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Nursing Columbia

Fall/Winter 2018

The Magazine of Columbia University School of Nursing

BABY BOON A NEW CHAPTER AS DEAN BERKOWITZ RETIRES

MASTERS OF INFORMATION HOW THESE NURSE RESEARCHERS ARE USING DATA SCIENCE AND INFORMATICS TO BLAZE NEW TRAILS IN PATIENT CARE


HELP INSPIRE COLUMBIA NURSING’S NEXT GENERATION By including Columbia Nursing in your estate plans today, with a minimum value of $125,000, you could provide a student with an endowed scholarship in your name. It’s simple, easy, and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

LEAVING

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LEGACY “It is my privilege to give back in any way I can to my beloved School of Nursing. It launched so many of us on careers that have enabled us to propel the profession of nursing forward and to bring ever-increasing excellence to the care of our patients.” “— Mary Masterson Germain ’64

CONTACT US TO DISCUSS YOUR LEGACY:

nursing.columbia.edu/giving/planned-giving For more information, please contact Janice Grady, senior director of development, at 212-305-1088 or jar2272@cumc.columbia.edu.


From the Dean

Passing the Baton

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y first letter as dean of Columbia University School of Nursing gives me the opportunity to introduce myself to all of you. It also gives me the chance to offer some insight into this issue of the magazine, which takes a look back and a look forward at the school’s legacy of innovation — from pioneering the nation’s first graduate nurse-midwifery program to today, breaking new ground in data science. This issue also honors the leadership that has fostered such innovation, as we pay tribute to Dean Emerita Bobbie Berkowitz, who stepped down in August. Data science is a vital part of the future of nursing research, and our first story, “Masters of Information,” showcases the cutting-edge research of six Columbia Nursing faculty. These pioneers are mining big data to deepen our understanding of illness and developing digital tools to transform this understanding into improved patient care and health outcomes. Their research addresses a wide range of health issues among people from diverse ethnic, racial, cultural, economic, and gender backgrounds. In one project, for example, researchers are using genetic, behavioral, and environmental data to advance the science of symptom self-management for people of Latino decent. In another, they are studying electronic medical record data — particularly nursing documentation — to identify early warning signs of patients’ worsening health status. Researchers are also developing an algorithm that analyzes electronic medical records to identify transgender patients and their health needs. The school’s increasing focus on informatics and data science, and a growing partnership with Columbia University’s Data Science Institute, demonstrates its commitment to innovation and diversity, core values that we have embraced throughout our history. Of course, the future of nursing isn’t only about the science. It is about using the science to touch human lives — as our midwives do.

In 1956, the school awarded the nation’s first master’s degree in clinical nurse-midwifery, just one year after creating the nation’s first nurse-midwifery graduate program. Our second story, “Baby Boon,” shows how our nurse-midwifery alumni are touching the lives of women — and increasing their healthcare access — nationwide, from the urban centers of New York City, to Amish Country in Pennsylvania, to a small town in Georgia, to a Navajo reservation in Arizona. Our nurse-midwifery program has grown exponentially since its founding 63 years ago. Today, master’s-level graduates who choose to become nurse-midwives must earn a doctorate in nursing practice (DNP). In this way, we’ve raised the educational bar to prepare midwives as clinical specialists not only in maternity and newborn care but also in women’s health before and after pregnancy. This advancement, like all of Columbia Nursing’s advancements in education, research, and practice, has steadily improved the health, care, and lives of patients. It is our greatest tradition — one that my predecessor, Dean Bobbie Berkowitz, fiercely supported and fostered. The third article in this issue, “A New Chapter: Leaving a Legacy of Innovation, Inspiration, and Excellence, Dean Berkowitz Retires,” describes the leaps that Columbia Nursing took under Bobbie’s leadership: the expansion of its research enterprise; the acceleration of its curriculum; the flourishing of its primary care clinical practices, including one that addresses the LGBT community’s healthcare needs; its contributions to global health and domestic healthcare policy; and the construction of its new building, with its state-of-the art simulation education lab. Bobbie epitomized the very best quality in a leader: one who helps others develop themselves. She inspired the school’s meteoric growth and provided faculty and staff with the tools to realize it. Together, they firmly planted Columbia Nursing in the 21st century. Because of her legacy, Columbia remains at the forefront of nursing innovation, nationally and globally. I am proud and honored to accept the baton that she has passed on to me.

LORRAINE FRAZIER, PhD, RN, FAAN Dean, Columbia University School of Nursing Mary O’Neil Mundinger Professor of Nursing Senior Vice President, Columbia University Irving Medical Center


Nursing Columbia

Lorraine Frazier, PhD, RN, FAAN Dean, Columbia University School of Nursing Mary O’Neil Mundinger Professor of Nursing Senior Vice President, Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Columbia Nursing is the magazine of the Columbia University School of Nursing and is published twice a year

Fall/Winter 2018 Contents

Produced by the Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing

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Linda Muskat Rim, Editor-in-Chief Associate Dean, Strategic Communications and Marketing Lara Philipps, Production Supervisor Manager, Strategic Communications and Marketing

ALUMNI NEWS EDITORS:

Reva Feinstein, MPA Associate Dean, Development and Alumni Relations Janice Rafferty Grady Senior Director, Development Janine Handfus Associate Director, Annual Fund

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION:

Eson Chan

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Andrea Kott Kenneth Miller

· Youths with Sickle Cell Disease Report Improved Medication Adherence with Community Health Worker Support

Mairead Moore Associate Director, Alumni Relations

BOARD OF VISITORS:

Rear Admiral Tina Alvarado ’81, MHA, RN Deputy Chief, Reserve Policy & Integration, Bureau of Medicine & Surgery, U.S. Navy Raleigh, North Carolina

Karen Hein, MD Jacksonville, Vermont

Brenda Barrowclough Brodie ’65, RN Durham, North Carolina

Mary Dickey Lindsay ’45, RN New York, New York

Paul Coyne ’13 ’15 ’16, DNP, MBA, MSF, RN, AGPCNP-BC President and Co-Founder, Inspiren; Senior Director of Advanced Practice and Clinical Informatics, Hospital for Special Surgery New York, New York

Wilhelmina Manzano, MA, RN, NEA-BC Senior Vice President, Chief Nursing Executive, & Chief Quality Officer, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Regional Hospital Network New York, New York

Delphine Mendez de Leon ’78, MBA, MPH, RN New York, New York Dorothy Simpson Dorion ’57, MS, RN Jacksonville, Florida Angela Clarke Duff ’70, RN Forest Hills, New York Marjorie Harrison Fleming ’69, RN Chair Seabrook Island, South Carolina Kenneth A. Forde, MD Scarborough, New York Susan Fox ’84, MBA, RN President & CEO, White Plains Hospital White Plains, New York Susan Furlaud ’09 ’12, MS, RN New York, New York

4 Research Roundup

Mary Turner Henderson ’64, RN San Francisco, California

· Study of Hospital-Acquired Infections Stresses Need for Tough Cleaning Standards · Nurse Practitioner to Physician Patient Co-Management Enhances Quality of Care

24 School News · Alumni Events Throughout the Year · Government and Private Research Funding · Selected Faculty Publications

Duncan V. Neuhauser, PhD Blue Hill, Maine Janet Ready ’81, MBA, MPH, RN, FACHE President, Penn Medicine/ Princeton Medical Center; Senior Vice President, Princeton Health Princeton, New Jersey Susan Salka, MBA President & CEO AMN Healthcare San Diego, California Sara Shipley Stone ’69, MS, RN Brooksville, Maine Keville Frederickson Tomasson ’64, EdD, RN, FAAN Professor and Founding Director, Nursing PhD Program, Pace University Pleasantville, New York

Please address all correspondence to: press.nursing@columbia.edu

Alumni are invited to update their contact information by emailing nursingalumni@columbia.edu or calling 212-305-5999

Subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter: nursing.columbia.edu Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/ColumbiaNursing Follow us on Instagram: columbia_nursing Follow us on Twitter: @CU_Nursing Follow us on LinkedIn: Columbia University School of Nursing Subscribe to us on YouTube: Columbia University School of Nursing


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Masters of Information By Kenneth Miller These six nurse researchers are using data science and informatics to blaze new trails in patient care.

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Baby Boon Reporting by Jasmine Banks and Sharon Tregaskis A look at Columbia Nursing’s midwifery program and the alums who provide care across cultures and communities spanning the United States. From New York City to the Navajo Nation, Columbia Midwives Care.

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A New Chapter By Andrea Kott Leaving a legacy of inspiration, innovation, and excellence, Dean Berkowitz retires.

ON THE COVER: Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

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Research

Roundup

Youths with Sickle Cell Disease Report Improved Medication Adherence with Community Health Worker Support

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ouths with sickle cell disease who received disease management support from a community health worker (CHW) reported greater improvements in medication adherence and healthrelated quality of life (HrQL) domains, especially relating to emotions, worry, and communication, than those who did not receive such support, according to new research from Columbia Nursing. In addition to focusing on barriers to daily hydroxyurea use, the HABIT (Hydroxyurea Adherence for Personal Best in Sickle Cell Treatment) study underscored the importance of improving parentyouth partnerships in disease self-management. Arlene Smaldone ’03, PhD, professor and assistant dean for scholarship and research, and co-investigators conducted the six-month randomized controlled trial to test the feasibility and acceptability of a CHW intervention. The intervention involved CHW home visits and text messaging designed to improve youths’ hydroxyurea adherence, their quality of life, and their partnership with their parents in managing the disease. Investigators randomized youth-parent dyads to intervention or control groups. Both groups attended seven monthly clinic visits, during which they received

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clinical care and educational handouts about sickle cell disease and hydroxyurea therapy. Only intervention dyads received monthly CHW home visits, during which the CHWs and youth-parent dyads discussed critical social issues, including barriers to hydroxyurea use and strategies for overcoming them. CHWs also helped intervention dyads develop text-message language in their native Spanish or English to remind them to take hydroxyurea daily. Texts replaced CHW visits by the study’s fourth month. Overall, 28 youth-parent dyads––18 intervention and 10 controls, half of whom were Hispanic—participated in the study. Youths’ mean age was 14 years. Compared with controls, intervention youths reported less worry about pain and the need for hospitalization or emergency room visits; less anger about having sickle cell disease; and less difficulty talking to others, including health professionals, about their emotions. They also reported improvement in all disease-specific HrQL scores, such as pain impact, compared with controls, whose scores remained stable or declined. Sickle cell disease is a painful, inherited disorder that affects some 100,000 Americans, most commonly


