ordinarily, applicants are employed by or

hold an official position in educational ministry throughout the duration of their enrollment in the degree program. To be considered for admission

Studies with: • An application for admission, including a

DEVELOPMENT OF A CURRICULUM DESIGN

6

6

DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY PRACTICUM

personal statement; • Certification of three years of experience in

3

ELECTIVE COURSES

to the DEdMin program, applicants are required to supply the Office of Advanced Professional

15

EDUCATIONAL CORE COURSES

DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY PROJECT

educational ministry after completion of the

Total:

45

+ PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN WORKSHOP (NON-CREDIT).

first professional degree; • Official transcripts of all degree program work

CREDITS

completed after high school, sent directly from the appropriate institutions; and • Three letters of recommendation (on forms

International applicants to the DEdMin

provided by Columbia): one academic

program must first contact the International

reference from a seminary or other graduate

Programs Office (intlprog@ctsnet.edu) for

school professor and two character references

application information.

from persons who are familiar with the applicant’s ministry; in some cases, a professor

TRANSFER CREDIT

of Christian education may request a personal

With prior approval from the Office of Academic

interview with the applicant.

Affairs, a student may receive up to 6 hours of

All DEdMin applicants for whom English is not

transfer credit from another ATS accredited

their first language must take the Test of English

institution. Each course must be at the advanced

as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Internet-based

degree level and the grade must be at least a

test (iBT), and the iBT TOEFL score must be from B (3.0 on a scale of 4.0). Independent studies a test date that is two years or less from the date

and enhanced basic degree courses will not

of application to Columbia Theological Seminary.

be considered for transfer credit. A course

A minimum total iBT TOEFL score of 86 is

submitted for advanced standing must have been

required, with the following minimum required

taken no more than five years before entrance

scores in the areas: Reading 22; Listening 20;

into the program. Students may not receive credit

Speaking 20; and Writing 24. All test fees are the

for academic work applied toward another degree.

responsibility of the applicant.

www.CTSnet.edu

31


DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY

DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

IN PASTORAL COUNSELING INTRODUCTION The Doctor of Theology (ThD) degree is offered through the Atlanta Theological Association by Columbia, Candler School of Theology, and the Interdenominational Theological Center of Atlanta. Students register for courses at any of these three seminaries within the ATA, as well as intensive clinical training (normally at the Care and Counseling Center of Georgia in Atlanta), with at least one-third of the student’s courses taken through the student’s school of enrollment. The program of study is conducted jointly under the direction of the ThD Committee of the Atlanta Theological Association, comprised of full-time teaching faculty in pastoral theology, care, and counseling at Columbia, Candler, and ITC. The ThD Committee has responsibility for approving student admission to the program, establishing curriculum offerings, and certifying candidates for the awarding of the degree. AIMS OF THE PROGRAM

and Family Therapist. The ThD is comparable to the

This program is unique among doctoral programs PhD, but it is designed for those whose vocation is in the U.S. for its integration of theological,

primarily clinical and theological.

clinical, and research dimensions of the advanced study of pastoral theology and pastoral

PROGRAM OF STUDY

psychotherapy. Graduates receive in-depth

The studies included within the program help students

education in psychodynamic, family systems,

gain an advanced understanding of appropriate

narrative and intercultural approaches to pastoral theological and theoretical concepts. Students learn psychotherapy, together with training in pastoral under qualified supervision the application of these theological methods and social science research.

concepts in pastoral counseling and how to promote

The program includes both academic coursework professional integration of theory and skills in both and clinical residency, and culminates in a

pastoral counseling and pastoral guidance. In addition,

dissertation. Graduates currently serve in a

students design and execute a research project

wide range of settings as pastoral counselors,

appropriate to their own professional practice that

chaplains, consultants, pastors in church

gives evidence of their creative ability to contribute to

settings, researchers, and seminary professors.

this aspect of pastoral counseling.

The program is designed to prepare persons for

To receive the degree a student must complete

the specialized ministry of pastoral counseling

50 semester credit hours of academic and clinical

at a doctoral level of competence and for

practicum courses (21 core courses, 17 practicum

membership at the Clinical Member level in the

courses, and 12 electives), pass both a Clinical

American Association of Pastoral Counselors.

Performance exam and five Qualifying exams, pass a

With this training, graduates currently

comprehensive oral exam, and complete a dissertation.

serve in a wide range of settings including pastoral counseling centers, chaplaincies,

32

COURSE WORK AND PRACTICUM

seminaries, congregations, and as consultants

Students will normally be in full-time coursework

and researchers. There is also an option for

and residency for the first 21 months of the program,

coursework fulfilling academic requirements for

including the first summer. Clinical counseling

licensure in the State of Georgia as a Marriage

residency normally takes place at the Care and

Columbia Theological Seminary


Counseling Center of Georgia (CCCG) in Decatur, GA. Each student admitted to the program has one

COMPONENTS OF THE CURRICULUM

member of the pastoral counseling faculty as adviser. EXAMINATIONS Following completion of all academic and practicum courses totaling 50 credits, and having earned a least a B average, the student will take a Clinical Performance exam (normally May of the second year), showing competency in counseling. Following the performance exam, students will prepare for five Qualifying Exams, covering therapeutic relationship and personality theory, marriage and family theory, pastoral theology, socio-cultural dimensions of pastoral counseling, and ecclesiological and ethical dimensions of pastoral counseling. The five written exams are followed by a comprehensive oral examination. DISSERTATION Following satisfactory performance in the qualifying examinations, students prepare a dissertation proposal in consultation with their advisor. Following approval of the dissertation proposal by their dissertation committee and the Institutional Review Board (IRB), students engage in the approved research project and write the dissertation. TIMEFRAME

Total:

50

CREDITS

21

GENERAL COURSE CREDITS

17

PRACTICUM COURSE CREDITS

12

ELECTIVE COURSE CREDITS

a grade of B or better must have been given for the prior coursework. The student must be able to show that the work is relevant to the ThD program. The course work normally can be no older than five years old. No more than 12 credit hours may be transferred from either an earned degree or from other course work. All classroom work transferred in will be counted as elective credit. In the case of clinical practicum work, a student may receive credit for practicum work that was done in conjunction with licensure, clinical work for another degree, or prior enrollment at the Care and Counseling Center of Georgia’s practicum program. No more than 8 credit hours will be awarded for this work and will be credited toward the basic practicum requirement. The student would be enrolled for the remaining 9 hours of practicum work at the advanced residency level. • Credit for work done after entry into the program at

Four to five years is a reasonable minimum timeframe

schools and agencies not related to the ATA may be

for completion of all requirements for the degree on a

transferred to fulfill requirements for the ThD degree

full-time basis, depending on the student’s other work

under the following guidelines:

commitments. Students may negotiate to complete

- Prior to registration for a course for which credit is

some of the degree requirements on a part-time basis,

to be transferred, the student must have written

typically after completion of the first two years of the

permission of his/her adviser or the ThD program

program. Students are required to complete all degree

director and the Office of Academic Affairs at the

requirements within nine years.

student’s school of enrollment. - The student pays his/her own fees to the school

TRANSFER OF CREDIT FOR THD STUDENTS

where such work is done at institutions not related to

In planning the student’s program with her/his adviser or

the ATA. The number of credits to be allowed within

ThD program director, a student may request credit for

this limitation is, in each instance, subject to the

work done prior to entry under the following guidelines:

approval of the respective ATA school.

• Credit for prior academic and/or clinical training must

A limit of 12 semester hours is placed upon any work done

be approved by the ThD Committee, in conversation

at institutions not related to the ATA whether earned prior

Office of Academic Affairs at Columbia. All transfer

to enrollment or during enrollment in the program. All

credit must have been done at a PhD or ThD level and

work transferred in will be credited as elective courses. www.CTSnet.edu

33


DEGREE PROGRAMS & ADMISSIONS

APPLICATION INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND EXCHANGE VISITORS All international applicants are expected to have the written recommendation of their denomination. A statement of the applicant’s plans for future work in the applicant’s home country is also required. In order to matriculate for a course for credit, internationals students must hold either a valid F1 or J1 non-immigrant student visa. All applicants for whom English is not their

financial aid awards. However, students must

first language must take the Test of English as a

be prepared to cover the expenses involved

Foreign Language (TOEFL) Internet-based test

while engaged in study at Columbia. Therefore,

(iBT), and submit an iBT TOEFL score from a

upon admission, and before the visa application

test date that is two years or less from the date

process can begin, persons must show proof

of application to Columbia Theological Seminary

of adequate financial resources to cover costs

before admission and enrollment for credit can

which include, but are not limited to, tuition,

be attained. Those applicants seeking admission

fees(including but not limited to activity

to basic degree programs (MAPT, MA[TS],

program, and graduation fees), textbooks,

and MDiv) must score at least 550 (paper

health insurance, travel, and living expenses for

based format), or 76 (internet format) with

the entire period of study in the United States.

minimum scores in the following areas: Reading

The required form I-20, form DS-2019, and

22; Listening 16; Speaking 16; and Writing 22.

other visa documents will not be issued until

Applicants seeking admission to advanced degree

this financial information has been received and

programs (ThM, DEdMin, DMin) must present

verified.

an iBT TOEFL score of 86, with the following

ALL international students and accompanying

minimum required scores in the areas: Reading

family members are required to carry health

22; Listening 20; Speaking 20; and Writing 24.

insurance which meets the standards of the U.

The Columbia institutional code for reporting

S. Citizenship and Immigration Service. No

the TOEFL score is 5118. All test fees are the

applicant should come to Atlanta until he or she

responsibility of the applicant.

has received a formal letter of admission to the

Columbia has a very limited number of

program from the Admissions Committee and

scholarships for international students and

the required form I-20 or form DS-2019.

those are awarded through arrangements with

Prospective international applicants should

specific theological institutions around the

contact the Admissions Office (admissions@

world. International students may, at the time

ctsnet.edu) for application materials and

of application to Columbia, submit a scholarship

additional information.

application and they may be eligible for Columbia

34

Columbia Theological Seminary


SPECIAL STUDENTS AND AUDITORS SPECIAL STUDENTS

when space permits. Auditors must register for

Those who meet requirements for admission

courses with the registrar. Auditors are advised to

to a basic degree program but do not wish to

follow the following procedures:

work toward a degree may enroll as a special

Request a class schedule from the registrar;

Select the class to be audited;

Secure permission from the professor of

student and take courses for credit. Those who do not meet the requirements for admission to a basic degree program may be admitted as

that class; and,

an unclassified student. Unclassified students are admitted for a limited number of courses as determined by the Office of Admissions. Special students may be enrolled for an approved course of study over a specified time period determined by the Office of Academic Affairs. All applicants for whom English is a second language must pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language

Secure permission from the registrar.

The cost for auditing a course is one-half the tuition for the course. Full-time basic degree students may audit a course in the Fall and Spring semesters for no charge pending the professor’s and registrar’s permissions.

(TOEFL) before admission and enrollment for credit can be attained. Those seeking admission as either an unclassified or special student must score at least 550 (paper-based test), or 76 (internet-based test) with minimum scores in the following areas: Reading 22; Listening 16; Speaking 16; and Writing 22. Applications are available through the CTS website. Students from other institutions of theological education who want to take courses for credit at Columbia can enroll as special students. Their applications must include either a letter of good standing from their home registrar or an official transcript of work completed at their home institution. It is the responsibility of the student to determine the transferability of Columbia’s credit to his or her home institution.

AUDITORS Columbia students, spouses of students, and other members of the community are invited to audit courses with the permission of the instructor and the Office of Academic Affairs

www.CTSnet.edu

35


FACULTY LEANNE VAN DYK 2015 | President and Professor of Theology BA Calvin College; MA Western Michigan University; MDiv Calvin Theological Seminary; PhD Princeton Theological Seminary She has served as a member of the Board of Commissioners of the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). As a theological educator Van Dyk is a strong proponent of theology addressing the present needs of the church particularly in the areas of worship and racial-ethnic diversity. JOHN AZUMAH 2011 | Professor of World Christianity and Islam External Dip (Theology), University of Ghana, Legon; MA University of Birmingham, UK; PhD University of Birmingham, UK. He has specialized in Islam and Christian-Muslim Relation and is interested in Islamics, Christian Theology of Religions, Missions & Missiology. His current research area is in World Christianity and Islam in the Global South. BRENNAN WILLIAM BREED 2012 | Assistant Professor of Old Testament BA University of Virginia; MDiv Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD Emory University His research focuses on the reception history of the Bible, which traces the divergent uses and understandings of biblical texts from their ancient contexts of production to the present day. His other interests include Hebrew poetry, biblical theology, textual criticism, ancient and medieval visual art, and philosophy. WILLIAM PATRICK BROWN 2004 | William Marcellus McPheeters Professor of Old Testament BA Whitman College; MDiv Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD Emory University He has abiding interests in the use of scripture in the life of the church and the world, particularly in the context of ecology and justice. Specific interests include creation theology, faith and science dialogue, the Psalms, and wisdom literature (Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes).   KELLY D. CAMPBELL 2013 | Associate Dean for Information Services and Director of the John Bulow Campbell Library BS Wichita State University; MLS Texas Women’s University; MATS Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary; EdD Candidate, Pepperdine University She is passionate about equipping people for learning and life, strategizing to develop best practices, and providing high quality service. Her current research focuses on leading others to strive for excellence and contributing to organizations by helping develop future leaders.

36

Columbia Theological Seminary

*The date after each name indicates the year service began at Columbia.


KIMBERLY L. CLAYTON 2005 | Lecturer, Director of Contextual Education BA Birmingham-Southern College; MDiv, DMin Columbia Theological Seminary Her current research interests include models of supervision for formation in pastoral identity, development of ‘teaching congregations’ for pastoral internships, and urban ministry initiatives. Her other interests include worship and liturgy, preaching, and congregational transition and development. KATHY DAWSON 2004 | Associate Professor of Christian Education and Director of the MAPT Program BA California State University, Long Beach; MACE Presbyterian School of Christian Education; MDiv Columbia Theological Seminary; PhD Princeton Theological Seminary Her current interests revolve around spiritual development, creative teaching methodology, curriculum theory, and children’s ministry. Her current interest is researching how parents and the church can have faithful conversations around fantasy literature for children and youth. She was chosen 2015 Educator of the Year by the Association of Presbyterian Church Educators. MARK DOUGLAS 1999 | Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of the MDiv Program BA Colorado College; MDiv, ThM Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD University of Virginia His wide ranging interests include: ethics in neo-orthodox theologies, medical and business ethics, the American philosophical tradition of pragmatism, and the role of religion in political philosophy. Additionally, he is the current chair of the board of Georgia Interfaith Power and Light, the largest faith-based environmental organization in Georgia. ANNA CARTER FLORENCE 1998 | Peter Marshall Professor of Preaching and Worship BA Yale University; MDiv, PhD Princeton Theological Seminary She is interested in historical, theological, aesthetic, and performative dimensions of preaching and in reflecting on the theories and practices that emerge when preaching engages other fields and different traditions. Her current research focuses on testimony, feminist theology, the role of experience in preaching, and the history of preaching women. ISRAEL GALINDO, 2013 | Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning and Director of Online Education BA Northeastern College; MRE, MDiv, EdD New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary His interests are in the areas of congregational and organizational leadership, instruction and pedagogy, educational assessment, and Christian faith formation. His work in lifelong learning includes helping leaders apply Bowen Family Systems theory for healthy and effective functioning in home and work settings.

www.CTSnet.edu

37


Faculty continued JOHN WILLIAM HARKINS III 1999 | Senior Lecturer in Pastoral Theology and Care and Director of the ThD Program BA Rhodes College; MDiv Vanderbilt University Divinity School; PhD Vanderbilt University He is interested in applications of pastoral theology, care, and counseling to both congregational life and clinical settings. Research interests include psychoanalytic theory, marriage and family therapy, and psychological/religious dimensions of literature and film. TIM HARTMAN 2014 | Assistant Professor of Theology BA Stanford University; MDiv Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD University of Virginia His research interests include contemporary Christian theologies worldwide, Christology, Lived Theology--the interrelationship between religious beliefs and practices, and the work of Kwame Bediako and Karl Barth. E. ELIZABETH JOHNSON 1998 | J. Davison Philips Professor of New Testament Language, Literature, and Exegesis BGS Ohio University; MDiv, PhD Princeton Theological Seminary She is interested in the ways the church uses the Bible to think about its faith and life. She is particularly drawn to the Pauline letters and how they invite us to engage in substantive theological reflection about who God is and what Jesus’ death and resurrection mean for human life and society. PAUL J. JOHNSON 2005 | Senior Lecturer in Pastoral Theology and Care BA University of North Carolina; MDiv Duke University; ThM Texas Christian University; PhD Emory University His current research interests focus on pastoral theology as embodied and lived within congregational care and liturgical experience. This includes reflections upon evil and the demonic as traditional, phenomenological categories of Christian religious experience. He is also interested in storytelling, narrative theory, and post-Freudian theorists whose theories offer rich opportunities for integrating an understanding of cultural and religious expression. KIMBERLY BRACKEN LONG 2007 | Associate Professor of Worship BMus College of Wooster; MMus University of Maryland; MDiv Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD Drew University She is interested in the formation of ministers for liturgical leadership in the church, with a particular emphasis on the sacramental and eschatological dimensions of worship. In addition to working in the area of liturgical language, she is currently researching the theology and history of marriage.

38

Columbia Theological Seminary


MARTHA MOORE-KEISH 2004 | Associate Professor of Theology and Director of the ThM program AB Harvard College; MDiv Union Theological Seminary in Virginia; PhD Emory University Her research interests include Reformed theology, liturgical theology, particularly the theology and practice of the sacraments, and feminist theology. She also has interests in ecumenical theology and interfaith issues including: Reformed-Roman Catholic relations, Christian-Jewish relations and the religions of India. She is currently co-editing a book on Karl Barth and Comparative Theology. DEBORAH FLEMISTER MULLEN 2010 | Vice President of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, Associate Professor of American Christianity and Black Church Studies BA University of Rochester; MDiv Colgate Rochester Divinity School/Bexley Hall/Crozer Theological Seminary; PhD University of Chicago Her research, scholarly and teaching interests as a historian of modern American Christianity and Black Church Studies cluster around themes related to race and sexuality as subjects of ongoing debates within American Religion and Civil Society. She is committed to a graduate theological curriculum that prepares religious leaders for ministries of care, compassion, empowerment, justice and service in the world and for the whole church of Jesus Christ. JACOB D. MYERS 2015 | Assistant Professor of Homiletics BA Gardner Webb University; MDiv Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD Emory University He is interested in homiletical theories and theologies, continental philosophies (esp. poststructuralism, existentialism, and phenomenology), and emerging expressions of faith and practice in postmodern, post-Christian contexts. His research focuses on alternative epistemologies for sermon development and delivery, the philosophical and theological conditions for the (im) possibility of preaching, contextual/constructive biblical hermeneutics and theologies, and the ways in which preaching interacts with cultures and traditions. RAJ NADELLA 2012 | Assistant Professor of New Testament Studies and Director of the MA(TS) program BTh Serampore College; MDiv/BD United Theological College; MABL Graduate Theological Union; PhD Union Theological Seminary in Virginia His research and teaching interests include Bakhtin and Biblical Studies and Postcolonial readings of the New Testament, especially the parables of Jesus. Additionally, his research focuses on New Testament perspectives on the issues of economic justice and their ethical and theological implications for the church and society today. KEVIN PARK 2012 | Associate Dean for Advanced Professional Studies and Assistant Professor of Theology BA University of Toronto; MDiv Knox College; ThM, PhD Princeton Theological Seminary He is interested in the emerging Asian North American theologies and the various expressions of theologies of the cross. His current research includes critiquing what he calls “Ornamental Multiculturalism� and articulating a theology of divine beauty as a key theological resource for multicultural theology and ministry for the North American context. www.CTSnet.edu

39


Faculty continued MARCIA Y. RIGGS 1991 | J. Erskine Love Professor of Christian Ethics AB Randolph-Macon Woman’s College; MDiv Yale Divinity School; PhD Vanderbilt University Her current interests are in the areas of descriptive ethical analysis addressing the relationship between social processes of oppression and socio-religious ethical praxis; ethical discourse that bridges the gap between womanist religious scholarship and the practice of ministry in the church; moral foundations for public policy; and the church and its role in social justice ministry. STANLEY P. SAUNDERS 1991 | Associate Professor of New Testament BA San Jose Bible College; MDiv Emmanuel School of Religion; PhD Princeton Theological Seminary His research and teaching interests focus on early Christian understandings of “the last days,” the nature of the Church, spirituality, and ecclesial self-definition, with a special interest in the Gospel according to Matthew. REBECCA F. SPURRIER 2015 | Associate Dean for Worship Life and Assistant Professor of Worship BA Calvin College; MDiv Emory University, Candler School of Theology; PhD Emory University She is interested in a theology and practice of public worship that reflects the beauty and tension human difference brings to Christian liturgy. Engaging ethnographic theology, disability studies, and liturgical aesthetics, her research explores the hope of human interdependence and the importance of liturgical access for ecclesial practice and Christian community. She integrates a focus on liturgical and practical theology in the classroom with the formation of worship leaders through daily chapel services. JEFFERY L. TRIBBLE SR. 2007 | Associate Professor of Ministry BS Howard University; MDiv Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; PhD Northwestern University He is interested in educating and forming persons for the transformative praxis of ministry in church and society. He bridges the church, community, and seminary through his teaching, ministry, and scholarship in the areas of practical theology, congregational studies, ethnographic research, urban church ministry, black church studies, congregational leadership, and evangelism. HARUKO NAWATA WARD 2002 | Professor of Church History BFA Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music; MA New York University; MDiv Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; ThM, PhD Princeton Theological Seminary Her research interests include the age of Reformations, the Jesuits, encounter of cultures and religions, women and religious vocation, history of biblical interpretation, history of Christianity in Asia, and justice issues in church history.

