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C O L U M B I A C O N TA C T CONNECTING THE COLUMBIA BIBLE COLLEGE COMMUNITY  |  COLUMBIABC.EDU

5 QUALITIE S O F G R EAT L EADERS How Christ-centered leadership transforms organizations

PIO NEER PR IE S TS Leadership alone isn't enough

H OW TO STA RT WELL AS A L EADER What to do (and not do) in

T OPI C

a new leadership role

T RANS FO RM AT IONA L LE ADERS HIP T he dif fe re nce C hr i st - ce nte red leadership makes


COLUMBIA CONTACT

PRE SI DE NT ’ S D ES K

2017-2018 Academic Year Columbia Bible College seeks to equip people for a life of discipleship, ministry, and leadership in service to the church and community.

LEA DIN G W I T H B O L D H U M I L I T Y

COLUMBIA CONTACT PURPOSE STATEMENT The purpose of the Columbia Contact is to encourage and provide updates about news, events, and related college business to students, alumni and friends of the college. Columbia Bible College provides faith formation and professional ministry preparation for Christians of all ages and supports the churches of the region in the fulfillment of their mission. Columbia is evangelical Anabaptist and is operated by two regional Mennonite conferences, British Columbia Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches and Mennonite Church British Columbia.

EDITOR IN CHIEF Stephanie Jantzen

LAYOUT & DESIGN Grant Bielefeld

COVER PHOTO Jag_cz on Shutterstock

CONTRIBUTORS Bryan Born Kathleen Doll Harvina Kaler Matt Kaminski Kurtis Kube Niamh Reynolds Sarah Rozendal

CONTACT Tel. (604) 853-3358 Toll Free. 1-800-283-0881 info@columbiabc.edu Fax. (604) 853-3063 Columbia Bible College 2940 Clearbrook Road Abbotsford, BC V2T 2Z8

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n one of my favorite books, Transforming Mission, author David Bosch argues that 21st-century Christians need to practice “mission in bold humility.” That exhortation has stuck with me through the years, and caused me to reflect on not just my mission efforts, but every aspect of life. Am I living in bold humility? As I consider current world events and those seeking to exercise leadership in these turbulent times, I believe this brief phrase, as contradictory as it sounds, is perhaps the best definition of the kind of leadership most needed today: bold humility. I have witnessed this type of leadership. Erwin Rempel was the country director for our mission agency when I served in Botswana. Prior to his African ministry, he had been a long-term missionary in Brazil, and then served as the General Director of the Mennonite Church USA mission agency. He had a wealth of experience, wisdom, and skill. When he arrived in country, he had every right to expect submission from a team of younger missionaries. But he never demanded respect; he earned it. As I look back on our years working together, the descriptions for Erwin that come to mind are: servant, listener, strategic planner, wise mentor, and committed Jesus-follower. I have often told students the story of how he unplugged the only toilet in one of my coworker’s homes while that colleague and I were off teaching in a remote village. Dealing with the crisis of three kids and no washroom facilities, my colleague’s spouse had asked Erwin for the phone number of a plumber. His response: “I’ll be right over to take care of it.” That was Erwin — no job was too dirty, too menial, or too frustrating for him. For just those reasons, our team loved and respected him deeply, and when he spoke, we listened carefully to his every word.

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Another one of my friends, Ron Toews, is similar to Erwin in many ways. He has taught me many lessons, but one of the most important is the idea of “non-anxious leadership.” Edwin Friedman in his brilliant book, A Failure of Nerve, describes how leaders will constantly face crises. Most crises cannot be solved quickly, and this is why we must learn non-anxious leadership: the ability to manage anxiety instead of frantically looking for the “right” solution. Ron has taught me that this kind of leadership requires a bold faith and courageous hope that God has things in control. Instead of reacting with fear, we can step out in risk-taking obedience. To me, bold humility is all about trusting God to guide and empower, and then equipping and enabling the people around us to serve as God leads. This edition of the Columbia Contact focuses on leadership. As many of our readers are aware, in the past decade Columbia has intentionally chosen to focus on the development of Christlike servant leaders. Some years ago, we made the decision to modify our mission statement to include a focus on leadership: “to equip people for a life of discipleship, ministry and leadership in service to the church and community.” This small edit manifested itself in small ways at first, but eventually led to the addition of a course in leadership studies within our core curriculum. Since then, Student Development has substantially ramped up our training and equipping of student leaders. More recently, we launched two new programs: Applied Leadership and Social Entrepreneurship. It's our aim that grounded in a solid biblical core, every one of our Columbia programs will develop Christ-like servants who will lead with bold humility. It’s exciting to see what God is doing!

Bryan Born, President


CON TE NT S DEPARTMENTS 01

PRESIDENT'S DESK

▄ 

NEWS & UPDATES

▄  

Leading with Bold Humility.

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Staff transitions, Columbia Annual Fundraising Dinner, and celebrating achievements.

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B ECO M I NG A L E A DE R W ORT H F OL L OW IN G

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SOUL FOOD

BEARCAT ATHLETICS

See what alumni from your Columbia community are up to.

What this year's student leaders experienced during their action-packed training week. 15

Insights and favourite quotes on leadership from faculty and staff.

FEATURES 17 07

ALUMNI UPDATES

13

Co-captains Harvina Kaler & Sarah Rozendal on leading the Bearcats women's basketball team.

