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Nursing Columbia

The Magazine of Columbia University School of Nursing

INNOVATING EDUCATION FOR 21ST CENTURY CARE

Spring 2018

ART REFLECTS LIFE

Linking

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Research Practice Forging mentorship programs that help RNs working in acute-care hospital settings design critical research projects.


HELP INSPIRE THE NEXT GENERATION OF COLUMBIA NURSING By including Columbia Nursing in your estate plans today, with a minimum value of $125,000, you will provide a student with an endowed scholarship in your name. It’s simple, easy, and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity!

LEAVING

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LEGACY

“I am so grateful for the nursing education I received at Columbia Nursing. It provided me with the requisite skills, knowledge, and opportunity to serve the world. My nursing career in public health and global health would not have been possible without what I learned at Columbia. I believe the most meaningful way I can convey my appreciation is to pay it forward and support the next generation of Columbia nurses.” Patricia L. Riley ’76 and Priscilla Schaper ’17, the 2016-2017 Gloria Thomas Riley Nursing Scholar.

— Patricia L. Riley ’76

CONTACT US TO DISCUSS YOUR LEGACY:

nursing.columbia.edu/giving/planned-giving For more information, please contact Janice Grady at 212-305-1088 or jar2272@cumc.columbia.edu.


From the Dean

Innovation in Action

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he health care environment is changing fast. But Columbia University School of Nursing is neither watching nor waiting for change. We are making it happen. The school has built a legacy of meeting the growing demands in health and health care not by following trends but by setting them. We do this through innovation in education, research, and practice. Of course, to have any impact, innovation needs real-world application. That’s what this issue of Columbia Nursing is about: the many ways in which we put innovation into action. Among our most recent innovations—and the focus of our first story—is our adoption of the establishment of joint appointments with other health care systems to increase the research potential of nurses within the system. Endorsed by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, joint appointments allow faculty to divide their time between conducting their own scientific investigations and mentoring hospital nurses who want to develop original research from their experiences on the frontlines of patient care. The success of these research-practice partnerships has led to LINK—Linking to Improve Nursing Care and Knowledge— which provides nurses at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital with the conceptual and logistical support they need to pursue clinical research that could lead to improved patient outcomes. It has also led to the creation of the Academic-Practice Research Fellowship, another collaboration between Columbia Nursing and NewYork-Presbyterian, which is a competitive two-year program that awards clinical nurses with mentoring and other support they need—including a work sabbatical— to pursue research. True to our tradition as an education pioneer, we have reinvented our curriculum with simulation education. The school has long used manikins to familiarize students with the fundamentals of patient assessment, but with our new high-fidelity manikins and other state-of-the-art technology, we are raising the level at which we are preparing registered and advanced practice nurses. As our second story illustrates, students can now practice patient care and critical-thinking

skills in a safe learning environment that replicates the health care setting, and benefit from real-time feedback made possible by videotaping capacity in every room. The educational models that we are creating are inspiring partnerships with other health systems and organizations. For example, we are using this technology to help the Hospital for Special Surgery prepare their nurses for the medical complexities of orthopedic surgery patients. As an official training site for opioid overdose prevention, as designated by the New York State Department of Health, we are creating programs to give health care practitioners and other members of our community the tools to help combat the opioid overdose crisis. We are also developing national educational programs, like our Cystic Fibrosis (CF) conference, to share ideas about implementing new therapies and promoting patient adherence. The conference, which drew nurses from across the country, has become the blueprint that four national CF centers will use to host conferences at their own institutions. Our school’s culture of curiosity and innovation are among the things that make me proud to be dean. At every turn, we are redefining what is possible in education, research, and practice. And with the curated art program for our new building, the subject of our third story, we are even changing the way we think about our environment in our new home. The building’s art program contains a compelling array of photography, painting, printmaking, and sculpture, as well as memorabilia and narratives, which tell a visual story of the school. Some of the work is made by up-and-coming artists who live in Washington Heights. Other pieces, from Columbia University’s own archive, are by well-known artists of their day. Together, they connect the school to the community, the patients we serve, and the world in which we live, whose health and wellbeing drive us to keep innovating and improving the work we do.

BOBBIE BERKOWITZ, PHD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN Dean, Columbia University School of Nursing Mary O’Neil Mundinger Professor of Nursing Senior Vice President, Columbia University Irving Medical Center


Nursing Columbia

Columbia Nursing is the magazine of the Columbia University School of Nursing and is published twice a year

Bobbie Berkowitz, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN

ALUMNI NEWS EDITORS:

Dean, Columbia University School of Nursing Mary O’Neil Mundinger Professor of Nursing Senior Vice President, Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Reva Feinstein, MPA Associate Dean, Development and Alumni Relations

Linda Muskat Rim, Editor-in-Chief Associate Dean, Strategic Communications and Marketing

Janine Handfus Associate Director, Annual Fund

Lara Philipps, Production Supervisor Manager, Strategic Communications and Marketing

Janice Rafferty Grady Senior Director, Development

Mairead Moore Associate Director, Alumni Relations

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Eson Chan

Andrea Kott Kenneth Miller Laura Raskin

BOARD OF VISITORS:

BOARD OF VISITORS:

Rear Admiral Tina Alvarado ’81, MHA, RN Deputy Chief, Reserve Policy & Integration, Bureau of Medicine & Surgery, U.S. Navy Raleigh, North Carolina

Karen Hein, MD Jacksonville, Vermont

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION:

Don Boyd ’06 ’17, PhD, MS, CRNA Nurse Anesthetist NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Medical Center New York, New York Brenda Barrowclough Brodie ’65, RN Durham, North Carolina

Mary Turner Henderson ’64, RN San Francisco, California Janice J. Izlar ’06, DNAP, MS, CRNA Chatham Anesthesia Services, LLC Savannah, Georgia Mary Dickey Lindsay ’45, RN New York, New York

Paul Coyne ’13 ’15 ’16, DNP, MBA, MSF, RN, AGPCNP-BC President and Co-Founder, Inspiren New York, New York

Wilhelmina Manzano, MA, RN, NEA-BC Senior Vice President, Chief Nursing Executive, & Chief Quality Officer NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Regional Hospital Network New York, New York

Delphine Mendez de Leon ’78, MBA, MPH, RN New York, New York

Duncan V. Neuhauser, PhD Blue Hill, Maine

Dorothy Simpson Dorion ’57, MS, RN Jacksonville, Florida Angela Clarke Duff ’70, RN Forest Hills, New York Gerral Felson ’93, MBA, MS, RN Boynton Beach, Florida Marjorie Harrison Fleming ’69, RN Chair Seabrook Island, South Carolina Kenneth A. Forde, MD Scarborough, New York Susan Fox ’84, MBA, RN President & CEO White Plains Hospital White Plains, New York Susan Furlaud ’09 ’12, MS, RN New York, New York

Spring 2018 Contents

Produced by the Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing

Janet Ready ’81, MBA, MPH, RN, FACHE President, PennMedicine/Princeton Medical Center Senior Vice President, Princeton Health Princeton, New Jersey Susan Salka, MBA President & CEO AMN Healthcare San Diego, California Sara Shipley Stone ’69, MS, RN Brooksville, Maine Keville Frederickson Tomasson ’64, EdD, RN, FAAN Professor and Founding Director Nursing PhD Program Pace University Pleasantville, New York

4 Research Roundup · Nurses Can Lessen the Effects of Climate Change on Respiratory Health · Mobile Self-Care Strategies May Improve Health Outcomes for PLWH · Internal Review Protocols at Academic Institutions More than Doubles Likelihood of External Grant Funding · Video-Based Education Reduces Distress in Pediatric MRI Patients · Women with HIV Experience More Fatigue, Muscle Aches After Menopause

28 · Alumni · A Glimpse of Some Alumni Events · Letter from the Alumni Association President · Class and Program Notes · In Memoriam

38 · Faculty Publications Please address all correspondence to: press.nursing@columbia.edu

Alumni are invited to update their contact information by emailing nursingalumni@columbia.edu or calling 212-305-5999

Subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter: nursing.columbia.edu Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/ColumbiaNursing Follow us on Instragram: columbia_nursing Follow us on Twitter: @CU_Nursing Join our LinkedIn group: Columbia University School of Nursing Subscribe to us on YouTube: Columbia University School of Nursing


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Linking Research and Practice By Kenneth Miller With mentorship programs that help RNs working in acute-care hospital settings design research projects, Columbia Nursing is narrowing the gulf between academic research and patient care.

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Innovating Education for 21st Century Care By Andrea Kott Through collaboration and sharing of best practices with other health care institutions, Columbia Nursing is transforming nursing education.

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Art Reflects Life By Laura Raskin The importance of one’s physical environment cannot be underestimated. A carefully curated art program throughout the new building, combining vintage, iconic, and modern art, connects the school to the community, the patients we serve, and the world in which we live.

ON THE COVER: Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

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Research

Roundup Nurses Can Lessen the Effects of Climate Change on Respiratory Health

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They emphasized that nurses could help reduce individual risk by considering climate-change impacts when providing patient assessments, treatments, and education. “The effects of climate change on respiratory health are probably the most established and yet poorly understood,” says George, lead author. “We need to think about how we are educating the workforce to identify and deal with these worsening connections to health and environment.” Bruzzese adds, “Many nurses are not aware of the impact of climate change on respiratory health, especially within children who are among the most vulnerable. We hoped to call attention to this important problem and suggest ways nurses can lessen the impact of climate change.” The paper stemmed from George’s original research, which found evidence that environmental factors ranging from pollen, dirt, illegal dumping, and traffic could create “hot spots” that worsen respiratory health symptoms. Being mindful of what health implications deteriorate with climate change will help nurses consider how to better care for their patients, according to the co-authors. “While it will take generations to reduce the health effects of greenhouse gases, there are immediate opportunities for nurses to lead research, practice, and policy initiatives aimed at lessening these effects,” says George.

associate professors Maureen George, PhD, and Jean Marie Bruzzese, PhD. In a review of the scientific literature addressing the adverse effects of climate change on asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, and respiratory infections, George and Bruzzese found that such change alters the natural and built environment in ways that may potentially increase respiratory disease prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. In addition to suggesting future research to explain climate-change hazards, they proposed policies to support the prevention and mitigation of climate change.

T HINKS T O C K

urses can play an important role in reducing the deleterious effects of climate change on respiratory health, especially among vulnerable patient populations, according to a paper from Columbia Nursing. Through a multipronged approach that entails research, policy, and clinical action, nurses can lessen the effects that increasing temperatures, extreme weather, desertification, and flooding have on patient populations—particularly children and adults with asthma or other respiratory conditions, wrote co-authors and

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Columbia Nursing Spring 2018

This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and appeared in the May 13, 2017, online edition of the Journal of Nursing Scholarship.