40

Columbia Theological Seminary


RALPH C. BASUI WATKINS 2011 | Peachtree Associate Professor of Evangelism and Church Growth AA, American River Junior College; BA, California State University at Sacramento; MA, University of Dubuque Theological Seminary; DMin, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary PhD, University of Pittsburgh; MFA, Savannah College of Art and Design His work and research is centered around building 21st Century Churches. His writing and research is done with the church as they partner to be faithful to the call of being the Body of Christ. He is presently working on ways the church can use multi-media approaches and web 2.0 strategies to be effective at evangelism and discipleship. CHRISTINE ROY YODER 1998 | Interim Dean of Faculty and Professor of Old Testament Language, Literature, and Exegesis BA Swarthmore College; MDiv, PhD Princeton Theological Seminary Her research interests include creation theology, wisdom literature, the socio-historical and theological dynamics of the post-exilic period, women in the Bible, and the history of methodology of biblical interpretation. She was named as a Henry Luce III Fellow in Theology for 2014-2015. WILLIAM YOO 2014 | Assistant Professor of American Religious and Cultural History BSE University of Pennsylvania; MDiv Westminster Theological Seminary; ThM, PhD Emory University His research interests within the history of Christianity in the United States include the expansion of the American foreign missionary enterprise, the formation of immigrant religious communities, the religious cultures of the American South, the Presbyterian experience, and the transnational encounter between American and Korean Protestants across both nations.

ADJUNCT/VISITING PROFESSORS ADJUNCT LECTURERS Ryan Bonfiglio Michael Cook ADJUNCTS/VISITING PROFESSORS Elizabeth Caldwell

Barbara Day Miller

Von Clemans

David Rhone

Christopher De Pree

Margaret Rightmyer

Catherine Gonzalez

Don Saliers

Holly Inglis

James Siwy

Glenroy Lalor

Brent Strawn

Tonya Lawrence

Joel Winchip

www.CTSnet.edu

41


HOUSING & FINANCIAL INFORMATION


HOUSING

Columbia’s housing is reserved for full-time MDiv, MAPT, and MA(TS) students. Full-time ThM students may be eligible for housing as space permits. The Office of Admissions distributes housing application forms to admitted students. Students should apply for housing as early as possible following their acceptance and should direct all inquiries about housing to the Business Office.

HOUSING FOR SINGLE STUDENTS

priority). Students who reside in efficiencies are

Columbia’s two residence halls, Florida Hall and

not required to participate in the standard board

the New Residential Hall, are designed for single

plan.

students and contain both single rooms and suites. In both halls, furnished and unfurnished

HOUSING FOR STUDENTS WITH

suites consist of two rooms and a private bath.

CHILDREN

Efficiency apartments in both halls are available

One-to-four-bedroom apartments are

to single students if these units have not been

available for students with children. Most of

assigned to married students.

these apartments are equipped with washer/

Occupation of the New Residential Hall for single students began in summer 2009. This

dryer hook-ups. Columbia does not provide refrigerators in these apartments.

building contains one-bedroom apartments for singles, as well as two and four-bedroom

HOUSING FOR STUDENTS WITH

apartments that can be shared by full-time

SPECIAL NEEDS

students. There are also a number of suites and

Columbia has a small number of older housing

studios. All of these units have private bathrooms

units that are accessible to persons with physical

(one per each bedroom). The apartments have

limitations. The entire new residential hall is also

full kitchens. The suites have kitchen sinks, small

accessible to those with physical limitations.

refrigerators, and microwave ovens. Students who live in single rooms and suites

LEASE AGREEMENT AND PAYMENT

are required to participate in Columbia’s standard

A student who has entered into a lease

full board plan (fifteen meals per week).

agreement for a seminary housing unit for a term, but who has not yet occupied the unit, is

HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS

responsible for payment in full unless written

WITHOUT CHILDREN

notice that the unit will not be used is given to

While married students without children are

the vice president for business and finance at

welcome to live in the residence hall suites, most

least two weeks before the first day of classes. In

prefer to reside in the efficiency apartments,

that case, no rent will be charged for that term.

which include cooking facilities. Married students

In other cases, a refund amount may be given

without children are also eligible for either one or

upon the initiative of Columbia.

two bedroom apartments on a secondary priority basis (married students with children have first

www.CTSnet.edu

43


HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE HOUSING &

Basic degree students are required to carry some form of hospitalization insurance acceptable to the

FINANCIAL

seminary. Presbyterian students who are inquirers or candidates of their presbyteries’ Committees on

INFORMATION

Preparation for Ministry are eligible to participate in the major medical plan of the Board of Pensions of the Presbyterian Church (USA). Students holding J or F visa status (and their J-2 or F-2 dependents in the United States) and enrolled in any program of the seminary are required to carry health insurance which meets the minimum standards set by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Health insurance which meets the minimum standards set by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services MUST be effective the date the student (and accompanying dependents) arrives in the U.S. Once a student is accepted and confirms his or her intention to enroll, the student should contact the International Programs Office (intlprog@ctsnet.edu) for additional information regarding this requirement.

FINANCIAL AID The seminary grants financial aid to eligible full-

New students who plan to attend Greek

time basic degree students using the seminary‘s

School must complete the FAFSA online by May

financial aid policies to determine need. Students

1. New students entering in the fall must submit

apply for financial aid by completing the Free

the FAFSA by July 1.

Application for Student Aid (FAFSA) form on the web. The difference between a student’s income

Returning students must submit the FAFSA online by April 22 and return the seminary’s financial aid application, along with any required

and expenses is established using Columbia’s

verifications, by April 30. All students should

expense norms and documented costs of some

submit applications as early as possible since

items. This constitutes the financial need of

awards are made as applications are received.

the student. After financial need is calculated,

Awards are contingent upon the availability

financial aid is awarded in the form of work-study

of funds. Persons interested in more detailed

and a grant at the maximum allowable amount.

information about the basic degree financial aid

Students who receive merit scholarships from

program offered by Columbia should contact the

Columbia are not eligible to receive need based

Admissions and Financial Aid Office.

financial aid. Students may supplement their need based institutional aid with outside grants

FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN

and scholarships. Institutional aid will not be

PROGRAM/ WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL

reduced due to outside awards unless the sum of

DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM

institutional aid and outside monies exceed the

The seminary participates in the William D. Ford

cost of attendance.

Federal Direct Loan Program. The Direct Loan

Students who withdraw from the seminary

44

Program was authorized under the Health Care

or become part-time students (less than 9

and Reconciliation Act of 2010. The program

credit hours for basic degree students) during a

remains essentially the same as the Federal

semester forfeit their right to financial aid for the

Family Education Loan Program relative to most

term in which such action is taken.

regulations, loan originations and certifications.

Columbia Theological Seminary


The changes have been related to the

When a student withdraws or drops below half-

disbursement process and loan origination fees.

time status, he or she may no longer be eligible

The intent of the Direct Lending (DL) program is

for the entire certified amount of a loan. Federal

the provision of greater benefits to borrowers.

regulations require that, within thirty days of

As of July 1, 2012, graduate and professional

a change in eligibility, the seminary return the

students are no longer eligible to receive Direct

portion of the loan funds applied to fees (tuition,

Subsidized Loans. The unsubsidized loans offered

room, and board) for which the student is no

under the DL program provide a preferable

longer eligible. The student will be billed for any

interest rate and delays repayment of loans

resulting amount owed Columbia. Changes in

until after the student graduates or enters less

enrollment status and financial assistance from

than half-time status. Columbia assists students

other sources may also affect loan eligibility.

with the application process by determining and certifying student loan eligibility, including

FEDERAL WORK-STUDY

certification of a student’s satisfactory academic

The federal work-study program is regulated

progress as it relates to the course of study for

under the Higher Education Act of 1965 and its

which the monies are borrowed. Funds for DL

subsequent amendments. Federal work-study

loans are provided by the federal government.

funds provide some employment opportunities

Applications for Direct Unsubsidized Loans at

for students. Eligibility for these funds is

Columbia may be obtained from the Admissions

determined according to the federal need-analysis

and Financial Aid Office

formula. Availability of these funds is limited by

To maintain eligibility for loans and deferment

the seminary’s annual allocation. Information

of prior loans, a student must continue enrollment pertaining to application procedures and policy in an eligible degree program, classified as at least

regulations for federal work-study at Columbia

half-time and be making satisfactory academic

may be obtained from the Admissions and

progress as determined by the seminary’s

Financial Aid Office.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. Copies of this policy are available from the registrar’s office

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION BENEFITS

and the Admissions and Financial Aid Office and

Certification for V.A. benefits is handled through

are published each year in the Student Handbook. the Office of Student Services.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR BASIC DEGREE STUDENTS COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIPS

The Admissions Committee may award up to

Qualified women and men planning to attend

five Columbia Scholarships per academic year. The

Columbia are encouraged to apply for a Columbia scholarship covers tuition, room (at the lowest single Scholarship. This scholarship is for students

student rate), and board. A Columbia Scholarship

entering into a basic degree program who have

will be renewed up to the maximum credit hours for

exhibited exceptional academic and leadership

the program for which the award was originally made

abilities during their undergraduate studies, as

if the recipient maintains full-time status, retains a

well as in community involvement and church

3.50 cumulative grade point average, and continues

commitments.

to show outstanding potential for ministry.

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45


Scholarships For Basic Degree Students continued HOUSING &

A completed admissions application is

returning students are also not renewable. A

FINANCIAL

required. Application is made through the Office

recipient who shows financial need over and

of Admissions and must be received no later

above a Merit Scholarship award may also apply

than January 15. Announcement of Columbia

for Columbia’s need-based financial aid. Such

Scholarship awards will ordinarily be made by

financial aid will include a work-study assignment.

INFORMATION

February 15. Those applying for Columbia Scholarships will

RACIAL/ETHNIC MINORITY GRANTS

automatically be considered for other scholarships

Eligible full-time basic degree students are

if they are not awarded Columbia Scholarships.

awarded the Racial/Ethnic Minority Grant for the fall and spring semesters based on self-

HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS

declaration of race and ethnicity.

A number of Honor Scholarships have been established at Columbia for full-time basic degree

PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT GRANTS

students. The Admissions Committee awards

Eligible full-time basic degree students are

several scholarships annually to first year students

awarded the Presbyterian Student Grant for

on the basis of academic achievement, leadership

the fall and spring semesters based on self-

in the church and on campus, and demonstration

declaration of denominational affiliation.

of outstanding promise for the ordained ministry. An Honor Scholarship covers tuition and fees

COLUMBIA FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE

for the academic year. The scholarship will be

SCHOLARSHIPS

renewed up to the maximum credit hours for

A number of scholarships are funded annually

the program for which the award was originally

by the Columbia Friendship Circle. These

made if the recipient maintains full-time status,

scholarships are awarded to full time, PC(USA)

retains a 3.30 cumulative grade point average,

MDiv degree students by the Basic Degrees

and continues to show outstanding potential for

Committee upon nomination by dean of students

ministry. Application is made through the Office

in consultation with the Admissions and Financial

of Admissions. A completed admissions application Aid Office. is required. Applications must be received no

The following criteria are used in making

later than January 15. Announcement of Honor

nominations: The student must be a second or

Scholarship awards will ordinarily be made by

third year student (fourth year if the student

February 15.

has been involved in a yearlong internship or dual degree program); have demonstrated both

46

MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS

a strong commitment to God’s call and diligence

Merit Scholarships are awarded each year to

in studies at Columbia; be a parent with family

returning full time basic degree students. The

responsibilities; and have demonstrated financial

Basic Degrees Committee considers all returning

need. Recipients who show need over and above

students and makes the awards based upon

the Columbia Friendship Circle Scholarship may

GPA, number of credited hours earned, and the

be eligible for additional need-based financial

student’s course load, as well as demonstrated

aid. Such financial aid will include a work-study

promise for ministry. Merit scholarships for

assignment with reduced work-study hours.

Columbia Theological Seminary


TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER CHARGES EFFECTIVE SUMMER TERM 2016 Tuition and fees listed are for the 2016-2017

income. Also, other services to the student are

academic year and are subject to change

provided on a subsidized basis.

annually. Tuition and fees represent only a small part

PAYMENT OF FEES

of the cost of providing theological education.

Tuition, fees, room, and board must be paid to the

Most of the cost is met through gifts from

Business Office by the deadline set at the beginning

individuals and churches and by endowment

of each term and are subject to change annually.

MASTER OF DIVINITY, MASTER OF ARTS IN PRACTICAL THEOLOGY, MASTER OF ARTS (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES) DEGREE CANDIDATES TUITION $440

Per credit hour

$220

Audit fee per credit hour

$130

Student Fee (for each long term), full-time students

$130

Student Fee (per year), part-time students enrolled in five year MDiv program.

$357

I520 Alternative Context, Atlanta (plus 3 credit hour course fee)

OTHER FEES

$1,230 I520 Alternative Context, Other U.S. (plus 3 credit hour course fee) $1,913

I520 Alternative Context, International (plus 3 credit hour course fee)

ADVANCED DEGREE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENTS TUITION $522

Per credit hour

$261 Audit fee per credit hour OTHER FEES $60

Advanced Degree Student Fee (annual)

$40 Non-Degree Student Fee (annual) $115 ATA499 ThD Research fee (ThD candidates only; does not apply to ThD students enrolled in courses) $330 $30

ThM, DMin, and DEdMin extension fee Thesis binding (per copy)

PROGRAM COSTS $ 13,734 Total cost for DMin and DEdMin programs for those matriculating in 2016 (includes all fees and tuition)

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47


FOR ALL STUDENTS OTHER FEES HOUSING &

$50 Application fee

FINANCIAL

$50 Late registration fee (does not apply to doctoral practicum and doctoral projects or to ThM thesis registration)

INFORMATION

$150 Commencement fee MEAL PLANS Full meal plan includes 15 meals per week.

$854 Summer Greek School $1,692 Fall term $427 January term $1,692 Spring term

July 11 – August 19 September 6 – December 16 January 5 – 20 January 30 – May 12

Lunch plan includes Monday-Friday lunch only

$322 Summer Greek School

July 11 – August 19

$676 Fall term

September 6 – December 16

$147 January term

January 5 – 20

$676 Spring term

January 30 – May 12

HOUSING When a housing option has two rates, the first is for unfurnished; the second, for furnished. Prices are per term unless otherwise indicated. FLORIDA HALL

NEW RESIDENTIAL HALL

Singles (full meal plan required)

Studio (full meal plan required 1st year, lunch plan year 2 and 3)

$758 $1,516 $379

Summer Greek School Fall or Spring term January term

Suite (full meal plan required) $968 / 1,038 $1,936 / 2,076

Summer Greek School Fall or Spring term

$484 / 519 January term Efficiency Units (lunch plan required 1st year, optional year 2 and 3)

$ 882

$1,764 Fall or Spring term $441 January term 1 Bedroom w/ Kitchenette (full meal plan required 1st year, lunch plan year 2 and 3) $1,072 / 1,142 Summer Greek School $2,144 / 2,284 $536 / 571

Fall or Spring term January term

1 Bedroom Apartment (lunch plan required 1st year, optional year 2 and 3)

$599

Standard (per month)

$666 / 704

$648

Exterior entrance (per month)

2 Bedroom Apartment (meal plan optional) $776 / 809

VILLAGE APARTMENTS (all unfurnished) $625

1 Bedroom, per month

$654 / 706 2 Bedroom, per month $776 / 849 3 Bedrooms, per month $865 / 903 4 Bedrooms, per month 48

Summer Greek School

Columbia Theological Seminary

Per month Per month

2 or 4 Bedroom Shared Apartment (lunch plan required 1st year, optional year 2 and 3) $388 / 406

Per month per occupant


REFUND POLICIES TUITION

ROOM AND BOARD

Subject to the following schedule, students are

A student who has entered into a lease

entitled to refunds when they drop a course or

agreement for a seminary housing unit for a

withdraw from school with approval from the

term or semester is responsible for payment

seminary. A course is considered dropped at

in full unless written notice that the unit will

the time the registrar receives written notice

not be used is given to the vice president for

from the student requesting a course drop. A

business and finance at least two weeks before

student is considered to have withdrawn from

the first day of classes. In that case, a 100

the seminary when a petition for withdrawal is

percent refund will be made. In other cases, a

approved by a seminary dean.

refund amount may be given upon the initiative of the seminary. A minimum charge of one

FALL AND SPRING TERM CLASSES (FULL-

month’s rent will be assessed as a penalty for

TERM):

breaking a lease.

By the end of the: First week

A student who otherwise is required to be 100%

on the seminary’s board plan, but who has a

Second week

80%

sufficient medical reason for withdrawing from

Third week

50%

board status, may be granted a full refund if a

Fourth week

25%

written request is made to the vice president

After fourth week

0%

for business and finance at least one week before the first day of classes. The seminary’s

COURSES SIX TO SEVEN WEEKS IN

vice president for business and finance

DURATION:

determines the validity of an exemption

By the end of the:

from the board plan, in consultation with the

First week of class

100%

seminary’s food service director.

Second week

50%

A student who withdraws or drops out of

Third week

25%

school must vacate seminary housing and cease

After third week

0%

using its dining facilities or be held liable for room and board charges beyond his or her last

JANUARY TERM CLASSES AND DMIN

date of attendance.