5 QUALITIES OF GREAT LEADERS

PIONEER PRIESTS

By Kathleen Doll

By Kur tis Ku b e

And how they impact an organization's success.

Leadership alone isn't enough.

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NE W S & UPDAT ES

C OLU M BIA N E W S & U P DAT E S UPCOMING EVENTS VIEW DAYS FOR POTENTIAL STUDENTS Thursday, Nov. 23 Thursday, Feb. 8 Thursday, March 29

WINTER CLASSES BEGIN Monday, January 8

VIEW OVERNIGHT Thursday, March 29 Friday, March 30

BEARCAT PROWL Saturday, April 14

2018 COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY & GRADUATION BANQUET

COLUMBIA ANNUAL FUNDRAISING DINNER

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ver 270 guests gathered for Columbia’s Annual Fundraising Dinner on October 21, 2017 to be inspired by the theme “Columbia 2030 – More Than All We Can Imagine.” After enjoying a delicious banquet prepared by Columbia Gourmet Catering, guests were treated to musical performances from Columbia’s Travelling Ministry Team. Keynote speaker and alumnus Warren Janzen, International Director of SEND International, shared that the lessons he learned at Columbia – “to seek first the kingdom” helped launched him on his current ministry. Today, he has the privilege of seeing people’s lives transformed as they are introduced to Jesus. Biblical Studies students Jordan Chanin and Amanda Dick expressed the dreams God is instilling within them during their time at Columbia. For Amanda, that dream is to bring theological education to areas overseas where it’s most needed. Jordan hopes to devote his life to ending extreme poverty and bringing the gospel to unreached people groups. The evening concluded with a video featuring the “Class of 2030,” young kids who will need Columbia to be here to equip them for discipleship. At the evening’s close, president Bryan Born invited guests to invest in the College. Thanks to the many who responded generously, over $200,000 has been raised so far!

WELCOME TO NEW STAFF & CONGRATULATIONS ON NEW ROLES

Saturday, April 21

ERICA BAIN

GIL DUECK

MICAH PARKERSON

Executive Assistant to the President

Academic Dean

Commuter Director

TRISTA COOPER

STEFAN GRABOWSKI

Development Events Coordinator

Director of Hospitality Operations

JOHN SHERK

2018 COLUMBIA OPEN GOLF TOURNAMENT Thursday, May 31

MIKE COPPIN Admissions Advisor

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Male Residence Director

JULIA M C DOUGALL

KRISTIINA VUORENSIVU

Development & Alumni Associate

Counselling Services Supervisor


PARTNERSHIP WITH HILLSIDE CHURCH THE NORTH SHORE SCHOOL OF MISSION

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his year, Hillside Church approached Columbia with a proposal to work together in training North Vancouverarea young adults for church ministry. They had established a ministry-apprenticeship program with a strong academic component, and wanted to provide participants with academic credit.

Our new partnership allows students to complete their first year of a Diploma in Intercultural Studies at the School of Mission at a reduced tuition rate, and then move into their second year on campus at Columbia. We're excited to be working closely with a church that shares our vision for bringing together practical and academic training.

FALL 2017 STATS GENDER:

PROGRAM:

3% 45% Men

ENROLLMENT:

Undeclared

22%

55% Women

STUDENTS

FALL 2017

FALL 2016

FALL 2015

FALL 2014

New

173

196

171

167

Continuing

228

199

206

212

Re-entry

13

16

23

21

Casual

12

07

06

05

TOTAL

426

418

406

405

Certificate

26% Diploma 49% BA

WHERE OUR STUDENTS ARE FROM 276

British Columbia

44

Alberta

22

Saskatchewan

13

Manitoba

33

Ontario

02

Quebec

26

United States

10

International

TOP 10 DENOMINATIONS: Mennonite Brethren Mennonite Church Alliance Baptist Catholic Evangelical Free

276

Evangelical Miss.

44

22

13

33

02

Non-denominational Pentecostal Reformed

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NE W S & UPDAT ES

ACA DEMIC NEW S ANNOUNCING 3 NEW PROGRAMS

DIPLOMA IN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP A two-year program focused on developing faith, a Christ-centered approach to business, and core skills needed to succeed in the marketplace: accounting, economics, marketing, entrepreneurial operations, and more. STATUS: 7 students enrolled for Fall 2017.

DIPLOMA IN APPLIED LEADERSHIP This equips students with leadership skills for ministry and the marketplace. Students may enter in their first year, or after completing Columbia One, QUEST, or the new ERT program. STATUS: 23 students enrolled for Fall 2017 (3 new students + 20 students in Year 2 or above).

EMERGENCY RESCUE TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE A one-year career-focused program that aims to develop a Christcentered character and worldview along with the hard and soft skills needed to help people in crisis. STATUS: 5 students enrolled for Fall 2017.

CELEBRATING ACHIEVEMENTS ACCREDITATION

We were granted a ten-year renewal of our accreditation status with the Association for Biblical Higher Education.

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BEST CHRISTIAN WORKPLACES

Columbia was recognized as a 'Best Christian Workplace' for 2017, based on our 'Best Christian Workplaces' staff engagement survey results. We're excited to see that our efforts to create a supportive and inspiring workplace culture are bearing fruit.