T HINKS T O C K

Mobile Self-Care Strategies May Improve Health Outcomes for PLWH

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eople living with HIV (PLWH) who used a smartphone app that provided evidence-based self-care strategies demonstrated greater symptom relief and medication adherence than those whose app did not provide such strategies, according to research from Columbia Nursing. The findings suggest that mobile technology may be an efficient platform for the delivery of information that helps improve health outcomes and reduces health and health care disparities among traditionally underserved racial and ethnic groups, said principal investigator Rebecca Schnall, PhD, the Mary Dickey Lindsay Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Schnall and colleagues developed a mobile Video Information Provider (mVIP) app to deliver symptom-specific, evidence-based self-care strategies to PLWH. To examine the app’s effectiveness in disseminating these strategies and their effect on health out-

comes, researchers randomized 40 PLWH to an intervention group whose app provided 143 self-care strategies for 13 different symptoms, and another 40 to a group whose app did not. Eligible participants were at least 18 years old, English-speaking, HIV-positive, owned a smartphone or tablet, and experienced at least two of 13 symptoms during the previous week. Nearly half the participants had an annual income of less than $10,000, and 90 percent belonged to a racial or ethnic minority group. Of the 76 participants who completed the 12-week study, those who received selfcare strategies showed improvement in 12 of 13 symptoms, compared with controls. In five of these symptoms––anxiety; depression; neuropathy; fever, chills, or sweats; and weight loss or wasting––the intervention group exhibited significantly greater improvement than did controls; they also

showed significant improvement in antiretroviral therapy adherence. With advances in HIV treatment, PLWH are living longer, often with adverse symptoms. Self-managing these symptoms can improve health outcomes and quality of life, said Schnall, who based the study on previous research that entailed distributing printed self-care strategies to PLWH, few of whom accessed them. “Our findings demonstrate the usefulness of mobile technology in disseminating and implementing evidence-based strategies,” she said. “The use of mobile technologies at nearly equal rates across racial and ethnic groups supports the use of these tools for bridging some of the current disparities in health care access and health outcomes.” This study was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and appeared in the January 3, 2018, online edition of AIDS and Behavior.

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ResearchRoundup

Internal Review Protocols at Academic Institutions More than Doubles Likelihood of External Grant Funding

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of scholarship and research, and Kristine M. Kulage, MPH, director, Office of Scholarship and Research Development. “Strategies such as internal funding and grant reviews help ensure that a school of nursing’s valuable time and resources are being spent on research proposals that are more likely to have higher success rates,” Larson and Kulage wrote. In 2012, the nursing school launched a three-part process to increase its research capacity. It consisted of a two-part internalreview procedure in which faculty members, associate research scientists, postdoctoral fellows, and pre-doctoral students participated in a Specific Objectives and Aims Reviews (SOAR) Protocol, during which they presented their proposals’ specific aims to faculty members for guidance, feedback, and suggested revisions; and took part in a Mock Review Protocol, fashioned after a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study section, in which they received a real-time, presubmission peer review from experts. This effort was coupled with an internal funding opportunity for faculty members holding doctoral degrees, associate research scientists, and postdoctoral fellows to apply for Intramural Pilot Grants funded by Columbia Nursing to support the collection of preliminary data or other scholarly work for the preparation and submission of a future grant. “Grant applications that underwent any type of internal review were more than twice as likely to be funded, compared with those that did not undergo internal review,” the co-authors wrote. The process also inspired interdisciplinary collaboration, and modeled “a professional attitude of openness and mutual support for predoctoral students,” they continued. In addition, the school invested a total of $127,376 in 19 intramural pilot-grant applications. Six of the pilot grants led to larger applications, which received more than $3 million in external funding, and 18 of the pilot grants produced 16 peer-reviewed articles and 33 presentations. “Because of the highly competitive environment for securing grant funding, strategies to support and increase research capacity are essential for schools of nursing to develop the next generation of nurse scientists, and establish and maintain a funding base for ongoing research,” according to the article. T HINKS T O C K

o boost chances of securing external research funding, Columbia Nursing investigators designed a two-part internal-review process that more than doubled the likelihood that research grant applications would be funded, and coupled it with an annual internal-funding mechanism to increase research capacity. A five-year study of this process found that, in addition to significantly increasing the number of grants that secured funding, it produced peer-reviewed publications, conference presentations, and an atmosphere of transparency and collegiality that likely would not have occurred otherwise, say co-authors Elaine L. Larson, PhD, the Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean

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This study appeared in the June 2017 online edition of ScienceDirect and was published in the January-February 2018 issue of Nursing Outlook.


Video-Based Education Reduces Distress in Pediatric MRI Patients

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magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure can be so stressful for children that many require general anesthesia to complete testing. Yet an educational video could significantly increase relaxation as well as procedural understanding in some pediatric patients undergoing an MRI, according to research from Columbia Nursing and NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital. Co-authors Daniel Hogan, MSN, and Kari A. Mastro, PhD (both formerly of NewYork-Presbyterian), and Tina DiMartino, MS, of NewYork-Presbyterian, and Columbia Nursing’s Jianfang Liu, PhD, Elaine Larson, PhD, and Eileen Carter, PhD, conducted a randomized controlled trial in which 50 pediatric patients either watched a sevenminute video before their first MRI or received standard of care (verbal instructions from nurses and MRI technicians before and during the procedure). Eligible participants were 6 to 17 years old, English-speaking, and undergoing an MRI as an outpatient; a caregiver’s consent was required for participation in the trial. Before the MRI, participants completed a questionnaire in which they circled their level of relaxation on a scale of 0 to 10. After the procedure, they again rated their relaxation level, as well as their understanding of what they had been told about the MRI. In addition, an open-ended question asked patients to describe what they found most helpful about the MRI education they had received. The researchers found statistically significant improvements in both relaxation and baseline procedural understanding scores among chil-

T HINKS T O C K

dren age 13 to 17 who received the intervention compared to those who did not. A total of 26 patients, half from the control group and half from the intervention group, responded to the question regarding what they found most helpful; among the intervention group, nearly all reported that the video increased their awareness and understanding of the MRI process. Although previous studies had found that multimodal psychological preparation programs (combining interventions such as demonstrations with mock MRIs, visual aids with photos and videos, and distraction/relaxation techniques) reduced distress among MRI patients, this study was the first to evaluate the impact of a video alone on children undergoing an MRI. “Educational videos offer a less expensive alternative to multimodal approaches,” the authors wrote. “Our study suggests that [this method] may be most effective among older, adolescent children.” The study was conducted under the auspices of the LINK Project (Linking to Improve Nursing Care and Knowledge), which provides conceptual and logistical support from Columbia Nursing faculty to staff nurses at NewYork-Presbyterian who wish to conduct their own research projects. The study appeared in the January 19, 2018, online edition of the Journal of Pediatric Nursing.

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ResearchRoundup

Women with HIV Experience More Fatigue, Muscle Aches After Menopause

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Nancy Reame, PhD, Mary Dickey Lindsay Professor Emerita of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. “A number of studies have described menopause symptoms in women with HIV, but few have examined whether menopause might help explain the enhanced severity of HIV symptoms observed in women when compared to men.” The study builds on the results of a national online survey conducted from February to August 2016 by co-author Rebecca Schnall, PhD, Mary Dickey Lindsay Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Schnall conducted the survey to better understand how people living with HIV in the United States experience symptoms and manage their disease. In the survey, people living with HIV reported fatigue, depression, muscle aches, and difficulty falling asleep as their most common symptoms. For the study, Schnall and Reame analyzed the original survey data to compare responses from women and men. They then conducted a follow-up survey among the women who participated to assess their reproductive status. Their findings showed post-menopausal women suffered a greater impact from fatigue and muscle aches—regardless of age, duration of HIV infection, and other health conditions. In recent decades, HIV has largely become a chronic condition, and an increasing percentage of people with HIV are now living longer. Nearly half of the 1.1 million Americans with an HIV diagnosis are age 50 or older. Although women make up less than 20 percent of people with HIV, the number of those women over the age of 50 is growing. Additionally, while previous studies have shown that some HIV symptoms affect women more than men, little was known about the influence of menopause on this added burden. “Given the shifting demographics in the HIV epidemic, our findings are very salient for people living with HIV and for their health care providers,” said Schnall. “If health care providers can better predict, identify, and manage the symptoms that are most burdensome to women living with HIV, they can improve care for these women.” T HINKS T O C K

n a recent study, researchers at Columbia Nursing found that post-menopausal women, an expanding demographic among aging HIV patients, suffer more from fatigue and muscle aches than others living with HIV—findings that could support better care management for this growing patient population. “The study of differences in the way men and women experience HIV symptoms is an important emerging focus,” said co-author

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This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research and the Office of the Director of the National Institutes of Health, and appeared in the March 2018 online edition of Menopause.


YOU CAN HELP BUILD THE FUTURE OF NURSING Your gift to the Annual Fund makes the future of nursing possible.

F R A NK O U D E M A N

Please consider contributing to: New Building Fund

Global Fellows Fund To make your tax-deductible contribution today, send a check payable to Columbia University School of Nursing or donate online at nursing.columbia.edu/giving.

Innovations in Simulation Fund

Dean’s Discretionary Fund

Student Scholarship Fund For more information, please contact Janine Handfus, associate director, Annual Fund, at 212-305-0079 or jh2526@columbia.edu.


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Linking

Research Practice

Eileen Carter, PhD, RN

With mentorship programs that help RNs working in acute-care hospital settings design groundbreaking research projects, Columbia Nursing is narrowing the gulf between academic research and patient care. By Kenneth Miller Photographs by Jörg Meyer

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s a charge nurse in the pediatric diagnostic and imaging center at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, Dan Hogan, MSN, knew that kids often feel anxious about undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Having to lie motionless for a prolonged period inside a machine that makes loud clanking and buzzing noises can be unnerving, even for adults. Children may grow so distressed that they can’t keep still. To ensure a clear image, many are given general anesthesia. One day a colleague of Hogan mentioned that her niece was facing an MRI; the colleague said she’d gone online in search of an educational video to help prepare the girl, but the few she found were of surprisingly low quality. Hogan volunteered to try to make something better, drawing on the expertise of Morgan Stanley’s nurses, MRI technologists, and child-life specialists. A few months later, he premiered a seven-minute production—starring his young daughter and her mom, and featuring several animated sequences—which received rave reviews from patients and their parents. Hogan’s patient-care director suggested he go further: Why not conduct a clinical study to see whether the movie had a measurable effect on anxiety levels before and during the procedure? If so, perhaps such videos


could lessen the use of anesthesia (which poses health risks, cost burdens, and scheduling challenges) as well as the incidence of emotional trauma (which may discourage families from seeking future medical care) for kids who need MRIs. There was just one problem: The study would be the first to address this topic, and Hogan had no idea how to go about it. “I was always intimidated by the notion of research,” he recalled. “I’d been exposed to the basic methods as an undergrad, but I’d never led a project of my own.” Hogan was hardly the first RN to come up with an insight into how care might be improved, only to hesitate at the challenges of testing the concept scientifically. “Staff nurses are on the front lines, and they often have great ideas about how to make things better,” noted Elaine Larson, PhD, the Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean for scholarship and research at Columbia University School of Nursing. “But they seldom know how to put those ideas into a researchable framework.” Over the past few years, the school has launched a series of initiatives aimed at closing that gap, in partnership with major medical centers in the New York City area. “In health care systems nationwide, there’s an expectation that nursing practice be evidence-based rather than just doing things the way they’ve always been done,” explained Dean Bobbie Berkowitz, PhD. “By working with hospitals to foster nurseled research, we’re helping to advance that goal. We’re also helping nurses fulfill their deepest motivation—to achieve the best possible outcomes for their patients.”

