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Colorado State University / THE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ARTS / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 4 / SEPTEMBER 2015


WELCOME TO

THE GREEN ROOM As the newly appointed director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance at Colorado State University, I consider it an honor to welcome you to the fall 2015 season at the University Center for the Arts. The UCA is a gem in Fort Collins, offering nearly every possible genre of music, theatre, dance, and visual art that one could imagine. CSU is all about students, and our students in dance, music, and theatre will be showcased in over 75 events throughout the fall. Dan Goble Jennifer Clary Jacobs Mike Solo Highlights include the annual Fall Dance Concert and Senior Director of the School of Marketing Director Publicity and Marketing Dance Major Capstone Concert; theatrical productions of The Music, Theatre, and Dance Manager Winter’s Tale by William Shakespeare and Step on a Crack by Susan Zeder; and concerts by CSU’s myriad performing ensembles, including the Symphony Orchestra, Jazz Ensemble, Wind Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble, and many others. Don’t miss the Ralph Opera Center’s production of Hansel and Gretel, as well as the annual Holiday Spectacular, which, along with Step on a Crack, are perfect for the entire family. One of the wonderful things about the UCA is its ability to attract outstanding faculty members and guest artists, enhancing the education of CSU students and providing Fort Collins and the surrounding community with world-class programming in the arts. CSU faculty will present over 20 recitals, workshops, and special events this fall, ranging from the OcTUBAfest and OboeRAMa workshops, to recitals for chamber woodwinds, saxophone, flute, percussion, violin, viola, cello, piano, and organ, and collaborative productions that include faculty members from the departments of music, dance, and theatre. The Classical Convergence Series, now in its second year, will feature Break of Reality, an award-winning eclectic cello and percussion quartet that performs music ranging from J.S. Bach to the alternative rock band Tool. Tickets for this one will go fast…so act soon! In addition, the fall season will feature many other guest artists, including Post Paradise, flautist Conor Nelson, and soprano Jennifer Black. Finally, please join us throughout the semester for the University Art Museum’s unique exhibition Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present. I look forward to seeing you this fall at the UCA!

Dan Goble

Dan Goble

Director, School of Music, Theatre and Dance

THIS IS YOUR UCA


TABLE OF TICKETS Online Sales: CSUArtsTickets.com Ticket Office: Griffin Lobby, University Center for the Arts (UCA) Spring 2015 Ticket Office Hours: M–F, 3:30–5:30 p.m., and 60 minutes prior to performances Information: (970) 491-ARTS (2787) / Email: CSUArts@colostate.edu Group rate: 15% off on ten or more tickets, applied at the time of purchase Tickets may be purchased, both online and at the UCA Ticket Office until 30 minutes after curtain. Print-at-home tickets are available online. All tickets are subject to a $1 ticket fee for both online and at-the-door purchases. At-the-door and phone purchases will incur a $3 processing fee per order. Advance ticket purchase is highly recommended to avoid lines and the at-the-door fee. Purchase Policy: All sales are final. No refunds or exchanges. Seating after the start of any performance is at the discretion of the house manager. Photography and recording of performances are strictly prohibited. Food and beverages prohibited in all theatres. Parents with disruptive children may be asked to excuse themselves if the performance is disturbed without refund.

CONTENTS Marching Band Entertains Broncos Fans....... 05 Alumni Series Concert: Britta Laree Risner... 08 Step on a Crack................................................... 10 The School of Music, Theatre and Dance...... 14 Introducing Dan Goble...................................... 17 CSU Textile Collection....................................... 25 Chamber Choir Reunion.................................... 28 Rams in Europe................................................... 29 Kids Do it All Todos Santos............................... 39 Message from Joshua M. Garcia..................... 44 Class Notes.......................................................... 45 Student Profile: Lara Mitofsky Neuss.............. 47 Review: 21st Century Clarinet.......................... 50 Upcoming Music Events.................................... 59 CIIPE 2015............................................................ 61 Fall Workshops.................................................... 66 Faculty Notes....................................................... 68

EXECUTIVE EDITOR: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS CREATIVE DIRECTOR: MIKE SOLO COPYEDITOR: SANDRA SANCHEZ

SOCIAL MEDIA This is your UCA! Stay connected with the University Center for the Arts by connecting with us on social media. Facebook: facebook.com/CSU.UCA Instagram: ColoradoStateUniversity_UCA Twitter: @CSUUCA Tumblr: ColoradoStateUCA Youtube: YouTube.com/ColoradoStateUniv Flickr: flickr.com/photos/csulibarts

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: SPENCER GILLARD JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS LAUREN SCOTT (UCA INTERN)

FOR ADVERTISING PLEASE CONTACT: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS, director of marketing jennifer.clary@colostate.edu / 970.491.3603

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Beckett and CSU in Ireland.............................. 53

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CSU MARCHING BAND ENTERTAINS DENVER BRONCOS FANS AT HOME OPENER

The band is planning a patriotic show honoring our military men and women in uniform, and the country they serve. Historically, the CSU Marching Band performed at more Broncos games than any other band during the 1960s, and received an invitation to entertain fans at the 2009 throwback game celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Denver Broncos Football Club. “The band is honored to be able to continue the tradition of entertaining the incredible Denver Broncos fans,” said Dr. Richard Frey, associate director of

Bands at CSU and director of the CSU Marching Band. “It’s also a nice touch point between Ram alumni and the band.” The Colorado State University Marching Band has a full fall schedule. In addition to six home game performances, the band performs at many special events including the Broncos halftime show, the Rocky Mountain Showdown, the CBA Northern Regional Exhibition, the CSU Homecoming and Family Weekend parade, the CBA State Marching Band Festival, and the 9News Parade of Lights. The CSU Marching Band is asking all alumni and friends attending the Sept. 13 Broncos game to support the ensemble by watching the halftime show, singing along to the CSU Fight Song, and sporting, along with their orange and blue, some green and gold.

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For the third consecutive year, the Colorado State University Marching Band will make a special appearance during halftime at the Denver Broncos home opener vs. the Baltimore Ravens on Sun., Sept. 13 at Sports Authority Field at Mile High. Kickoff is at 2:25 p.m.