AL U M NI UPDATES

YO U R COLU M BIA A LU M NI C O M M U N I T Y TOLU OJO

BA in Youth Work, 2016 Tolu: "This September I started my new position at Pacific Academy as High School Athletics Coordinator. In this position I get to coordinate all the gym space bookings within Athletics, coach various teams, and run Pacific Academy’s afterschool sports programs and summer camp programs. When I tell people what I am doing, their first response is often, “How did you land that role?” At first this question threw me off and I would jokingly reply “Well, I applied for the job.” But then I started considering how God and CBC prepared me for this new position so well and I grew to be really thankful for my experiences at CBC over the past five years. After graduating high school, I felt God calling me to attend Columbia and pursue a degree in Youth Work. I believed I was on the path to becoming a Youth Pastor; however my yearlong internship in Youth Ministry left me with this uneasy feeling that being a Youth Pastor was not for me. Now in my new position I interact and work with teenagers every day and I am thankful for everything I learned through my degree and how I am able to implement these lessons daily. At CBC, I was also able to participate in the Athletics Department on the Women’s Basketball Team. This team taught me how God and Sport can go hand in hand and it grew my passion for athletics. These lessons have a direct correlation in my role at PA as our goal is to be developing a Christ-Centered Athletics program and instilling this value in all of our athletes. Above all else, at Columbia I learned how to depend on God through everything, and this is something that is of immeasurable value in my life. I know it will continue to grow me and help me to become more of who God is calling me to be in whatever role he calls me to."

ANDREW BAERG

Certificate in Christian Studies, 1996 Andrew Baerg took a three-month sabbatical from his role as COO at SOLE (yoursole.com) to take on an exciting challenge: a 1600-km bike trip to help raise support for Camp Evergreen. During his tour, Andrew visited 18 churches, encouraging them to invest in Camp Evergreen by praying, donating, and sending kids to camp to be mentored and to hear the gospel. Andrew and his wife Lisa live in Calgary with their 3 boys, Jaxson (16), Eli (13), and Sawyer (10). You can read more about his bike adventure at biking4evergreen.ca.

LAVONNE KROEKER

Diploma in Biblical Studies, 1994 Lavonne: "In late 2016, I made the decision to move on from a ministry leadership position that I found very challenging. Before I resigned, I had a few leads on new opportunities, but nothing concrete lined up. This was scary! It threw me into a place where I needed to trust God’s provision in ways I never had before and I am now so thankful for that. Very shortly after my last day at work, my sister and her young family were blessed with their first home. I found myself with a new full time “job” either packing or caring for my niece and nephew. About a month after that, my parents moved off their farm after living there for 56 years. While I was working full-time, I had wondered how I would be able to give my parents the help they needed. Here was my answer! I now had ample time and filled my days with many tasks. My family and I are convinced that it was no coincidence I didn’t find a new position to jump into: it was so I could serve my family during these big transitions. After seven months on a rollercoaster job search, I began a new position with an organization called Eden Health Care Services as a Program Coordinator for a supported employment program. It is great to be a part of an organization that lives out their faith by walking alongside those who are struggling with mental health. One of my prayers was that I would continue to rely on God and stay connected to Him in the ways I had been during my job search and previous employment. Working with people with barriers to employment has certainly given me opportunity. Connecting with individuals has been a highlight so far and my prayer is that each one will leave encouraged and more hopeful about their own job search. Given our funding sources, there are uncertainties about my future here as well but I’m grateful for the job I currently have and also excited about possibilities within the organization that may come up in the future. Through the experiences of the last year, my appreciation has grown for my faith community that has so gently and faithfully cared and prayed for me, both those near me and people further away. CBC staff whom I’ve never met, found out about my situation and offered their prayers. It has been so humbling and a huge gift to me. I’ve also rediscovered that God does provide and I can trust Him. His plans are far beyond my own and I don’t need to know what’s around the bend. My prayer has been “Show me your ways, O Lord. Teach me your paths. Lead me in Your truth and teach me for You are the God of my salvation. On You, I wait all the day.” Psalm 25:4-5." ■

If you are a Columbia Alum and wish to update our community about your recent accomplishments and endeavours, please contact Julia McDougall at Julia.Mcdougall@columbiabc.edu.

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IN

the first assignment in our “Introduction to Leadership Studies” class here at Columbia, we ask students to describe what “good” leadership looks like. As we read their responses, it is fascinating to see how they arrived at their conclusions: someone has lead them well and thus provided a model to follow, or someone has lead poorly and their answer is the opposite of whatever that person did. If leadership is influence, then there is much work to be done to ensure it is truly good. Thankfully, we have the best example of leadership in our Saviour, and provision of instruction throughout Scripture. So, what then does great leadership look like, and how does it contribute to an organization’s success?

5 QUALITIES OF GREAT LEADERS A ND HOW T HEY H EL P T H EI R O RGAN IZ AT IO N S U C C EED

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| by Kat hl een Do l l

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DEPENDING ON JESUS WITH A HUMBLE HEART.

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SUBMITTING TO GOD.