AND DEDMIN INTENSIVE COURSES: FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

By the end of the: First day of class

100%

A student who withdraws from the seminary

Third day of class

50%

or becomes a part-time student (less than 9

0%

credit hours) forfeits any financial assistance

After third day of class

(scholarships and financial aid) previously No refund of course supervision fees or of clinical

awarded for the term in which such action

pastoral education fees will be made.

occurs.

No refund of Activity Fees will be made after completion of the second week in Fall or Spring Terms. No refund of Exploration Program Fees will be made after the third day of class.

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49


RESOURCES AND RELATED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS


THE JOHN BULOW CAMPBELL LIBRARY

The library’s collection includes over 195,000 books (both electronic and print), current print periodical subscriptions and numerous electronic subscriptions, 49,000 microforms, thousands of church records and archival collections, many media resources and databases selected to serve the changing landscape of theological education. The library participates in GALILEO (Georgia Library Learning Online), allowing access to over 170 additional databases for students and faculty. Library services include a continuously and professionally staffed central reference/ circulation desk, e-mail reference help, computer workstations installed with Word, Adobe Pro and Bible Works, scanner/copier, and a wireless environment throughout the facility. The library space is designed with the current theological user in mind including a large quiet reading room, small and large individual study spaces, natural lighting, individual carrels, and group study spaces. The library’s membership in two primary consortia, the Atlanta Theological Association (ATA) and the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education (ARCHE), gives Columbia’s faculty and students free access to the libraries of twenty-seven other academic institutions in the Atlanta area, including five major research libraries and six other theological collections. THE C. BENTON KLINE, JR. SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES The Special Collections and Archives area, named for Columbia’s fifth president, is the official repository for all seminary records and faculty books. Use of the collections by researchers is by appointment (Contact Archives@ctsnet.edu).

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51


RESOURCES & REL ATED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

RELATED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS In addition to the basic and advanced degree programs, Columbia offers a wide variety of academic opportunities. Some of these are offered in relationship with other educational institutions; others are special emphases of Columbia. ATLANTA THEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

public of the direct and indirect ways in which higher

Through the Atlanta Theological Association

education benefits the Atlanta region and the State

(ATA), Columbia enjoys academic and

of Georgia.

professional affiliations with Candler School of Theology (Emory University), Erskine Theological

CROSS-REGISTRATION AT AREA

Seminary, Interdenominational Theological

SCHOOLS

Center, Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary

Columbia students may cross-register for courses at

and McAfee School of Theology (Mercer

schools that belong to either the ATA or the ARCHE.

University). The association develops and

Cross-registration forms are available in the registrar’s

coordinates educational programs and resources

office at each school.

of these member institutions, which include

Students may cross-register for a course on a

approximately sixteen hundred students, two

space-available basis. Students may cross-register

hundred faculty, and a combined library collection

for a maximum of two courses per term, and the

of 600,000 volumes. Among significant and

combined load may not exceed the full-time allowable

promising cooperative endeavors, in addition

load on the home campus. Students register and pay

to the Doctor of Theology degree program, are

regular tuition and fees to the home institution.

cross registration, sharing of faculty, library and lectureship resources, inter-seminary courses,

CROSS-REGISTRATION AT THEOLOGICAL

and experimental programs in various academic

INSTITUTIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN

disciplines and professional specializations.

CHURCH (USA) A policy of reciprocal cross-registration at the ten

ATLANTA REGIONAL CONSORTIUM

theological institutions of the Presbyterian Church

FOR HIGHER EDUCATION

(USA) is designed to strengthen the theological

Columbia is a founding institution of the

education of persons preparing for ministry in the

metropolitan Atlanta consortium of institutions

denomination. This policy permits students registered

of higher education (ARCHE). ARCHE’s mission

in master’s degree programs to take courses at any

is to provide member institutions with services

of the other institutions without paying additional

that help expand educational opportunities,

tuition. Tuition for a course is charged at the home

promote academic excellence, and foster cultural

institution. For additional information, contact the

diversity for students, faculty, and staff. To

Office of Academic Affairs.

provide collaborative opportunities for member institutions to develop new resources and realize

52

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION

cost savings in ways that otherwise would not

Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE), a firsthand

be available to members individually and to

learning experience under certified supervision,

inform civic and business leaders and the general

provides theological students and pastors with

Columbia Theological Seminary


opportunities for intensive study of pastoral

Association (PCCCA). This organization supports

relationships. It seeks to make clear in

the camps and conference centers of the

understanding and practice the resources,

Presbyterian Church (USA) and The Presbyterian

methods, and meanings of the Christian faith

Church in Canada by equipping leaders for vibrant

as expressed through pastoral care. The Atlanta

and sustainable ministries. In 2008, the seminary

metropolitan region offers a wide variety of

created a partnership with PCCCA in order to help

settings in which a student may seek placement.

prepare our students for ministries that include camps, conferences, and retreats.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AT GEORGIA

The seminary is committed to providing a

STATE UNIVERSITY

consistent schedule of courses in the field of

The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at

camp and conference ministry. The P606 Camp/

Georgia State University offers three certificate

Conference Program and Administration course

programs in the following areas: Nonprofit

is currently offered during the January term.

Management, Planning and Economic

Students also have the opportunity to attend

Development, and Disaster Management. With

courses offered through the Compass Points

approval of the dean of faculty, a student may

Certification Program. These classes are offered

use four elective courses to pursue a certificate

each spring and fall (on and off campus) in

in one of the three areas. For information

cooperation with the Center for Lifelong Learning.

regarding the courses needed for each

You can learn more about this certification program

certificate, and procedures for enrolling in the

by going to www.compasspointsprogram.org.

certificate program, please contact either the Office of Academic Affairs or the Contextual Education Office.

CERTIFICATION IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Students can take courses leading to the

PARTNERSHIP WITH THE

certification in Christian education. Students

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CAMP AND

interested should inquire with the Christian

CONFERENCE ASSOCIATION

education professors.

Columbia has an official relationship with the Presbyterian Church Camp and Conference

PROGRAMS IN OTHER LOCATIONS

Appalachian Ministries Educational Resource Center

National Capital Semester for Seminarians

Columbia is a member of the Appalachian Ministries Educational Resource Center (AMERC), a seminary consortium that facilitates contextualized theological education for students interested in the Appalachian region or rural ministry. Through its educational programs, students have the opportunity to learn about Appalachia, its people and history, its values and religion, and its needs and issues for ministry. For information about AMERC courses, contact the Office of International Programs.

Columbia is a participating institution in the National Capital Semester for Seminarians, organized by Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C. The program provides students an opportunity to spend a semester in Washington for study and involvement in the processes of government and the concerns of the Church. The design includes an interaction/reflection seminar, supervised study, and the opportunity to select other courses in Washington institutions. For detailed information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs.

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53


COLUMBIA IN SERVICE TO THE CHURCH AND ITS MINISTRY


THE CENTER FOR LIFELONG LEARNING Columbia Seminary serves as a theological resource to students within degree programs, to clergy, other church leaders, and people of faith in the service of the Church. This mission includes the Center for Lifelong Learning which hosts a variety of learning events, on and off campus. These programs, single day to week-long classes, are designed to support participants’ spiritual, academic, professional, and personal growth, and the enrichment of the various ministries in which they serve. Among its many offerings are the Certificate in Spiritual Formation, the Certificate in Spiritual Direction, the Certificate in Older Adult Ministry, and its Pastoral Excellence Programs. Check the Lifelong Learning section of the seminary website for a full listing of program current programs and registration information.

INTERNATIONAL THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION Columbia is committed to the task of preparing students for ministry in a world that is expanding rapidly and where preoccupation with parochial concerns is no longer an option. A varied program of international education has emerged from serious, cross-cultural dialogue with church leaders in other parts of the world. Historically, more than sixty – five percent of the second year MDiv students have participated in one of Columbia’s international programs. These programs include: • An international component for the second year course, “Explorations: Alternative Context for Ministry.” Students may choose to take this course in an international setting. International placements are offered in Brazil, Central Europe, India, and Jamaica, with plans to add placements in Ghana and Korea in 2016-2017. • Supervised ministry placements for Columbia students in Caribbean, Ghanaian, Kenyan, Korean, and South African churches under the supervision of experienced local pastors. • Educational exchange programs and internships in the Czech Republic, England, Hungary, Jamaica, Kenya, Korea, and South Africa, with plans to add exchange programs in Ghana and India. • A Doctor of Ministry program located at the United Theological College of the West Indies. Many of the classes are held at the CTS DMin extension site in Kingston, Jamaica. • International students, faculty, and pastors working and studying on the Columbia campus. • Two week DMin and DEdMin travel seminars to China, Korea, South Africa, and Switzerland, with plans to offer travel seminars to Cuba, Ghana, and Palestine • Pilgrimages to the Holy Land. For further information, write to the International Programs Coordinator (intlprog@ctsnet.edu).

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55


COMMUNITY LIFE


Many networks of relationships and organizations, both formal and informal, shape community life at Columbia. The life of the seminary is as easily celebrated over a cup of coffee as it is in the ceremony of graduation. The following paragraphs briefly describe some of the structured events and organizations in which students participate during the academic year.

YEARLY SCHEDULE The academic year is composed of two long semesters of fourteen weeks each and a short January term. Fall semester runs from September to mid-December and Spring semester begins in late January or early February and ends in early May. The January term starts in few days into the new year. During the Summer Term, the seminary offers supervised ministry experiences, a limited number of basic degree courses, a six-week course in beginning Greek, and a four-week summer session designed primarily for advanced professional degree students and ministers interested in continuing education.

ORIENTATION All entering basic degree students and international students are required to attend an orientation program that occurs during the days preceding the regular opening of the seminary in the fall. It offers an opportunity for new students to become acquainted with each other, with student body leaders, and with members of the faculty and staff. Entering students receive notification of their faculty advisors at this time, and have an opportunity to meet and consult with them. All transfer students must come to the Office of Academic Affairs during orientation so that their previous course work is officially transferred in and a plan for their work at Columbia can be established. The Student Handbook is distributed to all entering basic degree students and international students. This handbook contains policies and practices that pertain to student life at the seminary. Returning basic degree students are also required to participate in orientation which includes activities such as placement assistance and procedures, preparation for ordination exams, orientation to the Candidacy Discernment Consultation process, and consultation on senior Chapel leadership procedures.

COMMUNITY WORSHIP AND CONVOCATIONS The seminary community gathers for worship four days each week to express its thanksgiving for and need of God’s grace, to hear God’s word, and to pray for the church and the world. Students, faculty, staff, and invited guests lead worship for the community. The sacrament of the Lord’s Supper is celebrated each Friday. Wednesday forums provide an alternative to the traditional worship service. Forums offer the Columbia community opportunities to consider significant issues for the church in the world, to be exposed to persons from other traditions and parts of the earth, or to be directed in spiritual formation. Several times during the year, the seminary community gathers for convocations and other special services. At opening convocation in the fall and at commencement each spring, students are recognized for outstanding academic work and for service to the church through the presentation of awards, prizes, and fellowships. Descriptions of these awards are on the following pages.

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57


AWARDS AND PRIZES COMMUNIT Y LIFE

Through the gifts of alumni/ae and friends of the seminary, several prizes and awards have been established to recognize the outstanding academic achievements of students.

THE WILDS BOOK PRIZE was established

THE EMMA GAILLARD BOYCE

by Louis T. Wilds of Columbia, South Carolina,

MEMORIAL AWARD is made annually by the

in 1917. In 1992, an addition to the fund was

Rev. David Boyce, an alumnus of the seminary,

made by Mary Scott Wilds Hill, Annie Edmunds in honor of his mother, a devoted music teacher, Wilds McLeod, Murphey Candler Wilds, and

choir director, church musician, and minister’s

their children in memory of their parents and

wife. A cash prize is awarded to the student

grandparents, Laura Candler Wilds and Louis T.

writing the best paper on the creative use of

Wilds, Jr. The fund provides a cash award to the

music in worship.

graduating MDiv student selected by the faculty for the highest distinction in his or her academic work over the entire seminary program.

ABDULLAH AWARDS of two types are made available each year by the Rev. Gabriel Abdullah, an alumnus of the seminary. The cash prizes

THE LYMAN AND MYKI MOBLEY PRIZE

are for the best paper setting forth a plan for

in Biblical Scholarship has been established in

the teaching of Bible in the public schools; the

memory of Donald Lyman Mobley ‘77 and Myki second is for the best paper designing a program Powell Mobley (Candler School of Theology ‘77). A cash award is given each year to the student or faculty member doing exemplary work in the field of biblical scholarship as it relates to the worship and work of the church.

for the development of moral and spiritual values. THE JULIA ABDULLAH AWARD is made available each year by the Rev. Gabriel Abdullah, an alumnus of the seminary. The cash prize is for the best paper on the subject, “How to make the

THE PAUL T. FUHRMANN BOOK PRIZE

church school hour the most interesting hour of

in Church History was established in 1962 by an

the week.”

alumnus of the seminary to honor the late Dr. Paul T. Fuhrmann, former professor of church history. The cash award is made annually to the student who has shown the most outstanding achievement in church history.

THE INDIANTOWN RURAL CHURCH AWARD was established by the family of Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Stuckey in their honor to highlight the work of ministry in rural congregations. The cash prize is awarded annually

THE FLORRIE WILKES SANDERS PRIZE in to an MDiv student who has done outstanding Theology is given by the family of Florrie Wilkes ministry in a rural congregation. Sanders of Atlanta, Georgia. A cash award is given each year to the student presenting the best paper showing sound theological scholarship and relevance to the needs of Christian people in the contemporary world. Special attention is given to papers relating theology to the education, professions, and avocations of laypersons. 58

Columbia Theological Seminary

THE LUDWIG RICHARD MAX DEWITZ BIBLICAL STUDIES AWARD is a cash award given to the basic degree student who prepared the best Old Testament exegesis during the academic year. A judging committee of professors of Old Testament nominates a person to the faculty for election.


THE SAMUEL A. CARTLEDGE BIBLICAL

THE HAROLD J. RIDDLE MEMORIAL

STUDIES AWARD is given to the basic degree

BOOK AWARD is presented to one or more

student who prepared the best New Testament

seniors, selected by the faculty in consultation

exegesis during the academic year. A cash award

with the pastoral care faculty, who show highest

is given along with a copy of the Greek New

distinction in the field of pastoral care, especially

Testament. A judging committee of professors of

in the area of terminally ill patients.

New Testament nominates a person to the faculty for election.

THE FLORIE S. JOHNSON AWARD was established by the family of Florie S. Johnson

THE PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN OF

in memory of their mother, who was a devoted

THE PRESBYTERY OF ST. ANDREW

teacher committed to lay ministry through the

PREACHING AWARD is a cash award given for

Church of Jesus Christ. The award is given to a

the best sermon preached by a student during the

senior who presents the best paper setting forth a

academic year.

plan for pastoral care to the aging and who shows

JAMES T. AND CELESTE M. BOYD BOOK FUND AWARD is presented to a graduating

promise of providing such ministry in a parish setting.

senior as a means of encouraging and helping

THE GEORGE AND SALLY TELFORD

establish a personal theological library of books

AWARD is designed to recognize each year an

and resources.

outstanding graduate in the Doctor of Ministry

THE C. VIRGINIA HARRISON MEMORIAL FUND AWARD is presented to a rising senior who is conscientious, responsible, hardworking, and in need of financial assistance. The president,

program. The award will be granted to a graduating DMin student who shows exceptional ability for congregational leadership with an emphasis on social justice issues and vision for the church.

in consultation with the secretary to the president, THE TOMS-MCGARRAHAN AWARD is selects the recipient of this award. THE ROBERT RAMEY, JR. CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP AWARD is given to a graduating senior who shows promise of providing outstanding leadership to the church. The recipient will have demonstrated unusual leadership qualities at Columbia as well as spiritual depth and integrity. THE WILLIAM DUDLEY FUND AWARD is a cash prize presented to two Master of Divinity seniors who have evidenced achievement and interest in, and commitment to, evangelism and

given by the John Calvin Presbyterian Church in Louisville, Kentucky, to honor Eunice McGarrahan’s leadership in the Worship and Theology Unit of the Presbyterian Church, USA, and her father the Reverend Russell Toms, a ‘51 graduate of Columbia. This award is given to one graduating PC(USA) MDiv student annually as nominated by the combined theology and worship faculty of Columbia Theological Seminary. This student must have passed the Theology and Worship sections of the PC(USA) Ordination Exams on their first attempt.

church growth. The award is to be used within a five-year period for continuing education or graduate study in evangelism and church growth at Columbia.

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59


Awards and Prizes continued COMMUNIT Y LIFE

THE WILLIAM RIVERS WADDEY AWARD in Youth Ministry was established by Walter and

CREATION CARE PREACHING AWARD

Cecilia Waddey in memory of their son William,

was established in 2013 by Dabney and Tom

who was an active and vital part of the youth

Dixon. A cash prize is awarded to the student

program at Peachtree Presbyterian Church. The

who prepares the best sermon that addresses

award is given to a student who shows promise

the intersections of the Bible, the Church, and

and commitment to a call in youth ministry

environmental concerns (e.g. sustainability,

upon graduation and ordination, as well as an

resilience, water, land, energy, climate change,

understanding of the profound impact that strong

food, communicable disease).

youth leadership can have on the individual, the community, and the Church of Jesus Christ.

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE

THE JOHN NELSEN AWARD is given for

SERMON AWARD is funded through a

the best Doctor of Ministry project focusing

generous grant from AAAS (The American

on scripture in aiding the transformation of the

Association for the Advancement of Science).

Doctor of Ministry student’s congregation into

The prize is given to the student who submits

a missional church. The award is given by Dan

the best sermon that addresses the question:

Winn Jr. in honor of his friend and counselor,

How can science further theological

John Nelsen, MDiv, DMin, Princeton Theological

understanding? The sermon is to be based on at

Seminary and pastor of University Presbyterian

least one biblical text and discusses or illustrates

Church, El Paso, Texas, who for 25 years has

how science can enhance Christian faith and

devoted his ministry to challenging, sustaining, and

practice.

transforming congregations. The missional church has been his primary focus for several years.

60

THE DABNEY AND TOM DIXON

Columbia Theological Seminary


GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS

PLACEMENT

Each year the seminary awards one or more

Columbia’s students seeking a call find a wide

fellowships to outstanding graduates completing

range of ministry options available to them

one of the basic degrees. The purpose of these

at graduation. While the majority of basic

fellowships is to recognize superior intellectual

degree graduates accept calls to congregational

achievement demonstrated during the course

ministries, others discover that their gifts and

of the regular seminary program and to provide

interests lead them into different avenues of

a modest support for graduate work beyond the

Christian service to the church and world.

first theological degree. Fellowships must be used

These avenues include further graduate

toward an accredited advanced master’s degree

study in one of the traditional theological

or doctoral graduate degree program in which the

disciplines; Clinical Pastoral Education and

recipient engages in the scholarly pursuit of an

focused study in the art and science of pastoral

academic or professional theological discipline.

care; work in international missions; service

THE HARVARD A. ANDERSON

in a social ministry agency; chaplaincy in

FELLOWSHIP was established in 1983 by the Rev. and Mrs. Harvard A. Anderson of Orlando, Florida. This fellowship is awarded to the graduate determined by the faculty to have the greatest potential for future academic achievement. THE FANNIE JORDAN BRYAN FELLOWSHIPS were established through a generous legacy left to Columbia by the late Mrs. Fannie Jordan Bryan of Columbia, South Carolina.

hospitals, schools, or the military services; campus ministry; teaching; and ministry in denominational staff positions. The Columbia placement program helps students explore their ministerial options. Workshops assist students as they prepare for denominational exams, compose personal information forms, prepare for interviews, negotiate calls, and plan for continuing education. Columbia maintains close ties with

THE COLUMBIA GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS

congregations seeking pastors and other calling

were initiated by the Class of 1941.

agencies. Announcements are posted regarding

THE ANNA CHURCH WHITNER

a wide variety of ministry opportunities.

MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIPS are given periodically from a legacy left to the seminary in 1928 by the late William C. Whitner of Rock Hill, South Carolina, in memory of his mother. Emma Gaillard Boyce Graduate Fellowship was established by the Rev. David Gaillard Boyce, an alumnus of the seminary, in honor of his mother. It is awarded to a graduating senior or clergyperson who enrolls in a graduate program

Individual personal information forms are sent to congregations and agencies that request them. Each year pastor nominating committees come to campus to interview seniors. As a result of these efforts, graduates ordinarily receive calls in a timely manner. However, while Columbia can provide the resources and consultation, responsibility for placement after graduation lies with the student.

of music and/ or worship.

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The teaching program at Columbia is arranged in four areas: BIBLICAL, HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL, PRACTICAL THEOLOGY, and SUPERVISED MINISTRY. Interdisciplinary courses, which combine studies in two or more of these areas, are also taught in the degree programs. While classroom instruction is foundational to all degree programs, the goal is to equip students to continue their education independently. The resources of the library, the structure of course work, and independent study courses encourage realization of that goal. BIBLICAL AREA studies seek to provide students with the necessary skills and tools to interpret the Bible with faithfulness, integrity, and imagination for a world that is much different from that in which the books of the Bible were written. To this end, Biblical Area courses focus on the languages (Hebrew and Greek), history, cultures, and worldviews of the ancient Mediterranean peoples, in order to clarify how the Bible spoke to those to whom it was first addressed. At the same time, Biblical Area courses give students the opportunity to practice appropriate and creative means of hearing Scripture anew today, in our own cultural and historical contexts, so that it may continue to speak to us and to our world in fresh and powerful ways. HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL AREA studies help students understand the past as a means of comprehending the present. Students engaged in these studies also struggle to form their own theology and to discover what it means to be Christian today. Since Columbia stands within a Reformed tradition, historical-doctrinal studies are concerned not only with right thinking, but also with the relation of Christian faith and doctrine to all arenas of life. Therefore, studies in this area engage students in consideration of the social, political, economic, and cultural life of today in the United States and across the world. In historical-doctrinal studies students acquire the tools they will need throughout their lives for dealing theologically with themselves and the world around them, tools that will enable graduates to lead the church in a prophetic and reconciling way as it works out its mission in the world. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY AREA studies center on the functioning of the theologian as a minister with a concern to train students to be ministers and to lead other persons in ministering. Studies in this area consider the dynamics of the minister’s role as pastor, evangelist, leader of worship, preacher, teacher, counselor, and administrator. Since the shape of the ministry of tomorrow is not fully known, these studies seek to train students to understand the issues involved, to help them see their own strengths and weaknesses, and then to develop a flexibility that will enable them to take their biblical and theological understanding and deal with whatever issues they face during their ministry. SUPERVISED MINISTRY serves an integrative function for the curriculum. Students are involved in the actual practice of ministry under competent supervision. Through experiential, relational, and inductive learning, students explore the forms, styles, contents, and concepts of ministry and put into practice what they have learned through studies in the biblical, historical-doctrinal, and practical theology areas. These studies are integrated with the practice of ministry and personhood of each student. ATA COURSES are the courses offered in the doctoral level ThD program offered through the Atlanta Theological Association. The offerings reflect both required and elective courses in the program. In most cases, these courses are offered in conjunction with Candler School of Theology and the Interdenominational Theological Center and will be taught by faculty from the member schools.

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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION CURRICULUM & COURSES

The following pages provide representative illustration of the courses taught by the faculty of Columbia. The registrar publishes the specific course offerings in the preceding spring each year. Copies are available in the Office of Academic Affairs and on the web. The faculty reserves the right to modify individual course requirements within a degree program. Such changes will be effective the next time such courses are offered or at a later date as determined by the faculty. Degree programs and their major requirements will remain unchanged for students entering that program, but changes may be made at any time to be effective for all entering students in the next academic year. The letter in the course designation is determined by the area in which it is offered: B for Biblical; HD for Historical-Doctrinal; P for Practical Theology; I for Interdisciplinary; and SM for Supervised Ministry. Courses whose numbers are prefaced by ATA are offered by the Atlanta Theological Association and not reflected in the numbering system below. For Columbia courses, the hundred’s digit refers to whether the course is a required course for a degree program or whether it is an elective course.

• • • •

500s are required courses in one of the basic degree programs 600s are elective courses for basic degree students, those numbered 650 and above typically requiring prior work in the area 700s are required courses for advanced degree programs 800s are elective courses for advanced degree programs

A current list of courses can be found at www.ctsnet.edu .

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BIBLICAL AREA Faculty: Brennan Breed, William P. Brown, Elizabeth Johnson, Raj Nadella, Stanley P. Saunders, Christine Roy Yoder B501 Essentials of Greek Johnson, Saunders Provides intensive study of the essentials of Koine Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary preparatory to reading the Greek New Testament. 3 credits B505 Introductory Biblical Hebrew Bonfiglio (adjunct) Introduces the essentials of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary preparatory to study of the Hebrew Old Testament. 3 credits B520, B521 Old Testament Interpretation I & II Breed, Brown, Yoder This two-semester course (Parts I and II) studies the diverse literature of the Old Testament, considers the historical and cultural contexts of the ancient world that produced it, introduces critical methods of biblical interpretation, and highlights the significance of the Old Testament for Christian faith. 3 credits each semester. 6 credits B530 New Testament Interpretation I Johnson, Nadella This is the first element in a two-semester sequence of courses that introduces the content, major forms, and contexts of the New Testament documents, the history and development of earliest Christianity, as well as methods of biblical interpretation. In particular, B530 focuses on the epistolary literature of the New Testament. 3 credits B531 New Testament Interpretation II Johnson, Saunders This is the second element in a two-semester sequence of courses that introduces the content, major forms, and contexts of the New Testament documents, the history and development of earliest Christianity, as well as methods of biblical interpretation. In particular, B531 focuses on the Gospel literature of the New Testament. 3 credits

B540 Ruth, Jonah, and Esther: Hebrew-based Exegesis Yoder Explores the Hebrew text of the short stories of Ruth, Jonah, and Esther, with particular attention to their ancient contexts, literary features and character development, depictions of life in the Diaspora and the “foreigner,� and theological perspectives. Considers a range of interpretive approaches to the stories, their reception in different communities, and how each is significant for Christian faith, life, and proclamation. Prerequisite: B505 Introductory Biblical Hebrew. 3 credits B541 Exodus: Hebrew-based Exegesis Yoder Explores the Hebrew text of Exodus, with particular attention to its ancient context, literary and rhetorical features, portrayals of liberation and covenant, and theology. Considers a range of interpretive approaches to the book, its reception in different communities, and how Exodus is significant for Christian faith, life, and proclamation. Prerequisite: B505 Introductory Biblical Hebrew. 3 credits B542 Text to Table: Methods in Old Testament Interpretation: Hebrew-based Exegesis Brown Participants will explore a variety of methods and reading strategies, all the while sharpening their translation and exegetical skills. Prerequisite: B505 or equivalent. 3 credits B543 Metaphors, Imagery, and the Prophetic Imagination: Hebrew-based Exegesis Bonfiglio (adjunct) This Hebrew-based exegesis course examines metaphors and other types of literary imagery in the Old Testament. Topics addressed include: the visual background of divine metaphors; the rhetorical function of imagery in prophetic discourse; the role of metaphors in biblical poetry; and the interplay between biblical metaphors and the theological imagination. Prerequisite: B505 or equivalent. 3 credits www.CTSnet.edu

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B544 Psalms - Hymnbook for Wholeness: Hebrew-based Exegesis Brown Engages in exegesis of the book of Psalms with special attention to their use in the liturgical, devotional, and theological life of ancient Israel and the church. Prerequisite: B505. 3 credits B560 Philemon and Matthew: Greek-based Exegesis Saunders This course offers students an opportunity to explore the Greek texts of both a letter of Paul and one of the Gospels, with attention to their oral character, historical and cultural settings in early Christianity, genres, structures and rhetoric, as well as the theological perspectives they presume and questions they raise for contemporary proclamation and practice. Prerequisite: B501 or equivalent. 3 credits B561 Romans: Paul, Empire, and Meaning of God: Greek-based Exegesis Myers, Nadella Designed to meet the MDiv exegesis requirement, this course offers students an opportunity to engage in close readings of Paul’s Epistle to the Romans through the dual lenses of post-structuralism and postcolonialism. One of the central aims of this course is to help students think more critically about how we make meaning of scriptures and the impact our ideological assumptions have upon biblical interpretation for teaching and preaching. Prerequisite: B501 or equivalent. 3 credits B562 Mark and Method: Greek-based Exegesis Allen (adjunct) An introduction to the art and practice of exegesis through the study of Mark’s gospel. Students will engage in close reading of the text by means of a variety of critical methods, drawing from: historical, literary, social, and cultural criticisms. Prerequisite: B501 or equivalent. 3 credits B563 Luke and Method: Greek-based Exegesis Allen (adjunct) An introduction to the art and practice of exegesis through the study of Luke’s gospel. Students will engage in close reading of the text by means of a variety of critical methods, drawing from: historical, literary, social, and cultural criticisms. Prerequisite: B501 or equivalent. 3 credits

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B601 Proverbs: Wisdom for an Uncertain World Yoder Engages in exegesis of the book of Proverbs, with particular attention to the book`s rhetorical strategies, worldview claims about the self, community, and theological perspectives. Considers ways in which the book may be read as a theological-ethical whole, and how it may inform faith communities today. 3 credits B603 The Bible and Literary Theories Breed Explores the Bible in light of post-structuralist thought, especially the concepts of difference, presence, and repetition. Examines the work of Ferdinand de Saussure, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Catherine Malabou, Homi Bhabha, Henry Louis Gates, Hazel Carby, and Gilles Deleuze. 3 credits B605 Genesis Yoder Explores the book of Genesis, paying particular attention to its ancient Near Eastern contexts, narrative and character development, and theological perspectives. Considers modern interpretive approaches to Genesis, the lasting influence of the book on Western art and literature, and interpretations and uses of the book in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. 3 credits B606 Song of Songs Yoder Interprets Song of Songs, with particular attention to the book’s rhetorical strategies, theological significance, and roles in Jewish and Christian liturgies. Considers ways in which the poetry and passion of Song of Songs may inform faith communities today. 3 credits B608 Ecclesiastes and Its Consequences Breed Traces the interpretation of the book of Ecclesiastes in Jewish and Christian communities in various modes (e.g. theology, liturgy, visual art, music, philosophy, film). Focuses on important questions raised by the book of Ecclesiastes as well as crucial interpretive problems as they feature in the reception history of this biblical text. 3 credits


B609 From Creation to New Creation: The Bible’s Ecology of Wonder Brown Participants will have opportunity to reflect on the many aspects of wonder that lies at the core of theological inquiry, biblical study, and creation care. 3 credits B613 Wrestling the Word: Old Testament Theology in Christian Faith and Practice Bonfiglio (adjunct) This course explores the contours of Old Testament theology, including its sources, challenges, diverse articulations, and on-going relevance for Christian faith and practice. Class sessions will meet at First Presbyterian Church in Midtown Atlanta and will include contextual learning components and opportunities for dialogue with church members and pastors. Hybrid—3 credits B622 Creation, Eschatology, and Ecology Saunders What resources (and problems) does the NT offer for Christians seeking to develop a theological framework for responding to our ecological crises? Does the NT view of salvation focus only on individual human souls, or also on the creation? This course explores especially the development of the Biblical stories of creation and fall (Genesis 1-4) in the New Testament and early Christianity, both in relation to the story of Jesus and the content of eschatological hope. 3 credits B625 Luke-Acts Seminar Allen (adjunct) A study of the Lukan corpus utilizing critical exegetical methods. Special attention will be given to the themes of reversal, community, and salvation particularly as they relate to social justice issues. Greek is recommended but not required. 3 credits B626 Sex, Celibacy, and Siblings Johnson An exploration of the ways early Christians use kinship language and metaphors to talk about themselves, their relationships, and the God they worship in Jesus Christ. Includes examination of New Testament texts that employ family imagery and texts that discuss family life in the context of the contemporary culture wars about families and family values. 3 credits

B630: The Bible and Visual Art Breed Examines the role of images within the Old and New Testaments, as well as the history of Christian and Jewish visual representations of biblical texts. Analyzes selected images that crystallize different theologies of images and modes of biblical interpretation. Considers various theological and hermeneutical frameworks that undergird these images. Students will learn how to interpret Jewish and Christian art and will develop a theological perspective on the use of visual art in the contemporary Church. 3 credits B652 The Book of Kings: Politics, Prophets, Worship & War Breed Exegesis of the Hebrew text of Kings. Topics will include the origin and shape of the so-called Deuteronomistic History, the nature of prophecy in Israel and the ancient Near East, and the rise and fall of Israelite and Judean monarchies. Prerequisite: B505 or equivalent. 3 credits B653 Eighth Century Prophets Breed Explores the books of Amos, Hosea, Micah, and First Isaiah by situating them in the historical and social contexts of eighth-century Israel and Judah. Compares the different prophetic understandings of YHWH as well as theological concepts such as faith, justice, and the role of the prophet. Surveys the reception histories of these various prophetic works. Prerequisite: B505 or equivalent. 3 credits B654 Joshua and Judges Bonfiglio (adjunct) This course offers an in-depth exploration of critical literary, theological, and historical issues in the study of Joshua and Judges. Special attention will be given to the translation and interpretation of these texts in Hebrew. In addition, we will explore how these texts—and the many difficult issues they raise concerning violence, holy war, the portrayal of outsiders, and the treatment of women—can be read in light of the contextual concerns of the church today, including feminist/ womanist, African-American, and postcolonial perspectives. In this sense, the course doubles as both an exercise in Hebrew exegesis and introduction to contextual hermeneutics. Prerequisite: B505 or equivalent. 3 credits www.CTSnet.edu

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B672 Romans Johnson The class will do a detailed interpretation of Paul’s letter to the Romans trying to understand something of the function of the letter for its original audience and its significance for Christian reflection and practice today. Prerequisite: B501 or equivalent. 3 credits B674 New Testament Ecclesiologies Johnson Will explore the various metaphors for the church in the New Testament, how they function to envision life together for the first Christians, and how they contribute to the contemporary church’s reflection on its own life together. Prerequisite: A course in the New Testament. 3 credits B679 Mark Johnson Explores Mark’s parabolic presentation of the Jesus story; students read the Greek text and engage theological, literary, and sociological interpretations. Prerequisite: B501. 3 credits B680 First Thessalonians Johnson A critical reading of Paul’s first extant letter with an eye to his relationship with the Thessalonian Christians, their relationships with each other and with their neighbors, and what Paul thinks those relationships have to do with God’s relationship to the world in Christ. Prerequisite: B501 or equivalent. 3 credits

B692 Exegetical Research in Old Testament Brown, Yoder 3 credits B693 Research in Old Testament Criticism or Theology Brown, Yoder 3 credits B694 Independent Study in Biblical Languages Staff 3 credits B695 Exegetical Research in New Testament Johnson, Saunders 3 credits B696 Research in New Testament Criticism or Theology Johnson, Saunders 3 credits B699 MA(TS) Final Independent Study Staff An independent study in Old or New Testament undertaken in the final semester of the MA(TS) program. Students do analytic, constructive work on a specific topic and produce original research in partial fulfillment of the degree requirements. 3 credits B702 ThM Thesis Research Biblical Area Staff This class focuses on the research and initial writing stage for the student’s thesis project, supervised by the advisor and in conjunction with the ThM director. 3 credits B703 ThM Literature Review Biblical Area Staff In this independent study, a student works with the primary advisor to develop a reading list in the area of research interest and writes a literature review of the sources in preparation for the thesis writing. This course is supervised by the student’s primary advisor with the assistance of the instructor of the ThM Research Seminar. 3 credits B704 ThM Thesis Writing Biblical Area Staff Required of all ThM students, leading to the completion of the ThM thesis in the biblical area. 6 credits

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B802 Texts of Terror: Teaching the Bible Critically for Lay Audiences Bonfiglio (adjunct) This course examines ethically and theologically difficult texts in the Bible, including those that deal with violence, holy war, the mistreatment of women, and the exclusion of outsiders. Emphasis will be placed on developing interpretive strategies and perspectives for teaching these “texts of terror” responsibly and critically to lay audiences. Online—3 credits

B827 Wisdom’s Wonder: Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes Brown The wisdom literature of the Old Testament is rich with insight about God’s relationship to the world and humanity’s place in it. The class will explore the many faces of wisdom in the Bible, focusing specifically on Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes, which together mark the journey of faith and wonder coram deo. Knowledge of Hebrew is recommended but not required. 3 credits

B806 Love, Desire, and the Song of Songs Yoder Interprets Song of Songs, with particular attention to the book’s ancient Near Eastern and Israelite contexts, rhetorical strategies, metaphors, connections to Israelite wisdom literature, and history of reception. Considers ways in which the poetry and passion of the Song can inform faith communities today. 3 credits

B851 The Gospel According to Matthew Saunders Explores Matthew’s story of Jesus and the restoration of “heaven and earth,” with an eye to themes of empire, violence, justice and forgiveness, and creation. This course provides resources especially for those who are preaching or teaching from the Gospel Lectionary next year (December 2016-November 2017). 3 credits

B809 The Pentateuch in Practice Bonfiglio (adjunct) This course explores how the stories and themes of the Pentateuch can be taught in the church today. Attention will be given to preaching Lectionary passages, using the Ten Commandments in Christian education, contemporary perspectives on the law and holiness, and the role of the Exodus tradition in Christian theology. Hybrid—3 credits

B855 Ecclesiastes and Its Consequences Breed Traces the interpretation of the book of Ecclesiastes in Jewish and Christian communities in various modes (e.g. theology, liturgy, visual art, music, philosophy, film). Focuses on important questions raised by the book of Ecclesiastes as well as crucial interpretive problems as they feature in the reception history of this biblical text. Prerequisite: B505 or equivalent. 3 credits

B822 A Dwelling Place for God: Creation, Eschatology & Ecology Saunders This course explores the biblical story of creation (“heaven and earth”) from Genesis to Revelation, focusing especially on the relevant NT materials in Matthew, John, Paul, and Revelation. The primary goal of the course is to develop a framework for understanding the biblical narratives of creation, fall and curse, and redemption, especially as these relate to current environmental concerns. 3 credits

B871 Rebuilding Our House: Community and Theology in the Post-Exile Yoder Explores the social-historical and theological dynamics of the Israelite community in the Persian period (539-331 BCE) by consideration of postexilic biblical texts. Emphasis is placed on the rebuilding of the faith community in its colonized and pluralistic context, conceptions of leadership, the roles of the priesthood and temple, concerns about idolatry and purity, and understandings of God and God’s work in the world. Participants will reflect on how this period in Israel’s history challenges and informs Christian faith, proclamation, and mission in the contemporary Church. 3 credits