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CSU UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS

 A NAT IO N A LIST IC T R E AT  T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

C ON DUCTE D BY DR. R E B EC CA P H I LLI P S

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Special Guest

Katie Mahan Piano 7:30 P.M. SEPT. 24 AND 25

GRIFFIN CONCERT HALL CSUArtsTickets.com Yo u th (u n d e r 1 8 ) $1 / C S U St u d e n t s N O CH A R GE / A dults $12


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A L U M N I

Without love, life is empty. So, first of all in your lives, fall in love. - Edith Piaf

S E R I E S

C O N C E R T

Each year since 2011, talented CSU alumni with thriving music careers are invited back to campus to perform in the Alumni Concert Series. This fall, Britta Laree Risner, who graduated from CSU in 1999 with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, and again in 2004 with a Master’s in Music, will grace the Griffin Concert Stage at the University Center for the Arts with her special presentation Pure Piaf: The Life and Music of Edith Piaf On Saturday, Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m., Britta will be joined by Karen Stoody, piano; Rich Valentino, accordion; and Maggie Sallee, violin, for this unique performance. Set in New York City’s Versailles Club in the late 1940s, Pure Piaff is the gripping story of French chanteuse Edith Piaf – Paris' "Little Sparrow" – her tumultuous rise to international stardom, her loves, and her losses, all wrapped up in the beautiful music she brought to the world, enchanting the masses. From an unknown street performer to the world’s highest paid singer, Piaf ’s life as portrayed in Pure Piaf is a must-see entertainment experience. See and hear why each generation is touched by Piaf ’s music in this intoxicating theatrical work. Pure Piaf is described as intimate and interactive, presenting 16 famous songs including "La Vie En Rose," "Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien," and "Mon Dieu" in two acts. Britta has been wowing audiences with her powerful vocals since focusing her musical abilities towards singing at the age of 14. Since graduating, she has headlined such musicals as “Man of la Mancha,” “Anything Goes,” “Hello, Dolly!,” “I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change,” and many more, earning not only audience accolades, but such critical responses as: “The heart of this musical beats in Britta Laree's unflinchingly sincere performance.” — The Denver Post “… her voice is full and lusty, and perfect …” — The Coloradoan For the past eight years, since being introduced to the magic of Edith Piaf and her indelible music, Britta has focused much of her performing energy into becoming a Piaf specialist. She performs music from Piaf ’s catalogue regularly with “The Amèlie Trio,” and has performed Pure Piaf locally, nationally, and most recently, during two sold out runs in downtown Denver at Lannie’s. “As a member of the first class of Vocal Performance Master’s students, I look forward returning to CSU to share this wonderful and unique piece that has been so widely accepted locally and nationally,” said Laree. Pure Piaf sweeps audiences through a fast-paced, satisfying evening. Join us!

7:30 P.M. SEPT. 19 / GRIFFIN CONCERT HALL Youth (under 1 8) $1 / CS U Students NO CHARGE / Adults $12

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Step On A Crack poster design by Nathan Young

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When most people think of children’s theatre, they usually picture stories inundated with magic, new lands, mystical creatures, and important lessons all being performed in intimate venues. In many cases, all these things can be true. However, children’s theatre can be just as diverse and significant as theatre for more adult audiences. This fall, Colorado State University Theatre will be on a mission to prove this.

CSU Theatre Major Under the direction of Laura Jones, theatre students, and kids in the Fort

Collins community, present Step on a Crack by Suzan Zeder. The story follows Ellie Murphy who grows up the child of a single dad. But, when her father remarries, Ellie seeks an escape from reality by adventuring with her imaginary friends, Lana and Frizbee, learning some important lessons along the way.

It is not new for CSU to be taking on children’s theatre, and this play has

long awaited its opportunity to fill the slot. “I first encountered Suzan Zeder’s Step on a Crack in graduate school at the University of Denver,” says Jones, whose teaching assistantship was in children’s theatre. She was given the green light by her professor, Dr. Annabelle Clark, to direct the show on a shoe-string budget, which first introduced a piece featuring contemporary themes to the DU campus. She explains that it is time to put it on the CSU stage saying, “I can finally do the play the justice it deserves by bringing 30 years of post-doctoral experience to bear.”

Step on a Crack will be a marvelous addition to CSU’s children’s theatre

repertoire as it is written by one of the leading playwrights for youth and family audiences in the United States. Suzan Zeder is known for expanding the subject matter of children’s theatre to include themes like divorce, stepparents, and deafness. Zeder was first introduced to writing for family audiences in graduate school

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“I write because I cannot fly… but words can. And where they land, worlds appear and characters move and breathe and audiences come together in the alchemy of the moment.” SUZAN ZEDER

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at Southern Methodist University where she was asked by a when they are not amused by fidgeting and will always professor to do an adaptation of the folktale entitled Wiley be honest in their reactions. This brings a fresh challenge and the Hairy Man. As a young writer still trying to find her to the actors who must become fully committed to their

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voice, Zeder discovered immense joy in being able to let her imagination run wild in this storytelling world where anything was possible. Her adaptation is still her most produced play and opened the door to the evolution of mature children’s theatre. In an industry flooded with fairytales where good fights evil and social norms are upheld, Zeder was one of the first to portray child characters as smart, strong, and complex as they work through real-life challenges.

jobs onstage. Second, children in our community and beyond are our future and we owe it to them to continue including them in our art so that it may be appreciated for many years to come. Jones put it best by saying, “If you can engage children at an early age, they are far more likely to support the arts as adults.” Lastly, children’s theatre is relatable – not just for kids, but also for adults. Take one of the major themes in Step on a Crack – single parents and mixed families. About fifty percent of all children in the The audition process has been Jones’ favorite part United States under the age of thirteen are raised by one of putting this show together so far. Step on a Crack is built biological parent and that parent’s partner, making this around the importance of imagination which made it a key piece immensely relatable. element in finding the perfect actors. Jones describes the auditions as a time for the actors to just have fun, recalling Perhaps it is Zeder herself who puts it best. “I write that “actors playing Ellie’s imaginary friends were in the because I cannot fly… but words can. And where they small acting lab with boxes of assorted props and asked to land, worlds appear and characters move and breathe and engage in unscripted ‘play’.” The design meetings have also audiences come together in the alchemy of the moment.” given Jones immense inspiration. The design team, led by Don’t miss out on your opportunity to be part of this pheLighting, Sound, and Projections Design Professor Price nomenal performance! Johnston, have worked hard to keep the play in its original 1970s setting. For Jones and the rest of the team, it has been a blast to work with neon, shag carpeting, a curtain made out of bottle caps, and plenty of bell bottom jeans.

Step on a Crack

So why is it so important that children’s theatre is included in the CSU season on a regular basis? For one, children are the most challenging of all audiences. They let you know

Oct. 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, and 24, 7:30 p.m., and Oct. 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, and 25, 2 p.m. at the University Center for the Arts located on 1400 Remington Street.