T HINKS T O C K

Study of Hospital-Acquired Infections Stresses Need for Tough Cleaning Standards

E T HINKS T O C K

African-Americans and Latinos. Although hydroxyurea reduces hospitalization and enhances quality of life in youths with the disease, it is underused, possibly because, as Smaldone noted, “treatment adherence often deteriorates during adolescence, as youths assume greater responsibility for their self-care.” Thus, parental support is critical as adolescents learn to manage their illness, she stressed. In the intervention group, youth-parent concordance over disease self-management improved slightly at three months but dissipated by six months, when text-message reminders had replaced CHW support. Nevertheless, Smaldone concluded, “the HABIT intervention is feasible, acceptable to parents and youth, and shows promise in improving psychosocial domains of both generic and disease-specific HrQL, as well as dyad concordance regarding selfmanagement tasks.” This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) at the National Institutes of Health, and appeared in the 2018 edition of The Journal of Pediatrics.

xposure to roommates and prior room occupants who harbor pathogenic bacteria may increase a patient’s risk of infection, Columbia Nursing researchers report. Their retrospective analysis of acutecare hospital data found that patients who had a hospital-acquired infection (HAI) had five to six times greater odds than uninfected patients of having been exposed to a roommate or prior bed occupant infected with the same pathogen, indicating the need for hospitals to tighten standards for cleaning and disinfection, according to Associate Research Scientist and principal investigator Bevin Cohen, PhD. Cohen and colleagues analyzed seven years of data from four inpatient, adult and pediatric acute-care hospitals from the same healthcare network in New York City. They compared patients who had developed a hospitalacquired bloodstream, urinary tract, or surgical site infection, or pneumonia, from one of many organisms that are common in inpatient settings, such as Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae, with randomly selected controls who had been admitted to the same hospital, during the same fiscal quarter, but who had never tested positive for infection. For both cases and controls, investigators examined exposures during the three- to five-day “incubation period” prior to infection. Overall, the study included 10,033 cases with HAIs and 10,033 controls. Of these, 136 cases had been exposed to a prior bed occupant with the same organism, compared with 20 controls; 309 cases had been exposed to a roommate with the same organism, compared with 64 controls. “Our findings reveal robust and statistically significant associations, with exposure to an infected or colonized prior bed occupant conferring a nearly six-fold increase in the odds of infection, and exposure to an infected or colonized roommate conferring a nearly five-fold increase,” Cohen wrote. She noted that more than 700,000 HAIs occur in U.S. hospitals each year, causing $28 billion to $45 billion in excess health spending. Although HAIs are fatal in nearly six percent of cases, they are largely preventable, she added. “If we establish that one of the ways people are getting infections is through shared environments, then we can take a closer look at how we are cleaning and decontaminating hospital environments,” she said. This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health and appeared in the May 2018 edition of Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

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ResearchRoundup

NP-Physician Patient Co-Management Enhances Quality of Care

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y co-managing primary care patients, nurse practitioners (NPs) and physicians can reduce their individual workloads, and improve patient care access, quality, and healthcare outcomes, Columbia Nursing researchers report. Their findings stem from studies of successful physician-NP patient co-management, which also underscored the importance of effective clinician communication, mutual respect and trust, a shared philosophy of care, and most important, a work environment that supports NP autonomy, wrote principal investigator Allison A. Norful ’17, PhD. “Hierarchies in healthcare are often counterproductive,” Norful said. “Organizational policies need to support NP-physician co-management to fully grasp the benefits of this interprofessional care delivery model.” Norful and colleagues systematically reviewed 156 studies, and conducted 26 qualitative interviews with NPs and physicians to identify the components and effects of successful patient co-management. They found that NP practice autonomy, which varies among states, and clinicians’ willingness to co-manage patients were essential for successful co-management, as were three core components: effective communication, mutual respect and trust, and a shared philosophy of care. “The stronger co-management is, the greater the potential for beneficial patient, clinician, and practice outcomes,” said Norful,

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T HINKS T O C K

whose team compiled study results to create an NP-physician patient co-management model. NP-physician co-management is a timely answer to the need for high quality patient care as the supply of primary care physicians dwindles, a growing number of patients--especially those with multiple comorbidities—seek primary care services, and insurers favor value-based rather than volume-based care for reimbursement. “Patients need timely and high quality care, yet care management demands cannot be left to a single discipline alone. We need an “all hands on deck” approach to meet the needs of our patients,” Norful said. She noted that NP–physician co-management could be more economical than two physicians caring for a single patient, although, she called for more studies about its cost effectiveness. She also called for more interdisciplinary education to familiarize NPs and physicians with each other’s disciplines and co-management strategies. This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, and appeared in in the May/June 2018 online edition of Annals of Family Medicine.


THE TRAILBLAZER

THE VISUAL THINKER

THE SAFETY MAVEN

THE ALL-AROUNDER

THE LANGUAGE WHIZ

THE SYMPTOM SLEUTH

MASTERS OF

INFORMATION THESE INNOVATIVE NURSE RESEARCHERS ARE USING DATA SCIENCE AND INFORMATICS TO HELP PATIENTS—AND HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS—THRIVE. BY KENNETH MILLER

Recent advances in computing power have enabled researchers in many fields to harness the potential of Big Data as never before. For nurse-scientists, that means a quantum leap in the ability to see how complex factors interact to shape patterns of health and disease in vast populations—and how everything from government policies to caregivers’ Twitter habits affect patients’ well-being. These six researchers are developing new digital tools to analyze those dynamics and to formulate solutions to some of healthcare’s knottiest problems. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JÖRG MEYER


THE TRAILBLAZER In the 1980s, Suzanne Bakken, PhD, RN, helped pioneer the field of nursing informatics, and she’s still breaking new ground. Since arriving at Columbia Nursing in 2000, Bakken—the Alumni Professor of Nursing and professor of biomedical informatics—has built an interdisciplinary training program that’s considered among the finest of its kind. Director of the Precision in Symptom Self-Management (PriSSM) Center and co-chair of the Health Analytics Center of Columbia’s Data Science Institute, she has published more than 300 papers and served as principal investigator for $30 million in grants. She was recently named editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA)—the first nurse to hold that title. Besides bolstering the skills of nurse-scientists, Bakken’s central goal is to improve care for underserved populations—in part, by helping them care for themselves. The PriSSM Center, for example, aims to advance the science of symptom self-management for Latinos through research that takes genetic, behavioral, and environmental factors into account. And the people being studied get a say in how that research is carried out. “For years,” Bakken explained, “I’ve insisted that when

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we collect data from a community, we make sure to give it back in a way that’s understandable and meaningful and actionable.” An example of this approach is an ongoing study aimed at developing a family health information-management system for caregivers of people with dementia. Team members, including assistant professor Adriana Arcia, PhD, RN, worked with community members to design the study and to develop information visualizations that would help caregivers understand their own health risks, including factors such as diet, exercise, and genetics. One aspect of the project, implemented by associate research scientist Sunmoo Yoon ’04 ’11, PhD, RN, involved mining Twitter to identify network structures among thousands of caregivers and to analyze the emotional tenor of the tweets themselves—all with the aim of creating an app- or Web-based intervention to improve social support. “The beauty of data-science methods is that you have the opportunity to collect information from novel sources, some of them outside of the traditional healthcare system,” Bakken said. “But what’s equally crucial is presenting it in a manner that’s as useful as possible.”


THE VISUAL THINKER Jacqueline Merrill ’98 ’06, PhD, MPH, RN, professor of nursing in biomedical informatics, is a leading researcher on how data science can help improve the performance of health organizations. But her route to the field was wildly circuitous. After several years as a diploma-educated critical care nurse, she spent more than a decade as a clothing designer and photo stylist. Then, missing her old profession, Merrill took a job as a school nurse—and found a new mission. “We followed the public health model, which is about preventing illness and promoting health in a large population,” she recalled. “Working at New York City schools, covering 3,000 kids, I realized how much public health nurses, as well as other public health workers, needed support in managing information effectively.” To deepen her own expertise, Merrill pursued a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a master’s in public health, followed by a PhD in public health informatics from Columbia Nursing in 2006. She specializes in data-science techniques such as network analysis and agent-based modeling, which target the complex interactions that can determine an organization’s effectiveness. Her work has had a range of real-world impacts, from helping health departments reduce the incidence of sexually transmitted illnesses to enhancing disaster-response preparedness. She’s currently co-principal investigator on an NIHfunded study analyzing years of Medicare and Medicaid data for over 50,000 patients with dementia who’ve been treated by the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY). “My team is mapping a trajectory of care for these people,” she explained. “Where do they live? What services do they use? In what sequence? How do those factors affect outcomes?” To make the results of such multilayered studies easier to grasp, Merrill is developing new ways of visualizing data—and teaching the latest methods to graduate and postdoctoral students at Columbia Nursing. “This is where my background in design is critical,” she said. “Visualization is a way to capture many planes of information in one image. It’s an ideal tool for explaining complexity.”

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THE SAFETY MAVEN After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania with a BS in nursing, Sarah Collins ’09, PhD, RN, worked as an ICU nurse at several major metropolitan hospitals. “As I moved from one to the other, I observed how strongly different information systems impacted clinical workloads and the ability to deliver care,” she recalled. “It was really quite striking.” That insight spurred Collins to enter the informatics program at Columbia Nursing, where she earned her doctorate in 2009. And it helped draw her back to the school this past February, when she became an assistant professor of biomedical informatics and nursing. Collins spent the previous seven years as an instructor at Harvard Medical School and senior clinical and nurse informatician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, where she focused on leveraging informatics to enhance patient safety. Her most ambitious project, still ongoing, was a multi-site study called Communicating Narrative Concerns Entered by RNs (CONCERN), funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), which aimed to mine electronic health-record data—particularly nursing documentation—to prevent patient mortality in real time. As her co-principal investigator, she tapped former Columbia Nursing classmate Kenrick Cato ’08 ’14, PhD, RN, who has continued in that role.