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HISTORICAL DOCTRINAL AREA CURRICULUM & COURSES

Faculty: John Azumah, Mark Douglas, Tim Hartman, Martha Moore-Keish, Deborah F. Mullen, Kevin Park, Marcia Y. Riggs, Haruko Nawata Ward, William Yoo HD540, HD541 History and Presence I & II: Movements in Christianities Across Time and Space Azumah, Ward, Yoo This two semester course (Part I and Part II) traces global movements of Christianities from the early church to the present using historical-critical analyses of primary texts, the development of ideas and practices, and one’s own tradition within diverse World Christianities. Preferably taken in the first year and consecutively. 3 credits for each semester. 6 credits HD550 Christian Theology I Hartman, Moore-Keish Introduces the basic doctrines of Christian faith. Studies classical theological paradigms, their contemporary reinterpretation, and the significance of theology for the life of the church. 3 credits HD551 Christian Theology II Hartman, Moore-Keish Introduces the basic doctrines of Christian faith. Studies classical theological paradigms, their contemporary reinterpretation, and the significance of theology for the life of the church. Prerequisite: HD 550, or permission of the instructor. 3 credits HD561 Ethical Leadership Riggs Students examine theories of leadership and ethics in light of current debates about the motives and actions of leaders in both church and society. Students also explore the relevance of such theories for understanding their roles as leaders and followers in various institutional contexts. 3 credits HD563 Theories of Justice and Public Policy Riggs Analyzes theories of justice and their implications for public policy regarding such issues as affirmative action, AIDS and drug testing, healthcare, and welfare reform. 3 credits

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HD564 The Church as Community of Moral Discourse Riggs This course uses the social interpretation of the church as a human community as presented in theological ethicist James Gustafson’s classic work, Treasure in Earthen Vessels (1961), as a point of departure for exploring the barriers to and dynamics of moral discourse in communities of faith. Students will develop models of moral discourse for application in congregations or other group settings in which they practice ministry. Hybrid. 3 credits HD565 Histories of Christian Ethics Douglas Christian ethics involves multiple voices and varied perspectives expressed over time and in many contexts. This course traces the histories that have shaped Christian Ethics, giving special attention to the way they complicate and make possible the church’s moral witness. 3 credits HD566 Christologies and Politics Douglas Considers how we now understand the church`s early confession, “Jesus is Lord,” questions whether we should use the same language today and the political implications of doing so. A cross between Christology and political philosophy. 3 credits HD567 History and Practice of Nonviolence Riggs Explores the history and practice of nonviolence as movements in the United States and around the globe as well as the ways in which nonviolence is a practice of liberation ethics. Class time will also be used to learn the philosophy and strategies of nonviolent protest. 3 credits HD575 Issues in Medical Ethics Douglas Explores how theologians try to make moral sense of life and death in relation to issues such as euthanasia, abortion, cloning, and healthcare reform. Online. 3 credits


HD601 Histories and Diversities of Theology in American Culture Yoo This course investigates the histories of Christian theology in American culture from colonial to recent times. Exploring diverse theologies across U.S. history, the course entails analysis of theological texts and the cultural and historical contexts in which they were formed. 3 credits HD602 Christianity in Asia in the Early Modern World Ward This course critically examines the development of Christianity in Asia between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. Beginning with the Treaty of Tordesillas (1493) through the Jesuit and later Protestant missions, the course examines the interactions of these missions and the new converts in Asia, the new expressions of Christianity produced, as well as the controversies in Europe regarding the new “native Christianities.” 3 credits HD603 Women in the Reformations (1400-1700) Ward An examination of representative women who helped shape the Reformation movements. Studies the range of women`s leadership in Lutheran, Reformed, Radical, English, and Catholic Reformations in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Addresses the critical issues in studying women in history. 3 credits HD605 History of Religion and American Popular Culture: From the Nineteenth Century to The Hunger Games Yoo This course explores the history of religion and culture in the United States from the nineteenth century to the present to analyze how Christianity has been represented in popular literature, art, music, and film. 3 credits HD606 History of Religion in the American South Yoo This course focuses upon the American South to study the troubled histories of race and slavery in the United States and to analyze the cultural and religious transformations of the region through migration, industrialization, urbanization, and other significant historical movements. 3 credits

HD607 Luther Ward An examination of Luther`s (1483-1546 C.E.) reformation in the context of late medieval and early modern Europe and beyond. Readings include Luther`s major biblical, theological and polemic works. Traces the development of his reform ideas and practices in interaction with other reform movements. Discusses issues of the Peasants’ War, Jews and Turks, national identity, witchcraft, and marriage and vocation for women and men. 3 credits HD610 Reformed Theology: Its Shape and Development Hartman Examines Reformed theology from the sixteenth century to the present, focusing on theologians, creeds, and confessions. 3 credits HD612 Theologies of Baptism and Eucharist Moore-Keish Surveys the development of baptismal and eucharistic theologies through history and explores some of the various debates concerning baptism and Eucharist in churches around the world today. 3 credits HD614 Theology and Community: A Lived Theology Approach Hartman Investigates social consequences of religious belief through resistance against Nazism (Dietrich Bonhoeffer), against racism through the U.S. Civil Rights Movement (Martin Luther King, Jr.), and against Rwandan genocide (Emmanuel Katongole) asking: How do ideas about God shape the way communities and individuals engage the social order? 3 credits HD615 Theology, Ethics, and Sexuality Douglas, Moore-Keish This course explores the theologies that underlie Christian notions of embodiment, desire, and sexual activity and attempts to connect those theological notions to contemporary issues of sexuality that confront the Church. 3 credits

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HD619 Black Church Studies Seminar Riggs Explores the Black American religious experience in topics ranging from Black women and religion, to the civil rights movement, to leadership models in the tradition. 3 credits HD620 Ethical Practices: Nonviolent and Intercultural Communication Riggs Marshall Rosenberg’s Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life and Min-Sun Kim’s NonWestern Perspective on Human Communication: Implications for Theory and Practice are theoretical bases for this course. Students learn theory and skills for communicating effectively and compassionately with persons of diverse raceethnicities, cultures, and religious backgrounds. 1.5 credits HD621 Ethical Practices: Conflict Transformation Riggs John Paul Lederach’s theories of conflict transformation along with theories of transformative mediation and narrative mediation are studied. These theories inform the practice of skills for sustaining relationships in contexts of conflict. Students will practice conflict transformation skills and develop their own conflict transformation leadership style. 1.5 credits HD622 Ethical Practices: Difficult Dialogues & Democratic Dialogue Riggs Theories regarding what constitutes dialogue (rather than conversation or debate) as well as the Democratic Dialogue—A Handbook for Practitioners provide theoretical and practical insights for this course. Students will practice dialogue skills and develop dialogue models for discussing difficult topics in the varieties of contexts in which they practice ministry. 1.5 credits HD623 Ethical Practices: Nurturing the Moral Imagination Riggs Nurturing the Moral Imagination Students study insights from conflict transformation theory, organizational theory, and cognitive science on moral imagination as they complete the exercises in The Little Book of Contemplative Photography by Howard Zehr. 1.5 credits

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HD624 Ethicist as Social and Cultural Critic Riggs A seminar exploring how selected theological and social ethical questions are presented in cultural sources such as contemporary movies, novels, political cartoons, music, and visual art. Theories of cultural criticism and traditional and liberation theologies and ethics provide the analytical and dialogical frame for the course. 3 credits HD625 Feminist and Womanist Ethics Riggs Examines the historical, sociological, and theological bases of feminist and womanist ethics to explore gender oppression, socioreligious ethics and the analysis of sexism, and the purpose of a movement against sexist oppression. 3 credits HD626 Science, Religion, & the End of the World Douglas The sciences and the Christian tradition provide narratives about the end of the world. Yet how do these narratives relate? How do we evaluate them? And what are the implications of the narratives for the way we live and think today? This course, taught by a professor of astrophysics and a professor of religious ethics and offered jointly by Agnes Scott College and Columbia Theological Seminary, takes up those critical questions and provides students from both schools with opportunities to study widely, think critically, and learn respectfully in a crossdisciplinary setting. 3 credits HD630 An Historical & Theological Survey of Islam Azumah An introduction to the development of Islamic religious thought and practice. It will survey the major dogmas and rituals that shape the Islamic faith. Particular attention will be paid to the mission and theological significance of Muhammad, scripture and revelation in Islam; major Islamic groups, Islamic law and Islamic teaching on Christians and Christianity. The course will equip students to theologically and biblically engage with Islam and relate to Muslims in a post 9/11 world context. 3 credits


HD661 Feminist Theologies Moore-Keish An examination of the roots of the feminist theological movement in earlier Christian history, the significant voices from the 1960`s and 1970`s, and contemporary theologians who are working in feminist theology today. In the final weeks of class, students work on projects on topics of particular interest. Prerequisite: HD550 or equivalent. 3 credits HD662 Marginality: Asian North American Theologies and Beyond Park Explores the emerging Asian North American theologies that have largely been shaped by the experiences of marginality and how this theme can be a useful hermeneutic to understand other minority cultures imbedded in a majority culture. Prerequisites: Christian Theology I and II. 3 credits HD664 Theology of Karl Barth Hartman Offers an overview of the theology of Karl Barth through close attention to his Church Dogmatics, Epistle to the Romans, and selected occasional writings. Barth’s understandings of revelation, the Word of God, election, reconciliation, and ecclesiology will be explored. Prerequisite: HD 550 or instructor’s permission. 3 credits HD670 Religion and Violence Riggs Students study the topic of religion and violence from historical, psychological, sociological, theological, and ethical perspectives as they develop an analytical perspective regarding religion’s role in conflict and violence. Students develop their own theological-ethical perspective on the relationship between religion and violence as a component of their overall theology of ministry. Best if students have some background in church history, theology, and/or worship. 3 credits HD691 Independent Study in Church History Ward, Yoo 3 credits HD693 Independent Study in Theology Hartman, Moore-Keish 3 credits HD694 Independent Study in Christianity and World Religions Azumah 3 credits

HD695 Independent Study in Philosophy Staff 3 credits HD696 Independent Study in Mission, Ecumenics, and World Christianity Staff 3 credits HD697 Independent Study in Ethics Douglas, Riggs 3 credits HD699 MA(TS) Final Independent Study Staff An independent study in Church History, Ethics, or Theology undertaken in the final semester of the MA(TS) program. Students do analytic, constructive work on a specific topic and produce original research in partial fulfillment of the degree requirements. 3 credits HD702 ThM Thesis Research Historical Doctrinal Area Staff This class focuses on the research and initial writing stage for the student’s thesis project, supervised by the advisor and in conjunction with the ThM director. 3 credits HD703 ThM Literature Review Historical Doctrinal Area Staff In this independent study, a student works with the primary advisor to develop a reading list in the area of research interest and writes a literature review of the sources in preparation for the thesis writing. This course is supervised by the student’s primary advisor with the assistance of the instructor of the ThM Research Seminar. 3 credits HD704 ThM Thesis Writing Historical Doctrinal Area Staff Required of all ThM students, leading to the completion of the ThM thesis in the historical doctrinal area. 6 credits HD801 History of Race, Migration and the Making of the American Church Yoo This course investigates the history of Christians from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe as they created new churches in the United States with particular attention to pastoral ministry, multicultural congregations, and practical implications for Christian leaders moving forward. 3 credits

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HD802 Histories of Presbyterian Experience in America Yoo What has it meant to be Presbyterian in the United States? This course examines the multifaceted history of the American Presbyterian experience from the colonial period to the present across diversities of age, ethnicity, gender, geography, and race. By looking at a myriad of source materials – sermons, theological treatises, congregational records, missionary publications, and archival findings – the course will cover the evolution of Presbyterianism in the United States and explore how church leaders may apply lessons from the past to contemporary local and global ministries. Hybrid—3 credits HD810 Reading Karl Barth for Ministry Hartman This course examines the implications of Barth’s theology for the practice of ministry. Particular attention will be paid to his understanding of election, his Christology, and especially his ecclesiology. Both Western and non-Western ministry contexts will be considered. 3 credits HD815 Prayer Moore-Keish This class will explore the theology and practice of Christian praying. Drawing on classical and contemporary writings and the students’ own experiences, we will reflect on major questions such as: What is prayer? What happens when we pray? Does it affect God? Does it affect us? What is Christian prayer in particular? How do we pray? 3 credits HD816 History of Western Christian Spirituality González Traces the central focus of spirituality in the Christian community throughout its existence, beginning with the early church that is largely in the East, and shifting to the West in the Medieval period. Gives attention to the renewal of spiritual life in the church, its sources, and its relationship to context in order to determine what such sources are for the church today. 3 credits

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HD817 Classics of Christian Devotional Literature González This course deals with seven books that have had great impact on the spiritual lives of Western Christians. They come from the monastic tradition as well as significant books of the English Protestant world. There will be an annotated reading list for those registering for the course. Reading the material and writing the brief responses outlined in the pre-assignment is expected. The final assignment of the course will involve creating material for the use of a congregation at the present time, based on elements from the different readings. 3 credits HD827 The Early Jesuits Ward A close examination of the writings and works of the Society of Jesus from its inception by Ignatius of Loyola in the 1530s to the papal suppression of the Society in 1773. Seminar topics include: a) spirituality (especially Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises); b) evangelization (global mission, theory and practice); c) interreligious dialogue; d) ministry (active apostolate, priesthood and women); e) martyr theology and martyrdom. 3 credits HD863 Eucharist of Crumbs: Women and Vocation in the Medieval Church Ward An examination of writings by medieval women and their theological, spiritual, and vocational quest. Discusses methods of teaching women’s texts from history in churches. 3 credits HD874 United Nations Seminar Douglas Under the guidance of a CTS professor, students in this NYC-centered seminar use the resources of the UN Office of the PC(USA) for an in-depth and cross-disciplinary exploration of an important issue confronting the global church. 3 credits HD879 Women of Color as Public Theologians Riggs Black women have a rich history of prophetic religious thought and activism. In this seminar students read primary source documents written by black women from the nineteenth through the twenty-first centuries. These documents are engaged as sources for doing constructive ethical reflection on issues of social justice and public policy. 3 credits


PRACTICAL THEOLOGY AREA Faculty: Kathy Dawson, Anna Carter Florence, J. William Harkins, Paul “Skip” Johnson, Kimberly Long, Jacob Myers, Rebecca Spurrier, Jeffery Tribble, Ralph Watkins P150 Scripture Reading Practicum Staff Prepares students to be liturgists and oral interpreters of scripture by offering a performance and proclamation theology for Reformed worship. Required of MDiv students in the first semester as a prerequisite to P530. 0 credits P500 Introduction to Practical Theology Dawson This required course in the Master of Arts in Practical Theology (MAPT) degree program introduces the student to the basic vocabulary, understandings, and methods in the field of practical theology. Incorporating a wide variety of teaching methods, this course seeks to show the foundation upon which each of the four areas of concentration rests. This course meets as a one-week intensive course in August of each year with three follow-up sessions set by the course participants during the fall semester that directly follows it. 3 credits

P510 Introduction to Christian Leadership Tribble This course is an introduction to the theories and practices of Christian leadership. The course will explore such topics as leadership development, systems theory and practice, financial administration, and missional church development examining how Christian leaders exercise legitimate authority by directing, influencing, coordinating, or otherwise guiding the thoughts and behaviors of persons and groups. The course seeks to create a space to discern and develop our unique qualities, characteristics, and expertise of Christian leadership with others through critical reflection and integration of course material. Hybrid. 3 credits

P512 Congregational Leadership & Church Administration Tribble Addresses time management in ministry, financial planning, spiritual development, organizational dynamics, power and authority, communication, problem-solving, conflict P501 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of and negotiation, coordinating personnel and members in mission and ministry, and Christian Education stewardship. Dawson 3 credits Examining understandings of God, mission, and education, students learn basic educational P514 Turnaround Congregations through concepts, analyze contemporary theories and Evangelism & Community practices, and develop approaches to Christian Watkins education. Many of us will be called to congregations 3 credits that have witnessed a decline over the years or are in need of missional realignment. These P502 Faith and Human Development congregations are referred to as “turnaround” Dawson churches. In this course we address what a Surveys the field of human development turnaround church is and how one might lead and explores the developmental theories and methods that inform current education practice. a congregation in the process of missional Faith interviews with children, youth, and adults realignment via evangelism and community engagement. are used to analyze and critique developmental 3 credits psychology. Fulfills the educator certification requirements in human development for PC(USA) students. 3 credits

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P515 The Art of Reading Congregations Tribble Recognizing that theological education must be seen in the context of the church and its mission in the world, this class helps students develop the art of reading congregations as “living human documents.” Multiple interpretive frames and methodologies for analyzing congregations are introduced as tools to enable practical theological reflections. Students learn to read the congregation and its history as context for the transformative praxis of pastoral leadership. Prerequisite: SM510 or by permission of instructor. 3 credits P516 The Beloved Community: An Introduction to Public Ministry Tribble Building upon a theological basis for the work of the church in the public sphere, students will explore a continuum of approaches for leading a congregation in public ministry. 3 credits P520 Introduction to Pastoral Care Harkins, Cook (adjunct) An introduction to the fundamentals of pastoral care, including how to respond in common pastoral situations (including individual, premarital, couples, family, and crisis situations). Students develop a biblical and theological framework for understanding their own pastoral identity, the meaning of care of persons, and the pastoral role of Christian community. Attention is given to professional ethics, gender and intercultural sensitivity, making appropriate referrals, and the spiritual importance of self-care and boundaries. 3 credits P530 Preaching Florence, Myers Focuses on the theory and practice of preaching as the church’s proclamation of the Word of God. Students work closely with instructors and peers to prepare and preach sermons in small group settings. Prerequisites: P150 Scripture Reading Practicum. 3 credits P540 Introduction to Christian Worship Long Christian worship has taken various forms from the earliest days of the church. This course will survey the diversity of liturgical expression in the Western church throughout the centuries and in

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our own time, while also considering the common elements that all Christian worshipers share. Special attention will be given to the theology and practice of baptism and the Lord’s Supper. Students will also explore themes such as the Christian year, liturgical space, music, and the arts. 3 credits P541 Worship and the Arts Long Students will read in the area of theological aesthetics (e.g. Thiessen, Theological Aesthetics: A Reader), theology and music (e.g. Begbie, Resonant Witness, Conversations Between Music and Theology, Costen, In Spirit and in Truth: The Music of African American Worship), and theology and visual arts (e.g. Jensen, The Substance of Things Seen: Art, Faith, and the Christian Community). Further assisted by texts such as Arts, Theology, and the Church (ed. Vrudny and Yates), students will strive to articulate an understanding of the relationship between worship and the arts in the context of the 21st century North American church. 3 credits P550 MAPT Capstone Course in Practical Theology Dawson This course is designed for Master of Arts in Practical Theology degree students in their final spring semester. Building on formative understandings developed in P500 Introduction to Practical Theology, students will continue to explore different models and issues within the field. A particular emphasis on vocations within Practical Theology will form a distinctive portion of this course. 3 credits P601 Transforming the Confirmation Journey Lawrence (adjunct) Explores the meanings of confirmation, critiques models and methods, and attempts to determine the best approach to confirmation in students’ future congregations. 1.5 credits P603 Faith and Formation: Christian Spirituality and Christian Education Erickson, Weir (adjuncts) This course is predicated on the belief that Christian spirituality and Christian education, while distinctive in their own ways, also complement one another and enhance and support one another especially as they are


engaged in congregational ministry. Both are very much engaged in nurturing persons in their faith - their believing, as well as their formation - their growing. Through the lens of the congregation, students in this course will gain a deeper understanding of how the practices of Christian spirituality and Christian education build up both the individual and the whole congregation into the Church as the body of Christ in the world. 3 credits

P607a Technology and Christian Education Clemans (adjunct) Discover how technology can be a vital tool for educational ministry. Explore the potential benefits and burdens of tech tools including social media, videoconferencing, group collaboration platforms, presentation software, and a variety of media creation and administrative tools. Research and reflect on best practices and policies. A combination of one initial face to face and five weekly online meetings, readings, and projects will help the student increase the student’s comfort and expertise in using technology in ministry. Online—1.5 credits