Great leaders are not perfect people. Great leaders are those who acknowledge their standing in relation to who God is. In each course on leadership that I teach at Columbia, I spend at least one class working through the concepts of pride and humility. As the students study Scriptural references, they identify that pride and humility are two sides of the same coin that can flip easily without our full awareness. When we journey in humility, we understand who we are in light of who He is; when we journey in pride, we begin with us, and understand Him in light of who we are. The danger here should be evident: we become our own gods, and therefore no longer believe we need Jesus. We decide that our way is best, and we stop listening to His Spirit, His Word, and the people we serve. The severe language Scripture uses around pride should serve as a clear marker: start with Him. Depend on Him. Great leadership is found when leaders are known for who they truly are: humble, dependent creations who belong to Jesus. When leaders lead in this way, we want to follow; the organization then experiences success because the employees can trust their leader. Understanding God to be sovereign, Jesus demonstrated His response in Luke 22:42: “Yet not my will, but yours be done”. He expressed His human nature in desiring another option, yet exemplified submission in choosing God’s will, knowing the

Photo: Sean Menary on Lightstock


greater cost. When we submit, we are no longer obstacles, and His work can be done. When we submit to God’s sovereignty, we can heed the words of Chip Ingram: “Refuse to worry. You can stop trying to manipulate situations and trying to figure out how to make them work out because you know who is in control. You can rest in his sovereign goodness” (God: As He Longs For You To See Him, 2004, p. 94). My response to daily circumstances and situations that arise can express who I believe God is, and how much power I inaccurately grant myself. Great leadership calls us to recognize our Leader, and allow Him to lead us first. When leaders practice this, they exhibit calm and clarity; the organization then experiences success because the leader sees the bigger picture, refusing to worry or manipulate, and subsequently we can work as a team.

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LIVING WITH PURPOSE.

It was early in the morning, and Jesus had left the house. The whole city had been gathered there the night before, asking for healing, witnessing His power. There was still much work to be done in this place, and Simon and his companions finally found Jesus: “’Everyone is looking for You.’ He said to them, ‘Let us go somewhere else to the towns nearby, so that I may preach there also; for that is what I came for.’” (Mark 1-37-38). Our Saviour took time to be with His Father, and while there were so many opportunities right in front of Him, He knew His purpose. His direction was clear. Great leadership requires us to define our mission as we follow our Leader, spending time with Him so He can renew and refresh our focus. The qualification here is that we are indeed spending time with Him, and then choosing boldly to act on what we hear Him asking of us. When we lead from this place we communicate purpose; the organization then experiences success because we stay on mission.

4

COMMITTING TO THOSE WE SERVE.

The wrestle between task and relationship will forever be a tension as I lead. I continue to learn from Jesus’ example, and appreciate Luke’s inclusion of this story in the gospel: Jesus was approaching Jericho, when a blind beggar on the side of the road became a distraction. This man was seeking Jesus, but the group He was with was on a mission, and these leaders saw him as an interruption. But Jesus stopped. Jesus commanded that he be brought to Him. Jesus took the time and asked him, “What do you want Me to do for you?” (Luke 18:41). In

my faulty ways, I would have assumed I already know this man’s needs. Jesus reminds me to ask those I serve, and not to assume. As we commit to those we serve, we build relationship by practicing vulnerability: “Laying down your life means making your own faith and doubt, hope and despair, joy and sadness, courage and fear available to others as ways of getting in touch with the Lord of life” (Henri Nouwen, In the Name of Jesus, 1989, p. 61). Great leadership calls us close to our Saviour; from His lovingkindness we love others, we serve, and we lead them to His lovingkindness. When leaders operate in this way, employees feel valued; the organization then experiences success as employees desire to contribute well.

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MULTIPLYING OUR LEADERSHIP.

As Jesus journeyed and lead the disciples, we see how he called them into a new way of life. He had called them (Matt 4), explained the cost (Matt 8), modeled and taught what God values (Matt 5-7), and related in ways they could understand (Matt 13). He heard their questions and found ways to explain this new life for them. And then He sent them out to do as He had done (Matt 10). Jesus equipped so that His Father’s work could continue. There is a continual question that runs through my mind as each year at Columbia passes: am I leading in such a way that others could continue the work after me? Am I equipping and teaching more than task; am I truly imparting vision? When leaders consider how to empower those working with them, they create culture. The organization then experiences success as those entering new leadership roles continue to build on the foundation laid: the organization becomes even better. As I share these five points with the students, I see their eyes grow bigger with awareness of all that leadership requires. I ask them if they now feel like leadership is beyond them, and when they inevitably nod back in agreement, I let them know it needs to feel that way. We are the clay, and He is the Potter, and I am so very thankful for that reality. As we consider what success looks like in His eyes, may we be guided into great leadership. ■

GREAT LEADERSHIP IS FOUND WHEN LEADERS ARE KNOWN FOR WHO THEY TRULY ARE: HUMBLE, DEPENDENT CREATIONS WHO BELONG TO JESUS.

K ATH L E E N D O L L serves as the Associate Dean of Students and Co-Director of the Applied Leadership Program here at Columbia. Want to share with her what you’ve learned about great leadership? Send an email to: Kathleen.Doll@ columbiabc.edu.

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” One word that has out to me has been authenticity – lead is not about being a mountain and lo down on others, be perfect figure for o students. It’s abou humble, vulnerabl available to others

B EC O M I NG A LE A D E R WOR TH F OL L OWI NG

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n August 27, student leaders arrived on campus for an intensive week of leadership training.