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olumbia Nursing’s research-practice partnerships benefit from a deep form of collaboration: Faculty members serving in joint appointments with medical centers or other health care providers commit to spending half their time cultivating staff research efforts, and the other half pursuing their own research. “This collaboration is essential as we continue to build a culture of inquiry and advance nursing science,” noted Wilhelmina Manzano, MA, senior vice president, chief nursing executive, and chief quality officer at NewYork-Presbyterian. The first such arrangement began in 2013, in collaboration with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York’s (VNSNY) Center for Home Care Policy & Research. Dawn Dowding, PhD, then a professor of nursing at Columbia Nursing, collaborated with the research team at VNSNY to develop and carry out projects related to nurse decision making and how technology affects that process. The second research-practice partnership was different. It started in November 2014, when Eileen Carter, PhD—a nurse-scientist who’d recently earned her doctorate at Columbia Nursing—was named an associate research scientist at the school and a nurse researcher at NewYork-Presbyterian. (She’s now an assistant professor.) In the hospital setting, Carter’s duties ranged from conducting grand rounds on literature-search techniques to helping nurses design and implement research studies. Not long after she began the clinical aspect of her joint appointment, Carter was approached by Hogan, who was struggling to get started on his research project. “Dan played me his video, which I thought was very professional, and told me he wanted to do things in a rigorous way,” Carter recalled. She suggested a randomized controlled trial, in which one group of participants would watch the video before their MRIs, while the rest received standard care—a brief talk about what to expect during the procedure and instructions to hold still. Over the following months, Carter helped Hogan shape the parameters of the study and prepare a proposal for Columbia’s institutional review board (IRB), reassuring him when the board sent it back for more work. “I was quite disappointed, but she laughed and told me proposals are rarely accepted the first time,” Hogan said. After the IRB approved the revised plan, Carter guided him in selecting a research assistant and recruiting 50 subjects for the study. And once the data had been collected, she introduced Hogan

Kenrick Cato, PhD, RN

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Reynaldo Rivera, DNP, RN

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to biostatistician Jianfang Liu, PhD, a senior data analyst at Columbia Nursing, who helped him interpret the results. The study showed significant improvements in relaxation and understanding of the procedure in patients 13 to 17 years old who watched the video, suggesting that this type of intervention was worthy of further investigation. With Carter’s guidance, they selected a prestigious journal as his target publication, and began writing up a manuscript. “Dr. Carter is an incredible educator,” said Hogan. “She opened my mind and broke down barriers. And she had so much confidence in me that I worked twice as hard to avoid disappointing her.” Over time, the research-practice partnership expanded. In January 2016, Assistant Professor Kenrick Cato, PhD, a clinical informatics specialist who’d served as an Army captain in Iraq, became a joint appointee of the school and the medical center. Associate Research Scientist Carolyn Sun, PhD, who’d conducted nursing research in Africa and the Middle East—and who, like Cato, had earned her doctorate at Columbia Nursing —soon joined him. More NewYork-Presbyterian nurses launched research projects under their mentorship, and (according to a study the team published in the Journal of Nursing Administration) a culture of inquiry began to flourish among the staff as a whole. Nurses’ monthly use of the hospital library nearly tripled. That March, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) released a report titled “Advancing Healthcare Transformation: A New Era for Academic Nursing,” which confirmed that collaborations like those Columbia Nursing was pioneering were just what academic health centers should be pursuing. Urging a closer relationship between academic research and clinical nursing, the document called for strengthening research-training programs for health-system nurses, and “creating mechanisms to coordinate research projects and activities” between nursescientists and their clinical counterparts. The AACN report confirmed for Dean Berkowitz and her colleagues at the school and NewYork-Presbyterian that their collaboration could become a national model. The group developed a more formal structure for the partnership, calling it Linking to Improve Nursing Care and Knowledge: The LINK Project. LINK was designed to ensure that any nurse with a viable idea for a clinical study could receive at least as much help as Hogan had. After filling out an online application, the clinician aspiring to develop a research project would be assigned a project manager (one of the joint appointees or Larson), who would provide conceptual and logistical support, including assistance in seeking funding. The clinician would also work with data expert Liu at every stage of the endeavor. “The idea was to give nurses the “This initiative has resources they needed without them having to come search for us,” been a great value to Cato explained. Larson became LINK’s co-director, along with Reynaldo Rivera, DNP, director of nursing research and innovation both organizations at NewYork-Presbyterian. “This initiative has been a great value to and has certainly both organizations and has certainly contributed to advancing the contributed to advancing nursing profession and improving patient care,” Rivera said. The school was also pursuing such partnerships with other the nursing profession institutions. Around the time LINK launched, Amanda Hessels, and improving patient PhD—a nurse scientist at Hackensack Meridian Health, New care,” Rivera said. Jersey’s largest health care system—completed her postdoctoral studies under Larson. Columbia Nursing then hired her as an associate research scientist, in a joint appointment with Hackensack Meridian. At the medical center, Hessels’ responsibilities include mentoring dozens of staff nurses who wish to pursue research projects. As a faculty member at a leading academic institution, with a growing list of published papers and a grant from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Hessels has been able to pass along skills


and perspectives that these clinicians otherwise might have missed out on. She also serves as a role model. “Most of them know me as one of their own,” she said. “They think, if Amanda can do this, maybe I can, too.”

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oday, Columbia Nursing’s research collaborations continue to grow. A joint appointment with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center was recently filled by Bevin Cohen, PhD, a recent graduate of the school who also holds a doctorate in epidemiology. At NewYork-Presbyterian, more than 30 nurses have consulted with LINK’s mentors since the project’s founding; several are now conducting studies on topics such as avoiding catheter-associated urinary tract infections and reducing emergency-department wait times. Cato is writing up a study evaluating the project’s first year, which he’ll submit for publication soon. The school recently launched the Academic-Practice Research Fellowship with NewYork-Presbyterian, which aims to further reduce the barriers between academic and clinical nursing. Spearheaded by Carter, the two-year fellowship is a competitive program. Proposals are evaluated by nurse members of the medical center’s Evidence-Based Practice Research Committee; those that score highest are reviewed by a faculty committee at Columbia Nursing, which selects the winning entries based on how important they are to the nursing profession and patient care, and whether they can be completed within the allotted time frame. Out of the 15 candidates who applied for the first round, five were chosen. In addition to mentoring by faculty members, statistical consultation, and a writing-for-publication workshop to assist in the dissemination of study results, the nurses get protected time off from their nursing duties for the duration of the fellowship. Upon completion of the fellowship, they’ll also receive a certificate of advanced training. “This is the only nursing fellowship of its kind that I know of,” said Courtney Vose, DNP, vice president and chief nursing officer at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center and Allen Hospitals, who helped shape the initiative. “It’s something nurses have dreamed of for years, and it’s amazing to see it come to fruition.” “Every nurse is The fellows’ research projects—including studies of extubation driven by a passion protocols for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), identifying delirium in ICU patients, techniques for improving med- to get it right,” said ication communications, and the use of meditation to reduce burn- Dean Berkowitz. out among surgical ICU nurses—are just getting started. But if all “Helping them find goes well, these clinical nurses will experience the same sort of satout how is what isfaction that Hogan’s MRI-video research ultimately brought him. The LINK team was thrilled when that study appeared in the these collaborations January 2018 issue of the Journal of Pediatric Nursing, with are all about.” Carter, Liu, and Larson among the co-authors. By then, the video had become part of standard care at NewYork-Presbyterian, and had scored nearly 40,000 views on YouTube. Hogan, meanwhile, had become a clinical nurse manager at the pediatric ICU of Seattle Children’s Hospital, overseeing a staff of more than 120. “I often wonder if I would have gotten this position if it hadn’t been for my research project,” he mused. “When I told them at the interview that I’d submitted a manuscript for publication, they were like, ‘wow!’ But what makes me most excited is the study’s potential for improving patient outcomes and family experience.” Or as Carter put it: “The point is not just to get published—it’s to make a difference.” That’s the central goal of all Columbia Nursing’s research-practice partnerships. “Every nurse is driven by a passion to get it right,” said Dean Berkowitz. “Helping them find out how is what these collaborations are all about.” Manzano added, “Close ties between service and academia are critical to our ability to improve patient care through nursing science.” 

Courtney Vose, DNP, RN

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INNOVATING

EDUCATION FOR 21ST-CENTURY CARE Through collaboration and sharing of best practices with other health care institutions, Columbia Nursing is transforming nursing education BY ANDREA KOTT, MPH

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he train-wreck survivors are bloodied and bruised. A man with a broken nose begs for morphine, as does a woman whose gashed ankle reveals a protruding bone. Another woman, her wrist swollen and blue, pleads for someone to call her child’s nursery school. Nearly 100 onlookers from New York City health care institutions observe students taking turns assessing wounds. A film crew captures the disaster as patients moan in fear and pain. The emergency is staged, the injured are actors. But the students are not pretending. They are applying classroom learning to a real-world setting during an open house in Columbia University School of Nursing’s Helene Fuld Health Trust Simulation Center, where the school showcased how new technology is transforming education, and shared best practices with experts and educators in the field. Transforming Simulation Technology in Nursing Education Simulation is not new to nursing education or to Columbia Nursing. Students have traditionally used manikins to practice listening to heart and lung sounds, dressing wounds, and inserting catheters. But with the opening last fall of the Helene Fuld Health Trust Simulation Center, which features a high-tech manikin that responds to the administration of anesthesia by nurse anesthetist students, another manikin that delivers a baby with the help of midwifery students, and other scenarios made possible by state-of-the-art simulation technology, the school has raised simulation education to a higher level. The technology is being used not

A nursing student assesses injuries sustained by a subway derailment victim, played by a standarized patient.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JÖRG MEYER


INNOVATING

EDUCATION FOR 21ST-CENTURY CARE only for task training but also to create lifelike situations in which students must think critically, respond quickly, and make informed decisions. “The school is enhancing the science of simulation and how it is being used to prepare students,” says Stephen Ferrara, DNP, assistant professor and associate dean of clinical affairs. “Our simulation center is a learning environment, as well as a platform for advancing the field by increasing the quality and safety of care, and exchanging ideas with other educators and health care systems.” In this 16,000 square-foot, ultramodern learning laboratory, MDE (master’s direct entry) and advanced practice registered nursing students encounter the myriad tasks and scenarios that mirror what they will face in real-life clinical settings. The simulation center features authenti-