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CONCERN grew out of Collins’s observation that nurses often expressed misgivings about a patient’s status, based on subtle signs of deterioration, long before worrisome signals appeared on vitalsigns monitors. Her goal was to identify such early-warning signs in EHRs (electronic health records), and use them to create what she calls predictive healthcare process models of clinical concern (HPM-CCs). In the first phase of the study, published in 2013, she and her team used advanced statistical modeling techniques to analyze EHRs for 15,000 acute-care patients and 145 cardiacarrest patients over a 15-month period. They found that records for patients who died had significantly more optional comments from nurses, as well as more frequent vital-signs checks, over the previous 48 hours—the first time such a correlation had been shown. The next phase of the study is to determine the precise threshold at which intervention is warranted, using natural-language processing and machine-learning techniques to generate HPM-CCs; after that, the team will develop an app to alert clinicians, and test it in the field. But Collins’s research has already confirmed her initial hypothesis. “The evidence is pretty clear,” she said. “If a nurse is worried about a patient, that’s a reason to act—and without delay.”


THE ALL-AROUNDER The computer-besotted son of an emergency room nurse, Kenrick Cato ’08 ’14, PhD, RN, always thought he would go into either healthcare or IT—but after graduating from Swarthmore, he joined the National Guard instead, and wound up serving as an infantry captain in Iraq. When his tour was over, a friend suggested that a career in nursing informatics might be the perfect way to unite his disparate interests. “She was right,” said Cato, who earned his doctorate from Columbia Nursing in 2014, and is now an assistant professor at the school. Cato’s research reflects his wide-ranging intellect and his combat-honed capacity for multitasking. Besides co-leading the CONCERN study, he’s responsible for a broad variety of investigations. For example, Cato and his colleagues are developing an algorithm that can identify transgender patients from their electronic medical records—a first step toward learning more about the health needs of this poorly understood population. His team is also mining EHRs over a five-year period to trace patterns of treatment for thousands of people identified as suicidal after admission to emergency departments. “One of the most crucial decisions for ED clinicians is whether and when to refer suicidal patients to higher levels of care,” Cato explained. “Yet there are currently no gold-standard guidelines for how to manage suicide risk in the United States, and traditional statistical approaches may not be well suited to analyze the large numbers of variables that contribute to optimal treatment of these patients.” Eventually, he hopes to identify which variables predict key outcomes (such as patients’ discharge disposition and overall length of stay), and to use that data to develop decision-making tools. To Cato, the diversity of these studies illustrates the vibrancy of his emerging field. “Nursing informatics is about much more than improving nursing practice,” he observed. “As this discipline grows, it’s becoming a force multiplier for finding better solutions throughout the healthcare system.”

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THE LANGUAGE WHIZ As a boy in post-Soviet Russia, Max Topaz, PhD, RN, saw his 83-year-old grandmother turned away from a clinic after she broke her hip, because the doctors deemed her too ancient to be worth treating. A few months later, she died of complications from her injury. “That’s when I first decided I wanted to make healthcare systems better,” Topaz recalled. After immigrating to Israel, where he served as an army medic, the teenage tech geek was thrilled to help implement the military’s first electronic health-records system. Moving on to the University of Haifa, he decided to focus on nursing informatics. And by the time he earned his PhD as a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, in 2014, he was recognized as one of the most promising young researchers in the field. This fall, after completing postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School and teaching at the University of Haifa, Topaz was appointed an associate professor at Columbia Nursing. Now 38, and the author of more than 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals, he’s a pioneer in natural-language processing in nursing, which uses machine learning to analyze large volumes of clinical texts or speech. Over the past few years, he has created algorithms that can highlight references to wound care or comorbid conditions in nursing notes, and help clinicians distinguish between urgent and less-crucial drug-allergy alerts. Working with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY), he’s currently developing software that can help home-care nurses decide how to prioritize patients upon admission based on analysis of risk factors, including socio-demographics, comorbid conditions, medications, depression, learning ability, and living arrangements. Besides advancing nursing research, Topaz (who consults for tech startups as well as major healthcare organizations) is eager to help students develop informatics tools of their own. In Haifa, he taught a course on innovation and entrepreneurship, in which students collectively created a mobile app for patient triage in emergency departments— and he plans to offer something similar at Columbia Nursing. “My basic goal,” said Topaz, “is to help move this technology revolution forward.”

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THE SYMPTOM SLEUTH Theresa Koleck, PhD, RN, got into nursing for two reasons: “I’ve always liked science—biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics. And I like interacting with people.” But as an undergraduate in the University of Pittsburgh’s nursing program, she realized that the science part excited her most. While working on a breast cancer treatment-related symptom study as part of a research mentorship program, she wondered why some breast cancer patients developed cognitive impairments before treatment while others didn’t. Could genetic differences play a role? Studying a small number of patients for her PhD project at Pittsburgh, Koleck found evidence to support her hypothesis. That only added to her curiosity, however. Cancer symptoms often came in clusters, she knew—fatigue, pain, depression,

and sleep disturbances, for example, or nausea and vomiting—and their severity varies from patient to patient. Other chronic diseases had symptom clusters, too, some of which occurred across multiple diagnoses. Could genetic or other factors help explain these groupings, and point toward ways of preventing or treating them? Koleck’s hunger for answers led her to a postgraduate fellowship in informatics at Columbia Nursing. After completing the program in May, she became an associate research scientist at the school. Koleck is leading an NIH-funded study that will use natural-language processing to mine years’ worth of electronic health records for thousands of patients with cancer, type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and heart failure. Her

team is currently developing ways to identify symptom clusters from these records; next, they’ll explore relationships between the clusters and clinical information, such as patient demographics or laboratory test results, for patterns suggesting biological, behavioral, or environmental risk factors. “Using EHRs allows us to analyze huge amounts of data without having to recruit huge cohorts of patients,” Koleck explained. “These new methods enable us to do massive longitudinal studies that would otherwise be impossible.” Her research would also be impossible, she adds, without the mentoring she’s gotten at Columbia Nursing. “Dr. Bakken is so incredibly generous, supportive, and protective of my time,” Koleck said. “She’s given me the skills and confidence I need to succeed.” 

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BABY BOON From New York City to the Navajo Nation, Columbia Midwives Care

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t Tséhootsooí Medical Center in Fort Defiance, Arizona, Rebecca Willis ’09 ’13, MS, MPH, serves as a nurse-midwife on the Navajo Nation. In Albany, Georgia, a small city 180 miles south of Atlanta, Lodz Joseph ’16 ’17, MS, works as a nurse-midwife among vulnerable populations. And in rural Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Sheilagh Cullen ’00 ’01, MS, provides care to Old Order Amish women who give birth at home. While these graduates of Columbia Nursing’s nurse-midwifery program specialize in providing maternal health services and newborn care, they do more: they also provide family planning and gynecological care, collaborate with MDs to screen for and treat pregnancy-related high blood pressure and diabetes, counsel the people under their care about obesity and other health risks, and educate and advise patients on wellness and self-care. Working in communities all over the United States, Columbia-educated nurse-midwives embody the success of the school’s nurse-midwifery program, which prepares graduates for independent clinical careers in evidence-based women’s healthcare.

Columbia Nursing created the nation’s first graduate program in nurse-midwifery in 1955, through a partnership with the Maternity Center Association of New York. And in 1956, Columbia Nursing awarded the nation’s first master’s degree in clinical nurse-midwifery. Today, the program’s rigorous curriculum — accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Midwifery Education (ACME) — combines health sciences fundamentals with training in clinical skills, professional practices, and the impact of policy on clinical practice. Upon completion of the program, graduates take the national certifying examination administered by the American Midwifery Certification Board to become a certified nurse-midwife. In addition, the program cultivates critical thinking and cultural sensitivity, laying a firm foundation for careers in healthcare delivery, policy, and education. Given the inequities in access to care and outcomes that affect pregnancy and childbirth in the U.S., Program Director Laura Zeidenstein ’05, DNP, urges all graduates to pursue careers that balance clinical practice and advocacy. “To become a midwife in our program means developing a deep awareness about disparities,” she says, “and the ways in which midwives can address the effects of racism and poverty, which too often result in high maternal mortality and morbidity rates.” For Willis, this means honoring the longstanding cultural practices of the women who seek care at Tséhootsooí Medical Center, which in 2010 became the fourth self-determined, tribally administered hospital on the Navajo Nation — a 27,000-square-mile reservation. “We try to incorporate traditional practices,” she says of the 300 to 400 births at the hospital each year, 90 percent of which the hospital’s eight midwives attend. By conventional metrics, the center’s maternal outcomes are more than solid — a cesarean-section rate of just 10 to 12 percent (nationwide, the rate hovers at close to 30 percent) and a similarly low epidural rate that, in part, reflects local values.

Illustrations by Alyssa Carvara


(Local values are also a factor in Cullen’s practice among the Amish; see the sidebar below for insights into the population she works with.) According to a nationwide analysis published in February by PLOS ONE, in states where midwives and obstetricians work together to provide integrated care, the way Willis and her colleagues do at Tséhootsooí Medical Center, newborns and their mothers have better outcomes, including reduced rates of premature births, C-sections, and newborn deaths. Such data should come as no surprise, says Sylvie Blaustein ’88, MS, a clinical nurse-midwife who has attended more than 2,000 births over the past 31 years and also served for two decades as a clinical preceptor for Columbia Nursing midwifery students. “The team model of midwives collaborating with obstetricians has been proven time and time again to increase good outcomes and increase satisfaction,” she says. As a student, Blaustein recalls having learned as much about the practice of humility and empathy as she did about the clinical skills associated with pregnancy, labor, and delivery. “There’s something about nursing in general and midwifery in particular that cultivates a curiosity and interest in other people,” she says. “Our education keeps reminding us what it’s like to be on the other side, imagining what it is to have the fears and anxieties and joys of pregnancy and birth that are so universal.”