Student leadership training week isn't something new at Columbia: it's a tradition that goes back more than 20 years. Back then, the focus was on training resident leaders. Over the past five years, student leadership opportunities on campus have almost doubled. In 2017, a record-setting number of student leaders gathered on campus: 54 young men and women. Their roles range from resident leaders to sports captains to commuter hosts, worship leaders, student council execs, and program interns. It’s these leaders who will set the tone for the entire student body as a new academic year launches. For the next five days, thirteen of Columbia’s staff and faculty would pour into them, equipping them to serve and disciple the student body in the upcoming year.

HERE’S WHAT THIS YEAR’S STUDENT LEADERS EXPERIENCED. 09

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< SARAH R.

DAY 1

DAY 2

MONDAY

TUESDAY

A LEADER WORTH FOLLOWING

THE INNER WORK

On Day 1, the leaders-intraining are introduced to the week's theme. A hands-on team activity drives home the lesson that great leaders work at balancing three elements of leadership: centering on Jesus, embracing a kingdomfocus understanding of leadership, and living out a transformational practice of leadership.

Day 2 is a a combinatio large group teaching an small group interaction Students grapple with t big ideas:

• the fact that our influ as leaders depends o humble we are in ligh who God is, and the d to which we're willin accept input

• the importance of be authentic as leaders, sharing vulnerably fr our experiences

• the results of their M Briggs personality tests and how they c collaborate well in lig of each other's indivi strengths and weakn


s stuck n dership up on ooking eing a other ut being le, and s.”

on of nd n. three

uence on how ht of degree ng to

eing , rom

Myers

can ght idual nesses

” This week has been incredible. The biggest impact for me was the four hours of solitude at Heritage Park. Time to get alone with God, listen to His voice, throw out the things of the world, and get in tune with what He wants for me this year.”  < ANDREW M.

DAY 3

DAY 4

DAY 5

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

THE UPWARD CONNECTION

THE OUTWARD FOCUS

HOW WILL WE LIVE IT OUT?

On Day 3, students travel to Heritage Park in Mission for a four-hour silent retreat. After a large group reflection on Mark 1:3539 (where Jesus took time out to be with his Father), students find a quiet spot to seek God's strength and wisdom for the year ahead.

On Day 4, the new leaders tackle the practicalities of leadership. In small groups, they review role descriptions, set goals for the coming year, train for specific tasks, and get started on prep work for the coming year.

On the final day of training, students spend the morning learning challenging lessons: how to draw clear boundaries so they can stay healthy as leaders, and how to respond when they run into the inevitable obstacles and setbacks leaders experience.

Supper together at The Old Spaghetti Factory leads into a small group debrief where students share what they learned as they met with God.

The Student Development team serves the student leaders a special dinner in the chapel, to celebrate how far they've come.

After a potluck lunch hosted by staff & faculty, the student leaders receive an "Orientation to Orientation," so that they'll be ready to greet and serve the 170 new students about to arrive on campus.

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HOW TO START WEL L AS A L EADER

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Photo: Prixel Creative on Lightstock

B Y M ATT KA M IN SKI


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his fall I have had the wonderful opportunity of watching my oldest son, Sullivan, start kindergarten. I have been able to observe firsthand through Sullivan what it’s like to start something new. I have watched Sullivan experience excitement and anxiety all at the same time, begin to make new friends, figure out his surroundings, and try to get his year started on the “right foot.” The truth is, these feelings don’t change much as we get older, and leaders certainly are not exempt. It doesn’t matter if it’s your first few weeks of kindergarten, like Sullivan, or you’re now leading a new team, business or organization, starting somewhere or something new is challenging and exciting all at the same time, and despite this mix of feeling it’s important to start well. Six years ago I started serving at Columbia as Director of Athletics & Recreation, and through that process I learned a lot about starting something new; I learned a lot about starting well.

WHO DO YOU KNOW? WHAT DO THEY KNOW? We’ve all heard the phrase, “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” One of the first things that I realized starting at Columbia was that I was a part of a team of great people who had been at Columbia a lot longer than I had. This team of people had been through ups and downs, had invested time and energy, and believed in the mission of the college and their role within that. I hadn’t done any of this yet. Luckily for me, athletics was just one part in a much larger body, a part with the opportunity to collaborate with student development, academics, the business office, facilities, and IT (just to name a few on campus). With that in mind, the need to get to know the folks in these departments, ask lots of questions, learn from them, and find out why they were passionate about Columbia, became imperative. As Proverbs 1:5 says, “A wise man will hear and increase in learning, And a man of understanding will acquire wise counsel.” If you want to start well as a leader, get to know your teammates: what they know, their vision for their team, and why they love what they do.

UNDERSTAND THE CULTURE In addition to getting to know the people of Columbia, it was also important to get to

know the culture. Quite simply “culture is how organizations ‘do things’” (Katanga). The culture when I first started at Columbia was very similar to today’s: “to equip people for a life of discipleship, ministry, and leadership in service to the church and community” by being Christ-centered, Kingdom-focused, and worldimpacting in all that we do as staff, faculty, and students. As a leader my job was, and continues to be, utilizing sport to carry out this culture: journeying with volleyball and basketball players and coaches as we learn to compete in a way that is Christ-centered, Kingdom-focused, and world-impacting.

If you want to start well as a leader, get to know your teammates: their vision, and why they love what they do.

change. It wasn’t until much later that I realized the importance of earning trust, respect, and credibility. It is in earning these elements that a leader is able to ask for support, belief, and collaboration in the future. If you want to start well as a leader, earn yourself some “spare change”; earn yourself trust, respect, and credibility.