P604 Youth Ministry Lawrence (adjunct) Explores youth subculture and its implications for ministry, including the developmental challenges of youth, ministry with young people in crisis, changing family patterns, and emerging strategies in ministry P608 Using Children’s & Adolescent Literature in Christian Faith Formation with youth and their families. Rightmyer (adjunct) 3 credits This class will explore the rationale for using children’s books and adolescent literature in P605 The Spiritual Lives of Children Christian faith formation as well as the process Caldwell (adjunct) and criteria for evaluating and selecting books to Focuses on a variety of aspects of ministry with use. It will also present specific ways to use these children. The perception of children is explored books so learners are actively engaged both in theologically, developmentally and educationally. group and individual reading. Special attention Particular focus will be given to how children grow will be given to the relatively new genre of graphic in the life of faith, review and critique of Bible novels, a particularly engaging form for middle storybooks, and the ways that families can be school students or reluctant readers. involved in a child’s faith formation. Taught as a hybrid/intensive course with online assignments prior 1.5 credits to first class and prior to final class meeting in April. P609 Introduction to Recreation Ministry 3 credits Winchip (adjunct) This course will explore the use of recreation to P606 Camp/Conference Program and address the developmental, educational, and Administration spiritual needs of children, youth, and adults. Winchip (adjunct) Students will have hands-on opportunities to plan This course will explore the many facets of camp, and lead recreational activities that could be used conference and retreat ministry. It will focus on in a variety of ministry contexts. the form and function of programming and how it relates to all aspects of site administration. Students 1.5 credits will be introduced to the principles behind mission P612 Evangelism, Photography, & Social Media statements, program models, staffing and facility management, as well as trends and standards within Watkins In this course we study what makes media this important field. social and theologically enriching. It focuses 3 credits on the culture of sharing photos as a means of evangelism. Students will be taught what makes P607 Curriculum Planning and Evaluation in the visually strong images that are shared / liked Local Congregation and how to make visually strong images that Rightmyer (adjunct) effectively share the Gospel. Students will do An introduction to and analysis of instructional projects that engage blogs, Instagram, Twitter, resources available from denominational and Flickr, Facebook (and other photo sharing nondenominational publishers. Contexts of platforms) that are conducive for sharing the community, prayer, teaching, proclamation, and service provide the focus for curriculum analysis and Gospel over the web. Hybrid—3 credits formation. 3 credits www.CTSnet.edu

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P613 Evangelism and Social Justice Watkins Church leaders in the future will have to be able to nurture their congregation while simultaneously being organically connected to the community that surrounds the church. This type of church is externally focused and sees its life as inextricably linked with the work of social justice in its community. This course explores the missional foundation and definition of what it looks like for a church to link evangelism, mission and social justice. Hybrid—3 credits P614 Future of Ministry: Being the Church in the 21st Century Watkins In this course students will engage the emergent church and the missional church models as dialogical partners with established congregational life. This course deals with the tension and integration of the old and the new as the class seeks to uncover what God is doing in God’s church as God leads us into the 21st Century. The class will ask and work at answering, what does the a 21st Century church look like as compared to a 20th Century church? Hybrid—3 credits

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P617 Reaching Young Adults in the Digital and Media Age: Foundations of Young Adult Ministry Watkins Many of our churches are using methods and practices to communicate the gospel that were fitted for a previous generation that was a churchgoing population. This course is designed to help us think about why and how we can effectively share the gospel with young adults in a media/ digital age by using technology as a resource to build community and transform lives while also addressing the foundations of young adult ministry. Online—3 credits P621 Death, Dying & Bereavement Washburn (adjunct) An in-depth exploration of the physical, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of death and dying, and the process of bereavement, in the context of pastoral theology. Students will explore the skill and art of ministering to the dying and the bereaved, and develop their own theological framework for understanding and facing terminal illness, life-threatening violence, and death. Pastoring to diverging beliefs about evil, suffering, and life after death will be considered. 3 credits

P615 Theological Grounding and Development of the Virtual Church Watkins This course addresses the theological issues surrounding the virtual dimension of faith as negotiated in cyberspace. This course will also explore the phenomena of virtual faith expressions and what their creation imply for the future of the church. Online—3 credits

P622 Family Systems Theory for Ministry Johnson Explores the basics of family systems theories as a basis for understanding dynamics at work within families and congregations. Enhances understanding of the student`s own family system and the impact of this system upon formation for ministry. Addresses issues relating to personal and professional boundaries. 3 credits

P616 Evangelism and Videography: Story as Witness and Outreach Watkins In this course we study story structure and explore ways to share the Gospel via creative multi-media approaches. Students will do projects that engage the screen (computer, tablet and phone) by creating videos that effectively share the gospel of Jesus Christ. Students will be taught how to shoot and edit videos to be posted on Vimeo, Youtube, Flickr and Vine and or other appropriate platforms. 3 credits

P623 Pastoral Care as a Public Practice Cook This course is intended to teach students how to engage in pastoral care beyond its traditional focus of congregational and individual care and into broader social and public spaces. Students will learn how to participate in public practices of pastoral care that critically assess and respond to the range of contextual, systemic, and relational factors that often contribute to individual and social suffering. Furthermore, students will learn practical ways to provide pastoral care in public spaces and understand the theoretical and theological foundations of this public ministry. Ultimately, students learn a communal-contextual

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method of pastoral care that is committed to both the care of souls and societies. Hybrid—3 credits P624 Intro to Marriage & Family Care & Counseling Ministry Cook Introduces students to a range of theological and theoretical resources and approaches related to marriage and family care and counseling in the context of pastoral ministry. Attention given to the areas of pre-marital counseling and marriage enrichment and how careful navigation of these experiences can impact the overall health and stability of family life. Students encouraged to begin the process of developing their pastoral theology of marriage and family counseling as well as consider the unique context of clergy marriage. 3 credits P628 Pastoral Counseling in the Parish Harkins Explores the theory, methodology, and practice of the appropriate scope of counseling in the parish context. This includes accountability and consultation, confidentiality and boundaries, networking and referral, principles of psychological and theological diagnosis, and the theological rationale of pastoral counseling in the congregation. Hybrid—3 credits P629 The Art and Practice of Theological Reflection Harkins This class will be of use for those whose “vocatio” calls upon and invites them to engage in theological reflection in a variety of settingsparish ministry, chaplaincy, and clinical venuesand in turn for those for whom they care, as this topic can then be taught in adult and other education settings (CPE, confirmation classes, etc.) contexts. Matters of formation, spiritual discipline, and human development will be considered. 3 credits P637 Postmodernism: Why it Matters for Preaching Myers Postmodernism —along with its methodological cousin, deconstruction —has shaped the last fifty years of Western thought. As both a philosophical and cultural phenomenon,

postmodernism calls for careful attention by any who would proclaim the gospel with theological awareness and contextual relevance. This intensive course will interrogate the central themes and theorists associated with postmodernism and discuss postmodernism’s implications for contemporary Christian preaching. 3 credits P638 Preaching Justice in an Age of Globalization Myers This course aims to empower preachers to address issues of global injustice and oppression through their preaching ministries with the hope of mobilizing congregational engagement thereby. To that end, this course will equip students with critical tools to prepare congregations for ethical engagement in an age of globalization through their preaching ministry. This course will model a certain kind of social analysis, theological/ethical reflection, and prophetic preaching — one that is globally aware and locally mobilized. Students will select one topic of injustice in Atlanta for close social analysis, which will serve as a catalyst for ethical, theological, and homiletical reflection. 3 credits P639 Back to the Text: The Gospel of John Florence A communal exercise in getting “back to the text” by reading and performing together an entire book of scripture—in this case, the Gospel of John. Students will read widely in Biblical Studies pertaining to the Gospel of John, experiment with various ways of reading, rehearsing, and improvising a scriptural narrative, and finally create a group performance of John’s Gospel, which we will offer to the community. This course happens annually in the spring with a different book each year, and is open to anyone in all degree programs. 3 credits P643 Writers’ Workshop: Words for Worship Long How can the words we speak in worship be accessible, lively, and evocative? This course will study the way language is used in worship, provide tools for analyzing and critiquing liturgical resources that have been published in recent years, and offer a vision for how to write and speak liturgy for today’s church. 3 credits

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P648 Worship and the Arts: Theology and Practice Miller, Saliers (adjuncts) This course explores key relationships between Christian public worship and liturgical arts, with special attention to poetry and music. Our focus is on developing pastoral, biblical and theological imagination in basic patterns of Word, prayer and sacramental actions. 3 credits P672 Pastoral Care of Couples and Families Cook Acquaints students with ways to think theoretically and theologically about the family, with the assumption that all Christian ministers have involvement with family dynamics and systems theory implications. Objectives are to develop appropriate pastoral /theological responses to family issues in congregational contexts; to gain familiarity with some major schools of family therapy; to be reminded of the importance of the pastor`s own family experience in his or her pastoral work; and to begin developing a theology of family life. 3 credits P674 Intercultural & Interfaith Pastoral Care and Counseling Harkins This course is designed to develop competence, imagination, and self-and-other awareness in intercultural and interfaith pastoral care and counseling. Students will develop in-depth disciplines of awareness and reflection upon the questions of history, ethnicity, gender, power, sexual orientation, race, and class that have shaped the nature of therapeutic and pastoral encounters. The course will explore the pastoral counseling, pastoral care, and clinical pastoral education applications of the deepening awareness in the field for interfaith, intercultural competence, practices, and ethical and clinical reflection. The course will include experiential components, and CPE, SM510, or other significant ministry/contextual experience is preferred. 3 credits P680 The Preacher and the Poet Florence Considers the poet’s art-language, imagination, experience, and form as a resource for preaching. Includes a workshop with a working poet and the preaching of two sermons. Prerequisite: P530. 3 credits

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P682 Prophetic, Imaginative Preaching for God’s Changing World Myers Imagination —empowered by the Spirit —is the lifeblood of prophetic preaching. Drawing upon traditional and contemporary approaches to preaching, this course will lead students to innovate upon said styles and to incorporate preaching styles across cultures and denominations. Particular attention will be paid to inductive, narrative, performative, and poetic preaching styles. Prerequisite: P530. 3 credits P690 Worship through the Phases of Life: Occasional Services Long This course will consider the theological, liturgical, and homiletical aspects of occasional services in the life of the church: weddings, funerals, services of healing and wholeness, ordination, and other rites related to baptism. Students will explore cultural attitudes and sociological analyses regarding rites of passage in the church, consider those rites theologically, and examine liturgies associated with those rites. Prerequisites: P530 & P540. 3 credits P691 Worship & Preaching through the Christian Year Long The Christian year enables the church to mark time in a profound way. In this course, students will study the theological themes and dominant metaphors inherent in the days and seasons of the liturgical year. Building on these insights, they will then explore the liturgical and homiletical possibilities therein. Participants will study liturgies and sermons as well as engage in creating their own. Attention will be given to the use of language and the role of music and other lively arts. Prerequisites: P530 & P540. 3 credits P693 Independent Study in Practical Theology and Counseling Harkins, Johnson 3 credits P694 Independent Study in Worship Long 3 credits P695 Independent Study in Preaching Florence, Myers 3 credits


P697 Independent Study in Spirituality Staff 3 credits P698 Independent Study in Ministry and Administration Tribble 3 credits P699 Independent Study in New Church Development Staff 3 credits

P771 Teaching and Learning Theory Dawson Provides for advanced study in teaching and learning as Christian formation. Particular attention is given to various teaching theories with an emphasis on faith formation. Various teaching methods will be explored with a practicum component in the course enabling students to practice, evaluate, and hone their skills as a teacher and a teacher of teachers. Hybrid—3 credits

P772 Advanced Study in Faith and Human Development Dawson P702 ThM Thesis Research Practical Theology A core course for the DEdMin degree. This Area seminar assumes that participants are familiar Staff with a basic understanding of the classic This class focuses on the research and initial developmental theories such as Piaget, Kohlberg, writing stage for the student’s thesis project, supervised by the advisor and in conjunction with Fowler, Freud, Erikson, and Gilligan. Students focus in the area of faith, spiritual, and religious the ThM director. development, looking at different ways of 3 credits conceptualizing the Christian life from historical P703 ThM Literature Review Practical Theology and current theorists. Emphasis is placed on child and adolescent spirituality in particular in the Area exploration of best practices for presenting the Staff gospel at different ages. In this independent study, a student works with the primary advisor to develop a reading list in the 6 credits area of research interest and writes a literature review of the sources in preparation for the thesis P773 Advanced Study in Curriculum Theory writing. This course is supervised by the student’s Dawson, Galindo A core course for the DEdMin degree. Students primary advisor with the assistance of the think beyond curriculum as a lesson plan or instructor of the ThM Research Seminar. resource and explore the history of curriculum 3 credits theory in the church and world. Special emphasis is placed on obtaining a multicultural and P704 ThM Thesis Writing Practical Theology interfaith perspective on this issue as well as Area comparing the course of public education in the Staff U.S. to Christian education. Required of all ThM students, leading to the 3 credits completion of the ThM thesis in the Practical Theology Area. P774 Theory, History & Philosophy of 6 credits Educational Ministry Nishioka P770 DEdMin Introductory Seminar Provides for advanced study in the theology, Dawson, Inglis, Rhone (adjuncts) This course is the introductory seminar for those history, and philosophy of Christian education. The course unfolds by weaving the three areas persons beginning the doctor of educational ministry degree program and therefore provides of theology, history, and philosophy together enabling the learner to experience how the an overview of the program, a survey of the disciplines are complementary and integrated various disciplines to be studied in the program, and how together, all three contribute to the and enables the student to relate their study tapestry that is educational ministry. to their context for educational ministry. The 3 credits course is framed by the tasks of practical theology as they lead to Christian formation in congregational settings. 6 credits www.CTSnet.edu

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P775 Development of a Curriculum Design Dawson, Nishioka In consultation with the student’s adviser and the instructor for the Advanced Study in Curriculum Theory course, the student will create and implement an original curriculum design on a topic most often related to their project. 3 credits P779 DEdMin Doctoral Project Dawson Required of all DEdMin students. 6 credits P812 A Systems Approach to Congregational Leadership Galindo Using Bowen Family Systems Theory (BFST) as applied to organizations as a theoretical framework, the student will explore ways to apply the theory to congregational leadership and other ministry contexts. The role of pastoral leadership in context is emphasized. Hybrid. 3 credits P830 Church as Cultural Curation Myers This course introduces students to the motif of curation as a way of thinking critically and creatively about church leadership —particularly in regard to preaching, worship, discipleship, and new church development. Herein, students will learn to nurture spaces to connect with cultures in and beyond the church; preserve what is best in ecclesial cultures; and transform church and societal cultures under the power of the gospel. Online—3 credits

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P838 Pastoral Care and the Experience of Crisis and Trauma Johnson, S. An exploration of ways for pastors to speak and live God`s story when crisis events overwhelm individuals, families, and communities. Focuses on pastoral care skills one can learn to help persons who are moving through such a time. Looks beyond management and intervention response to crisis to consider the resiliency of hope and possibility of grace incarnated through acts of pastoral care. 3 credits P853 Preacher and the Poet Florence Considers the poet’s art-language, imagination, experience, and form as a resource for preaching. Includes a workshop with a working poet and the preaching of two sermons. 3 credits P885 Transformative Pastoral Leadership Tribble Explores the role of the pastor as spiritual leader embracing key adaptive issues for personal, congregational, and communal transformation. Acknowledging that leading a congregation through processes of deep change may be risky and costly, we explore current interdisciplinary ministry approaches for pastors leading congregations through processes of transition involving time and learning where identity, mission, culture, and operating procedures are fundamentally altered. This class is a seminar for students to work on actual case studies from their church and ministry contexts. 3 credits


INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES I500 MA(TS) Seminar Nadella Assists entering MA(TS) students in focusing on vocational or personal goals. Required for entering, full-time MA(TS) students. Part-time students are expected to enroll after taking at least two courses, but before completing five. 3 credits

in theology and personality theory, film, literature, and class discussions. Students will be asked to write one substantial paper, present a verbatim of a pastoral experience, and contribute to class discussions. This will be a hybrid class, with an upper level graduate seminar format. Prerequisites: P520, HD550, and HD551; or by permission of instructor. 3 credits

I510 Imagination and Resilience for God’s Changing World Clayton, Douglas, Saunders Designed specifically for first-year MDiv students, this course explores “imagination and resilience” by engaging in a variety of Christian practices such as study, listening, prayer, dialogue, and hospitality. Students will grow personally and as members of the seminary and greater Atlanta community, while nurturing essential marks of ministerial presence in God’s changing church and world. 3 credits

I609 Readings in Spiritual Classics Galindo In this course students will read selected passages in classic Christian literature in spirituality. Through guided online discussion students will engage in critical and reflective study of the historical contexts out of which Christian spirituality has developed and will interpret their own personal spiritual formation in light of historical Christian thought. This course meets program goals 2 and 5 of the MDiv and program goal 1 of the MA(TS). This is an online course. Online. 3 credits

I520 Explorations: Alternative Context for Ministry Staff An academic and experiential exploration of a significantly different cultural context and the church’s mission. Contexts may include inner-city Atlanta, the Appalachian region of the U.S., Central Europe, Ghana, Brazil, Jamaica and immigrant communities in Atlanta. 3 credits

I618 Presbyterian History and Polity Yoo A study of the history and polity of the Presbyterian Church (USA), focusing on the theological debates and missiological commitments that have influenced current polity. 3 credits

I530 Cross/Roads Douglas Imaginative and resilient communities need imaginative and resilient leaders. Relying on in class discussions, common readings, outside speakers and drawing upon students’ life experiences and seminary studies with special attention to theologically acute contextual analysis, this course explores ways leaders develop such communities. 3 credits I605 Theological Anthropology and Pastoral Care and Counseling Harkins Theological anthropology has typically been understood as doctrine about the nature of the human or what it is to be a person created in the image of God. Through the exploration of related themes such as health/ wholeness, finitude, sin, blessing, and salvation, as variously understood in pastoral theology, secular (e.g., medical model) understandings, personality theory, and theology, students will explore this rich set of practical pastoral and theological topics. Pedagogical methods will include primary and secondary readings

I619 The Cross and the State: Biblical, Theological, and Pastoral Reflections on States, Prison, and Execution Saunders Introduces and critically engages aspects of the current justice system in the U.S., especially the “Prison-Industrial Complex” and state-sponsored executions, in light of biblical and theological traditions regarding bondage, imprisonment, and crucifixion. Includes readings, discussion, and field trips. Prerequisites: B520 and B530. 3 credits I620 Men in Ministry Harkins Explores the relationship between physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being in men and the ways in which men care for themselves, even as they care for others. Focuses on personal theological narrative, spirituality, ethics, systems theory, and pastoral care, as well as readings, film, and fiction. Participants engage in the construction of a religious autobiography and attend an overnight mountain retreat. 3 credits www.CTSnet.edu

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CURRICULUM & COURSES

I625 Wellness: Ministering From a Balanced Life Johnson, S. Wellness in the course understanding moves beyond the concept of “self improvement” to embrace abundance, connection and fullness of living while also acknowledging the reality of boundaries and limits. Readings will deal with multiple considerations of wellness and with the stress inherent in the vocation of ministry as well as factors that detract from the goal of wholeness and interfere with our human need for relationship. Students will be invited to become more intentional in constructing a faithful life in ministry that is mindful and reflective, along with determining necessary practices for maintaining it. 3 credits I701 ThM Research Methods Seminar Moore-Keish Intensive one week introductory seminar required for all entering ThM students. 3 credits

I723 Christian Spirituality Introductory Seminar Riggs, Ward The DMin Christian Spirituality Introductory Seminar discusses critical issues of spirituality in biblical, historical, theological, ethical and practical fields of study. It guides participants to build academic resources for their personal, congregational, and communal ministries in spirituality. 6 credits I730 DMin Research Seminar Park Students will be introduced to qualitative and quantitative research methodologies that they will utilize for their final projects. In depth library research methods will also be introduced. 1.5 credits