State of Making Mu s ic Join CSU’s non-auditioned music ensembles this year!

If you don’t have an instrument with you on campus, don’t worry! Many instruments are available for rental. The positive environment has provided sophomore Stephanie Lane with many performance opportunities, fantastic memories, and chances to meet new people. “It is incredible that even though we are all studying different majors, we are still united through music and through the hard work we put into it,” she said. Lane hopes more students will discover reasons to continue in music. “I love concert band where it’s low-stress and super fun,” she said enthusiastically, “Continuing music in college is something I encourage everyone to do!” Information about all non-auditioned and auditioned ensembles is at music.colostate.edu

The collaborative Concert Orchestra (MU 206) is a an ensemble of 30 string players who perform with choral, wind, and percussion students and faculty. M/W, 1 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Contact: Leslie2.Stewart@ colostate.edu With over 100 men and women singers, the University Chorus (MU 202) is the largest mixed choir on campus. T/TH, 5:30–7 p.m. Contact: Stuart.Dameron@colostate.edu Men’s Chorus (MU 201) performs a wide variety of music specifically for men’s voices. T/TH, 2–3:15 p.m. Contact: Ryan.Olsen@colostate.edu

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At CSU, there are four ensembles open to all majors that do not require an audition to be a member. Students in these ensembles come from biological sciences, business, engineering, computer sciences, English, political science, zoology, and music. Simply register and show up.

Concert Band (MU 205) is an exciting, dynamic group of 100 instrumental musicians. W/F, 4:15–5:45 p.m. Contact: E.Johnson@colostate.edu

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The arrival of our new director, Dr. Dan Goble, comes on the heels of an exciting name change for music, theatre, and dance at Colorado State University. Prior to the spring of 2015, the three areas were a ‘Department,’ and with the new, more standard nomenclature of the ‘School of Music, Theatre and Dance,’ a sharpened sense of prestige and unity exists at the University Center for the Arts.


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We must hang together... else, we shall most assuredly hang separately. — Ben Franklin

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by Jennifer Clary Jacobs Dan Goble, who arrived on campus in mid-July, grew up in Casper, Wyo., and spent most of his career at Western Connecticut State University where he was dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts for the past four years.

The new moniker doesn’t insinuate blended disciplines with identical methods and processes, but connotes the alliance of three distinct areas. “The underlying theme of the organizational structure is the unification of the creative and artistic process,” said Goble. And this theme transcends the production, rehearsal, research, and teaching processes. Despite Goble’s insight on the name evolution, he doesn’t have a pre-determined vision to be meted on the School. “I don’t presume to already know the vision for 100 highly seasoned professionals already hard at it – the visioning and mission for the School is going to be fleshed out, and even newly created, during the year,” assured Goble. “We’ve been going along for a long time as a department, and now, the school designation gives us the opportunity to continue building on the synergies between the disciplines, something that really began when we all moved into the University Center for the Arts in 2008.”

I believe the School of Music, Theatre and Dance is a leader in performing arts education in Colorado and beyond.

For Goble, the first step is to determine what the School already does really well. The second step is to establish what can be done as a School that is innovative and resonates with students and patrons. “We’re going to take some time to figure out what we do well, what we do not do so well, what we do better, and what we could do better, analyzing our place as leaders in the performing arts and establishing our goals as a performing arts school,” he outlined. Goble’s questions are not rhetorical. What sets the School of Music, Theatre and Dance at CSU apart from the regional competition? Why would a prospective

student choose us? What makes the School unique to donors? Why would someone support us with their time or treasure? What do our alumni and patrons say about their experience? How is what I do as a faculty or staff member, or grad student, fit into the overall picture? As the director, Goble is equipped to tackle these hard questions as he leads the faculty and staff through the re-positioning process, where the challenge will be to identify additional niche elements – such as having the state’s single undergraduate dance degree emphasizing pedagogy, or being one of the only music therapy programs in the Rocky Mountain region – crucial to excelling as regional and national leaders. “The main reason I took the position is to help CSU realize its potential of having a truly great performing arts program,” he revealed. “I believe the School of Music, Theatre and Dance is a leader in performing arts education in Colorado and beyond.” What Goble also hopes to accomplish, with everyone’s help, is the alleviation of any residual music, theatre, and dance hierarchy from the days as a department. “Hey, it’s the west – we’re all neighbors, we all help each other,” he exclaimed. “Our frontier mentality means we’re all committed to the same thing, and in the spirit of the old west, the three distinct areas are supportive of each other to reach our goals and dreams.” In the five weeks that Goble has been immersed in Fort Collins, one thing has become quite clear – “Colorado State University and this city are great destinations,” he enthused. “I’ve met a lot of professionally experienced people who have obviously done a great job making the UCA a fantastic place for students, faculty, and staff.”

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It became apparent after just a few interactions with Dr. Goble that he is quite passionate about what the new name represents, as well as the opportunities it signifies. “To me, departments are separate units, representing the singularity of one discipline, whereas a school is an entity or group going in the same direction,” he explained. “As a name, the ‘School of Music, Theatre and Dance’ encompasses the notion that we’re all going in the same direction.”

For example, a Ralph Opera Center production at the University Center for the Arts (UCA) involves music, theatre, and dance students and faculty; technical staff; costume shop staff; and the marketing, event, and front office staff. “Take a look at the UCA Performance Guide, where full productions like Hansel and Gretel, Step on a Crack, and the Fall Dance Concert occur throughout the year – in many respects we’re already solidly operating as a School,” he said. “Consistently thinking like one will move us forward.”

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[Continued from page 17]

Another of Goble’s quests has become the search for the perfect breakfast burrito, trying Consuelo’s, Snooze, Silver Grill, Doug’s Day Diner, and Taco John’s so far. Upon revealing this pursuit, he was instructed to immediately go to Big City Burrito, and he fully expects a deluge of additional suggestions!

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But mostly, Goble’s excited about the arrival of the students at the UCA. “It was a thrill seeing the students coming in for calls last week,” he said. “That will be the cool part – getting to know the students.”

S E R I E S

C O N C E R T

DAN GOBLE SAXOPHONE

From Bach to Bebop November 2, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA Dr. Dan Goble makes his UCA debut in a concert that features music spanning over 300 years: from Bach to Bebop. An arts administrator who is also an active performer, Dr. Goble has performed with the New York Philharmonic for over 15 years, and has recently been featured with the orchestra as the saxophone soloist on Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet, Mussorgsky’s  Pictures at an Exhibition, and Ravel’s Bolero.