A CLOSER LOOK: MIDWIFERY IN RURAL AMISH COUNTRY WORKING IN RURAL LANCASTER COUNTY, Pennsylvania, since 2001, Sheilagh Cullen ’00 ’01, MS, has seen firsthand how midwives are uniquely equipped to honor their patients’ values. Among the Old Order Amish families she serves, community, simplicity, and frugality make home births with few interventions the cultural norm. “It’s a little like wilderness practice, even compared to the rural hospitals,” says Cullen, who partners with a fellow nurse-midwife. They share an office they rarely use that still contains metal file cabinets crammed with manila folders in lieu of a computer and electronic records. While the vast majority of the births Cullen attends have healthy outcomes, she says there are high rates of congenital anomalies — including a condition known as Amish lethal microcephaly, an invariably fatal genetic condition that leads to death within a baby’s first six months and affects one in every 500 births among the Old Order Amish. Cullen sometimes wishes her patients were more inclined to consider prenatal testing, so she could be more prepared for each newborn. But, she notes, for her patients, the results would be irrelevant. “The baby is who the baby is,” says Cullen. “Sometimes they’re okay and sometimes they’re not, and always they’re cherished.”

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An emphasis on humility, empathy, and cultural sensitivity also guides Lodz Joseph, a Haitian-American who works with medically underserved black, white, and Latino populations at the Mirian Worthy Women’s Health Center, a division of Albany Area Primary Health Care. “Women are looking for women providers who look like them and take time to explain things,” says Joseph, who speaks fluent French with her clients from West Africa and has already attained intermediate fluency in Spanish to enhance her ability to communicate effectively with the growing number of Central American immigrants in her care. “I tell my patients, ‘I want to give you the best care possible, as if we were in a posh, private practice,’ even though I’m at a federally qualified health center.” And providing the best care possible means treating the whole woman — including the array of conditions that can complicate pregnancy, labor, and delivery and that are prevalent among Joseph’s patients, many of whom are considered high risk. “Midwives connect with our patients, and there really is significant follow-up, explaining what’s going on with their bodies and why we want to follow up so aggressively,” she says. “I’m always asking, ‘What have we missed?’ because this is our snapshot and opportunity to provide people with optimum care.” Jessica Tsipe Angelson ’13 ’14, MS, also keeps her eye on the big picture. Angelson works with a high-volume, private-practice midwifery group with admitting privileges at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. And, like Joseph, she leverages every bit of her preparation as a primary-care provider to scrutinize each encounter with a patient for clues she might be missing. “If you only see a person’s pregnancy, you’re missing this huge opportunity to care for her in other ways that she might need,” Angelson says. The majority of Angelson’s patients rely on Medicaid to cover the cost of their care. In addition to clinical concerns, Angelson sees clearly how birth outcomes among her patients reflect social determinants of health — the strength of their interpersonal relationships, for example, or whether they have access to reliable transportation and healthy food, or the effects of discrimination and violence. “Some of the people at highest risk for having babies born too early or sick are at risk because of their social circumstances, such as poverty and unstable housing,” she says. Moreover, the nine months of pregnancy and the six postpartum weeks are, in many cases, the only times in her patients’ lives that they have healthcare coverage. “Often,” says Angelson, “insurance is not the norm for people in my care. They suddenly feel like they have abundance in healthcare. It’s heartbreaking, because you understand that they exist within an environment of tremendous scarcity.” While some midwives, like Willis and Joseph, opt to work in medically underserved regions where systemic and socioeconomic inequality amplify health disparities, some Columbia Nursing graduates work on the other end of the spectrum, caring for people unbound by such structural constraints as underinsurance or limited access to competent healthcare providers. Nationwide, midwives attend approximately 10 percent of births, practicing at hospitals, in freestanding birthing centers, and in homes across the U.S. In


high-resource countries affiliated with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development — such as Canada, France, Germany, Israel, Japan, and Australia — midwives attend between 50 and 75 percent of births. “The prime minister of New Zealand chose a midwife, and so did Kate Middleton,” says Blaustein. “These are women who could have anyone, and they chose midwives.” For many such women, says Blaustein, the profession’s emphasis on pregnancy as a healthy and normal process feels particularly appealing. “Midwives are experts at taking care of basically healthy women with low-risk pregnancies,” she says. “We look at the whole woman, not just her uterus.” For 14 years, Blaustein had a private practice in Manhattan, where her clientele included movie stars, lawyers, and MDs — the vast majority of whom had the freedom to choose among multiple birthing options covered by their private insurance carriers. Frequently, says Blaustein, demand was so high that she had to refer prospective patients to her midwifery colleagues elsewhere in the city. “There’s a huge need among women of means who seek out midwifery care because they want personalized, respectful care where the woman is really listened to,” says Blaustein. “Everyone wants to be listened to, and midwives do that.” To cultivate the conditions for candid conversation, Blaustein created a homey environment in her midtown office, complete with a couch in each exam room, where patients and their partners — and even their children, on occasion — could chat with their midwife at each visit. Despite her conviction that such unhurried conversations enhance birth outcomes, says Blaustein, she closed her private practice

in 2017. “When you’re spending that kind of time with a patient and limiting the number of patients you can take in,” she says, “it’s a financial catch-22.” Now working part-time as a nurse-midwife at St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital in Paterson, New Jersey, Blaustein credits the experience of juggling her practice’s rent, malpractice premiums, and patient insurance reimbursements with cementing her commitment to an overhaul of healthcare economics in the U.S. “I’m a real supporter of single-payer,” she says, “so the profit motive is removed and the priority is care.” Over the last 30 years, Zeidenstein, who has led Columbia Nursing’s midwifery program since 2002, has practiced in a variety of settings — in public health practices in Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Manhattan; as the founder of a freestanding birthing center in Manhattan and the clinical director of two others; and in private practice with Blaustein. And, like Blaustein, she credits that breadth of experience with galvanizing her drive to participate in reimagining healthcare delivery in the U.S. “Midwives are in a great place to be politically active,” says the associate professor, who regularly pens commentaries on midwifery for peer-reviewed journals and also co-chairs NYC Midwives, the local chapter of the American College of Nurse Midwives. “We are able to see, one on one, the results of working in a way that is humane and respectful of all people. It’s about speaking out, standing up for people, never closing your eyes.” In the three years since she arrived on the Navajo Nation, says Rebecca Willis, she’s had increasing opportunities to bear witness to the resilience of the people she serves. This summer, the reservation’s

“We are able to see, one on one, the results of working in a way that is humane and respectful of all people. It’s about speaking out, standing up for people, never closing your eyes.” first annual Pride Festival featured so-called two-spirit dancers performing in front of the Tribal Council Office. Young people are returning to the reservation in greater numbers than ever before, intent on transforming and uplifting the community; a native woman plans to launch a birthing center, for example. The medical center, too, has made great strides, with a new mobile unit that is taking sexual and reproductive healthcare on the road, a paid fellowship in midwifery to increase training opportunities for tribe members, and early-stage plans for a clinic tailored to the needs of two-spirit and transgender members of the community. It’s been a tremendous honor to work among the Navajo people, says Willis, and yet she yearns for a time when people from the community have full access to the educational opportunities she had growing up in Connecticut. “My hope,” says Willis, “would be that a native midwife would one day take my place.”  Jasmine Banks and Sharon Tregaskis provided reporting for this article.

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n a muggy summer afternoon, Bobbie Berkowitz, PhD, scans the streets of Washington Heights from her office. Wrapping up eight years as dean of Columbia Nursing before retiring, she is taking in more than the view. “I recently found the list I’d put together of all the things I wanted to do when I first came to Columbia Nursing,” she mused. “Everything on that list we have accomplished.” Berkowitz credits colleagues for implementing the shared vision of elevating the school’s curriculum, expanding its research enterprise, and growing its primary care practice. Indeed, she considers having worked alongside faculty and staff one of the greatest gifts of her deanship. “I have never worked with a team that is as strong and talented as the one I have had the pleasure of working with here.” The admiration goes two ways. Members of the Columbia Nursing community know they are losing not just a boss, but also an inspiration, colleague, and friend.

A NEW CHAPTER Leaving a Legacy of Inspiration, Innovation, and Excellence, Dean Berkowitz Retires

An Ambitious Agenda Profoundly modest, Berkowitz redirects any attempt to highlight her legacy. “All my great ideas have come from the people who work here,” she insisted. But she doesn’t mind offering that being an adventurer from the Northwest with a powerful appetite for opportunity (“I always take a look ...”), who is future-oriented and has a decades-long track record as a nursing and health policy leader, made her completely up for the task. She arrived with an ambitious agenda: to overhaul the school’s structure, develop its research enterprise, revamp its curriculum, expand its faculty practice, and boost its national ranking, to name a few of her goals. Before she could launch any of these projects, she had to produce a five-year strategic plan—the school’s first—which she did. With the plan in place, Berkowitz reorganized the school into divisions, including Scholarship and

By Andrea Kott, MPH


TOP RIGHT: Cutting the ribbon and celebrating the opening of the Nurse Practitioner Group’s new primary care practice location in Washington Heights.

Research, Academic Affairs, Clinical Practice, Student Affairs, Diversity and Cultural Affairs, Strategic Communications and Marketing, Development and Alumni Relations, and Finance and Administration, to promote shared decision making and accountability. “You don’t want the dean to run everything,” she said. “Now faculty and staff are the senior leaders who run this place.”

Bobbie Berkowitz meets Her Royal Highness Princess Muna al-Hussein of Jordan at a Global Nursing and Midwifery Summit.

A Simpatico Leader Her leadership style—collegial and embracing debate— is among the qualities that her colleagues have lauded. “Bobbie engenders in people empathy and a simpatico sense,” said Elaine Larson, PhD, senior associate dean, scholarship and research. “I valued her wise counsel and advice, and the fact that she was open to suggestions from others, even if they did not quite agree with her.”

TOP LEFT: Bobbie Berkowitz addresses the 2017 graduating class.