Kellie Bryant, DNP, RN

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cally appointed patient examination rooms, two inpatient hospital rooms, a labor and delivery suite, and an operating room. Every room has been furnished with the equipment one would find in a clinical setting––blood pressure cuffs, thermometers, otoscopes, ophthalmoscopes, oxygen supplies, nitrile gloves, and monitors––for assessing and tracking patients’ health status. All have a sink for handwashing, and a laptop computer for maintaining electronic medical records (EMRs). And each room has the latest audiovisual technology for recording students in action, providing a source of instructor feedback. “This gives students the opportunity to work on a scenario and hone their skills for real-world situations,” Ferrara says. Research shows that simulation education increases student confidence and improves patient safety. Instead of performing a procedure for the first time on a patient, students first practice on manikins, says Kellie Bryant, DNP, assistant professor and the center’s executive director. “The more they practice and build their skills, the more confidence they acquire, and the better they will perform in a real clinical setting,” Bryant adds. Kamal Nguyen, an MDE student who hopes to pursue a degree as an adult gerontology acute-care nurse practitioner, says that learning in the simulation center has boosted his self-assurance. “It ensures that I will provide safer care to my patients, and enhance patient outcomes, which is the main goal.” Learning to Think Critically in Real Time The simulation center features an array of task trainers and manikins––from low fidelity to high fidelity. A technician operates the computer that makes the high-fidelity manikins breathe, gasp for air, speak, blink, and respond to medication. Caring for these computerized “patients” familiarizes students with the protocols of patient care: hand-washing, donning nitrile gloves, scanning bar-coded wristbands, performing an assessment, and recording patient information in an EMR. They also learn to track clinical treatment orders, insert intravenous lines, administer medications, and continually assess patients. The advanced practice registered nurse students perform sophisticated procedures: diagnosing and treating acute and chronic illnesses; attending simple or complex deliveries; evaluating a newborn’s Apgar scores; or intubating a patient awaiting anesthesia. Repeating these tasks helps students perfect their clinical skills. Yet it’s confronting the unexpected that teaches what classroom lectures cannot: how to get students to think step by step, and on their feet, says Eileen Thomas, EdD, assistant professor and simulation educator. For example, an instructor can program a manikin to develop fluid in its lungs, or have signs and symptoms of a heart attack. “Simulation


Kamal Nguyen, MDE student

encompasses diverse ways of learning, but usually when we speak about simulation education, we are speaking about running an unfolding case study,” Thomas says. “It is here that students’ critical-thinking skills are developed.” Critical thinking is essential to good decision making, Ferrara adds. “It’s not just about being able to administer a treatment or medication but also asking, ‘Is this the appropriate treatment for this patient’s diagnosis?’” Seeing Patients as People Columbia Nursing students have always received clinical preparation by rotating through a number of clinical sites, including Columbia Nursing’s faculty practice. Simulation education doesn’t replace these experiences; rather, it augments students’ skills, says Karen Desjardins, DNP, assistant professor and assistant dean for academic affairs. “We’re trying to help students increase their confidence and rehearse their critical-thinking process in a safe and efficient environment so they develop clinical competence.” Nguyen says that working with a manikin that simulates a birth was the best preparation he could have had for his obstetrics-gynecology rotation at Mount Sinai Hospital. “Caring for a patient during a vaginal birth was unlike anything I’d ever experienced,” he says. “I was able to look

“It’s not just about being able to administer a treatment or medication but also asking, ‘Is this the appropriate treatment for this patient’s diagnosis?’” back and remember the step-by-step nursing interventions when I got into the hospital setting.” But task training is only one part of simulation education, Ferrara notes. Indeed, the scenarios that students experience in the simulation center challenge them to see beyond tasks and into patients’ lives. “They learn how to manage complex issues, such as helping individuals with adherence to treatment, and patient and family interactions,” Ferrara says. Scenarios frequently involve role-playing. Students take turns pretending to be patients or family members; some role-play with professional actors––known as standardized patients––who portray patients with any number of conditions such as a cough, congestion, or gastrointestinal discomfort, symptoms that require investigation. “We use actors more for advanced practice students who are going into primary care,” Ferrara explains. “We may create a scenario where a patient has been experiencing increased thirst, urination, and weight loss over a couple of months, signs and symptoms suggestive Spring 2018

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INNOVATING

EDUCATION FOR 21ST-CENTURY CARE of early-onset diabetes. Students are responsible for taking a history, performing the appropriate exam, ordering the appropriate lab or radiology tests, and doing it in an economical and comprehensive way,” he says. Some scenarios also require students to have conversations with patients who are facing a difficult diagnosis or treatment. “The scenarios challenge us to look at a patient holistically, to think about their living situation, their cultural background, whether they’re getting family support, and the effects on their health,” Nguyen says. “They force us to think critically.”

assistant vice president of nursing excellence. “I want our nurses to have the simulated experiences of managing cases that would be similar to those found at HSS,” Quinlan says, adding that the symposium will also cover pain management, transitioning patients from hospital to home, care coordination, leadership, and patient advocacy. “They need to know how to think on their feet as problems escalate.” Being able to respond quickly improves outcomes and increases patient safety, says Desjardins, who designed the HSS symposium. “When emergencies happen in the hospital, you don’t have much time. You have to learn critical thinking beforehand, and practice the decision-making process in your mind so that when something happens in real time you know what to do.”

MI C H A E L D i V I T O

Modeling Nursing Education and Patient Care In addition to facilitating real-world clinical preparation, Columbia Nursing’s simulation education is inspiring new models for teaching and patient care through partnerships with other health care organizations. For example, a local health system has solicited the school’s expertise in helping prepare NPs to recognize and address the multiple challenges of caring for orthopedic surgery patients who present with common comorbidities such as cardiovascular complications, obesity, sleep apnea, and diabetes; opioid and alcohol use; and the lack of family or social support. With these considerations in mind, Columbia Nursing has developed a customized symposium for the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), featuring scenarios in which manikins or actors develop potentially grave postoperative complications, according to Patricia Quinlan ’09, PhD, the hospital’s

New York State Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul receives naloxone education and training in the simulation center from simulation educator Eileen Thomas, EdD.

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Helping to Stem Opioid Overdoses Columbia Nursing’s use of sophisticated technology to replicate real-life emergencies for education is one of the reasons why the New York State Department of Health (DOH) has registered it as a site for training in opioid overdose recognition, treatment, and prevention. “Overdose from opioids is the number-one killer of people under 50 in the United States,” Bryant says. “Our collaboration with DOH allows the school to play a critical role in helping to stem the opioid epidemic.” As executive director of the simulation center, Bryant provides the hands-on education, which entails distributing kits provided by the DOH containing the overdosereversing agent naloxone and teaching participants to use them. Bryant will prepare all Columbia Nursing students, Columbia University Irving Medical Center practitioners, and anyone in the community who is interested, which will have profound lifesaving potential. One of the first to receive the training at Columbia Nursing was New York State Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul, who received her naloxone education and training from Bryant and Thomas and has prioritized fighting the state’s opioid epidemic. “New York is investing heavily in higher education to train our students of today for the careers of tomorrow, especially careers in STEM-related fields,” she says. “Columbia University School of Nursing is at the cutting edge of clinical simulation, providing students with a realistic setting to hone their skills before entering the field and caring for real patients. By investing in the future of our students, we are investing in the economic future of New York State.” Transforming Models Beyond Simulation Simulation technology and Columbia Nursing’s ongoing collaboration are just some of the ways in which the school is using new and replicable teaching models to transform education. Its partnership with the Boomer Esiason Foundation and the Johnson & Johnson TRUE Heroes Program to create


Karen Desjardins, DNP, RN

the October 2017 conference, The Path Forward in Cystic Fibrosis: Advanced Education for Nurses, is another. The school developed the national, multidisciplinary conference to educate registered and advanced practice nurses about breakthroughs and challenges in cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment and care. In addition to presenting the most current in CF science, the conference connected nursing leaders from all over the country who came seeking new knowledge, skills, and professional support, says Lisa Iannacci-Manasia, PNP, clinical instructor and conference program director. “Not many nursing programs, even in advanced education tracks, can address the breadth of knowledge that is needed to care for individuals living with CF,” Iannacci-Manasia says. “This program bridges that gap.” The inaugural program also provided a model for the four collaborating cystic fibrosis centers at the University of Pennsylvania (PennMed), Boston Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, and the Baylor College of Medicine that will sponsor similar conferences during the next year, under Columbia Nursing’s guidance. “These centers will be building upon the Columbia Nursing CF curriculum and, accordingly, they will be educating hundreds more nurses in CF treatment and care,” Iannacci-Manasia says. Continuing a Tradition of Innovation The imperative to advance nursing research and clinical practice has driven innovation at Columbia Nursing for more than a century. Innovation thrives on the exchange of ideas and best

Lisa Iannacci-Manasia, PNP, RN

“Not many nursing programs, even in advanced education tracks, can address the breadth of knowledge that is needed to care for individuals living with CF,” Iannacci-Manasia says. “This program bridges that gap.” practices, which has inspired the school to partner with other organizations and to host events, like the upcoming Helene Fuld Institute for Excellence in Simulation Summit this fall, at which national and international experts will convene to discuss the future of simulation education, its impact on patient safety and outcomes, future research, and accreditation. Bryant calls the summit, the first that will occur at the school annually for the next five years, a “simulation education think tank” for nurses and other health care leaders seeking an opportunity to network and collaborate. “We know that simulation education has a major impact on nurses’ professional development, confidence, and on patient safety,” she says. “Now we need to come together and focus on what research needs to be done to advance the field.” And what better place than Columbia Nursing, which has a 125-year tradition of transforming nursing education? “Our goal is to be a center of excellence, to make this the place people will come to when they want the latest in simulation-based education,” Bryant says. “We want to continue to be the innovator and leader people look to.” 

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Katy Stone Columbia Ray, 2017 Laser cut plexiglas and acrylic paint, 41' W x 6' H Seattle-based artist Katy Stone was commissioned to create a monumental piece for the south wall of Columbia Nursing’s seventh-floor, double-height event space. The sculptural relief is composed of hundreds of hand-painted acrylic pieces that mimic leaves and petals. The bold composition, called “Columbia Ray,” is, as Stone says, “a metaphor for the trajectory and reach of education.”


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A carefully curated art program, combining the work of vintage, iconic, and contemporary artists, connects the school to the community, the patients we serve, and the world in which we live.

A D A M REI C H

ART REFLECTS LIFE By Laura Raskin

hen Columbia University School of Nursing opened its new seven-story glass-and-steel building last summer, students, faculty, and staff were welcomed into a state-of-the-art educational facility offering abundant sun-drenched areas for learning, collaboration, and conversation, including a sprawling rooftop terrace overlooking upper Manhattan. The building, designed by FXCollaborative Architects in New York and CO Architects in Los Angeles, roots Columbia Nursing strongly to its home in Washington Heights. The transparency of its glass façade is one way the building invites the neighborhood inside. A robust, integral, and carefully curated art program that includes pieces that could line the walls of a New York City art gallery is another important link. Threaded throughout all seven floors and spanning a variety of mediums—from photography and painting, to printmaking and sculpture—Columbia Nursing’s newly mounted art collection deepens its connection to the community and New York City. Each piece tells the story of New York through its subject matter and its creator. Some of the work is contemporary, made by young


up-and-coming artists who live in Washington Heights. Other pieces, such as photographs from Columbia University’s own art properties by Leon Levinstein (1910–88), are historic gems by iconic artists who helped reflect the city back to itself, and the world. “We wanted a building that had what we would call an enhanced environment—one that is not just about the education that goes on inside but is also a reflection of the environment that we live in,” said Dean Bobbie Berkowitz. “The idea of enhancing the environment through art and connecting it with where we live and the people who live here— these were the two ideas that prompted us to take a serious look at the building’s design and furnishings, and then the art, too.” In order to curate a selection of art that complemented Columbia Nursing’s new building, and vice versa, Dean Berkowitz and the building committee worked with Connie Vick, a renowned New York-based art advisor who helps corporations and institutions source art and integrate it with a client’s interior-design goals. “What was refreshing about this project was that Columbia Nursing is an institution

with a long history, so we looked at all of its memorabilia and art, which was fascinating,” said Vick. She and her team chose special pieces—such as a series of portraits of Columbia Nursing’s deans stretching back to Anna Maxwell, to refurbish, reframe, and relocate. “And then Dean Berkowitz said she wanted the art program to be about the community. Right off the bat that was a novel request.” Using Dean Berkowitz’s clear directive, Vick and art advisor Jessica Bruzzaniti got to work sourcing art from hyper-local artists—those who live on the Upper West Side or in Washington Heights—as well as emerging artists who, as Vick said, are analogous to Columbia Nursing’s students in that they too are embarking on their professional lives in New York City. One of those local artists is Paden Treadway, a Washington Heights resident and photographer who moved to the city a couple of years ago from his hometown of Edmond, Oklahoma. Bruzzaniti and Vick chose two of Treadway’s photographs of

Jake Lambroza Brooklyn Car Wash, 2016 Pigment print, 32" W x 24" H

Diana Robinson Under the George Washington Bridge Pigment print, 42" W x 42" H

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“We wanted a building that had what we would call an enhanced environment—one that is not just about the education that goes on inside but is also a reflection of the environment that we live in,” said Dean Berkowitz.