ABOUT DAN Recently named the new director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance at Colorado State University, saxophonist and professor Dan Goble is thrilled to return to the Rocky Mountain West where he began his career in his hometown of Casper, Wyo. Previous to his appointment at CSU, Dr. Goble served as the dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts (SVPA) at Western Connecticut State University (WCSU) in Danbury, Conn. In his roles as the dean of SVPA, coordinator of Jazz Studies, and chair of the Department of Music at WCSU, Dr. Goble led efforts to assure excellence in teaching, scholarship and service that enhanced the reputation of WCSU while attracting outstanding faculty, staff and students to the campus. Throughout his tenure at WCSU, he served in numerous positions of leadership and service, providing guidance for curricular and programmatic changes that affected positively SVPA and the university, most notably the planning and construction of a new $97 million instructional and performance facility which opened in Aug., 2014. Photos by Sarah Press, 2001

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An arts administrator who is also an active performer, Dr. Goble has performed with the New York Philharmonic for over 15 years, and has recently been featured with the orchestra as the saxophone soloist on Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet, Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, and Ravel’s Bolero. In addition to his work the New York Philharmonic, Dr. Goble has performed with the New York City Ballet, The American Symphony Orchestra, The Mariinsky Orchestra, the New York Saxophone Quartet, and the Harvey Pittel Saxophone Quartet. Committed to recording and promoting contemporary works for the saxophone, his critically acclaimed CD Freeway, includes significant compositions by Pulitzer Prize winning composers Charles Wuorinen and John Harbison (CRI 876). His recording of Quartet, Opus 22, by Anton Webern, conducted by Robert Kraft, is available on the Naxos label, and his most recent project with pianist Russell Hirshfield, Mad Dances, American Music for Saxophone and Piano (Troy 1251), features the music of David Diamond, William Albright, David Del Tredici, Libby Larsen, and Kevin Jay Isaacs.

Dr. Goble received his Doctor of Musical Arts and Master of Music degrees from the University of Texas at Austin, and his Bachelor’s degrees in Saxophone Performance and Music Education from the University of Northern Colorado. Recently, he was named distinguished alum of Casper College in his hometown of Casper, Wyo. His saxophone teachers include Roger Greenberg, Thomas Kinser, Harvey Pittel, and Albert Regni. Dan Goble is a D’Addario performing artist.

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On the international stage, Dr. Goble has toured extensively with the New York Philharmonic, including the historic visit to North Korea in 2008, as well as recent tours to Europe, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, and China. He was a featured performer at the 2004 Thailand International Saxophone Conference in Bangkok, Thailand, and has performed recitals in Japan, China, and in Europe. He was the First Prize-winner at the 1993 Louise D. McMahon International Competition, and has won or placed in numerous other prestigious competitions, including, the Concert Artist Guild International Competition, the Ima Hogg International Young Artist Competition, and the Fischoff Chamber Music Competition.

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You’re Invited

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 50 YEAR CLUB LUNCHEON Honoring the Class of 1965 and those before FESTIVAL ON THE OVAL Enjoy music, kid-friendly activities, and plenty of Ram pride

BONFIRE, LIGHTING OF THE A, AND FIREWORKS Enjoy the sights and sounds of what makes CSU special

GO RAMS!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 5K RACE Show your Ram power and run or walk with those who love CSU PREGAME TAILGATE AND FOOTBALL GAME Enjoy game-day fare and cheer the Rams to victory over Air Force

Visit homecoming.colostate.edu for frequent updates on Homecoming & Family Weekend events and activities.

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HOMECOMING PARADE Gather friends, family, and CSU spirit for a parade through campus

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ERIC HOLLENBECK PERCUSSION featuring

Leo Canale, Shilo Stroman, and Julie Strom September 14, 7:30 p.m. T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Duo Francois and

Friends September 21, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

RON FRANCOIS VIOLIN

SILVANA SANTINELLI PIANO

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S E R I E S

C O N C E R T S

featuring

Timothy Burns September 28, 7:30 p.m.

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MARGARET MILLLER VIOLA

Organ Recital Hall, UCA 23


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One of Colorado State

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University’s most valuable and precious assets — its enormous textile and historic clothing collection of about 20,000 items — is getting settled into a new and improved home.

1944 wedding dress made from Parachute silk. CSU Photographer John Eisele


SU textile collection ettled at expanded, renovated digs BY JEFF DODGE The Avenir Museum of Design and Merchandising, located east of the University Center for the Arts, has undergone a striking transformation over the past 18 months. It involved remodeling about 8,000 square feet in the current Avenir facility and adding 10,000 square feet, allowing for two galleries, classroom and seminar space, a library, a conservation laboratory and expanded collection storage and management areas. The expansion of storage cabinetry was made possible by a generous bequest from the estate of prominent fashion designer and critic Richard Blackwell. “We’ve more than doubled our footprint,” said Doreen Beard, the Avenir Museum’s director of operations and engagement.

But before the project could begin, the thousands of artifacts had to be relocated in December 2013 to the former Centers for Disease Control and Prevention facility on the Foothills Campus. It proved to be an appropriate temporary storage area for the collection, since it is secure and relatively climate-controlled, new Avenir Museum Curator Megan Osborne said. The collection was moved back to the bigger and better Avenir Museum in June. Volunteers and staff will spend the coming months getting all of the pieces properly situated in their new storage and gallery areas before the museum opens in early 2016 with several exhibitions, including one featuring recently donated

Guatemalan textiles and another highlighting the quilt work of CSU alumna Lucile Hawks.

ACCOMMODATING GROWTH For Osborne, it’s the fourth time she has helped relocate the collection. The 2004 CSU apparel and merchandising graduate got her master’s in the history of decorative art, with a concentration in costumes and textiles, from the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington D.C., where she worked for the Smithsonian Institution and the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum. She was hired by CSU in 2009 to help unpack after the move from the Gifford Building to the UCA East loca-

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CSU Public Relations Coordinator for the College of Liberal Arts

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Volunteers Terrie Cornell and Jessica Sholts rolling flat textiles for storage CSU photographer Joe Mendoza

tion, serving in various roles since then, and was recently named curator for the collection. In Gifford, the only storage area was the room that is now the Gustafson Gallery. “It was really crammed in,” Osborne said. “We were over-committed at Gifford.” Since then, the collection has grown by more than 7,000 pieces. “And every piece we take in requires great care and ongoing funding to preserve it,” she explained, opening one of the new storage cabinets to reveal an array of men’s and women’s clothing from the 1890s. Osborne moved on to another new cabinet containing wide, flat drawers. Eventually each will contain a single beaded dress — improved accommodations for apparel that over time can stretch and rip under the weight of the beads if hung vertically. One of the older pieces in the collection, she said, is a nightgown inscribed with the name of its owner, Rebecca Tyler, and the year, 1803 — when Thomas Jefferson was president. The Avenir, a French word for “future” pronounced “ah-veneer,” is a teaching facility where CSU students, scholars and community members can engage in hands-on learning and research, and where stories about people and what their textiles mean to them can be woven together. Beard said that with the popularity of TV shows like Downton Abbey, a whole new generation of young people is becoming more interested in the apparel of previous eras, and how it was made.