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Stephen Ferrara, DNP, associate dean, clinical affairs, added, “When you’re sitting in a meeting with Bobbie, you really feel comfortable speaking because you feel respected and that you’re being listened to.” Expanding Research A believer in the power of partnerships, Berkowitz worked closely with senior scientists like Larson to expand the school’s research enterprise. “Bobbie was very instrumental in helping me provide people with the resources they needed to get grants and external funding,” Larson recalled. “She recruited a number of younger faculty members who were promising but just beginning, and helped us provide them with the pilot monies and grant-writing assistance they needed to develop. She understood research enough to know that building an enterprise wasn’t going to happen tomorrow but only after years of providing people with the resources they needed to be competitive.” Larson added, “Bobbie was really in it for the long haul, and it’s paid off. We’ve gone from being 14th to fifth in terms of NIH funding for schools of nursing.” The school’s expanded research enterprise now includes joint appointments with other health systems, which allow faculty to conduct their own scientific investigations while mentoring hospital nurses who want to develop original research based on their clinical experiences. In one such appointment, Eileen Carter ’14, PhD, RN, mentored one of NewYork-Presbyterian’s pediatric nurses as he designed a now published study showing the effectiveness of using video about MRIs in reducing anxiety in children who are about to undergo the procedure. Their partnership inspired LINK (Linking to Improve Nursing Care and Knowledge), a program that provides NewYorkPresbyterian nurses with the support to pursue clinical research that might improve patient outcomes. It also spurred the Academic-Practice Research Fellowship, also with NewYork-Presbyterian, a competitive two-year program that awards clinical nurses with mentoring and support––including a work sabbatical––to pursue research.


Committed to increasing the school’s focus on informatics research and data science, Berkowitz championed its partnership with Columbia University’s Data Science Institute. “Research informs practice, and our role is to understand the value of data in improving patient care,” she said. “We have nurses and non-nurses who really understand the creation and utilization of data in large sets to answer questions about the most pressing public health issues, like HIV/AIDS and hospital-acquired infections. We see that as the future.” This future contains another hallmark of Berkowitz’s tenure: the school’s dedication to diversity, both among students and staff, and in the research it undertakes. “Bobbie’s main focus is on global population health in service and research, in what’s relevant for the community at large and for the world,” Larson said. Because relevance is paramount, the school has concentrated recent efforts on building research in LGBT health and global health. Locally, it has partnered with the Columbia University Department of Psychiatry and the New York State Psychiatric Institute to found the Program for the Study of LGBT Health, whose find-

ings on health issues among transgender and gendernonconforming people, sexual minority women, and the aging LGBT population have informed the LGBT health services at ColumbiaDoctors Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Group in Washington Heights. Through its global programs, led by Jennifer Dohrn, DNP, the school is collaborating with the University of Jordan on a joint study of the reproductive health of Syrian refugees in Jordan; recently completed a three-

The admiration goes two ways. Members of the Columbia Nursing community know they are losing not just a boss, but also an inspiration, colleague, and friend. year study on the gaps and needs in nursing research in eastern and southern Africa, and the Middle East; and is now working with 13 clinical sites in 11 countries to provide students with exceptional learning experiences. “Our global program has blossomed,” Larson said. “It takes vision to do research and service not just for New York City but also for the world.” The school’s global reach expands even further. For example, it is the only World Health Organization (WHO) collaborating center focusing on advanced practice nursing. “WHO collaborating centers have been around for decades, but we really made ours come alive when Bobbie came,” Larson said.

Bobbie Berkowitz signs the beam at the Topping Off ceremony, before it is lifted into the school’s new building.

Revamping Curriculum Before arriving at Columbia Nursing, Berkowitz recognized that hospitals were beginning to hire nurses with advanced degrees. Moreover, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) was recommending that the nursing workforce upgrade its educational requirements and increase its number of doctoral-level nurses. “It’s where the future was going,” she said. Following the IOM’s lead, in 2017 the school revamped its curriculum, transitioning its registered nursing programs from baccalaureate to master’s level, and its advanced practice programs from master’s to doctoral level, according to Judy Honig ’05, DNP, senior associate dean, academics, and dean of students. “Bobbie shared the faculty’s vision that we were poised to take a leadership role in moving our education upwards,” Honig said. Thus, graduates with a master’s degree who choose to become nurse practitioners, midwives, or nurse anesthetists must now earn a doctorate in nursing practice (DNP) but may complete their combined mas-

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ter’s and doctoral studies in four years instead of five. Master’s-level graduates may also enter and complete an accelerated PhD program in three years. The school also enriched its curriculum with subspecialty certifications in adult and pediatric oncology, palliative and end-of-life care, and women’s health. Accelerating the curriculum was one way that the school raised its educational bar under Berkowitz.

If there’s one message that Berkowitz has driven home, it’s that nurses must recognize their intrinsic capacity to lead.

Bobbie Berkowitz with the honorees from Columbia Nursing’s Building the Future Gala in October 2017 at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel: Marjorie Harrison Fleming ’69, Donald Jonas, and Marc Bertolini.

Constructing and relocating to an ultramodern building with a state-of-the-art simulation center was another. Here, the school prepares nurses to practice, teach, and research 21st-century healthcare. Advanced technology creates clinical scenarios that nurses encounter in realworld settings; it also enables the school to model teaching and patient care for its various partners, including clinicians who attended a national summit on the treatment and management of cystic fibrosis; the Hospital for Special Surgery, which sought the school’s expertise in training nurses to address the multiple challenges

of caring for orthopedic surgery patients who present with common comorbidities; and the New York State Department of Health, which registered the school as a site for training in opioid overdose treatment and prevention. Although many contributed to the new building, it was Berkowitz who oversaw the $25 million capital campaign that made it a reality. She introduced innovations to the school’s fundraising efforts by diversifying the scholarship-focused Annual Fund into several smaller entities, including a Building Fund, an Innovations in Simulation Fund, a Dean’s Discretionary Fund, and a Global Fellows Fund, giving donors choices for directing their support. She has also been a source of steady support for Columbia Nursing’s Alumni Association and its efforts to provide mentoring and other types of professional guidance to students. Elevating Practice With the research enterprise expanded, curriculum revamped, and a new building up and running, Berkowitz harnessed the school’s talents to address New York City’s primary care gap. “People in New York get a lot of specialty care but not a lot of primary care,” she said. Under her leadership, the school opened a new location of the faculty practice, rebranded as the ColumbiaDoctors Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Group, in Washington Heights. The original practice still operates in Midtown. The only one of its kind in northern Manhattan, the practice offers a range of LGBT-specific services, filling a critical need among a population that commonly struggles with homelessness, lack of health insurance, drug addiction, or other mental health issues. Ferrara oversaw its launch with Berkowitz’s enthusiastic backing. “She saw this as so logical, was there to champion it, and did everything she could to make it happen,” said Ferrara. The school’s commitment also inspired “House Calls,” a service that brings primary care to homebound patients who need chronic disease management and post-hospitalization care. Promoting Policy If there’s one message that Berkowitz has driven home, it’s that nurses must recognize their intrinsic capacity to lead. “Policy doesn’t just impact their patients. It impacts their profession,” she said. She is immediate past president of the American Academy of Nursing, and an active member of the Deans’ Nursing Policy Coalition, which works with policymakers to protect

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healthcare funding, including scholarships for nursing students. “We spend time evaluating the direction of the federal government’s policy on health and then act on what is needed to increase support for students, education, research, and the field overall,” Berkowitz said. For Ferrara, Berkowitz has been an inspiration. While his lobbying efforts helped win passage in 2014 of the Nurse Practitioners Modernization Act, which allows NPs with 3,600 or more hours of clinical experience to practice without a written agreement with a physician, he credits Berkowitz for playing a pivotal role in getting the legislation off the ground. “To say she had a small part in that is an understatement,” he said, referring to both the Modernization Act and the “BSN in 10” law, which passed in 2017, requiring nurses to attain a baccalaureate degree in nursing within 10 years of receiving their initial RN license. “Bobbie was instrumental in making sure the entire nursing profession was aware of this bill.” As a health policy leader, Berkowitz advanced the role of nurses and the profession, Ferrara continues. “Her leadership in health policy and on different boards and coalitions is not just about nursing. It’s about how can we lead and take responsibility for public health. That’s the idea of nursing in general: to

go beyond individual patients and enhance the health of all the people.” An Appetite for Adventure and an Eye on the Future In less than a decade, Columbia Nursing has transformed the ways it prepares nurses as clinicians, scientists, educators, and leaders. These changes, sewn into the fabric of the school, are Berkowitz’s legacy. Honig says she’s proud of where the school has come in the last eight years. “We’ve set an academic example for clinical education, and I appreciate the support and backing from Bobbie to make that happen.” Berkowitz, who is both excited and wistful about this new phase, says she’ll miss her colleagues. The missing will be mutual. “It’s been a pleasure to work for her and with her,” Honig said. Meanwhile, opportunities and adventures await Berk­owitz and husband Rich, who, in the spirit of Teddy Roosevelt (“Teddy Roosevelt is one of my heroes!”), will visit the country’s major national parks. They’ll golf, flyfish, and gradually acquire a menagerie of cats and dogs to replace the beloved pets that died over the years. And they’ll travel abroad. “I want to explore what’s going on out there,” Berkowitz said. “I need some time to play. Now, we’ll see how good I am at that.” 

Fall/Winter 2018

Enjoying the fruits of her labor, Bobbie Berkowitz takes in the view from the rooftop terrace of Columbia Nursing’s new building.

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A GLIMPSE AT ALUMNI EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR Photographs by Michael DiVito 5

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1: Daniel Billings ’15 ’17 ’18, Julie Yoshimachi ’17, Vidya Goberdhan ’17, and Andrew Hsia ’15 ’17 at the 2018 Alumni Reunion in May.

11: Berit Naes Wenner ’58, Jill Wenner, Eileen McLoughlin Stiles ’58, and Miriam Tostlebe Thompson ’58 celebrate their 60th Reunion.

2: Teresa Tamargo ’83 and Nancy Witterholt ’83 at the New Student Welcome Breakfast in June.

12: Elizabeth McCormick, Stacie Corcoran ’93, Nancy Mansfield ’93 (co-host), Laura Ardizzone ’04 ’10 (co-host), Dean Bobbie Berkowitz, and Kevin Browne ’92 (co-host) at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) alumni event in April.