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Tony Serio Bike Path and Overpass, 2011 Oil on linen, 62" W x 28" H

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1. V  . Grey Hudson River view from Fort Tryon Park Pigment print, 32" W x 22" H

4. R  ebeca Diaz Face Painted Girl, 2016 Pigment print, 42” W x 42” H

2. J  ack Vartoogian SImphiwe Dana at ‘Africa Now! South Africa!’ Apollo Theater, 2014 Pigment print, 28" W x 42" H

5. Columbia Nursing’s new building contains a curated selection of the school’s most prized artifacts that tell its history—photographs, documents, paintings, and objects are now highlighted in story stations on each floor. An old model of Maxwell Hall—the school’s first purpose-built home, opened in 1928—a gift from Dorothy Simpson Dorion ’57—was cleaned and restored, and is now on display on the fifth floor.

3. Nicolo  Sertorio Coney Island Pigment print, 50" W x 40" H

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Tony Serio The Sutherland, 2010 Oil on linen, 48" W x 38" H

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Tony Serio George Washington Bridge and Park in Winter, 2009 Oil on linen, 48" W x 38" H

“Story stations” on each floor of the new building represent the different themes of Community, Innovation, Leadership, Care, Knowledge, and Discovery and highlight the institution’s 125-year history with memorabilia, photographs, and narratives. Above, Community illustrates the school’s international role and legacy in nursing and in nursing education, including original World War I medals bestowed upon alumna Jane Rignel St. John ’1913, for distinguished service on the battlefield.

Central Park for the school. The unusually quiet scenes of the park hint at Treadway’s sense of discovery in his adopted home, and his fascination with the city’s moments of calm. Vick and Bruzzaniti also chose photographs from Getty and other sources, focusing on classic New York milieus such as Coney Island and the Apollo Theater in Harlem. Once they had a selection everyone agreed on, they overlaid floor plans of the new building with thumbnails of each image, deciding— wall by wall, floor by floor—where each piece would look best. With the photography, Vick was able to print each image at the ideal scale for the room and the work. “You’re telling a story with the art,” said Vick. The art team also tapped the expertise of Roberto C. Ferrari, curator of Columbia University’s Art Properties. Ferrari oversees a collection of over 12,000 works of fine and decorative art and archaeological objects from around the world that were given to the University by alumni and other donors. He helps maintain and preserve the work as well as display it throughout the University, makes it available for research, and lends pieces to major institutions.

With Woman, 1995, (oil on linen), was a gift from artist and alumna Laura Zeidenstein ’05, DNP, associate professor of nursing, and director, nurse midwifery program.

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Columbia Nursing Spring 2018

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Kirsten Midura Community Series, 2016 Pigment print, 22" W X 15" H

Paden Treadway Overcast Park, 2016 Pigment print, 30" W x 24" H Morningside Heights resident Paden Treadway’s photos of New York City hint at a newcomer’s delight in discovering all of the city’s contrasts. Treadway moved to the city just a couple of years ago and is an up-and-coming artist.

Julian Opie Running Women From Runners, 2016 Printer in 21 colors, on Somerset Satin, 61.5" W x 60" H

“For Columbia Nursing, we chose a selection of wonderful black-and-white photographs by Leon Levinstein,” said Ferrari. “He was a New York City photographer who captured candid views of everyday people of all backgrounds, cultures, and ethnicities, mostly dating from the 1960s and 1970s.” Several of Levinstein’s photographs now have a new life and a new audience. The literal and figurative apex of the art program is a commissioned sculpture in the school’s seventh-floor double-height event space. Here, the team worked with Seattle-based installation artist Katy Stone, whose works blur the boundaries between painting, sculpture, and assemblage. Stone’s “Columbia Ray” soars across the south wall of the event space; it’s a sculptural relief installation made of 1,200 individual pieces of hand-painted laser-cut acrylic in vibrant shades of yellow, attached to the wall with custom standoff hardware that makes each piece appear to be floating. “The work suggests a ray of light, a striking formal addition to the space, and a metaphor for the trajectory and reach of education,” said Stone. Referencing petals, leaves, and

cellular forms all at once, the organic form complements the adjacent “Columbia Blue” wall and reflects the light streaming in from the doors that lead to the rooftop terrace. Stretching to 41 feet across, the artwork also mimics the grand scale of the event space, which serves diverse functions and audiences. “That art can be a tool for healing, a portal to another mental state, is important to my work. And it seems magnified in a setting that is about life and health,” said Stone. Together with “story stations” on each floor of the Columbia Nursing building that tie in different themes related to nursing with highlights from the school’s 125-year history including memorabilia, photographs, and narratives, the cohesive art program tells a visual story about the school’s local and global community that is equally important to its legacy as a leader in nursing education, research, and practice. “I think the message we are trying to send with the art program is that this is what makes Columbia Nursing come alive, and it refocuses us on not just what we teach, practice, and research, but also on how we live,” said Dean Berkowitz. 

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A GLIMPSE OF SOME ALUMNI EVENTS Columbia Nursing hosted events across the country over the last year to mark its 125th anniversary and to recognize more than a century of nursing excellence. These celebrations culminated in the Building the Future Gala in October 2017, which took place at the Mandarin Oriental in New York City. Alumni and friends of the School celebrated honorees Marjorie Harrison Fleming ’69, Barbara and Donald Jonas, and Mark Bertolini. The event raised $585,000. All gala proceeds support student scholarships.

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1: Neil Ryan and Phebe Thorne ’64 at Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. 2: Dean Bobbie Berkowitz, Cristina Lindsay, Mary Dickey Lindsay ’45, and Katie Murphy at Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. 3: Barbara Jonas and Dean Lee Goldman, executive vice president and dean of the Faculties of Health Sciences and Medicine, and chief executive, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, at Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. 4: Kristie Roach Roeth ’85 and Meagan Roeth at Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel.

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5: Mark Bertolini, Andy Dahl, and Janet Ready ’81 at Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. 6: Members of the Class of 1969 attend Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel: Joan Hagan Arnold, Nancy Ellen Jones, Angela Clarke Duff, Majorie Harrison Fleming, Sally Shipley Stone, and Christine Tassone Kovner. 7: Dean Bobbie Berkowitz at Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. 8: Members of the Class of 1964 attend Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel: Keville Frederickson Tomasson, Sandy McLaughlin Johanson, Don Boyd ’06 ’17, Mary Turner Henderson, and Mary Masterson Germaine.

8 Gala photographs by Michael DiVito and Monika Graff

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A GLIMPSE OF SOME ALUMNI EVENTS

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9: Jennifer Dohrn ’85 ’05, associate professor and director, Office of Global Initiatives and its PAHO/WHO Collaborating Center for Advanced Practice Nursing; Tonda Hughes, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing and director, Office of Global Health Research; Safwan Masri, executive vice president for global centers and global development at Columbia University; Dean Bobbie Berkowitz, Kenrick Cato ’08 ’14, assistant professor; and Vidya Goberdahn ’17 at Columbia’s Handprint Across the Globe panel and reception in December, jointly hosted by Columbia Nursing’s Alumni Association and Global Health Program. 10: Lusine Poghoysan, assistant professor; Rebecca Schnall ’09, Mary Dickey Lindsay Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Elaine Larson, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research, attended Columbia’s Handprint Across the Globe panel and reception in December, jointly hosted by Columbia Nursing’s Alumni Association and Global Health Program. 11: Susan Fox ’84 and Donald Jonas at Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. 12: Jennifer Walsh ’08 ’09, Laura Ridge ’08 ’10 and Andrea Sonenberg ’07 at Columbia’s Handprint Across the Globe panel and reception in December, jointly hosted by Columbia Nursing’s Alumni Association and Global Health Program. 13: Three honorees from Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel: Donald Jonas, Majorie Harrison Fleming ’69, and Marc Bertolini.

14: Current students Dawn Fitzgerald, Stephanie Huezo, Stephanie Yom, and Angela Han at Columbia’s Handprint Across the Globe panel and reception in December, jointly hosted by Columbia Nursing’s Alumni Association and Global Health Program. 15: Martha Cohn Romney ’81 receives the Columbia Alumni Medalist Award at the Alumni Medalist Ceremony prior to Columbia University Commencement in May 2017, pictured with Brian Krisberg and Keith Goggin, chairs of the CAA Honors and Prizes Committee. 16: Current student Estelle Autissier moderates an alumni panel for oncology students in February featuring Elizabeth Kelliher ’13, Miriam Kolb ’05 ’09, and Kevin Browne ’92. 17: The annual Nurse Anesthesia Reception for alumni and students at Columbia Nursing took place during National Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Week in January.