Outside a room packed with containers of clothing, Osborne and Beard consulted an extensive, detailed Excel spreadsheet documenting every single piece in the collection, where it came from, and where it belongs in the new facility. Nearby, volunteer Terrie Cornell and graduate student Jessica Sholts were busy rolling rugs; the textiles need to be periodically unfurled and re-rolled in the opposite direction to alleviate “internal crush,” which occurs when the fibers are compressed and stretched. Among the facility’s new features that are expected to strengthen the Avenir Museum’s bid to gain accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums is a coiling garage door that can accommodate large deliveries and rolls up inside a ceiling tube. Nearby, rows of white mannequins fill one storage room, eerie-looking without their clothing.

The undulating brick patterns on the exterior of the building change with the light, evoking images of the various textures and weaves found within. In May, about 70 people attended a sneak-peek open house at the new Avenir Museum, which is part of the Department of Design and Merchandising in the College of Health and Human Sciences. As for the rest of the campus and Northern Colorado community, their first glimpse of the collection’s new home won’t come until early 2016.

PUBLIC SPACES But it will be worth the wait. Aside from the enhanced behind-the-scenes storage areas and equipment, the public-facing areas of the teaching museum make an impression. In the lobby, against wood paneling, metal and wood latticework designed to look woven shows off the names of donors who made the project possible. A large classroom featuring three wide-screen monitors has been equipped with technology that will allow stu-

Main entry approach - 216 E Lake St CSU photographer Joe Mendoza

LIKE THE AVENIR MUSEUM ON FACEBOOK OR SIGN UP TO RECEIVE EMAIL UPDATES FROM THE MUSEUM.

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“It’s kind of creepy when the lights are off,” Osborne said.

dents to observe the tiniest details of textile conservation work as it goes on in the conservation lab across the hall, thanks to a microscope camera and live video feed. In the library, where an extensive reference collection can be consulted by appointment, a section of what appears to be wall paneling is actually a tall cabinet door that opens to reveal a sink and coffee service area for large meetings. The room features colors chosen for their resemblance to original sources of natural dyes. (A garden of plants that yield natural dyes is planned on the east side of the building.)

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Chamber Choir Reunion By Stuart Dameron

At the beginning of the summer, CSU Chamber Choir alum, along with their families and Dr. James Kim, director of Choral Activities at CSU, gathered together for a chance to sing and catch up. The group rehearsed and performed favorite pieces from the last eleven years including “Abide with Me,” at a Denver nursing home. The day concluded with dinner, camaraderie, and more singing at Kim’s house.

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CSU Special Assistant Professor of Choir Stuart Dameron, who graduated with his Bachelor's Degree in Music Education from CSU in 2009, and went on to earn a Master's in Choral Conducting at CSU in 2011, reflected on the joy brought about by the reunion:

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What was most remarkable about getting back together with the Chamber Choir alumni for me was the tangible connection we had with each other; one that we realized we never lost. After we each graduated, we’ve grown, moved to other places, created families, and pursued careers – both in and out of music – and yet, despite perhaps losing contact, none of us lost the connection we had with our fellow members throughout the years. We consider this group to be a family, and like families, we know are members for life. In this modern world of social media and compartmentalized online interaction, many "connections" we find ourselves making with the outside world are in fact, baseless. To have a tangible connection with these cherished individuals who have not only walked together with me through the most formative years of my life, but have also grown as I have grown and have gone out as I have gone out to make the world a better place, is something I will carry with me for all the years of my life.

Stay connected with the CSU Chamber Choir on Facebook or by updating your information at music.colostate.edu/alumni.


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The group, exhausted but happy after a long day of walking in the summer heat, then singing a concert at Lobkowicz Palace in Prague, Czech Republic.

This summer, CSU’s Chamber Choir went on an eleven-day European tour to Bratislava, Salzburg, Vienna, Eisenstadt, and Prague. The excellent reputation earned the ensemble an invitation to participate in the 2015 International Youth Music Festival in Bratislava, Slovakia. The invitation also brings with it opportunities to sing in historic concert halls, cathedrals, and outdoor venues across Europe. CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE CHOIR PERFORM IN VIENNA Recording courtesy of Dean Reiger, Bachelor of Music in Education and CSU Choir member


The outside of St. Martin’s Cathedral, built in 1452. The choir performed here as a guest choir in the Youth International Festival, Bratislava Slovakia.

The Salzach River in Salzburg, Austria. Members of the choir took a walk over the river into Old Town on the first night of tour.

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Choir members gather inside a university church in Salzburg, Austria.

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(TOP) The flyer for the choir’s performance of a concert in Lobkovicz Palace in Prague, Czech Republic. (BOTTOM) Dr. James Kim rehearses the group for a formal concert in the Karlskirche, or St. Charles Church, Vienna, Austria.


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The bass section gather for a photo in front of the Hofbrauhaus- a traditional German bier hall.

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(TOP LEFT) Makartsteg Bridge in Salzburg, where lovers have left behind hundreds of locks over the Salzach River. (TOP RIGHT) Jessica Lauer and Stacey Miller in front of a small house on Golden Lane in Hradcany, Prague. Guards and officers used to live in these houses, in order to be close to the Palace. (BOTTOM) A train waits in the Budapest-Keleti Railway Terminal in Budapest, Hungary. Members of the choir decided to take an impromptu train trip from Bratislava, Slovakia to Budapest on the final day of tour.


(BOTTOM) The tenor section jumps for joy at Hohensalzburg Fortress in Salzburg.

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(TOP) Bryan Kettlewell and Dean Rieger in front of the John Lennon Wall in Prague, Czech Republic. This wall is open to public graffiti and is painted clean once a year.