3: Dean Bobbie Berkowitz receives an Honorary Distinguished Alumni Award from the co-chairs of the Distinguished Alumni Awards Committee, Angela Clarke Duff ’70 and Joan Hagan Arnold ’69. 4: Jeannemarie Baker ’90 and Penny Buschman ’64 at the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards Dinner. 5: The Class of 1968 celebrates their 50th Reunion. 6: Students lead tours of the ColumbiaDoctors Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Group at the 2018 Alumni Reunion. 7: Mary Dickey Lindsay ’45 DNP Student Scholars pictured with George Lindsay Jr. and Dean Bobbie Berkowitz at the Annual Dean’s Reception in March. 8: Tenesha Kelly-Roberts, Olga BrownVanderpool ’70, Sarah James ’97, and Laila Roberts at the 2018 New Student Welcome Breakfast. 9: Don Boyd ’06 ’17 and Vidya Goberdahn ’17 at the 2018 Annual Dean’s Reception. 10: Mary Masterson Germain ’64, Sally Murphy Albano ’64, Sue Law Hawes ’59, and Sandy McLaughlin Johanson ’64 at the 2018 Alumni Reunion.

13: Lauren DeLucia ’00 ’02, Patti Dykes ’04, Suzanne Bakken, professor, William Daniel Roberts ’05, Sarah Collins ’09, and Olivia Velez ’06 ’11 at the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards Dinner.

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14: Daniel Billings ’15 ’17 ’18 , Anna Spykerman ’17, Estelle Autissier ’17, Stefon DeAllie ’16 ’18, Kimberly Nojima ’16 ’18, Estee Ephron ’17, Jeannie Lope ’16 ’18, and Linda Armstrong ’16 ’18 at the MSKCC alumni event.

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15: Felesia Bowen ’10 and Anita Nirenberg ’96 ’09 at the 2018 Alumni Reunion. 16: Alumni and student volunteers put together over 175 toiletry bags for Harlem United Veterans Housing, including notes to the veterans. This initiative was part of the 2018 New Student Welcome Breakfast. 17: Student volunteers help make reusable sanitary pads from cotton T-shirts—by cutting and sewing from a preset pattern—for the Girls2Women Organization, founded by Mary Moran ’08. This initiative was part of the 2018 New Student Welcome Breakfast.

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Government and Private Funding for

Research and Training July 1, 2017–June 30, 2018

T HINKS T O C K

Principal Investigator: Suzanne Bakken, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: New York City Hispanic Dementia Caregiver Research Program (NHiRP) R01NR014430 (Multiple PI: Jose Luschinger, MD [Contact]) Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,662,135 Total Project Dates: 6/1/2013 - 3/31/2019

Principal Investigator: Bobbie Berkowitz, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Jonas Nursing and Veterans Healthcare at Columbia University JCH CU16-0569 Program Funding Source: Jewish Communal Fund/Jonas Nursing and Veterans Healthcare Total Budget: $11,082,858 Total Project Dates: 12/28/2017 - 12/27/2027

Principal Investigator: Suzanne Bakken, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Precision in Symptom Self-Management (PriSSM) Center P30NR016587 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,722,457 Total Project Dates: 8/16/2016 - 5/31/2021

Principal Investigator: Jean-Marie Bruzzese, PhD Project Title: A Pilot Study to Improve Sleep Quality in Urban High School Students with Asthma R21HD086448 Program Funding Source: NIH-NICHD Total Budget: $456,375 Total Project Dates: 9/25/2016 - 8/31/2019

Principal Investigator: Suzanne Bakken, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Precision in Symptom Self-Management (PriSSM) Center Administrative Supplement 3P30NR01658702S1 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $102,291 Total Project Dates: 6/1/2017 - 5/31/2018

Principal Investigator: Jean-Marie Bruzzese, PhD Project Title: Translating an Evidence-Based Urban Asthma Program for Rural Adolescents: Testing Effectiveness & Cost-Effectiveness and Understanding Factors Associated with Implementation R01HL136753 Program Funding Source: NIH-NHLBI Total Budget: $3,620,591 Total Project Dates: 7/5/2017 - 6/30/2023

Principal Investigator: Suzanne Bakken, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Reducing Health Disparities Through Informatics (RHeaDI) T32NR007969 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $1,939,614 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2022 Principal Investigator: Bobbie Berkowitz, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Ladies Christian Union (LCU) Fund for Women’s Education LCU CU17-1931 Program Funding Source: LCU Total Budget: $80,000 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2018

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Principal Investigator: Jean-Marie Bruzzese, PhD Project Title: Multi-Component Technology Intervention for African American Emerging Adults R01HL133506 Program Funding Source: NIH-NHLBI (Wayne State University Subcontract) Total Budget: $165,081 Total Project Dates: 9/1/2016 - 6/30/2021 Principal Investigator: Jean-Marie Bruzzese, PhD Project Title: Peer-Administered Asthma Self-Management Intervention in Urban Middle Schools R01MD012225 Program Funding Source: NIH-NIMHD (Rhode Island Hospital Subcontract) Total Budget: $136,006 Total Project Dates: 9/25/2017 - 6/30/2022


Principal Investigator: Eileen Carter, PhD, RN Project Title: Exploring Nurses’ Role in Antimicrobial Stewardship: A Multiple Qualitative Study APIC CU16-2883 Program Funding Source: APIC Total Budget: $40,000 Total Project Dates: 1/1/2017 - 3/31/2018 Principal Investigator: Kenrick Dwain Cato, PhD, RN Project Title: Finding the Safer Way: Novel Interaction Design Approaches to Health IT Safety R01HS023708 Program Funding Source: AHRQ (UPitt Subcontract) Total Budget: $29,042 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2015 - 4/30/2019 Principal Investigator: Kenrick Dwain Cato, PhD, RN Project Title: Communicating Narrative Concerns Entered by RNs (CONCERN) R01NR01694101 (Multiple PI: Sarah Collins, PhD, RN [Contact]) Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,415,488 Total Project Dates: 5/1/2018 - 1/31/2022 Principal Investigator: Dawn Dowding, PhD, RN Project Title: QualDash: Designing and Evaluating an Interactive Dashboard to Improve Quality of Care ULEEDS CU17-2786 Program Funding Source: ULEEDS (University of Leeds Subcontract) Total Budget: $3,231 Total Project Dates: 10/1/2017 - 9/30/2018 Principal Investigator: Maureen George, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Self-Care Decision-Making: Feasibility of the BREATHE Asthma Intervention Trial R21NR016507 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $455,758 Total Project Dates: 9/26/2016 - 7/31/2019 Principal Investigator: Michael Greco, DNP, CRNA Project Title: Nurse Anesthetist Traineeships 1A22HP29901 Program Funding Source: HRSA Total Budget: $34,083 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2018 Principal Investigator: Amanda Hessels, PhD, RN Project Title: Impact of Patient Safety Climate on Infection Prevention Practices and Healthcare Worker and Patient Outcomes K01OH011186 Program Funding Source: CDC Total Budget: $324,000 Total Project Dates: 9/2/2016 - 8/31/2019 Principal Investigator: Kathleen Hickey, EdD, RN Project Title: iPhone Helping Evaluate Atrial Fibrillation Rhythm Through Technology (iHEART) R01NR014853 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $1,988,000 Total Project Dates: 8/1/2014 - 5/31/2019

Principal Investigator: Tonda Hughes, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Impact of Supportive Policies on Minority Stress, Drinking, and Health Among Women R01AA013328 Program Funding Source: NIH-NIAAA (University of Illinois at Chicago Subcontract) Total Budget: $251,919 Total Project Dates: 2/1/2017 - 7/31/2021 Principal Investigator: Tonda Hughes, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Sexual Orientation Differences: Prevalence and Correlates of Substance Use and Abuse R01DA036606 Program Funding Source: NIH-NIDA (Public Health Institute Subcontract) Total Budget: $137,725 Total Project Dates: 2/1/2017 - 8/31/2019 Principal Investigator: Tonda Hughes, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Health, Stress, and Tobacco Use Disparities Among Sexual Minority Populations R01CA212517 Program Funding Source: NIH-NCI (University of Michigan Subcontract) Total Budget: $61,186 Total Project Dates: 6/16/2017 - 5/31/2020 Principal Investigator: Tonda Hughes, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Sexual Orientation, Discrimination, and Health Disparities in DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder R01AA025684 Program Funding Source: NIH-NIAAA (University of Michigan Subcontract) Total Budget: $60,030 Total Project Dates: 4/1/2018 - 1/31/2019 Principal Investigator: Theresa Koleck, PhD, RN Project Title: Advancing Chronic Condition Symptom Cluster Science Through Use of Electronic Health Records and Data Science Techniques K99NR017651 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $180,235 Total Project Dates: 6/1/2018 - 3/31/2020 Principal Investigator: Jeffrey Kwong, DNP, RN Project Title: Collaborative Access for LGBT Adults (CALA) UD7HP29872 Program Funding Source: HRSA Total Budget: $981,623 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2016 - 6/30/2018 Principal Investigator: Elaine Larson, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Flu SAFE: Flu SMS Alerts to Freeze Exposure R01AI127812 (Multiple PI: Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH, Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH [Contact]) Program Funding Source: NIH-NIAID Total Budget: $798,011 Total Project Dates: 9/1/2016 - 8/31/2020 Fall/Winter 2018

Columbia Nursing 27


Government and Private Funding for Research and Training Principal Investigator: Elaine Larson, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Nursing Intensity of Patient Care Needs and Rates of Healthcare-Associated Infections (NIC-HAI) R01HS024915 Program Funding Source: AHRQ Total Budget: $1,350,476 Total Project Dates: 9/1/2016 - 8/31/2019

Principal Investigator: Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Disease Outcomes and Nurse Practitioner Practice R01MD011514 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,558,012 Total Project Dates: 6/13/2017 - 1/31/2021

Principal Investigator: Ruth Masterson Creber, PhD, RN Project Title: mHealth for Heart Failure Symptom Monitoring K99NR016275 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $181,650 Total Project Dates: 8/1/2016 - 7/31/2018

Principal Investigator: Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Nurse Practitioner Supply, Practice, and Economic Efficiency to Benefit the Underserved and Medicaid Patients NCSBN R101016 Program Funding Source: NCSBN Total Budget: $256,416 Total Project Dates: 3/1/2018 - 3/01/2020