I731 Project Proposal Workshop Park This workshop will guide students in developing their project proposals that clearly articulate the topic, thesis, context, theoretical and theological perspectives, I705 ThM Colloquium research question, and methodology. Library research Moore-Keish Final capstone course required of all ThM students. tools and guides for form and style will also be covered. Required for DMin students. January or July. This class focuses on the development and 1.5 credits presentation of a publishable piece of work based on the ThM thesis. I732 Project Literature Review 3 credits Staff Students will gather essential literature for their DMin I721 Church and Ministry Introductory Seminar projects and write a literature review under the guidance Tribble of their first reader and complete the chapter on the The DMin Church and Ministry Introductory theoretical and theological perspective for their projects. Seminar has as its primary aim to encourage 3 credits pastors, church administrators, chaplains, and those in other forms of church service to become I735 DMin Doctoral Project familiar with excellent recent thinking about Staff ministry and to apply new insights to their own Required of all DMin students. practice of ministry. 6 credits 6 credits I722 Gospel, Culture & the Transformation of the Church Introductory Seminar Douglas, Park, Lalor (adjunct) The DMin Gospel and Culture Introductory Seminar encourages participants to develop a new paradigm for their ministry, aimed at supporting the local congregation of Christian people to understand their call to mission in a post-Christian, globalizing culture. Developing theological approaches to cultural analysis, participants, in readings, reflection with teachers and conversations with colleagues, describe their own setting in ministry and develop faithful ways of bearing witness to the gospel of Jesus Christ for the sake of witness, service, and transforming mission. 6 credits 84

Columbia Theological Seminary

I840 Sexuality, Marriage, and the 21st Century Church Long Americans are asking questions around the nature of sexuality, debating who has the right to marry, and wondering what the church has to do with it all. Students in this course will seek to articulate a biblical theology of relationship that considers sexual, marital, familial, ecclesial and communal ties while taking seriously the lives and experiences of 21st century Americans. Special attention will be given to marriage: the history of marriage in the church, the power of the wedding industry, the pastor’s legal and ecclesial roles, contemporary expectations of marriage, and wedding liturgies. 3 credits


SUPERVISED MINISTRY SM505 MAPT Contextual Education Clayton The Contextual Education required course for the Master of Arts in Practical Theology. In this 400-hour, 6 credit course of Supervised Ministry, the student is engaged in an actionreflection model of ministry with a Supervisor and a Supervised Ministry Team. The course may be an internship, allowing the student to gain experience in a particular area of practical theology. For students already working professionally in ministry, the course is a Practicum, designed to challenge the student to grow in their chosen area of practical theology. 6 credits SM510 Congregation-Based Internship Clayton The student engages in the ministry of a teaching congregation serving in a broad range of pastoral functions, and engaging in a structured process of theological reflection with a supervising pastor and lay committee. 6 credits, fall/ spring semesters, 200 hours each semester. Prerequisites: language and exegesis, and preaching. 6 credits SM520 Internship within an Institution Clayton An internship that engages the student in ministry within an academic, medical (non-CPE), denominational, ecumenical, etc. institution. The student gains experience in a particular area of ministry or service, and also develops the skills, insights and knowledge needed to relate this work to the larger institutional structures and mission. Supervision provided by a theologically trained leader within the institutional site. This course may be taken for 400 hours, 6 credits (Summer, or fall/spring semester concurrently); or for 200 hours, 3 credits. 3 or 6 credits SM530 Basic Internship in Specialized Ministry Clayton An internship that helps students gain experience for ministry and work in a specialized setting in a congregation or agency. The student will work with a Supervisor to develop skills, insights, and knowledge needed for effectiveness in the particular form of ministry/work to be engaged. Specialized ministries include: youth ministry,

public ministry, non-profit agency, criminal justice, campus ministry, camp and conference ministry, educational institution, etc. This course may be taken for 400 hours, 6 credits (Summer, or fall/spring semester concurrently); or for 200 hours, 3 credits. 3 or 6 credits SM610 Practicum in Clinical Pastoral Education (Basic Unit) Staff Brings students into supervised encounters with people in order to develop pastoral identity and skills, interpersonal competence, and enhanced abilities for theological reflection. Clinically trained supervisors provide educational leadership. Placement limited to hospitals, congregations, prisons, and other institutions accredited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. Fulfills the DMin requirement for Supervised Ministry. Full-time for 6 credits; or part-time, 3 credits per semester. 6 credits SM611 Clinical Pastoral Education (Advanced Unit) Staff Additional units of CPE build upon the teachings of the first unit and provide pastoral education over a full year. Prerequisite: Basic unit of CPE. Credit listed is for full year. 6 credits SM620 Advanced Congregation-Based Internship Clayton An internship providing students additional congregational experience in pastoral ministry and leadership. Students are encouraged to concentrate in a particular area of ministry such as Christian education, pastoral care, worship and preaching, administration, etc. while also engaging more broadly in the life of the congregation. Designed to enhance a student’s competence, leadership skills, and vocational clarity in ministry in a congregation. Prerequisites: SM510 and completion of 60 credits. This course is 400 hours, taken full-time in the summer or part-time (200 hours each) over concurrent semesters, 3 credits per semester. 3 or 6 credits

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SM630 Advanced Internship in Specialized Ministry Clayton An internship in a ministry or work setting that helps students gain additional experience in a specialized setting in a congregation or agency. Students work with a Supervisor to enhance basic competence, leadership skills, and vocational clarity in the area of specialization. Such specialization includes: public ministry, non-profit agency, youth ministry, campus ministry, camps/ conference ministry, criminal justice/prison ministry, etc. Prerequisites: SM510 and at least 60 credits. This course is 400 hours, taken fulltime in the summer or part-time over concurrent semesters, 3 credits per semester. 3 or 6 credits SM640 Directed Supervised Ministry Clayton This course is an independent study arranged with the director of contextual education and a professor or professors with knowledge in the particular area of focus. Approval of the dean of faculty is required. 3 or 6 credits SM650 Intern Year: Congregation Clayton A full-time internship that provides an in-depth experience in the life and ministry of a teaching congregation. 9-12 months (full-time), plus option of 1 additional course taken in Extended Spring term. 6 credits SM660 Intern Year: Specialized Ministry Clayton A full-year internship in one or more ministry/ work settings. Students engage in a specific context of ministry or work to develop the skills, insights, and knowledge needed for effective ministry and leadership. An actionreflection model under supervision is required. Specialized ministries include: youth ministry, public ministry, non-profit agency, criminal justice, campus ministry, camp and conference ministry, international mission, etc. Prerequisite: completion of at least 60 credits. 9-12 months, full-time, 6 credits. 6 credits

SM690 Supervised Ministry: Independent Study Clayton A 400 hour (minimum) internship for students who seek to gain experience of ministry under supervision in specialized areas not designated in other internships. Summer (full time) 6 credits. Fall and/or Spring (part-time), 3 credits per semester. 6 credits SM780 Practicum: Church and Ministry Park Designed by the DMin student and approved supervisor. The student engages in a specific aspect of ministry of the church and utilizes an action-reflection learning process with a peer group and approved supervisor. 3 credits SM782 Practicum in Christian Spirituality Park Recommended for DMin students in the Christian Spirituality specialization. Involves engagement in a ministry of the church related to spiritual formation and sharing issues and concerns in a peer group with an action-reflection process. Supervision by an approved instructor. 3 credits SM783 Practicum in Gospel, Culture & the Transformation of the Church Park Recommended for DMin students in the Gospel, Culture and Transformation of the Church specialization. Designed to meet the major challenges of this specialization; involves students in a ministry of the church with particular aspects of modern culture. Includes work with peer groups and approved supervisor in an actionreflection process. 3 credits SM787 Practicum in Educational Ministry Park Designed by the DEdMin student and approved supervisor. The student engages in a ministry of the church, often outside the student`s normal setting for ministry, and utilizes an actionreflection learning process with a peer group and approved supervisor. 6 credits  

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ATA COURSES ATA Faculty in the ThD in Pastoral Counseling program: Gregory Ellison II (Candler), J. William Harkins (Columbia), Skip Johnson (Columbia), Emmanuel Lartey (Candler), Carolyn McCrary (ITC), Carol Pitts (Care and Counseling Center of Georgia), Karen Scheib (Candler), F. Keith Slaughter (ITC), Edward Wimberly (ITC) ATA421 Family Systems in Context Harkins Places the family in context, historically, culturally, and socially. Assumes that in responding to family programs or planning their own, ministers and counselors must place the family in context in order to think critically and evaluative. 3 credits ATA434 Foundations of Marriage and Family Therapy Harkins Explores systems of family evaluation and counseling, emphasizing theorists and clinicians such as Bowen, Minuchin, Satir, Nagy, and Haley. 3 credits ATA435 Ethics in Marriage and Family Therapy and Pastoral Counseling Monti, (adjunct) The course, mainly by reading, discussion, and narrative clinical experiences, will engage ethical issues in marriage and family practice in particular, and pastoral counseling in general, including material related to professional examination and licensure. Since this is a ThD degree, there will also be discussion of some of the religious and theological issues involved, closing with reflections on the character of therapy and therapists. 3 credits ATA463 Pastoral Counseling in Historical and Global Dimensions ATA Faculty This ThD core course surveys the history of the discipline of pastoral counseling in sociological and global perspective, with an emphasis on the implications of this history for contemporary practice and the role of pastoral counselors in context. 3 credits

ATA471 Theology and Personality Harkins This ThD core course examines theological and psychological theories of personhood to assess their relevance for pastoral counseling. 3 credits ATA473 Theory and Practice in Pastoral Counseling Johnson, S. This class is a ThD level overview of the theory and practice of pastoral counseling from a dynamic and post-Freudian psychoanalytic perspective, with other theoretical understandings as time permits. Historical development of theories, practical therapeutic approaches, and theological reflection are integrated in an examination of the “art” and “science” of pastoral psychotherapy. This is a year long course with 1.5 credits awarded for each semester. 3 credits ATA475 Pastoral Theological Methods ATA Faculty This ThD core course examines methodologies of theology and pastoral care to help students develop pastoral theological methods for the ministry of pastoral counseling. ThD core course. 3 credits ATA476 Evaluation and Treatment in Marriage & Family Therapy Johnson, S. Explores various approaches to couples therapy and applies them to clinical cases. Studies models of intervention as well as issues of individual psychopathology. 3 credits

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CURRICULUM & COURSES

ATA478 Group Therapy: Theory, Process, and Application Siwy, (adjunct) Provides students with theory and practice of group psychotherapy. Introduces students to the major theories and approaches to group therapy. Assists in applying knowledge of group theory and dynamics to clinical settings. Gives students the knowledge needed to design, lead, and assess a psychotherapy group. 3 credits ATA479 Family Development Through the Life Cycle Cook (adjunct) Explores phases of family development and their impact on those entering, living in, and leaving the family; also studies developmental, situation, and nodal(divorce, retirement, and geographical uprooting) crises and events faced by families. 3 credits ATA481 Pastoral Counseling Research Methods Cook (adjunct) This required core course examines qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches in practical theology and social scientific research. Particular attention is given to research as a vehicle of social action and intrapsychic change. Course assignments provide opportunities for students to integrate theory and practice in the construction of a viable research proposal. 3 credits ATA484 Developing Intercultural Competence in Pastoral Counseling ATA Faculty Pastoral counseling, like every other form of counseling, is culturally embedded. This means that the theories and practices of counseling (along with the personhood of the counselor) reflect the cultures within which they have been formed. This course will assist students in the exercise of a disciplined in-depth reflection upon the broader questions of history, ethnicity, gender, power and class that shape both the therapeutic relationship as well as the experience and definition of the perceived problem. This is a yearlong course with 1.5 credits given per semester. 3 credits

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ATA485 Practicum: Individual Supervision ATA Faculty A seminar for ThD students that provides the experience of one-on-one clinical pastoral supervision of their pastoral counseling practice. ATA485a and ATA485b refer to the fall and spring semester of the first year. ATA485c and ATA485d refer to the fall and spring semester of the second year (1 credit hour per semester). 1 credit ATA485s Summer Practicum ATA Faculty Undertaken by ThD students during the summer between the first and the second years by residents already in the practicum. Provides residents with ongoing practical training and supervision of their pastoral counseling practice. 3 credits ATA486 Practicum: Group Supervision ATA Faculty A seminar providing supervision for and interaction among ThD students in groups as a means of sharpening students clinical and pastoral awareness and therapeutic practice. ATA486a and ATA486b refer to the fall and spring semester of the first year. ATA486c and ATA486d refer to the fall and spring semester of the second year (1 credit hour per semester.) 1 credit ATA487 Practicum: Case Conference ATA Faculty ThD students meet with clinical professionals for in-depth analysis of cases and practices of pastoral counseling. ATA487a and ATA487b refer to fall and spring semester of the first year. ATA487c and ATA487d refer to the fall and spring semester of the second year (1.5 credit per semester). 1.5 credits ATA489 Directed Study ATA Faculty Taken at recommendation of the advisor. Credit as assigned. 3 credits


ATA497 ThD Comprehensive Examinations ATA Faculty Required of all ThD students who have finished their coursework and are preparing for Comprehensive Examinations. ATA 497 is considered as full-time enrollment. Fee = $115 per long semester. 0 credits ATA499 ThD Dissertation ATA Faculty Required of all ThD candidates (i.e., those who have passed their comprehensive examinations) who are working on their dissertation proposal and research. ATA 499 is considered as full-time enrollment. Fee = $115 per long semester. 0 credits ATA585 Advanced Practicum: Individual Supervision ATA Faculty For students who have already completed this practicum on a basic level. Permission of the instructor required. 1 credit ATA585s Advanced Summer Practicum ATA Faculty For students who have already completed this practicum on a basic level. Permission of the instructor required. 3 credits ATA586 Advanced Practicum: Group Supervision ATA Faculty For students who have already completed this practicum on a basic level. Permission of the instructor required. 1 credit ATA587 Advanced Practicum: Case Conference ATA Faculty For students who have already completed this practicum on a basic level. Permission of the instructor required. 1.5 credits

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ACADEMIC NOTES & POLICIES


The following information pertains to students enrolled in Columbia’s academic degree programs. Additional policies and information related to a particular degree program may be found in the student handbook or the manual for that program.

BASIC DEGREE STUDENTS SUMMER GREEK SCHOOL

Consultation with a cumulative grade point

Entering students in the MDiv degree

average of 3.60 and a 3.80 average in the

program may choose to begin their studies

proposed area of study. Students may choose

in the summer with Greek language study.

to work with a particular professor in the

The seminary offers a 3 credit-hour course,

biblical, historical-doctrinal, or practical

B501, during the summer. This six-week

theology areas. The program consists of

course meets each weekday morning for two

guided study in both long semesters for a total

hours, with small group afternoon tutorial

of 6 credit hours. If the area determines that

sessions. Students who have previously

the project should receive honors, then the

studied Greek should consult the registrar

advisor will grant an A to the student for each

about taking a Greek proficiently exam which semester of study. If the area determines that the project should not receive honors, then will allow them to proceed to exegetical courses.

the advisor, with the input from the area, will determine the final grade for each semester

ADVANCED STANDING Students who satisfactorily demonstrate

of study. For additional information, see the chairperson of the area of interest.

they have already achieved the objectives of a given course but do not have graduate

ORDINATION EXAMS

credit in the area may be exempt from the

Students in the Master of Divinity degree

course and permitted to take an advanced

program who become candidates for

course in the area to satisfy the required

ordination in the Presbyterian Church (USA)

course credit. Requests for flexibility in a

are required to take written examinations

student’s program should be made to the

in the areas of Bible, theology, worship and

Office of Academic Affairs.

sacraments, and polity. The regular basic degree curriculum provides students with

HONORS PROJECT Students in the Master of Divinity degree

ample opportunity to take course work preparatory to the exams.

program may pursue an Honors project if they pass their Candidacy Discernment

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ACADEMIC NOTES & POLICIES

TEMPORARY GRADES FOR BASIC

PROVISIONAL ADMISSIONS FOR BASIC

DEGREE STUDENTS

DEGREE STUDENTS

The temporary notation of IP (In Progress)

An entering student whose undergraduate or

is given for Honor Projects and Supervised

graduate school preparation is deemed deficient

Ministry courses that extend over more than

(below 3.0) may be admitted provisionally. To be

one term. No academic credit is awarded for IP.

admitted provisionally is not a punitive action,

A student may be assigned an E for incomplete

rather a mechanism for monitoring academic

work. In order to receive an E, the student

process. A student who is admitted provisionally

must complete the Extension Form with all

as a full time student is afforded full student

required signatures and a set extension date

privileges, including financial aid and housing. A

before the end of the term. The extension date

student who is admitted provisionally is required

cannot extend beyond the following dates: Fall

to meet with his or her adviser monthly with

Term, December 31; January Term, January

appointments made at the student’s initiative. In

31; Spring Term, May 31; and Summer Term,

the spring of the entering year, or upon completion

August 31. Basic Degree students cannot begin

of the term in which s/he has completed (12)

another course in a subsequent academic term,

semester credit hours, the student meets with the

until all course work is complete from courses

dean of faculty to review academic work to date

from all previous academic terms. Students

and to report on the meetings with the student’s

who experience lengthy illnesses or have other

adviser. The Academic Standing Commission

unusual circumstances may be granted a longer

will review the student’s academic progress upon

period to complete their work by the dean

completion of that term and report to the student

of faculty. All grades of E are automatically

regarding his or her status after its meeting.

changed to F if the extension deadline for

Possible actions include removal of provisional

completing the work expires.

status or placement on academic probation.

GRADING FOR BASIC DEGREE STUDENTS At the end of each term, students receive grades according to the following four-quality points system. A grade report is made available to each student through the student portal. For Master of Divinity, Master of Arts (Theological Studies), Master of Arts in Practical Theology, Unclassified, and Special students, the criteria for grading are mastery of material, skill in organizing and expressing ideas, creativity, and the ability to relate to other teachings.

The grading system is as follows: A A− B+ B B− C+ C C− D F 92

4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.0 0.0 Columbia Theological Seminary

Outstanding Superior Very good Good Slightly above standard Standard Slightly below standard Below standard Serious deficiencies Failing

Third-year MDiv students may choose to take up to 6 credit hours of elective course work Pass/Fail if the instructor grants permission in the first two weeks of the course. MAPT students in good academic standing may take one of the four non-concentration electives (3 credits) on a Pass/Fail basis in their final semester of study if the instructor grants permission in the first two weeks of the course. The grade designations are as follows: S (Pass) work that represents sufficient mastery of the content of the course to merit recommendation for graduation U (Fail) work that represents insufficient mastery of the content of the course to merit recommendation for graduation.