HOLD ON TIGHT, TAKE NOTES, AND DREAM BIG Finally, like riding a rollercoaster, starting a new position as a leader is a wild ride full of excitement and anxiety. Hold on! It’s during this time that you will undoubtedly experience ups and downs, twists and turns, and moments when you feel that you are all turned around. Do not lose heart! Keep your eyes open on the ride. Be observant, take some good notes, and dream about what it is you want to do and where it is you want to take others in the future. If you want to start well as a leader, hold on tight, take good notes, and dream about what you want the future to look like. Observing Sullivan start kindergarten this fall has reminded me in a lot of ways about my start as a leader. By that I mean, both opportunities were occasions to learn and grow through the process of discovery and failure. Both were times to journey with others and ask lots of questions. And both were occasions to be a little uncomfortable and to dream big! If you are somebody who is starting something new, start well by getting to know your teammates and the culture, by earning yourself some “spare change,” and hold on tight because it is going to be a worthwhile ride! ■

If you want to start well as a leader, understand the culture that exists within your organization and how you can help bring that culture to life.

EARN SOME “SPARE CHANGE” One of the greatest pieces of advice that I have received regarding starting well as a leader came from my father-in-law. He told me that when starting a new role as a leader it is important to not jump in and start making changes as I would have no “spare change” to spend. While I didn’t make many changes in my first year as AD, it wasn’t until much later that I understood what he meant by spare

M AT T K A MI N SKI serves as the Athletic Director as well as the Co-Director of the Applied Leadership Program here at Columbia.

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Pioneer Priests: Leadership Alone Isn’t Enough by Kurtis Kube

Leadership and management always go handin-hand. They are not opposed to one another, but rather are unified in their diversity. 13

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eadership is a “buzz word” these days, especially within the Christian community. While I appreciate the emphasis on leadership, I have noticed a disturbing trend: “leadership” is often used in juxtaposition to “management,” as though one was superior to the other — a good versus evil delineation. Perhaps you’ve heard claims such as “managers do things right, while leaders do the right things.”1 While I certainly agree with aspects of the statement, and I appreciate the emphasis on right motive and action, the language is incendiary and fails to capture the necessity of both leadership and management within the context of any organization, whether that be a family, church, registered charity, or a for-profit entity. I saw the necessity of administrative and management skills within all organizations on a road-trip this past

2017- 2018

summer when my family and I visited La Parisma Mission in Lompoc, California. The Franciscan mission was established in 1787 by Padre Presidente Fermin Francisco Lasuen.2 At its prime, the footprint of the mission covered 470 square miles and included roughly 24,000 cattle and sheep — no small operation! The Padres had to manage both the spiritual and physical needs of all the inhabitants, while maintaining financial sustainability. What caught my attention was a sign that read, Pioneer Priests. Managing the Mission Requires Many Skills. If you want to be a Franciscan Priest…you will not only be responsible for the spiritual welfare of the entire mission community, but your resume should also include experience in the following areas: business, import/export, law, politics, accounting, farming, architecture, engineering, construction….


of administration (some might call that management). The word κυβέρνησις — kybernēsis — is found in I Corinthians 12:28 and communicates the notion of “guiding.” The image that always comes to my mind as I talk with students, pastors, parents, business owners is one of a white-water guide, steering and leading his or her crew of sometimes terrified team-members through the rapids, steering clear of oncoming dangers: both leading and guiding (administration and management) the team to safety. This skill set requires training and equipping, practice and refinement. Management is a necessary part of leadership, and likewise must be studied and applied, learned, and refined.

K U R TI S KU B E serves as the Director of Development, as well as the Social Entrepreneurship

Photo: Andrew Robles on Unsplash

My goal at Columbia is

I couldn’t help but think of the Apostle Paul, and the “practical” skills he employed as an artisan and entrepreneur, all while leading the local church. During our visit, we came across another sign, this one explaining that the mission sought always to have a minimum of two padres on staff at all times: one to lead the spiritual well-being of the community, and another to manage the necessary business activities required to sustain the mission and provide for the community. I couldn’t help but think leadership and management always go hand-in-hand. They are not opposed to one another, but rather are unified in their diversity. To use a cliché, they are two sides of the same coin — connected by a grander purpose. Of course, I’d be remiss if I didn’t take the opportunity to include Paul’s exhortation to the people of Corinth when mentioning various spiritual gifts, among them the gift

Program Director here at Columbia.

to develop holistically

He would love to

equipped leaders... we're

can be contacted at

developing modern-day

columbiabc.edu.

receive feedback and kurtis.kube@

Pioneer Priests. To the sceptics who sometimes push back against management, I often ask the question, “Do you want to guide your organization, family, or church well?” When they respond, “yes”, I then ask, “Are you prepared and equipped to both lead and manage?” My goal at Columbia is to develop holistically equipped leaders who have the character and requisite skills needed, as they have been for centuries, to guide their organizations well for God’s glory. This goal was why we began a conversation four years ago to develop a Diploma in Social Entrepreneurship, and why I’m very excited that we launched the program this fall! In combination with the new Diploma in Applied Leadership, Columbia will offer students a dynamic degree which encompasses the many facets required to truly guide ministries into the future. I guess you could sum up the intention of these efforts with the following words: we’re developing modern-day Pioneer Priests. ■