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2015 Alumni Band Reunion at Homecoming & Family Weekend T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

A Note from CSU Marching Band Director, Dr. Richard Frey:

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We are excited to announce this year’s Alumni Band Reunion dates and invite you to join us on Friday, Oct. 16 and 17 this fall for food, friends, and fun! Have you heard about the Alumni Band experience? We anticipate a large and energetic group this year to march with the band during pre-game and halftime for this year’s Homecoming face-off with Air Force! Whether you’re a recent graduate or have been an alum for years, we want you to join us for this special weekend as we celebrate our traditions and connect with old friends. Homecoming activities start as early as Thursday night and include a special Alumni Band breakfast at the University Center for the Arts. I look forward to seeing and meeting many of you this fall as we share our memories, experiences, and show our RAM pride!

Stay updated on the latest Alumni Band Reunion news at Bands.colostate.edu and by joining the Facebook event

GO RAMS!


(subject to change)

Friday, October 16

Saturday, October 17

CSU Homecoming & Family Weekend Parade Parade Route, Downtown Fort Collins

Alumni Band Brunch & Rehearsal Instrumental Rehearsal Hall, UCA

Friday Night Lights: Pep Rally, Bonfire, Fireworks & Light of the A West Lawn, Campus

Rehearsal with CSU Marching Band Sonny Lubick Field, Hughes Stadium

Alumni Band Hot Spot The Mayor of Old Town, 632 S. Mason St.

Homecoming & Family Weekend Tailgate RAM Town, Hughes Stadium – Alumni Association Tent

Homecoming Football Game: CSU vs. Air Force Sonny Lubick Field, Hughes Stadium

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Pre-Game Show Sonny Lubick Field, Hughes Stadium

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I’m feeling grateful, excited, and ready to take these experiences and use them to become a great teacher. I have memories that will last forever and a desire to see more of the world!

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— WILLA BOGRAD CSU Theatre alum, graduate student at Denver University

Colby, who played the Dragon King in The Royal Disco (El Disco Real)


According to a 2014 university press release, the center provides “expanded opportunity for Colorado State students and faculty to participate in international scientific and cultural exchange experiences — using land and facilities largely donated by MIRA, a Mexican real estate investment and development company sponsored by Black Creek Capital, a Colorado-based development company.” Under the guidance of its founder, CSU Theatre Professor Walt Jones, the Kids Do It All leadership team was comprised of nine CSU students and alumni, who, alongside four communications students from La Paz, gained “valu-

able international teaching and bilingual experience,” a mission the center fulfills for students interested in early childhood development. “The people that I've met are truly amazing and I feel so lucky to have crossed paths with them. The culture, history, and beauty…was so different and so intense,” said CSU Theatre Alum Willa Bograd, who is currently seeking her teaching license and Master’s in Education Psychology and will be an elementary teaching assistant at Steele Elementary School in Denver this fall. Kids Do It All Todos Santos encourages “cross cultural team building skills from a very young age, and exposes children to unique cultures allowing them to experience, first hand, their counterparts from a different country.” (Todos Santos Cultural Center website) During the week, the entire camp was invited to eat dinner at the Hogar del Niño orphanage where some of the campers

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his summer, 45 kids from Todos Santos and seven kids from Colo. came together for the second annual Kids Do It All at the Todos Santos Cultural Center in Baja California Sur, Mexico. The non-profit international center for research, teaching, and outreach facilitated the bilingual theatre, dance, and music experience designed for kids ages 7-12.

by Jennifer Clary Jacobs

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(TOP LEFT) Kids Do It All Todos Santos counselors and campers (BOTTOM LEFT) Sebastian during prop painting day (TOP RIGHT) CSU alums Kelly Waldo, Abbey Featherston, and Willa Bograd (BOTTOM RIGHT) Carimen, who played the DJ in The Royal Disco (El Disco Real), painting her boombox prop


live. “The focus of the orphanage is to be a small family, to teach the kids life skills like cooking and woodworking, to help them thrive in school, and to build a support system for when they leave,” described Bograd of the orphanage where the kids call the founders ‘Mama’ and ‘Papa’. “I have never witnessed so much love and joy.” The unique and very special week wrapped up with a performance written and created by the kids on July 26 at the Todos Santos Cultural Center. Creativity, laughter, food, hugs, and new friends were in abundance!

CSU STUDENT AND ALUMNI COUNSELORS DEVIN ANDERS – CSU Theatre student (design) KAILY ANDERSON – CSU Theatre alum, PhD student

at University of Colorado

DEANZA BANUELOS – CSU Theatre student WILLA BOGRAD – CSU Theatre alum, graduate student at Denver University

ELI CAGEN – CSU Music graduate student (jazz, saxophone)

NIGEL DAWSON – CSU Anthropology graduate student ABBEY FEATHERSTON – CSU Theatre alum CATY PUCCI – CSU Theatre alum, CSU Design and Merchandizing graduate student

KELLY WALDO – CSU Business alum

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“I couldn't be happier to be home and starting my next adventure in the 2nd grade classroom. I’m feeling grateful, excited, and ready to take these experiences and use them to become a great teacher,” Bograd reflected about the experience. “I have memories that will last forever and a desire to see more of the world!”

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FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, CSU STUDENTS CAN ATTEND ANY MUSIC, THEATRE, OR DANCE PERFORMANCE*

FOR FREE.

charge ticket to all music, theatre, and dance department events at the UCA. Tickets are available in-person at the UCA Ticket Office, both in advance or at-the-door. A valid RAMCard must be presented for ticket redemption. Tickets are limited to one (1) per student for each performance/series of performances (i.e. multiple theatre or dance performances of the same show). Space is limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Excludes Classical Convergence and community produced events.