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To view more pictures and event information, visit: nursing.columbia.edu/alumni Spring 2018

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From the Alumni Association President

Dear Fellow Columbia Nursing Alumni,

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t has been a pleasure to serve as Columbia Nursing’s Alumni Association president since October 2017. Alumni embody the spirit of this renowned school, and it was wonderful to see so many graduates at events across the country over the last year. Whether engaging in conversations with faculty and students at Spotlight programs marking our 125th anniversary, participating at Reunion, attending panel discussions on topical issues, or serving as mentors or admissions ambassadors, Columbia Nursing graduates are taking part in the life of our school in record numbers. There is much to make us proud, including last year’s dedication and opening of our new building in Washington Heights. And alumni support—through the always-important Annual Fund as well as capital gifts—was crucial to the successful conclusion of our $25 million Building the Future Campaign last December. I urge you to come back to campus soon to visit our beautiful new state-of-theart home. During your visit, don’t forget to check out the sweeping urban views— including that of the George Washington Bridge—from the rooftop terrace and garden. The Alumni Association’s goal is to help alumni connect with each other, students, and faculty. We provide opportunities that allow alumni to strengthen their bond with the school, and encourage you to take full advantage of our programs and events, including: • Regional events • School- and University-sponsored programs and events on campus • Reunion • Student-Alumni Connection Program • Alumni Admissions Ambassador Program • Recent Alumni Engagement Program • Program-specific mini-reunions I look forward to the opportunity to meet many more alumni in the year ahead. Meanwhile, I encourage you to reach out to the Office of Alumni Relations with suggestions on how we can make our Alumni Association stronger—or send us an update on your professional or personal news. Please contact Mairead Moore, associate director of alumni relations, at 212-305-5999 or mm4513@columbia.edu. It is a privilege to serve as the Alumni Association president and work on your behalf to serve our school. I look forward to all that lies ahead. Warm Regards,

Laura Ardizzone ’04 ’10, DNP, CRNA, ACNP, DCC President, Columbia Nursing Alumni Association Director, Nurse Anesthesia Services, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

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2017-2018 Alumni Association Board of Directors Ellen Soley Adkins ’81 Laura Ardizzone ’04 ’10 Paige Bellinger ’10 ’12 Daniel Billings ’15 ’17 Kevin Browne ’92 Monica Buff Burrell ’09 ’12 Kenrick Cato ’08 ’14 Sharron Close ’01 ’03 ’11 Patricia C. Dykes ’04 Patricia DeAngelis Fife ’68 Mollie Finkel ’11 ’12 Elizabeth Gary ’14 ’15 Christa Simpson Heinsler ’76 Denise DeMarzo Houghton ’78 Matthew Jenison ’10 ’12 Miriam Kolb ’05 ’09 Kathleen McCooe Nilles ’89 Rose Chapman Rodriguez ’87 ’06 Marty Cohn Romney ’81 Natalie Wilson ’09 ’11 Connie Yip ’11 ’13


2017–2018

Class Notes

1960s Faith Hawley Howarth ’61 is still working part

time, mostly from home, as a CRNP for a multi-location primary care practice. She writes that it keeps her young and challenged. She also notes that her family is doing well and that they hope to visit the school soon. Katherine Klimacek Beiter ’63 writes that it is difficult to relate her story, since it began 54 years ago. She would like to share a letter from a colleague: “I first met Katherine in the late 1980s when I was a nursing student. Since the first interaction with Katherine, when she was an adjunct professor, she has been a consistent ‘gentle giant’ in my personal advancement as a nursing professional. Katherine was a role model of the art of nursing, particularly where science meets the spiritual needs when providing care. She was instrumental in my developing a parish nurse program. Katherine was the sole driving force behind the development of an elder abuseprevention program, which became a model

for the state. Her work was highly valued, with several awards. Her grass-roots efforts to lead a volunteer group to develop a certified hospice in our county has had the most long-lasting effect. Hospice & Palliative Care of Chautauqua County continues to grow, and credit goes to Katherine. I saw firsthand the results of her pioneering work. Katherine is skilled, courageous, visionary, and able to quietly communicate, accomplish, and motivate others around her.” Keville Frederickson Tomasson ’64 will be serv-

ing as the program project leader for the new PhD program in nursing at Pace University.

1970s Celeste Yanni ’72 started an outreach program to help seniors who feel isolated. The Friendly Telephone Call Program allows seniors who are feeling lonely to call a volunteer once a week to engage in a conversation for several minutes.

1980s Gail Rosselot ’82 hopes that new graduates will follow in a similar career path to the one she has chosen. She writes that she has worked in many settings and specialties, and almost 25 years ago started her own private practice in travel health called Travel Well of Westchester. Global health is expanding and so the specialty continues to grow. She writes that she sees patients pre- and post-international travel; writes for the CDC Yellow Book; teaches a continuing education course; and participates in international research initiatives. Gail notes that there are frequent opportunities for travel and great colleagues to meet around the world. Susan Fox ’86 was inducted as a fellow in the New York Academy of Medicine. Leslie Groves ’86 is now the chief nursing officer at Bridgewater State Hospital in Massachusetts.

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2017-2018

Program Notes Adult Kevin Kalnoski ’12 launched a stand-alone outpatient psychiatry practice in November 2016. The name of the practice is Selah Behavioral Health Services, and it continues to see slow but steady growth serving the mental health needs of patients in and around Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Jeanne Churchill ’10, assistant professor, presented “Narrative Writing in Nursing Education,” at Sigma Theta Tau International’s 44th Biennial Convention, in Indianapolis, Indiana. Paul Coyne ’13 ’15 ’16 was honored with the

prestigious Crain’s Heritage Healthcare Innovation Award. Karen Desjardins ’98 ’05, assistant professor

Anesthesia Antoinette Baleba-Lekane ’09 was named

the 2017 Clinical Preceptor of the Year by Columbia Nursing’s Nurse Anesthesia program. James Doran ’02 was reappointed by

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to the New Jersey Board of Nursing. In addition, he was recently elected secretary/ treasurer of the board. Ladan Eshkevari ’95 was named a 2017 fel-

low of the American Academy of Nursing. Maribeth Massie ’98 is a new member of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Board of Directors.

DNP Laura Ardizzone ’04 ’10, was inducted as a fel-

low in the New York Academy of Medicine. Laura also addressed the David Rogers Health Policy Colloquium at Weill Cornell Medical College. Her topic was, “Why Florence Nightingale and Ignaz Semmelweis are Still Relevant in Modern Healthcare.”

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at Penn Nursing. Her research focuses on vulnerable women, children, and families. Sabrina Opiola McCauley ’02 ’10, assistant professor, presented “Congenital and Neonatal Infections and Demystifying Diagnostics” at the NAPNAP Specialty Symposium on Pediatric Infectious Diseases, in Tampa, Florida.

Jennifer Dohrn ’85 ’05, associate professor,

Marlene McHugh ’89 ’91 ’08, assistant professor, presented “Outpatient Palliative Care” at the Palliative Care Rounds at Montefiore Medical Center. Marlene also presented “Using TeamBased Learning for Interprofessional Education” at the Aligning Curriculum to Achieve Health Equity at the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research Annual Meeting, in Savannah, Georgia.

presented “Building a Program of Global Clinical Experiences to Prepare Future Nurses” at the International Council of Nurses Congress, in Barcelona, Spain.

Wen-Chiao Peng ’03 ’14, assistant professor, brought a group of PhD students from Taiwan to tour the new school of nursing building.

and assistant dean for academic affairs, presented “Re-Envisioning the Curriculum and Advancing Nursing Education” at the GANES-Catalyzing Nursing Education and Scholarship for Global Health Third International Conference, in Miami.

The late Abigail Flanagan ’15 was honored by the Rockland County Legislature for her positive contributions through her nursing and volunteer service. Norma Hannigan ’07 is retiring this year from the faculty of Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing. Brenda Janotha ’08, assistant professor, presented “Interactive Learning for Effective Inter-Professional Collaboration” at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, in Washington, D.C. Rachel Lyons ’07 is a Ruth L.Kirschstein

NRSA Doctoral Fellow in the PhD program

Wen-Chiao Peng ’03 ’14 and PhD students from Taiwan tour the ColumbiaDoctors Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Group with Stephen Ferrara, DNP, associate dean of clinical affairs.

Courtney Reinisch ’07 is now the director of undergraduate nursing at Montclair State University. Rebecca Dover Wilson ’16, instructor, has been

working in a community health center in the East Village of Manhattan treating adult and adolescent patients with a variety of complex


chronic diseases, including HIV/AIDS. She has also been working with a committee on Governor Cuomo’s initiative to end the epidemic by 2020, focusing efforts on HIV testing, treatment, and prevention with the help of PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis). She received the HIV Specialist certification from the American Academy of HIV Medicine (AAHIVM) after maintaining an active panel of HIV patients, completing the required continuing education, and passing an exam. Through the AAHIVM, she is now a member of their national NP Committee, which is working for policy improvements for NPs and HIV treatment and prevention efforts. Laura Zeidenstein ’05, associate professor,

received a 2017 Excellence in Teaching Award from the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

PhD Judith Aponte ’04 was named a 2017 fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. Raga Bjarnadottir ’16 received the 2017

AcademyHealth Interdisciplinary Research Group on Nursing Issues New Investigator Award.

Dennis Graham ’93 ’08 founded a not for Andrea Brassard ’05 was named a 2017

fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. Eileen Carter ’14, assistant professor, pre-

sented “Facilitators and Barriers to Implementing Implementations: Stewardship and Leadership” at APIC’s 2017 44th Annual Conference, in Portland, Oregon. Kenrick Cato ’08 ’14, assistant professor,

FAMILY Andrea Fry ’04 ’07 had her poems published

in a volume titled The Bottle Diggers. Joan Miravite ’98 ’01 received the 2017 Award

for Advanced Clinical Practice from the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses.

presented “Nurse and Midwife Researcher Collaboration in Eastern Sub-Saharan Africa: A Longitudinal Social Network Analysis” at the International Council of Nurses Congress, in Barcelona, Spain. Hwayoung Cho ’17, Kasey Jackman ’05 ’10 ’17, Allison Norful ’17, and Samantha Stonebraker ’13 ’16, are current postdoctoral fellows at

Columbia University School of Nursing.

MDE Bevin Cohen ’17, associate research scientist; Meghan Murray ’16, PhD student; and Natalie

Neu, MD, associate professor of pediatrics, presented “Implementation of Antibiotic Stewardship in Pediatric Long-Term Care” at APIC’s 2017 44th Annual Conference, in Portland, Oregon.

MIDWIFERY Joanne Nieratko Cunha ’04 ’06 holds a new

position as the first midwife at Saint Peter’s University Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

profit named Center for Veterans Health, which was recently incorporated in New York State and received its first grant to improve health care outreach in the Rockaways. Dennis will appear in a new PBS documentary called Going to War, airing on May 28, 2018. Kasey Jackman ’05 ’10 ’17 presented “Gender Identity, Transgender Populations, and Considerations for Nursing Care and Assessment” at the New York University Winthrop Hospital Annual Nursing Symposium, in Manhasset, New York. Jacqueline Merrill ’98 ’06, professor, and Dawn Dowding, professor, co-presented the poster “Heuristics for Evaluation of Dashboard Visualizations” at the American Medical Informatics Association Annual Symposium, in Washington, D.C.

Sharron Close ’01 ’03 ’11 received the Eugene

Washington PCORI Engagement Award for her work leading a PCORI-funded project to improve outcomes for patients with a particular sex chromosome abnormality. Thanks to Sharron’s efforts, the governor of Georgia proclaimed May as X and Y Chromosome Variations Awareness Month, which yielded a support group and a clinic to treat patients with the condition.

Nancy Pontes ’03 was inducted as a fellow of the National Academies of Practice, an interprofessional national organization that advises governmental bodies on health care delivery in the United States.

Elizabeth Cohn ’09, adjunct associate research scientist, was named a 2017 fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

Rebecca Schnall ’09, the Mary Dickey

Sarah Collins ’09 received the 40 Under 40 Healthcare Innovators Award from MedTech Boston.

Sylvia Fibich ’81 ’84 joined the women’s care

team at UCHealth Longmont Clinic in Longmont, Colorado.

Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research; and Amanda Hessels, PhD, associate research scientist, were panelists on “Building Your Professional Competency in Research: How Peer Review Really Works” at APIC’s 2017 44th Annual Conference, in Portland, Oregon.