1  2 

Peter Drucker http://www.lapurisimamission.org/

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SO U L F OOD

RESOURCES ON LEADERSHIP:

INSIGHTS & FAVOURITE QUOTES ON LEADERSHIP FROM BRYAN BORN President

Uncommon: Finding Your Path to Significance by Tony Dungy

“The fullness of the Spirit is an essential and indispensable experience for spiritual leadership. And each of us is as full of the Spirit as we really want to be.” — J. Oswald Sanders, Spiritual Leadership (74) “The fact that people choose to follow you is not necessarily an indicator that you deserve to be followed. There is a significant difference between having a following and being worth following. The truth is that talented, charismatic, visionary people will almost always have a following. Whether they are worth following is a different question, predicated upon a different set of values.” — Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader (151)

FROM MATT KAMINSKI Co-Director of Applied Leadership “Sometimes you win. Sometimes you learn.” Leading from the Sandbox by T.J. Addington

My leadership is most effective when I am truly authentic and aim to empower those I lead. Leadership is not about me and my agenda, but about growing others.

"Another flaw in the human character is that everyone wants to build and nobody wants to do maintenance." — Kurt Vonnegut Jr, Hocus Pocus

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“New leadership is needed for new times, but it will not come from finding new and more wily ways to manipulate the external world. It will come as we who lead find the courage to take an inner journey toward both our shadows and our light, a journey that, faithfully pursued, will take us beyond ourselves to become healers of a wounded world.” – Parker Palmer

FROM JASON WARKETIN Men's Volleyball Head Coach “All leaders are learners. The moment you stop learning, you stop leading.” — Rick Warren

FROM ANDY STROMBERG ICS Associate “You make a living by what you get; you make a life by what you give.” ­— Source unknown

— John Maxwell

FROM FERIN WILLMS Academic Support Coordinator

Crucial Conversations by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Genny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler

FROM KATHLEEN DOLL Co-Director of Applied Leadership

I think the biblical accounts of Ruth & Boaz are impactful and meaningful demonstrations of practical, everyday leadership that reflects the care and character of God. Being a leader like Ruth means staying committed despite reasons not to, doing the "dirty" work to help others, and standing up for your convictions. In my life, it has looked like putting aside my desire for titles and being in the limelight of leadership, and instead embracing ways to be a leader in my community like being kind to others, doing the tedious and unpleasant jobs that no one wants to do, and standing up for those who "leaders" say ought not to belong.

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“The place God calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.” – Frederick Buechner, Wishful Thinking: A Theological ABC

These may on the surface not seem like quotes about leadership, but in my experience good leadership really flows out of service, enthusiasm, and understanding one’s place in the world. When those things are straight, it enables one to enter confidently into the work at hand. Although this doesn’t always look like Type A, megaphone-style leadership, it is the quiet leadership of a life well-lived. Those are the kinds of people I like following, anyhow.

FROM KARA BERGSTROM ICS Program Director Reading I Am Malala showed me the influential power of one courageous act of conviction. There is no minimum age requirement to impact the world. ■


leader means being an adult and taking charge, yet God is asking me to be a child. I’ve managed to hold on to this part of my relationship with God in all my previous leadership roles but

One of the most valuable lessons I have learned in my time at Columbia is that leadership doesn’t fit one box.

Willing & Obedient: WHEN YOU DON'T FEEL LIKE A LEADER By Niam h R ey nolds

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eadership. It’s a strange concept and one that I have never fully understood. I could tell you what I think leadership should look like or even describe my ideal picture of a leader. There’s just one problem: I don’t match that picture. When I think of a leader I think of someone with a powerful presence, someone confident in every setting, someone who is decisive and enjoys taking charge. None of these are descriptions I would use for myself. In my four years at Columbia, I have taken on many leadership roles, formal and informal, but I have struggled to claim ‘leader’ as part of who I am. I can admit to having gifts and skills that lend themselves well to leadership, but to say that I am a leader seems too big a step to make. One of the most valuable lessons I have learned in my time at Columbia is that leadership doesn’t fit one box. There isn’t one right way to lead or one type of person fit to lead. I have had many incredible models of leadership in my life, but until I came to Columbia I didn’t value the difference in their leadership styles. My dad leads

Illustration: Prixel Creative on Lightstock

with wisdom and confidence in front of crowds; my old youth pastor leads with a gentleness rarely seen in youth ministry. I now realize that both are gifted leaders, but in very different ways. I have had the opportunity to observe multiple different styles of leadership within the walls of Columbia Bible College — from our staff and faculty to my fellow student leaders. I have watched, analysed, and tried to figure out what I want my style of leadership to be. The struggle I’ve had with this is that you don’t get to choose who you are as a leader; you just are. You can develop better self-control or decide your leadership will have a relational focus, but you can’t change who you are. Picking and choosing the traits of a leader you like and want to emulate will only lead to wearing a mask of perfect leadership, and neglecting one of the integral features of great leadership: authenticity. When I was first approached about running for Student Council President this year, I was flattered. Who wouldn’t be when people think you have gifts and traits worthy to lead the entire student body, and when the students themselves want you to do it? As I processed and thought of all the wonderful opportunities that come with a position like this, I realised all the negative possibilities this role could hold for me and I began to be fearful. I have walked my last three years here in childlike obedience to God and loved every minute of it. I haven’t always been as faithful to this commitment as I should be, but God always brought me back to Him. But I’ve found the times I’ve struggled to be faithful the most are in moments of leadership: when I think being a