For a full listing of events, visit uca.colostate.edu

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*RAMCard is your ticket to the UCA! Full-fee paying students (enrolled in six or more credits) can receive one (1) no-

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CSU Marching Band Alumni T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

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The summer months have flown by, and that means Colorado State University’s football and marching band seasons are here! With another record-breaking season last year, many exciting things are in store for 2015. Though I just graduated, it has been amazing to see our university, and all of the activities that make up campus life, progress and become even more incredible. During my time at CSU, I watched as our football team went from the bottom of the Mountain West to being selected for back-to-back bowl games. Through that, I was never more proud to be a Ram as when I was part of the CSU Marching Band, and I wouldn’t change a thing. I had the opportunity to be a section leader and drum major, I got to perform at Denver Broncos’ games, and play at beautiful settings across Ireland. I did things that most people from my small town just dream of! It was during these years that I found my passion, made friendships that will last a lifetime, and became part of a community that will forever hold a special place in my heart. If there’s one thing I know about my band family, it’s that we will always cheer on our Rams. We are at a turning point in CSU history with a new football coach, new, high quality buildings being built on campus, a music program on the rise, and consistently winning academic awards. Though many of us have moved away from Fort Collins, we have an opportunity to head back to our glory days and take part in all of the great things happening. We would like to invite all alumni of the CSU Marching Band to join us for Homecoming & Family Weekend, Oct. 16-17! For this special event, alumni are invited to return to Fort Collins, jump back into our tradition of excellence, and rejoin our friends as part of the marching band. On Friday, Oct. 16, we will cheer on the band in the parade, and get hyped up for our Ram team at the pep rally. Afterwards, head to one of the most popular local spots – The Mayor of Old Town – for the chance to reignite friendships and talk about the good ol’ days. For Homecoming day on Oct. 17, we face off against in-state rival Air Force, and many activities are scheduled to help us get pumped up for the game. Start with brunch and rehearsal at the University Center for the Arts, followed by a pre-game tailgate at the stadium. The best part is the moment we get to grab our instruments and be alongside the CSU Marching Band during the game. There was a great alumni turn out for last year’s homecoming game, so we need to step it up this year and come back with an even larger presence! Let’s make our alma mater proud by having even more alumni members accompanying the band in the stands and on the field. Now that I’ve started my professional career as a band director in southern Colo., few things that could make me miss this event. Bring your family, and let’s meet up for the Colorado State University Homecoming and Family Weekend – it’s bound to be another experience full of memories! Warmest Regards, Joshua M. Garcia, ‘15 Former Drum Major, 4-Year CSU Marching Band Member


Alex Billman, ‘14, Liberal Arts: Theatre, was recently awarded a fellowship at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in Williamstown, Mass. through the national Kennedy Center for American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF). The fellowship was awarded based on Alex’s work on CSU’s production of The Night of the Iguana (Spring 2014) and included an internship during the summer of 2015. The festival hosts seven main stage shows in two months.

John Lindsey, ’09, B.M. Vocal Performance, Tenor, was recently accepted to compete in the International Competition for Wagner Singers this summer in Bayreuth, Germany. The competition, held every three years, selects singers from a worldwide-pool of applicants and invites them to Bayreuth for the preliminary round. John is one of 36 singers selected after examination of professional development and pre-screening recordings.

Heston McCranie, ’09, B.M. Performance, Cello, is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Music Education at Georgia State University in Atlanta. She teaches string techniques for the university and is part of some exciting research projects on improvisation and creativity. Beginning fall 2015, she will begin a position as the primary orchestra director for the Atlanta International School. She also performs with the Georgia Symphony Orchestra and takes every chamber music opportunity she finds.

Zachary Garcia, ’13, B.M. Music, Tuba, is the director of Bands for the Thunder Valley K-8 School in Frederick, Colo. He also performs in the Longmont Concert Band, Wither Without Orchestra, Flatirons Jazz Orchestra, and freelance swith a handful of other side groups while running a private studio of low brass students at the Guitars, Etc. music store in Longmont.

Mila Gates, ’08, Communication Studies and Marching Band Member, Flute & Trombone, recently opened her own event and wedding planning business in Denver.

Caitlin Melby, ’11, B.A. Theatre, currently teaches 6th and 7th grade social studies at the Harmony School of Excellence in Austin, Texas.

Amy Mills, ’12, B.A. Theatre, recently completed a stage management internship at the Seattle Repertory Theatre in Seattle, Wash. and is continuing to work in the area.

To submit your Class Note, email Jennifer Clary Jacobs at jennifer.clary@colostate.edu

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Dan Bell, ’88, M.M. Performance, Trumpet, is director of Bands at Cheyenne Mountain Junior High in Colorado Springs. Dan has taught for 27 years in the Colo. districts of Fort Lupton, Rangeview HS in Aurora, and Cheyenne Mountain as a high school assistant and junior high band director. In his career, he has conducted over 40 honor bands in Colo. and Wyo. and has had his ensembles perform for the Colorado Music Educators Clinic/Conference nine times.

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U S C g n i d n e t I knew at or gettable expe f n u n a e b d l wou v i r t s I l e v e l e h t o t e m g n i g brin y k s f o t i M a r a L

Performance of works by Andy Akiho at Bang on a Can Music Festival

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STUDENT PROFILE:

erience, ve for.

LARA MITOFSKY NEUSS Incoming Graduate Student Champions Contemporary Clarinet and a Deep Sense of Self

by Jennifer Clary Jacobs Lara Mitofsky Neuss graduated from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music in May 2015 with a Bachelor of Music and is attending Colorado State University this fall, studying for her Master of Music in Performance. Neuss’ path to CSU began at the inaugural LIFT Clarinet Academy, held in 2014, where she was inspired by the enthusiasm and techniques displayed by Dr. Wesley Ferreira, director of LIFT and assistant professor of Clarinet at CSU.

The friendly and professional reputation of the clarinet studio drew her in, and during the following year, Dr. Ferreira became a musical mentor for Neuss. “He continued to support me after LIFT ended,” she explained. “It showed me that he cares for his students and makes them a top priority.”   Neuss with her dog Banjo, a rescued Beagle mix. Photo by her sister, Ilysa Mitofsky

While attending LIFT, Neuss enjoyed the beautiful and accepting atmosphere of Fort Collins and the campus. “The music building [UCA] at CSU is gorgeous and up-to-date, and the musical opportunities – both in and out of the school – are abundant,” she said. “I knew attending CSU would be an unforgettable experience, bringing me to the level I strive for.” Neuss will attend CSU with an arts administration assistantship for the ensemble area, and, during her second year, a clarinet teaching assistantship. “I have an incredible opportunity to learn about the administration and teaching side of the music world, two abilities that I think are important to being a successful musician and performer,” Neuss expressed. “I am extremely grateful for these new pathways.” After graduation, Neuss was accepted as a performer and fellow to Bang on a Can, a three-week festival and residency program for composers and performers dedicated to adventurous contemporary music. Held at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA), she performed an abundance of solo and ensemble repertoire, including the world premiere of Jeff Brook's

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“I knew instantly that I clicked with him,” explained Neuss. “I liked his unique ideas and alternate paths to being musical or working on technique, such as using imagery or using breathing devices to enhance air support.”