Principal Investigator: Ruth Masterson Creber, PhD, RN Project Title: My Clinic: Integrating Medication Reconciliation and Symptom Reporting to Support Patient-Centered Care HFSA CU16-3002 Program Funding Source: Heart Failure Society Total Budget: $10,000 Total Project Dates: 9/1/2016 - 8/31/2017 Principal Investigator: Ruth Masterson Creber, PhD, RN Project Title: Survival Analysis of Urban Home Care Patients with HF Entering Hospice Using the Palliative Performance Scale as a Predictor of Mortality VNSNY 2017-01 Program Funding Source: Doyle Fund/VNSNY Total Budget: $2,458 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2018 Principal Investigator: Jacqueline Merrill, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN Project Title: A Longitudinal Network Study of Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care in Relation to Disparities in Access and Outcomes R56AG056347-01 (Multiple PI: Miriam Ryvicker, PhD [Contact]) Program Funding Source: NIH-NIA (VNSNY Subcontract) Total Budget: $190,963 Total Project Dates: 9/30/2017 - 8/31/2018 Principal Investigator: Michelle Odlum, EdD, RN Project Title: Exploring HIV Risk Within the Context of Gender-Based Imbalances in a US Population of Racial and Ethnic Minority Women at Risk for HIV/AIDS P017002027 Program Funding Source: HPTN Total Budget: $94,692 Total Project Dates: 4/1/2017 - 9/30/2019 Principal Investigator: Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Further Psychometric Testing and Validation of the Errors of Care Omission Survey (EoCOS) R03HS024758 Program Funding Source: AHRQ Total Budget: $99,795 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2016 - 9/30/2018

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Columbia Nursing Fall/Winter 2018

Principal Investigator: Meghan Reading ’18, PhD, RN Project Title: Factors Associated with Sustained Engagement with ECG mHealth Technology in a Post-Intervention Atrial Fibrillation Population F31NR017313 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $44,044 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2018 Principal Investigator: Tawandra Rowell-Cunsolo, PhD Project Title: Contextualizing and Responding to HIV Risk Behaviors Among Black Drug Offenders K01DA036411 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $703,574 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2013 - 12/31/2018 Principal Investigator: Rebecca Schnall, PhD, RN Project Title: Video Information Provider for HIV-Associated Non-AIDS (VIP-HANA) Symptoms R01NR015737 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,331,859 Total Project Dates: 7/16/2015 - 5/31/2020 Principal Investigator: Rebecca Schnall, PhD, RN Project Title: The Wise App Trial for Improving Health Outcomes in People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWH) R01HS025071 Program Funding Source: AHRQ Total Budget: $1,989,445 Total Project Dates: 9/30/2016 - 9/29/2021 Principal Investigator: Rebecca Schnall, PhD, RN Project Title: A Pragmatic Clinical Trial of MyPEEPS Mobile to Improve HIV Prevention Behaviors in Diverse Adolescent Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) U01MD011279 Program Funding Source: NIH-NIMHD Total Budget: $7,882,836 Total Project Dates: 9/1/2016 - 4/30/2021


Principal Investigator: Jingjing Shang, PhD, RN Project Title: Infection Control in Home Care and Predictive Risk Modeling R01HS024723 Program Funding Source: AHRQ Total Budget: $1,391,760 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2016 - 4/30/2019

Principal Investigator: Arlene Smaldone, PhD, RN Project Title: Columbia University Future of Nursing Scholars (5th Cohort: 2 Scholars) 75252 Program Funding Source: RWJF Total Budget: $150,000 Total Project Dates: 4/1/2018 - 7/31/2021

Principal Investigator: Jingjing Shang, PhD, RN Project Title: Infection Prevention in Home Health Care (InHOME) R01NR016865 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,534,014 Total Project Dates: 9/21/2017 - 6/30/2021

Principal Investigator: Arlene Smaldone, PhD, RN Project Title: Hydroxyurea Adherence for Personal Best in Sickle Cell Treatment R01NR017206 (Multiple PI: Nancy Green, MD [Contact]) Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,938,465 Total Project Dates: 9/27/2017 - 6/30/2021

Principal Investigator: Jingjing Shang, PhD, RN Project Title: Home Health Agencies in the Changing Policy Environment AHHQI CU18-0122 Program Funding Source: AHHQI Total Budget: $149,983 Total Project Dates: 4/1/2018 - 9/30/2019 Principal Investigator: Arlene Smaldone, PhD, RN Project Title: Columbia University Future of Nursing Scholars (2nd Cohort: 2 Scholars) 72569 Program Funding Source: RWJF Total Budget: $100,000 Total Project Dates: 4/1/2015 - 8/31/2018 Principal Investigator: Arlene Smaldone, PhD, RN Project Title: Columbia University Future of Nursing Scholars (3rd Cohort: 2 Scholars) 73510 Program Funding Source: RWJF Total Budget: $75,000 Total Project Dates: 4/15/2016 - 7/31/2019 Principal Investigator: Arlene Smaldone, PhD, RN Project Title: Jonas Nurse Leaders and Veterans Scholar Program JCNVHCU153329 Program Funding Source: Jonas Nursing and Veterans Healthcare Total Budget: $80,000 Total Project Dates: 6/1/2016 - 7/31/2018 Principal Investigator: Arlene Smaldone, PhD, RN Project Title: Columbia University Future of Nursing Scholars (4th Cohort: 2 Scholars) 74336 Program Funding Source: RWJF Total Budget: $150,000 Total Project Dates: 4/15/2017 - 7/14/2020

Principal Investigator: Patricia Stone, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Comparative and Cost-Effectiveness Research Training for Nurse Scientists T32NR014205 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $1,503,740 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2023 Principal Investigator: Patricia Stone, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Study of Infection Management and Palliative Care at End-of-Life (SIMP-EL) R01NR013687 Program Funding Source: NIH-NINR Total Budget: $2,759,942 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2012 - 3/31/2021 Principal Investigator: Patricia Stone, PhD, RN, FAAN Project Title: Barriers and Facilitators for NHSN Adoption in Nursing Homes CDC 200-2016-91952 Program Funding Source: CDC Total Budget: $371,995 Total Project Dates: 9/20/2016 - 9/19/2018 Principal Investigator: Cindy Veldhuis, PhD Project Title: Testing Associations Among Sexual Identity, Race/ Ethnicity, Relationship Characteristics, and Hazardous Drinking F32AA025816 Program Funding Source: NIH-NIAAA Total Budget: $190,406 Total Project Dates: 9/1/2017 - 8/31/2020 Principal Investigator: Judy Wolfe, EdD Project Title: Nursing Student Loan (NSL) Graduate Nursing 4E4DHP17942 Program Funding Source: HRSA Total Budget: $24,410 Total Project Dates: 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2018

Fall/Winter 2018

Columbia Nursing 29


Selected Faculty

Publications M O NIK A G R A F F

Our faculty’s research continues to create new knowledge that advances healthcare. Listed are selected articles published by leading peer-reviewed publications. Dawon Baik, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, co-authored “RN Job Satisfaction and

Retention After an Interprofessional Team Intervention,” published in Western Journal of Nursing Research, and “Clinical Nurses’ Experiences and Perceptions after the Implementation of an Interprofessional Team Intervention: A Qualitative Study,” published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing. Walter Bockting, PhD, professor, was among the authors of “Healthcare Experiences Among Young Adults Who Identify as Genderqueer or Nonbinary,” published in LGBT Health, and “Barriers and Facilitators to Oral PrEP Use Among Transgender Women in New York City,” published in AIDS and Behavior. Jean-Marie Bruzzese, PhD, associate professor, was among the authors of “Does

Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Physicians Improve Pediatric Asthma Outcomes? A Randomized Trial,” published in Journal of Asthma. She was also author of “Association of Exercise-Induced Wheeze and Other Asthma Symptoms With Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in a Large Cohort of Urban Adolescents,” published in Respiratory Medicine. Billy Caceres, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow,

was among the authors of “Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Sexual Minority Women

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Columbia Nursing Fall/Winter 2018

(18–59 Years Old): Findings From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001–2012),” published in Women’s Health Issues. Eileen Carter ’14, PhD, assistant professor, was among the authors of “Exploring the Role of the Bedside Nurse in Antimicrobial Stewardship: Survey Results from Five AcuteCare Hospitals,” published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Eileen Carter ’14, PhD, assistant professor, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among the authors

of “Exploring the Nurses’ Role in Antibiotic Stewardship: A Multisite Qualitative Study of Nurses and Infection Preventionists,” published in American Journal of Infection Control. Hwayoung Cho ’17, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist; Rebecca Schnall ’09, PhD, Mary Dickey Lindsay Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Dawon Baik, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow; Tiffany Porras, MPH, research coordinator; and Melissa Beauchemin ’06 ’10, PhD student, were authors of “Understanding

the Predisposing, Enabling, and Reinforcing Factors Influencing the Use of a Mobile-Based HIV Management App: A Real-World Usability Evaluation,” published in International Journal of Medical Informatics.

Bevin Cohen, PhD, associate research scientist; Haomiao Jia, PhD, associate professor; and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among the authors

of “Long-term Impact of Universal Precautions on Rates of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in ICUs: A Comparative Effectiveness Study,” published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. Bevin Cohen ’17, PhD, associate research scientist, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among

the authors of “Use of Antibiotics in Paediatric Long-Term Care Facilities,” published in The Journal of Hospital Infection. Bevin Cohen ’17, PhD, associate research scientist; Jianfang Liu, PhD, assistant professor; and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among

the authors of “Association Between Healthcare-Associated Infection and Exposure to Hospital Roommates and Previous Bed Occupants with the Same Organism,” published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. Jennifer Dohrn ’85 ’05, DNP, associate professor; Karen Desjardins ’98 ’05, DNP, associate professor; Judy Honig ’05, DNP, Dorothy M. Rogers Professor of Nursing; Heidi Hahn-Schroeder, DNP, assistant professor; Yu-hui Ferng, MPA, global program manager; and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were

authors of “Transforming Nursing Curricula for a Global Community,” published in the Journal of Professional Nursing.