could I do so in such a public role as President? When others are depending on me to make decisions, how do I hold on to my attitude of ‘wait and God will reveal his will’? Unwilling to take the risk that this role could pull me away from God, I told them at first that I wasn’t interested. I changed my mind only when I sensed that God was asking me to be Willing and Obedient: willing to be used in this role if that is what He wanted and obedient to answer if He called me into it. Those fears I started with have become reality in some ways. I do struggle more in this role than any other I’ve taken on and I notice my inclination to act in a more headstrong, assertive manner than how I would act otherwise. Sometimes I find myself trying to be the type of leader I think I should be, instead of the leader God wants me to be. There is nothing wrong with assertive leaders of course — we need them in the world — but that isn’t me. I’m learning that it isn’t about changing who I am to be the type of leader I want to be; it’s about changing the type of leader I want to be to match who God created me to be. God has called me to lead in a way that is grounded in childlike obedience. I don’t yet understand how that will look in practice, but I know He will show me. Not everyone is called to lead this way. But I know if I’m to be a good leader, I have to lead out of my relationship with God and who I am. ■

N IA M H R EYN O L D S is Student Council (StuCo) President for 2017-2018.

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BE ARC AT AT HLETICS

BEARCAT HIGHLIGHT: HARVINA & SARAH Harvina Kaler and Sarah Rozendal, co-captains of the women's basketball team, to get their insights on leadership.

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HOW HAS BEING A BEARCAT SHAPED YOU AS A PERSON AND A LEADER?

and supported to lead from a position of humility, which was a struggle for me prior to being a Bearcat.

HARVINA: I am thankful and feel very honoured to have the opportunity to be a captain for the women's basketball team. Being a Bearcat has been one of the greatest experiences of my life. It has absolutely shaped who I am today. Being a Bearcat has allowed me to embrace and reveal my real and most authentic self. The relationships I have made with my teammates and coaches have allowed me to feel safe and encouraged to be uniquely myself. Bearcats have given me a family when I needed it the most and I will forever be grateful. By allowing me to become my most real and authentic self, the Bearcats have also caused my leadership to evolve in a more authentic way as well. I now feel free

SARAH: My first year as a Bearcat I remember hearing at the athlete's retreat this idea of pursuing excellence in every area of our lives. Pursuing excellence meant doing everything to the best of one's ability. This idea has stuck with me these past few years and I look to pursue excellence in every area of my life, including my relationships, my studies, and my sport. Being a Bearcat has also provided me with a community that constantly supports and encourages me to never give up, to always maintain a positive attitude and effort, and to lead others by example.

2017- 2018

Sarah Sozendal (12) leading the way against VIU

We talked with


AR VI N A 15 HKAL ER

Harvina Kaler (15) driving toward the hoop

2017-2018 Women's Basketball co-captain.

IN YOUR EXPERIENCE, WHAT ARE THE QUALITIES OF A GREAT TEAM CAPTAIN? HOW DOES A GREAT TEAM CAPTAIN LEAD?

perfect and to play from a place of joy rather than fear. This also helps a captain to earn the respect of their teammates.

HARVINA: A great team captain, in my opinion, is someone who is unselfish, puts the team first, is loving, confident, consistent, respected, trustworthy, caring, positive, hardworking, and is able to recognize and utilize the strengths of others as well as help in strengthening weaknesses. I think that a great leader leads from a place of humility and honesty. A captain should be the hardest working, most consistent, and approachable teammate.

WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS FOR THE WOMEN’S BB TEAM THIS YEAR? WHAT ARE YOU EXCITED ABOUT?

SARAH: Captains can lead well by being caring, courageous, humble, and consistent. Team captains need to have a love and passion for the game and for their teammates. They need to be willing to step up and come alongside their teammates as they reach for their potential. They need to be humble and put the team above themselves. And they need to model consistency in their attitude and their effort, choosing to never give up on their team or on themselves. I think it is also really important to recognize that no one is perfect and that people, including captains, will make mistakes. It is in that authenticity and rawness with one's team that they give their teammates permission to not be

Athletic Photos: Leslie & Grant Miller

HARVINA: My goal for our team this year is to make a run at playoffs. We have all the right pieces this year to pursue excellence on and off the court, which I am very excited about. I am also excited to just play the game I love with some of my best friends and the family I have made through Bearcats. SARAH: My overall goal for our team this year is to make provincials. I also want our team to be known for our competitive and Christ-centered spirit. I'm really excited to play with this particular group of girls. We have a great group and they have been working very hard these past few months. We have a lot of talent and it has been really encouraging to start to see chemistry on the court. I think we have a lot to offer this year and it will be exciting to see where this season goes. ■

Career Stats: Averaged per game: • 9.6 points • 4.3 rebounds • 2.7 assists Achievements: • 2015/2016 Pacwest athlete of the week • 2015/2016 Bearcat WBB MVP

AH 12 SAR R O Z E N DAL 2017-2018 Women's Basketball co-captain. Career Stats: Averaged per game: • 9.3 points • 5.5 rebounds • 1.5 assists Achievements: • 2014-2016 Pacwest Academic Excellence • 2015/2016 President's Leadership Excellence

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Columbia Contact: 2017-2018 Issue  
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Transformational Leadership

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