ADVANCED DEGREE STUDENTS GRADING FOR ADVANCED DEGREE STUDENTS

The grading scale for ThM, DMin, DEdMin, and ThD students is as follows: A A− B+ B B− C+ C F

4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 0.0

Outstanding Superior Very good Good Slightly above standard Standard Slightly below standard Failing

COURSE COMPLETION FOR

may be admitted provisionally. A provisional

ADVANCED PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

admission student has all the privileges of other

STUDENTS

Advanced Degree students. As soon as possible

If a course requires work to be completed after the last class meeting, the student may have up to sixty days to complete the work. Under unusual circumstances, and before the end of the sixty days, the student may request a thirty-day extension. This request must be made through the Office of Academic Affairs. A grade of F

after taking the Introductory Seminar and one additional course, the student must consult with the faculty adviser to review his or her progress. The Registrar shall report the grade point average to the Academic Standing Commission. If the student has not achieved a 3.0 GPA, the student will be subject to dismissal from the

will be automatically assigned if all work is not

Advanced Degree program.

completed by the end of the course, the end of

In the case of ThM and ThD students, the

the sixty days when the syllabus so designates, or

Academic Standing Commission shall review

the end of the thirty-day extension.

the provisional student’s progress, after the student has completed (12) semester credit

PROVISIONAL ADMISSIONS FOR

hours. If the student has not achieved a 3.0

BASIC DEGREE STUDENTS

GPA, the student will be subject to dismissal

If a candidate for admission shows unusual

from the Advanced Degree program.

promise in a particular Advanced Degree program when his or her previous degree gradepoint average was below 3.0 GPA, the applicant

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ALL DEGREE STUDENTS ACADEMIC NOTES & POLICIES

ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES

hours of guided instruction for a 3 credit course.

Courses may only be added during the first five

For supervised ministry courses 200 hours of

days of class and only dropped during the first twenty days of the fall and spring terms. Greek school may be added within the first three days of class and can be dropped no later than the tenth

hours of engagement is awarded 6 credit hours. This correlates with the time and credit level of the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education which

day of class. In the January term, a class may be

awards CPE credit.

added by the second day and dropped by the fifth

Satisfactory completion of a course, however,

day of class. Two-week courses can only be added on the first day of class and dropped by the third day of class. A course is only considered dropped at the time the registrar receives written notice to that effect. A student may petition the Office of Academic Affairs for an exception to this policy in special circumstances. CREDIT HOUR AND VALUATION POLICY While the educational progress of students cannot ultimately be measured by the number of credits earned, a system of course valuation is necessary to assure consistency in the curriculum. Columbia Theological Seminary defines one (semester) credit hour as equivalent to a minimum of one hour per week on in-class instruction or engaged learning over 12 weeks of instruction, plus two more weeks of out-of-class independent learning in which exams are taken or papers are produced, for a total of 14 weeks. It is expected that for each one credit hour, a minimum of two hours of preparation has taken place. A three credit course would indicate at least 36 hours of instruction, plus two periods of assessment through examinations and/or production of written work, along with the necessary out-of-class preparation. DMin and DEdMin courses ordinarily meet over a two week period for a minimum of 30 hours of direct in-class instruction, as well as in engaged learning activities outside the classroom, including small groups, online discussion forums, and preand post-course assignments, for a minimum of 36

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engagement is awarded 3 credit hours and 400

Columbia Theological Seminary

is determined finally not by time invested but by learning goals and objectives achieved by the student. INDEPENDENT STUDY Students are allowed one independent study per degree program. Petitions for proposed independent studies must be submitted in writing to the dean of faculty for approval prior to registration. The full procedure for receiving approval for an independent study is outlined in the student handbook. ACADEMIC PROBATION Academic probation reflects unsatisfactory academic progress and, therefore, students are automatically placed on academic probation when: • A continuing MA(TS), MAPT, or MDiv student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 2.30. • A continuing ThM, DMin, DEdMin, or ThD student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00. A student on academic probation: • Does not receive federal financial aid, • Has his or her academic record reviewed by the Academic Standing Commission, • Is required to regularly meet with his or her adviser, and


• Shall not be permitted to elect to take graded courses on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis. At the end of every term in which grades are recorded, the Office of Academic Affairs shall review the academic progress of all degree-seeking students and provide the Academic Standing Commission and the Office of Financial Aid six lists of students: • Provisional students who have successfully attained

• Does not raise his or her cumulative grade point average to or above a 3.00 with the next course after being placed on academic probation, or • Fails any course at any time during the degree program. A student who is dismissed for academic reasons may not take classes, live on campus, or shall not have any of the privileges afforded to students.

the required cumulative grade-point average, • Provisional students who are to be placed on academic probation, • Continuing students whose cumulative grade point average places them on academic probation,

APPEALS Any decision of the Academic Standing Commission may be appealed to the faculty by filing with the registrar a written notice of appeal.

• Students who are to be considered for academic dismissal, • Students who failed one or more courses, • Students who are to be dismissed according to the CTS drop out policy. After reviewing these lists, the Academic Standing Commission informs the student(s) in writing of their probationary status and schedules, as necessary, of a meeting with the Commission. Those attending this meeting are the members of the Commission, the student, and his or her adviser with the objective to develop a plan to help the student return to good academic standing. ACADEMIC DISMISSAL A MA(TS), MAPT, MDiv or MDiv/Dual student is dismissed when he or she: • Does not raise his or her cumulative grade point

• A notice of appeal must be filed within two weeks after receipt by the student of the decision of the Academic Standing Commission. • The appeal will be presented to the faculty at its next stated meeting. MORAL CONDUCT The faculty and the Board of Trustees of Columbia reserve the right to refuse to grant a degree to any individual in any degree program whose moral conduct raises serious questions about that person’s personal integrity or fitness for service in the Christian Church. Persons are accepted into degree programs with the requirement that should they become the subject of criminal, civil, or ecclesiastical proceedings they will report the fact of those proceedings and their outcomes to the Judicial Commission of the faculty. The determination of

average to or above a 2.30 by the next semester

when not to award a degree based upon moral failings

after being placed on academic probation, or

of the candidate is the sole and exclusive province of

• Shall have failed in the aggregate any 9 credit hours of course work.

the institution, represented by its faculty and Board of Trustees.

A ThM, DMin, DEdMin, or ThD is dismissed when he or she:

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All Degree Students Continued ACADEMIC NOTES & POLICIES

DISCIPLINARY CASES The Columbia Theological Seminary Amended and Restated Bylaws and Plan of Government (2013) states, “Upon matriculation, the Seminary and each student shall enter into the following covenant: Relying upon God’s grace, will you, so long as you are a student of Columbia Theological Seminary, promise and covenant to: • be diligent in your studies, • seek academic excellence, • pursue such learning as joins mind and heart, and • strive to live your life consistent with your calling as a disciple of Jesus Christ?” Furthermore, the governance documents clearly place the faculty under the supervision of the president and accountable to the Board with the authority to adjudicate matters related to conduct. “The faculty, subject to the oversight of the Board, may establish such policies and regulations concerning student and community conduct as the faculty shall deem necessary, the provisions of which shall be administered by the faculty under the supervision of the president” (2013, Article V, section 3). When a member of the seminary community becomes personally aware of a circumstance which could potentially lead to disciplinary action against a student the matter may be brought to the Judicial Commission by a written complaint filed with the dean of faculty. The complaint shall include all relevant information, including the names of any witnesses. Prior to filing the complaint the complainant may, but shall not be required to, resolve the matter with the person complained about. Upon receipt of a complaint,

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the dean may determine to resolve the complaint administratively if: (i) the complaint alleges a first offense by the accused, and (ii) the acts complained about are not egregious in the judgment of the dean. In such case, the dean, the accused, and the complainant shall meet and endeavor to adjudicate the complaint with appropriate action and/or admonition. If a complaint is not resolved administratively, the Judicial Commission shall initially review the complaint. The advisor of the student against whom the complaint has been lodged and other members of the administration and the faculty may be consulted by the Judicial Commission as it may determine necessary or appropriate. If the Judicial Commission determines that the allegations of the complaint would, if established, provide the basis for disciplinary action, it shall schedule a hearing. Prior to the hearing, the complaint and any additional information pertinent to the case uncovered during the Judicial Commission’s review shall be provided to the student against whom the complaint has been lodged. At the hearing, the student against whom the complaint has been lodged shall have opportunity to examine the person making the complaint and respond to all evidence introduced at the hearing concerning the complaint, and present evidence and / or witnesses in his or her own defense. Both the complainant and the accused may be accompanied by an advocate, such as a student’s advisor or friend, but representation by external legal counsel is not permitted. If the student accused does not attend the hearing, the Commission is authorized to respond to resolve the matter notwithstanding such absence.


Following the hearing, the Judicial Commission

faculty, such notification to include the time and

shall deliberate in private. The Judicial

place of the faculty meeting. The student shall

Commission may:

be provided an opportunity at such meeting to

1. Determine that no cause for disciplinary action exists and declare the matter closed without further action. 2. Impose corrective actions it deems appropriate, including the issuance of a warning to the student, placing the student on disciplinary probation. 3. Suspend or dismiss the student, or impose such other discipline as it deems appropriate. 4. Recommend to the faculty that the student be expelled from the Seminary. 5. Require that the student vacate Seminary housing, even if he or she may be permitted to continue as a student.

present to the faculty any information relevant to his or her case. The student shall not be entitled to be represented by legal counsel. The decision of the faculty will be communicated in writing to the accused student, to the Judicial Commission, and to the ecclesiastical body having oversight for the student’s preparation for ministry (as applicable). A student who is expelled may not take classes, live on campus (except in the case of a spouse of a continuing student), or have any of the privileges afforded to students. A student who has been expelled may not apply for readmission to the Seminary. While any complaint is pending before the Judicial Commission and/or the faculty, the

The decisions of the Judicial Commission

president has discretionary authority to suspend

will ordinarily be communicated in writing to

the accused from participating in classes and

the parties involved, the student’s advisor,

/ or seminary housing when such action is

and the ecclesiastical body having oversight

necessary for the general welfare of the seminary

for the student’s preparation for ministry (as

community.

appropriate). A log of all proceedings and actions will be kept securely by the Seminary. EXPULSION

APPEALS The decisions of the Judicial Commission (other than a recommendation of expulsion)

In the case of a recommendation by the Judicial

may be appealed to the faculty in writing by

Commission that the faculty expel a student, the

filing a notice of appeal with the dean of the

faculty shall have responsibility for considering

faculty within ten (10) days after the decision

whether expulsion is appropriate. The president

of the Commission. The faculty shall follow the

shall notify a student in writing no later than

procedures required for expulsion in the case of

fifteen days prior to the date of a faculty

an appeal. There shall be no appeal beyond the

meeting at which a recommendation concerning

faculty.

his or her expulsion is to be considered by the

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WITHDRAWAL FROM SEMINARY ACADEMIC NOTES & POLICIES

WITHDRAWAL A student considering withdrawal is treated with special concern. The dean of students and the adviser will help in thinking through personal and

can be found on the website under academic forms. DROPOUT AND DISMISSAL

vocational implications. The dean of faculty will

A student enrolled in the MDiv, MAPT,

counsel regarding academic implications. A student

MA(TS), ThM or ThD programs who does not

who withdraws from Columbia forfeits all financial

register for classes in two consecutive semester

assistance (scholarships and financial aid) previously

terms will be asked to initiate a temporary or

awarded for the term in which such action occurs.

permanent withdrawal. If the student does not

A student must follow one of the processes below.

respond, he or she shall be dismissed. A letter

A student who does not follow the appropriate

informing the student of this action will be sent

procedures will continue to be responsible for

to the student’s last known address by registered

expenses incurred at Columbia, will receive F grades

mail. If the student left in good standing, he

in all courses, and will not be eligible for readmission.

or she may petition the dean of faculty within

TEMPORARY WITHDRAWAL WITH RETURN

30 days of receiving the letter of dismissal

IN A SPECIFIC TIME: The student must • Discuss the reasons with the dean of faculty or the dean of students;

to register for classes for the next term and continue in the degree program. A DMin or DEdMin student who does not register for classes for 12 months will be contacted by the associate dean of advanced

• Fill out a withdrawal form; and

professional studies and encouraged to

• Clear all accounts with the Business Office,

register for additional courses at the earliest

Library, and the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid. A student in good standing may be readmitted by the dean of faculty within one year following withdrawal; beyond this, action by the Academic and Judicial Commission is required.

opportunity. If the student indicates that she or he does not intend to continue in the program, she or he will be requested to initiate a temporary or permanent withdrawal. If the student does not then register for classes in the next 12 months, or initiate a temporary or permanent withdrawal, she or he will be

PERMANENT WITHDRAWAL:

automatically considered inactive and will be

The student must

dismissed from the program. A letter informing

• Discuss the situation with the dean of faculty or the dean of students and sign a withdrawal form; • Clear all accounts with the Business Office, Library, and the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid. Readmission is through the Academic and Judicial Commission for a period of up to two years; beyond that, the regular admissions process must be used.

98

The form for temporary or permanent withdrawal

Columbia Theological Seminary

the student of this action will be sent to the student’s last known address by registered mail. If the student left in good standing, he or she may petition the dean of faculty within 30 days of receiving the letter of dismissal to register for classes for the next term and continue in the degree program.


ACADEMIC CALENDAR

2016-2017

2017-2018 Tentative

SUMMER 2016

SUMMER 2017

Advanced Degree 1st Term

July 11-22

Advanced Degree 1st Term

July 10-July 21

Greek School

July 11-Aug 19

Greek School

July 10-Aug 18

Advanced Degree 2nd Term

July 25-Aug 5

Advanced Degree 2nd Term

July 24-Aug 4

MAPT/ThM Introductory Seminars

Aug 15-19

MAPT/ThM Introductory Seminars

Aug 14-18

FALL 2016

FALL 2017

Faculty Conference

Aug 29-30

Faculty Conference

Aug 28-29

Entering Student Orientation

Aug 30-Sept 1

Entering Student Orientation

Aug 29-31

Labor Day

Sept 5

Labor Day

Sept 4

Classes begin

Sept 6

Classes begin

Sept 5

Convocation

Sept 8

Convocation

Sept 6

Orientation for Returning Students

Sept 9

Orientation for Returning Students

Sept 8

Smyth Lectures

Oct 11-13

Smyth Lectures

Oct 10-12

Assessment and Midterm Period

Oct 17-21

Assessment and Midterm Period

Oct 16-20

Seminary Weekend

Nov 4-5

Seminary Weekend

Nov 3-4

Thanksgiving Holiday

Nov 21-25

Thanksgiving Holiday

Nov 20-24

Classes end

Dec 12

Classes end

Dec 11

Assessment and Finals Period

Dec 13-16

Assessment and Finals Period

Dec 12-15

JANUARY TERM 2017

JANUARY TERM 2018

Basic Degrees Classes

Jan 5-20

Basic Degrees Classes

Jan 4-19

Advanced Degrees Classes

Jan 9-20

Advanced Degrees Classes

Jan 8-19

King Holiday

Jan 16

King Holiday

Jan 15

SPRING 2017

SPRING 2018

Classes Begin

Jan 30

Classes Begin

Jan 29

Seminary Weekend

Feb 17-18

Ash Wednesday Community Day

Feb 14

Ash Wednesday Community Day

Mar 1

Seminary Weekend

Feb 23-24

Assessment & Midterm Period

Mar 13-17

Assessment & Midterm Period

Mar 12-16

Spring Break

Ap 3-7

Good Friday

Mar 30

Good Friday

Apr 14

Spring Break

Apr 2-6

Classes end

May 8

Classes end

May 7

Assessment and Finals Period

May 9-12

Assessment and Finals Period

May 8-11

Baccalaureate

May 19

Baccalaureate

May 18

Commencement

May 20

Commencement

May 19

Memorial Day

May 29

Memorial Day

May 28

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INDEX ADMISSIONS AND ADVISING

Greek School, Summer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

Doctor of Educational Ministry . . . . . . . . . 28

Historical Doctrinal Area Courses. . . . . . . . . . 70

Doctor of Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Honors Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

Doctor of Theology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Master of Arts in Practical Theology. . . . . 16

International Theological Education . . . . . . . . 55

Master of Arts in Theological Studies. . . . .18

Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Master of Divinity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Master of Arts in Practical Theology. . . . . . . .16

Master of Theology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Master of Arts in Theological Studies. . . . . . . 18

Advanced Standing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

Master of Divinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Atlanta Theological Association Courses. . . . 87

Master of Theology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Auditors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Moral Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Ordination Exams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91

Biblical Area Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Orientation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Candidacy Discernment Consultation. . . . . . 13

Placement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Clinical Pastoral Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Practical Theology Area Courses. . . . . . . . . . . 75

Continuing Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Probation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Convocations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Courses of Instruction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Credit Hour Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Cross-Registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

100

PROVISIONAL ADMISSIONS Basic Degree Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Advanced Degree Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Disciplinary Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Refund Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Doctor of Educational Ministry. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Room and Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Doctor of Ministry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Christian Spirituality Approach. . . . . . . . . . 24

Special Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Church and Ministry Approach. . . . . . . . . . 23

Supervised Ministry Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Gospel and Culture Approach. . . . . . . . . . . 23

Suspension/Expulsion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

Doctor of Theology in Pastoral Counseling. . . 32

TOEFL. . . . . . . . . . . 15, 17, 19, 22, 27, 31, 34, 35

Explorations Alternative Context . . . . . . . . . . 55

Transfer of Credit. . 15, 17, 19, 22, 27, 31, 33, 35

Fellowships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Tuition and Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Financial Aid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Grading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

Worship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Columbia Theological Seminary


DIRECTORY Telephone: 404-378-8832

Please address inquiries to the following people at:

Fax: 404-377-9696

Columbia Theological Seminary

Web: www.CTSnet.edu

PO Box 520 Decatur, Georgia 30031-0520

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, CURRICULUM, FACULTY Christine Roy Yoder, Interim Dean of Faculty Assistant—Jane Gleim: GleimJ@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4521 ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID: MDIV, MA(TS), MAPT, THM Betsy Lyles, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid Admissions@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4517; 1-877-548-2817 (toll free) ADMISSIONS: DMIN, DEDMIN Kevin Park, Advanced Professional Studies AdvancedStudies@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4534 ALUMNI/AE AFFAIRS, STUDENT SUPPLY PREACHING Randy Calvo, Jr., Director of Alumni/ae and Church Relations CalvoR@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4593 BUSINESS, ACCOUNTING, LEGAL MATTERS; CAMPUS AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Martin Sadler, Vice President for Business and Finance Business@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4510 CAMPUS SAFETY AND SECURITY Agnes Scott Security (non-emergency) 404-471-6355 Agnes Scott Security (emergency) 404-471-6900 COMMUNICATIONS: PUBLICATIONS, WEBSITE, BLOG, ADVERTISING, MEDIA RELATIONS Michael Thompson, Director of Communications ThompsonM@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4530

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Columbia Theological Seminary


GENERAL MATTERS ABOUT THE SEMINARY Leanne Van Dyk, President Assistant—Mary Lynn Darden: DardenM@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4515 HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICE Miguel Angel Chavez, Facilities Coordinator ChavezM@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4510 LIFELONG LEARNING COURSES AND EVENTS Sarah Erickson, Director of Lifelong Learning EricksonS@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4526 Debra Weir, Associate Director of Spirituality (certificate programs in spirituality) Weir.Debra@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4557 Israel Galindo, Associate Dean, Lifelong Learning GalindoI@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4558 Linzmarie Bason, Staff Associate LifelongLearning@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4577 Alison Riviera, Certificates Program Coordinator RivieraA@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4557 PLACEMENT AND STUDENT SERVICES Dean of Students Assistant—Judy Graves GravesJ@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4523 REGISTRATION, COURSE SCHEDULES, AND TRANSCRIPTS Michael Medford, Registrar Registrar@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4576 SUPERVISED MINISTRY AND INTERNSHIPS Kimberly Clayton, Director of Contextual Education ClaytonK@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4518 TRANSFER CREDITS, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH, AND ACCREDITATION Ann Clay Adams, Academic Administrator AdamsA@CTSnet.edu; 404-687-4524


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Profile for Columbia Theological Seminary

Academic Catalog 2016-17  

Learn more about the great courses being offered at Columbia Theological Seminary. Printed copies of the catalog are also available from the...

Academic Catalog 2016-17  

Learn more about the great courses being offered at Columbia Theological Seminary. Printed copies of the catalog are also available from the...

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