Maureen George, PhD, associate professor, was

the author of “Adherence in Asthma and COPD: New Strategies for an Old Problem,” published in Respiratory Care. Amanda Hessels, PhD, assistant professor, was

among the authors of “Understanding of Safety Monitoring in Clinical Trials by Individuals With CF or Their Parents: A Qualitative Analysis,” published in Journal of Cystic Fibrosis. Amanda Hessels, PhD, assistant professor; Bevin Cohen ’17, PhD, associate research scientist; Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research; Jianfang Liu, PhD, assistant professor; and Jingjing Shang, PhD, assistant professor, were authors of “Severity of Ill-

also among the authors of “Health Service Use by Same-Sex Attracted Australian Women for Alcohol and Mental Health Issues: A CrossSectional Study,” published in BJGP Open; “Tobacco Use and Sexual Orientation in a National Cross-Sectional Study: Age, Race/ Ethnicity, and Sexual Identity-Attraction Differences,” published in American Journal of Preventive Medicine; and “Validation of the Korean Parental Depression Literacy Scale,” published in International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. She was also among the authors of “Sexual Orientation Disparities in Pregnancy and Infant Outcomes,” published in Maternal and Child Health Journal and “Attributes of the Drinker Prototype among Thai Adolescents,” published in Cogent Psychology.

ness Measures for Pediatric Inpatients,” published in Journal for Healthcare Quality.

Tonda Hughes, PhD, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing, and Walter Bockting, PhD, professor, were among the authors of “Mental

Amanda Hessels, PhD, assistant professor; Bevin Cohen ’17, PhD, associate research scientist; Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research; and Meghan Murray ’16, PhD student,

Health Promotion for Gender Minority Adolescents,” published in Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services.

were authors of “Perception of Patient Safety Culture in Pediatric Long-Term Care Settings,” published in Journal for Healthcare Quality.

Tonda Hughes, PhD, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing; Kasey Jackman ’05 ’10 ’17, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist; and Cindy Veldhuis, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, were

Kathleen Hickey, EdD, professor, was among the

among the authors of “Risk and Protective Factors for Substance Use Among Sexual and Gender Minority Youth: A Scoping Review,” published in Current Addiction Reports.

authors of “Cardiac Channelopathies: Recognition, Treatment, Management,” published in AACN Advanced Critical Care. Kathleen Hickey, EdD, professor, and Haomiao Jia, PhD, associate professor, were among the

authors of “Nursing Genetics and Genomics: The International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) Survey,” published in Nurse Education Today. Kathleen Hickey, EdD, professor, and Shazia Mitha ’16 ’18, MS, PhD student, were among

the authors of “Detection and Management of Atrial Fibrillation Using Remote Monitoring,” published in The Nurse Practitioner. Tonda Hughes, PhD, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing, co-authored “Alcohol

Expectancies, Heavy Drinking, and Indicators of Alcohol Use Disorders in a CommunityBased Sample of Lesbian and Bisexual Women,” published in LGBT Health. She was

Tonda Hughes, PhD, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing, and Cindy Veldhuis, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, were among the

authors of “Depression and Victimization in a Community Sample of Bisexual and Lesbian Women: An Intersectional Approach,” published in Archives of Sexual Behavior; “Comparing Substance Use and Mental Health Outcomes Among Sexual Minority and Heterosexual Women in Probability and Non-Probability Samples,” published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence; “Sexual Minority Women’s and Gender-Diverse Individuals’ Hope and Empowerment Responses to the 2016 Presidential Election,” published in Journal of GLBT Family Studies; “Impacts of Marriage Legalization on the Experiences of Sexual Minority Women in Work and Community Contexts,” published in the Journal

of GLBT Family Studies; and “‘I Fear for My Safety, but Want to Show Bravery for Others’: Violence and Discrimination Concerns Among Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Individuals After the 2016 Presidential Election” published in Violence & Gender. They also authored “Comparing Substance Use and Mental Health Outcomes among Sexual Minority and Heterosexual Women in Probability and Non-Probability Sample,” published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Kasey Jackman ’05 ’10 ’17, PhD, postdoctoral research scientist, was among the authors

of “Benefits of Implementing and Improving Collection of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data in Electronic Health Records,” published in Computers, Informatics, Nursing (CIN). Haomiao Jia, PhD, associate professor, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among the authors

of “Assessment of Temporally-Related Acute Respiratory Illness Following Influenza Vaccination,” published in Vaccine. Rita Marie John ’05, DNP, associate professor, co-

authored “Psychosocial Impact of Growing Up with Food Allergies,” published in the Journal for Nurse Practitioners, and “Understanding Masturbation in the Pediatric Patient,” published in the Journal of Pediatric Health Care. Theresa Koleck, PhD, associate research scientist, was among the authors of “Trajectories

of Cognitive Function and Associated Phenotypic and Genotypic Factors in Breast Cancer,” published in Oncology Nursing Forum. She was also an author of “Regionally Clustered ABCC8 Polymorphisms in a Prospective Cohort Predict Cerebral Oedema and Outcome in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury,” published in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. Kristine Kulage, MPH, Office of Scholarship and Research director, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were

authors of “Intramural Pilot Funding and Internal Grant Reviews Increase Research Capacity at a School of Nursing,” published in Nursing Outlook.

Fall/Winter 2018

Columbia Nursing 31


Selected Faculty Publications Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, was among the authors

of “Comparison of Outpatient Medically Attended and Community-Level InfluenzaLike Illness—New York City,” published in Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, and “Associations Between Enteral Nutrition and Acute Respiratory Infection Among Patients in New York Metropolitan Region Pediatric Long-Term Care Facilities,” published in Nutrition in Clinical Practice. Jianfang Liu, PhD, assistant professor; Bevin Cohen ’17, PhD, associate research scientist; and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among the authors

of “Financial Incentives to Reduce HospitalAcquired Infections Under Alternative Payment Arrangements,” published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. Jianfang Liu, PhD, assistant professor, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among the authors

of “The Impact of HIV Diagnosis on Length of Hospital Stay in New York City, NY, USA,” published in AIDS Care.

Allison Norful ’17, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, and Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, associate professor, were among the authors of

“Nurse Practitioner–Physician Comanagement: A Theoretical Model to Alleviate Primary Care Strain,” published in Annals of Family Medicine. Sabrina Opiola McCauley ’02 ’10, DNP, assistant professor, co-authored “Mucormycosis:

Early Identification of a Deadly Fungus,” published in Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, and “Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures,” published in The Journal for Nurse Practitioners.

Jacqueline Merrill ’98 ’06, PhD, professor, was among the authors of “The Development of Heuristics for Evaluation of Dashboard Visualizations,” published in Applied Clinical Informatics, and “Converging and Diverging Needs Between Patients and Providers Who Are Collecting and Using Patient-Generated Health Data: An Integrative Review,” published in the Journal of American Medical Informatics Association. Jacqueline Merrill ’98 ’06, PhD, professor, and Meghan Reading ’18, PhD, co-authored “Con-

verging and Diverging Needs Between Patients and Providers Who Are Collecting and Using Patient-Generated Health Data: An Integrative Review,” published in Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Columbia Nursing Fall/Winter 2018

Jingjing Shang, PhD, assistant professor; Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research; and Victoria Adams, PhD student,

were among the authors of “Factors for Compliance with Infection Control Practices in Home Healthcare: Findings from a Survey of Nurses’ Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Infection Control,” published in American Journal of Infection Control.

Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, associate professor,

was among the authors of “A National Study of Australian Nurse Practitioners’ Organizational Practice Environment,” published in the Journal for Nurse Practitioners; “Federal, State, and Organizational Barriers Affecting Nurse Practitioner Workforce and Practice,” published in Nursing Economics; and “An Informatics Approach to Implement Support for Shared Decision Making for Primary Prevention Statin Therapy,” published in MDM Policy & Practice.

Maichou Lor, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow,

was among the authors of “Postdoctoral Opportunities for Nursing PhD Graduates: A Resource Guide,” published in Western Journal of Nursing Research.

the authors of “In People Living with HIV (PLWH), Menopause (Natural or Surgical) Contributes to the Greater Symptom Burden in Women: Results from an Online US Survey,” published in the online edition of Menopause.

Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, associate professor, and Allison Norful ’17, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, were among the authors of “Removing

Restrictions on Nurse Practitioners’ Scope of Practice in New York State: Physicians’ and Nurse Practitioners’ Perspectives,” published in the Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. Nancy Reame, PhD, Mary Dickey Lindsay Professor Emerita of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, was among the authors

of “Postmenopausal Hormone Treatment Alters Neural Pathways but Does Not Improve Verbal Cognitive Function,” published in Menopause. Rebecca Schnall ’09, PhD, Mary Dickey Lindsay Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Haomiao Jia, PhD, associate professor; and Nancy Reame, PhD, Mary Dickey Lindsay Professor Emerita of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, were among

Jingjing Shang, PhD, assistant professor; Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research; and Patricia Stone, PhD, Centennial Professor of Health Policy, were among

the authors of “A Research Agenda for Infection Prevention in Home Healthcare,” published in American Journal of Infection Control. Arlene Smaldone ’03, PhD, professor, and Haomiao Jia, PhD, associate professor, were among

the authors of “HABIT, a Randomized Feasibility Trial to Increase Hydroxyurea Adherence, Suggests Improved Health-Related Quality of Life in Youths with Sickle Cell Disease,” published in Journal of Pediatrics. Samantha Stonbraker ’13 ’16, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow, and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were

among the authors of “Clinical Nursing and Midwifery Research in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: A Scoping Review,” published in the International Journal of Nursing Practice. Samantha Stonbraker ’13 ’16 PhD, postdoctoral research fellow; Arlene Smaldone ’03, PhD, professor; and Elaine Larson, PhD, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, were among

the authors of “Associations Between Health Literacy, HIV-Related Knowledge, and Information Behavior Among Persons Living with HIV in the Dominican Republic,” published in Public Health Nursing.


JÖRG ME YER

“Columbia Nursing’s Annual Fund enabled me to have a powerful experience at La Clínica de la Familia in the Dominican Republic. I partnered with a community health worker on home visits and then—with the clinic team—helped manage patient care coordination. Your support of the Annual Fund allows students like me to grow and find our passions.”

Make your gift to the Annual Fund today!

“— Jaime Betancourt ’17, DNP

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