Laurie Conway ’15, Janet Hass ’07, Elaine

Larson, PhD, the Anna C. Maxwell

Dianne Lapointe Rudow ’05 was named a

2017 fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

Lindsey Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, was named a 2017 fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. Arlene Smaldone ’03, professor and assistant

dean of scholarship and research, presented “HABIT: A Community Health Worker Intervention, Improves Psychosocial Health

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Program Notes and In Memoriam

in Youth with Sickle Cell Disease” at the 45th National Convention on Sickle Cell Disease, in Atlanta, Georgia. Samantha Stonbraker ’13 ’16, postdoctoral research fellow, and Adriana Arcia, PhD, assistant professor, presented “A Systematic

Method for Identifying Data Attributes for Information Visualization” at the American Medical Informatics Association Symposium, in Washington, D.C.

Nurse and Midwifery Clinical Research” at the International Council of Nurses Congress, in Barcelona, Spain. Jasmine Travers ’16 and Raga Bjarnadottir ’16

Carolyn Sun ’15, associate research scientist,

presented “Building a Model to Expand

were named American Academy of Nursing Jonas Policy Scholars.

2017-2018

In Memoriam Carol Ethel Allen ’48, a 25-year resident of

Skyview on the Hudson in Riverdale, New York, passed away June 1, 2017, after a long illness. She was 91. A lifelong New Yorker, she was born and raised in Brooklyn. She received her bachelor’s and registered nursing degrees from Columbia University School of Nursing, and was a surgical nurse at Presbyterian Hospital her entire nursing career. After retiring in 1991, she became active with the Skyview Tenants Association, where she was the treasurer and worked on the elections board. Summer was her favorite season, and she could be found sunning herself at the Skyview pool from Memorial Day through Labor Day. A memorial celebration was held at Skyview Gazebo on Arlington Avenue on June 17, where friends and family members raised a toast with her favorite drink, the Manhattan, and ate deviled eggs and chocolate cake. She was a passionate advocate of the arts. Joy Jones-Anderson ’55, 85, passed away peacefully on Aug. 13, 2017, in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Joy was born Mary Joyce Mackie on July 24, 1932, in Westfield, New Jersey. She graduated from Centenary College as a registered nurse and began her career at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. Joy was instrumental in the planning and design of the original Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville, Florida. She was a member of Timuquana Country Club, Marsh Landing Country Club, and the Ponte Vedra

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Inn and Club. Joy was a founding member of the Sew ’n’ Sos. Among the many things she made is an heirloom christening gown that has been used by all of her grandchildren. Joy was an avid rose gardener, and she blessed many friends through the years with her buckets of roses. Joy’s greatest love was for her family. Frances Smith Caulo ’44 died peacefully at her

home in Arlington, Massachusetts, on Jan. 2, 2018, at the age of 95. The proud daughter of Irish immigrants, Frances Josephine Smith was born in the Bronx. Her Bronx birthplace, her Irish roots, and her connection to Columbia University Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing were central to her identity throughout her life. She attended Hunter College before transferring to Columbia, where she earned her BS and RN. She worked at Presbyterian Hospital before joining the Army Nurse Corps in 1947. After she completed her service, Frances returned to the Bronx and worked as a nurse at Post Graduate Hospital.

Frances Smith Caulo ’44 (center) with her daughers Nina Caulo Feirman ’76 (left), and Susan Caulo Purcell ’72 (right) at Frances’ 70th Reunion in May 2014

There, she met her late husband, James E. Caulo, a Brooklyn native, and with him raised five children in New Jersey. Along the way, she returned to school for a certificate in education, and finished her nursing career working as an elementary-school nurse for the town of Franklin Lakes. She loved news of Columbia and “the Medical Center,” looked forward to receiving her alumni news, and attended her 70th reunion with daughters Susan Caulo Purcell ’72 and Nina Caulo Feirman ’76. Jeanne Marie Cherry ’53, beloved wife,

mother, and friend, passed away in Santa Monica on June 2, 2017, at the age of 84. She was born in Bergen County, New Jersey, and graduated from Chatham High School as valedictorian of the Class of 1950. She received an RN from Columbia University Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, where she graduated as valedictorian of the Class of 1953. Jeanne returned to school in 1980, graduating magna cum laude with a BA from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1984. Jeanne’s keen intellect, personable nature, and kind heart served her well as a pediatric nurse in New York City and Burlington, Vermont, up to and after her marriage to James D. Cherry in 1954. Following the birth of their first son in 1956 and three subsequent children, she focused primarily on her family. She was an active volunteer in numerous organizations, serving as vice president and president-elect of the board of directors of the Ocean Park


Other Losses in Our Community Community Center; co-chair of the Los Angeles County School Attendance Review Board; and member of various boards of directors. Jeanne was also a tennis historian and passionate collector of tennis antiques. Catherine Buck Damon ’65, 74, died at her

home in Barnstable, Massachusetts, on June 26, 2017, following a long illness. She was surrounded by her close family and was in the loving thoughts and prayers of friends near and far. Cathy Damon was born in Buffalo, New York. She graduated from the Buffalo Seminary in 1960 and went on to Elmira College, where she graduated in 1964 with an Associate of Arts in Nursing. Following college, Cathy enrolled in Columbia University’s nursing program and earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 1965. After receiving her BSN, Cathy worked as a registered nurse for the Visiting Nurse Association in Buffalo and then also in San Francisco after moving there. Cathy enjoyed meeting patients and advancing her knowledge within a continually evolving field. Deeply committed to her community, Cathy served for 47 years on the board of directors at Carleton-Willard Village, a continuing-care retirement community in Bedford, Massachusetts. She was also a long-standing trustee of the Peabody Foundation, Inc., a grant-making organization whose mission is the eradication of crippling diseases in children.

Alice Kingsbury Bakemeier ’48 Constance Ballard ’48 Esther Rosengren Bartlett ’55 Margaret Bensen ’46 Wendi Birnbaum ’74 Wilfreda Rutherfurd Brehm ’58 Julia Witten Carter ’04 Dorothy Nelson Churchill ’50 Margaret Clark ’71 Margaret Grace Coligan ’64 Louise Crosby ’50 Ellen Cramer Culver ’62 Joanne Mayer Danforth ’61 Annette Fitch Donovan ’42 Joanne Brinton DuWick ’48 Renee D’Aiuta Feuerbach ’86 Kathleen Donellan Garber ’74 Suzanne Boland Golden ’52 Susan Greenberg Gordon ’64 Mary Sowter Gould ’46 Gloria Thurow Hauser ’60 Elizabeth Guy Hayes ’49 Joanne Heinly ’55 Doris Frey Henry ’47 Ruth Hazzard James ’47 Rosina Thomas Johnson ’57 Lisa Kugler ’83 Terry Lahita ’95 Bernard Lazarus ’86

Kathleen Agnes Sutliff McMains ’40, 98, died

years living in Stuyvesant Town, in Lower Manhattan. They enjoyed the lifestyle and entertainment that New York City offered. Kathleen is survived by her two children, and two stepchildren.

Feb. 25, 2017, in Utica, New York. She was born Sept. 25, 1918, in Erie, Pennsylvania. She grew up in Benton and was a graduate of Benton High School. She also graduated from Columbia University School of Nursing, where she earned her RN. Kathleen was employed for over 40 years as a corporate nurse with Coty Cosmetics Corporation, Uniroyal Corporation, and the Colgate-Palmolive Company, in their corporate offices in New York City. Her first marriage was to Benjamin J. Gault, PhD. While working in New York City, she met and married her second husband, Charles Van McMains Jr. They spent more than 50

passed away peacefully on Dec. 20, 2017, in Akron, Ohio, following a short illness. Joan was born and raised in the north Bronx, New York, and graduated from North Park College, Columbia University, and Columbia Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing. Joan and her husband lived in Germany for a short while and enjoyed traveling through Europe, especially in France. Joan was a devout Christian and deeply committed to her faith through serving Grace Lutheran Church in Akron. She supported several missionary organizations throughout her life

Joan Elizabeth (Betty) Seaburgh Puydak ’56

Rebecca Thurston Leach ’62 Mary Neylan Lucas ’49 Frances Maly ’44 Christine Mascia ’99 Alice O’Donnell Melcher ’43 Melva Brown Neff ’62 Jane Webster Newton ’52 Clare Nisbet ’10 Gertrude Snively Parker ’47 Jaculyn Carpenter Parry ’60 B. Adelide Decker Philippe ’09 Joan Seaburgh Puydak ’56 Dorothy Redfern ’53 Elizabeth Bird Richmond ’49 Joyce Roberts ’63 Alice Hart Schott ’50 Florence Mueller Schumacher ’53 Jeanne Shervington Scott ’47 Katherine Nightengale Seawright ’60 Catherine Hirsch Sugarman ’41 Donna Sultan ’71 Mae Taylor ’57 Claudia Groth Vail ’54 Elizabeth Aiken Van Siclen ’57 M. Welsh Welsh ’69 Cynthia White ’61 Miriam Rubidge Willey ’54 Jane Herbert Williams ’44 Katherine Roulston Williams ’54

and sponsored the Christian education of her nieces and nephews. Mary Jean “Deany” Rasmussen Wright ’52 passed

away on Aug. 30, 2017, surrounded by family, in Amherst, Massachusetts. She was born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, in 1928. She grew up in Montclair, New Jersey, attended Ohio Wesleyan, and earned her RN at Columbia University School of Nursing in 1952. Before starting a family, she worked as a visiting nurse in New York City. While raising four daughters in Summit, New Jersey, she coordinated a tutorial program pairing Summit residents with students from Elizabethport Presbyterian Center. She worked at Overlook Hospital and at a private medical practice in Summit after her children left home. She retired to Amherst in 2003 to be closer to her daughters and grandchildren.

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Selected Faculty

Publications

M O NIK A G R A F F

Our faculty’s research continues to create new knowledge that advances health care. Listed are selected articles published by leading peer-reviewed publications. Adriana Arcia, PhD, assistant professor, Janet Woollen, PhD student, Department of Biomedical Informatics, and Suzanne Bakken, PhD, Alumni Professor and director, Center for Evidence-based Practice in the Underserved,

mizing Strategies for Clinical Decision Support: Summary of Meeting Series, a special publication of the National Academy of Medicine.

were authors of “A Systematic Method for Exploring Data Attributes in Preparation for Designing Tailored Infographics of Patient Reported Outcomes” published in Generating Evidence & Methods to Improve Patient Outcomes (eGEMs).

“Pallor and Swelling in Athlete’s Upper Arm,” published in Contemporary Pediatrics.

Jeannemarie Baker ’90, MS, Jacqueline Merrill, PhD, professor, Penelope Buschman, MS, assistant professor, and Jasmine Travers ’16, PhD, were

co-authors of “An Efficient Nurse Practitioner-Led Community-Based Service Model for Delivering Coordinated Care to Persons With Serious Mental Illness at Risk for Homelessness,” published in Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association. Suzanne Bakken, PhD, Alumni Professor and director, Center for Evidence-based Practice in the Underserved, was among the editors of Opti-

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Janice Bistritz, DNP, instructor, was author of

Walter Bockting, PhD, professor and co-director, LGBT Health Initiative, Division of Gender, Sexuality, and Health, Sigrid Gabler, PhD, instructor, and Jeffrey Kwong, DNP, associate professor and director, Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program, were among the authors

of “Development of an Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Model for Older LGBT Adults,” published in LGBT Health. Kellie Bryant, DNP, assistant professor and executive director of the simulation center,

authored two book chapters titled, “Medication Administration” and “Diabetes Management: Nurse Practitioners,” published in Simulation Scenario for Nursing Educators, Third Edition: Making It Real.

Yoon Jeong Choi ’15 PhD, and Arlene Smaldone, PhD, professor and assistant dean for scholarship and research, were

authors of “Factors Associated with Medication Engagement Among Older Adults with Diabetes: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” published in The Diabetes Educator. Ruth Masterson Creber, PhD, associate research scientist, Ting Chen, MDE student, and Chao Wei, Mailman School of Public Health student,

were among authors of “Brief Report: Patient Activation Among Urban Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure,” published in Journal of Cardiac Failure. Dawn Dowding, PhD, professor, and Kyungmi Woo, PhD student, were authors of “Factors

Affecting the Acceptance of Telehealth Services by Heart Failure Patients: An Integrative Review,” published in Telemedicine Journal and e-Health. Maureen George, PhD, associate professor, was among the authors of “Highlights from the 2017 IPAC-RS/ISAM Joint Workshop ‘New Frontiers in Inhalation Technology,’” published in Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery.


Maureen George, PhD, associate professor, and Jean Marie Bruzzese, PhD, associate professor,

were among authors of “Climate Change Effects on Respiratory Health: Implications for Nursing,” published in Journal of Nursing Scholarship. Amanda Hessels, PhD, associate research scientist, was the co-author

of “Stethoscopes: Friend or Fomite?” published in Nursing Management, and “Journal Club: Commentary on ‘Risk Factors for MRSA Colonization in the Neonatal ICU: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,’” published in American Journal of Infection Control. Amanda Hessels, PhD, associate research scientist, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research,

were among authors of “National Testing of the Nursing-Kids Intensity of Care Survey for Pediatric Long-term Care,” published in Journal of Pediatric Nursing. Kathleen Hickey, EdD, professor, was among

the authors of “Genetic Knowledge of Parents and Children with Inherited Cardiac Syndromes,” published in the Journal for Nurse Practitioners. Tonda L. Hughes, PhD, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing and director of global health research, and Cindy Veldhuis, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, were among

authors of “Relationship of Religiosity and Spirituality to Hazardous Drinking, Drug Use, and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women,” published in Journal of Homosexuality. Tonda L. Hughes, PhD, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing and director of global health research, and Cindy Veldhuis, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, were

among authors of “Relationship of Religiosity and Spirituality to Hazardous Drinking, Drug Use, and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women,” published in Journal of Homosexuality.

Kasey Jackman ’05 ’10 ’17, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist, Jean Marie Bruzzese, PhD, associate professor, Walter Bockting, PhD, professor and co-director, LGBT Health Initiative, Division of Gender, Sexuality, and Health, and Curtis Dolezal, PhD, New York State Psychiatric Institute, were authors of “Generational

Differences in Internalized Transnegativity and Psychological Distress among Feminine Spectrum Transgender People,” published in LGBT Health. Rita Marie John, DNP, associate professor,

was the author of a chapter titled, “Nursing Care of a Family When a Child Has an Infectious Disorder,” published in Maternal & Child Health Nursing: Care of the Childbearing & Childrearing Family, Seven Edition. Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research, and Mansi Agarwal, PhD, were among authors of “Repeat Gram-

Negative Hospital-Acquired Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility: A Systematic Review,” published in Journal of Infection and Public Health, and coauthors of “Risk of Drug Resistance in Repeat Gram-Negative Infections among Patients with Multiple Hospitalizations,” published in Journal of Critical Care.

the authors of “Assessing Intensity of Nursing Care Needs Using Electronically Available Data,” published in Computers, Informatics, Nursing (CIN). Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research, Bevin Cohen, MPH, program director, Center for Interdisciplinary Research to Prevent Infections (CIRI), and Meghan Murray, PhD student, were among the

authors of “Use of Antibiotics in Paediatric Long Term Care Facilities,” published in Journal of Hospital Infection. Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research, Amanda Hessels, PhD, associate research scientist, and Lisa Saiman, MD, professor, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, were among authors of “National

Testing of the Nursing-Kids Intensity of Care Survey for Pediatric Long-Term Care,” published in Journal of Pediatric Nursing. Maichou Lor, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow,

was among the authors of “Important Care and Activity Preferences in a Nationally Representative Sample of Nursing Home Residents,” published in Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. Marlene McHugh, DNP, assistant professor, was

Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research, Bevin Cohen, MPH, program director, Center for Interdisciplinary Research to Prevent Infections (CIRI), Haomiao Jia, PhD, associate professor, and Meghan Murray, PhD student, were among the authors of

“Incidence, Risks, and Types of Infections in Pediatric Long-term Care Facilities,” published in JAMA Pediatrics. Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research, Bevin Cohen, MPH, program director, Center for Interdisciplinary Research to Prevent Infections (CIRI), Jianfang Liu, PhD, assistant professor, and Jingjing Shang, PhD, assistant professor, were among

among the authors of “Managing Pain in Patients with Chronic Medical Illnesses and Serious Mental Illnesses,” published in American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care; and “Providing Pediatric Palliative Care Education Using ProblemBased Learning,” published in Journal of Palliative Medicine. Jacqueline Merrill, PhD, professor, was senior

author of “The Public Health Workforce Taxonomy: Revisions and Recommendations for Implementation,” published in Journal of Public Health Management & Practice. She was also among the authors of “Increasing the Capacity of Public Health Nursing to Strengthen the Public Health Infrastructure and to Promote and Protect

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Selected Faculty Publications

the Health of Communities and Populations,” published in Nursing Outlook. Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, assistant professor, Allison Norful, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, and Jean Marie Bruzzese, PhD, associate professor, were among authors of “Primary

Care Providers’ Perspectives on Errors of Omission,” published in Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Rebecca Schnall, PhD, Mary Dickey Lindsay Assistant Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, and Jia Haomiao, PhD, associate professor, were among the authors

of “Information Sources of Self-Care Strategies for Persons Living with HIV,” published in International Journal of Medical Informatics. Arlene Smaldone, PhD, professor and assistant dean of scholarship and research, was an

author of “Implementation of a School Nurse-led Intervention for Children with Severe Obesity in New York City Schools,” published in Journal of Pediatric Nursing. Arlene Smaldone, PhD, professor and assistant dean of scholarship and research, Jia Haomiao, PhD, associate professor, and Sally Findley, PhD, professor, Mailman School of Public Health, were

among authors of “Randomized Feasibility Trial to Improve Hydroxyurea Adherence in Youth Ages 10–18 Years Through Community Health Workers: The HABIT Study,” published in Pediatric Blood & Cancer. Arlene Smaldone, PhD, professor and assistant dean of scholarship and research, and Elizabeth Heitkemper, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist, were among authors of “Baseline

Characteristics and Technology Training of Underserved Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the Mobile Diabetes Detective (MoDD) Randomized Control Trial,” published in The Diabetes Educator. Arlene Smaldone, PhD, professor and assistant dean of scholarship and research, Elizabeth Heitkemper, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist, Olena Mamykina, PhD, assistant professor,

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and Rita Kukafka, DrPH, associate professor, Mailman School of Public Health, were among

Carolyn Sun ’15, PhD, associate research scientist, co-authored “Impact of Mentoring

authors of “Personal Discovery in Diabetes Self-Management: Discovering Cause and Effect Using Self-Monitoring Data,” published in Journal of Biomedical Informatics.

on Nursing and Midwifery Educators and Students: An Integrative Review,” published in Texila International Journal of Nursing.

Samantha Stonbraker, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, Arlene Smaldone, PhD, professor and assistant dean for scholarship and research, Heidi Luft ’17, PhD, Linda F. Cushman, PhD, Mailman School of Public Health, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research and associate dean of scholarship and research, were among the

authors of “Associations Between Health Literacy, HIV-related Knowledge, and Information Behavior Among Persons Living with HIV in the Dominican Republic” published in Public Health Nursing. Patricia Stone, PhD, Centennial Professor of Health Policy and director, Center for Health Policy, authored “Integration of Infec-

tion Management and Palliative Care in Nursing Homes: An Understudied Issue,” published in Research in Gerontological Nursing. Stone was an author of “Quality Measures: A Stakeholder Analysis,” published in Journal of Nursing Care Quality; “Racial/Ethnic Differences in Receipt of Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination among Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents,” published in Health Services Research; and “Differences in Work Environment for Staff as an Explanation for Variation in Central Line Bundle Compliance in Intensive Care Units,” published in Health Care Management Review. Patricia Stone, PhD, Centennial Professor of Health Policy and director, Center for Health Policy, Andrei Constantinescu, MD, assistant professor, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Jeffrey D. Edwards, MD, assistant professor, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Rachel Miller, MD, professor, College of Physicians and Surgeons, were among authors of “Survey of

Financial Burden of Families in the U.S. with Children Using Home Mechanical Ventilation,” published in Pediatric Pulmonology.

Jasmine Travers ’16, PhD, Catherine Crawford Cohen ’12 ’16, PhD, and Patricia Stone, PhD, Centennial Professor of Health Policy and director, Center for Health Policy, were among

authors of “The Great American Recession and Forgone Healthcare: Do Widened Disparities Between African-Americans and Whites Remain?” published in PLOS ONE. Cindy Veldhuis, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, and Tonda L. Hughes, PhD, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing and director of global health research, were

among the authors of “‘I Fear for My Safety, but Want to Show Bravery for Others’: Violence and Discrimination Concerns Among Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Individuals After the 2016 Presidential Election” published in Violence & Gender; “The Impact of Marriage Equality on Sexual Minority Women’s Relationships with Their Families of Origin,” published in Journal of Homosexuality; and “Relationship Status and Drinking-Related Outcomes in a Community Sample of Lesbian and Bisexual Women,” published in Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. They were also first and second author of “Alcohol Use, Age, and Self-Related Mental and Physical Health in a Community Sample of Lesbian and Bisexual Women,” published in LGBT Health, and first and senior author of “‘We Won’t Go Back into the Closet Now Without One Hell of a Fight’: Effects of the 2016 Presidential Election on Sexual Minority Women’s and Gender Minorities Stigma-Related Concerns,” published in Sexuality Research and Social Policy. Sunmoo Yoon ’04 ’11, PhD, associate research scientist, was among contributors to Com-

munities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity, published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

W


“My education at Columbia Nursing changed my concept of standard bedside care, broadening it to a populationwide health care endeavor. As a Latino, it transformed my cultural custom of respect for the elder into a deliberate effort to understand and to address the travails of the elderly population in our health care system. I once dreamt of furthering my education. Columbia not only introduced the idea of nursing as a profession, it provided the best nursing education available, and it helped me to become a nurse practitioner. Because others should have that opportunity ... is why I give.” — Francisco Diaz ’03 ’05

JÖRG ME YER

Why I For more information about giving to Columbia Nursing, please visit: nursing.columbia.edu/giving or contact Janice Grady at 212-305-1088 or jar2272@cumc.columbia.edu.


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Nursing Delegation to India with Dean Bobbie Berkowitz

Save the Date: October 6–15, 2018 Dean Bobbie Berkowitz will lead a nursing delegation to India ( Delhi, Jaipur, and Agra) open to alumni and friends of Columbia Nursing. To register and for more information, visit: nursing.columbia.edu/delegation-india-dean-bobbie-berkowitz

Columbia Nursing Spring 2018  
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