"Capriccio on the Departure of a Beloved Brother,” student compositions, Latin

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Chilldren's concert at Bang on a Can Music Festival / Photo by Nadine Photography

music, African drumming, and an orchestra of original instruments where she played PVC pipe clarinets and vacuum pipe instruments. The program was memorable, even life-changing for Neuss who found a renewed vigor for her musical exploration, specifically composing. “Bang on a Can showed me that there are many options for playing music,” summarized Neuss. “You can create music out of anything, and all ideas are original, are unique, and have a place in this world.” The friendly atmosphere, combined with top notch musicians, “made me fall in love with the world of music all over again.” Neuss, who arrived in town in time for the rigorous CSU Marching Band camp and her position assisting the ensemble staff, is enthralled with Fort Collins and can’t wait to get involved in her new community. “It is like no city I've ever been in. The vibe is chill and relaxed, yet innovative and in-the-now,” said the Wayne, N.J. native. “A goal of mine is to take a big part in introducing contemporary music to the people of Fort Collins.”

"It was clear to me from my first interactions with Lara that she was a creative and talented clarinetist,” said Ferreira. “I am very pleased to welcome her to CSU now as a graduate student as she will add much to an already very talented clarinet studio." In addition to playing clarinet, Neuss was inspired by Jeff Anderle, her conservatory teacher who is also a Reiki master, to become certified in the Japanese energy-healing method, which, combined with Mindfulness – the practice of in-themoment nonjudgmental awareness – allows Neuss to explore, take risks, and grow physically and mentally during solo and ensemble practice sessions and performances. “There is nonjudgmental appreciation and support for my fellow musicians and their uniqueness as their journeys parallel mine in our desire to become accomplished artists,” she contemplates. Mindfulness meditation keeps Neuss focused on her body and breathing, keeping intrusive thoughts brief and in check, and increasing her clarity of thinking. “I attribute the practice of meditation to my ability to be more relaxed in performance and organized in practice, academics, and life.”


For Neuss, Reiki has the benefit of restoring physical and emotional well-being caused by the intense physical and emotional stress brought on by dedicated practice and performance; focusing on the moment the energy is felt releases a flow of creativity. “Lately I have been practicing my clarinet while incorporating Reiki into my fingers, breath, and body, and feeling that energy has improved my overall performance,” she revealed. Animals are also very important to Neuss’ well-being; with a veterinarian father, she grew up volunteering at local animal shelters and owning many dogs and cats herself. She’s found that being with animals is extremely meditative and plans to continue volunteering. “When walking or cuddling with a dog, you are automatically put into the ‘now’ because you are focus-

ing on them, and they themselves are always in the ‘now’ – we can learn from them!” When asked about the future, Lara’s response was grounded in the moment. “My plans after graduating are not known yet – the possibilities are endless! I’m just excited to be here and see where it takes me.”

LISTEN TO LARA MITOFSKY NEUSS ON SOUNDCLOUD.

Give to the Lilla B. Morgan Memorial Endowment, the premier fund for arts and culture at Colorado State University. Your gift will help make possible: • exhibitions and performances, • guest lecturers and visiting artists, • purchase of items for the University’s permanent collections, • events showcasing the breadth of human cultural endeavor, and, • enhance the cultural awareness of the CSU community.

Donate today at advancing.colostate.edu/2085

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Support the Arts and Humanities at CSU

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CSU Performance Major Emily Kerski has spent the last year expanding her musical experience nationally and internationally. Kerski spent 2014 attending The Royal Academy of Music in London, and traveled to the annual International Clarinet Association’s 2015 ClarinetFest in Madrid, Spain. Her journey also included attending incoming graduate student Lara Mitofsky Neuss’ undergraduate recital. The conscientious and mindful Kerski reviewed her fellow student’s concert, and we’re sharing an excerpt, which covers three of the eight pieces. CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE REVIEW.

Review: The 21st Century Clarinet: Lara Mitofsky Neuss

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By Emily Kerski, CSU Music Performance Major, Senior

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A rising champion of the contemporary clarinet, Lara Mitofsky Neuss presented an innovative and engaging evening of new music in San Francisco on May 16. This recital was performed live to an enthusiastic audience in the Osher Salon at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and was also livestreamed online. WATCH A VIDEO OF LARA’S PERFORMANCE.

The concert program included solely pieces written in the last ten years, a daring choice which was carried out with great success. This boldness was showcased from the outset, with Nico Muhly’s It Goes Without Saying for clarinet and electronics. Lara immediately demonstrated impressive technical control and the strong rhythmic integrity inherently necessary for a performance with electronics, especially in a piece with such tight dialogue between the track and the soloist. Lara was then joined by pianist Keisuke Nakagoshi to perform As Desperation Sets In. This was a committed performance from both players, conveying the ‘desperation’ of the title and a sense of haunting or lamenting something of the past. Particularly notable was Lara’s clear enjoyment of the piece itself, inviting the audience to similarly be in the moment and experience the clever interplay of pianist and soloist, and the intricacy of shifting rhythmic patterns. Lush melodies soared over the piano’s harmonic accompaniment and a more agitated, faster section added intensity and drive to the work. The first instance of extended technique in the recital, microtones in the melodic line, was also expertly handled. The second half of the program gave the audience the chance to hear Lara’s prowess on the bass clarinet, equal if not surpassing

HANSEL AND GRE

a children’s opera, by E N G E L B E R T H U M

OPENING THIS NOVEMBER


in technical mastery and fluidity of sound. Her bass playing was first showcased in Michael Lowenstern’s Trip for bass clarinet and electronics. The world premiere of Homer Collyer Blind (Kyle Hovatter, commissioned for the recital) followed, featuring Lara on bass clarinet alongside bassoonist Justin Cummings. Beginning with an ostinato like pattern in the bassoon, the piece evoked a minimalist quality with contrapuntal figures between bassoon and clarinet. The players interacted brilliantly with deep concern for every element of the piece to come across as the composer intended. The writing demanded a wide contrast of dynamics and colors from both instruments, ranging from somber lyricism at the start to mysterious agitation in the third section. Lara invited the audience into a new soundscape with clarity and humor throughout, making the music approachable for even those unfamiliar to the clarinet. She is an infectiously spirited performer who brought an unhindered passion for the music in every moment. Composers of this century certainly have a friend in Ms. Neuss.

ETEL

MPERDINCK

I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

Nico Muhly’s It Goes Without Saying performed by Neuss at a Bang on a Can Music Festival / Photo by Nadine Photography

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T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

– Samuel Beckett


By Jennifer Clary Jacobs

The creative team was comprised of Price Johnston, interim director of CSU Theatre and Dance and associate professor of Lighting, Sound and Projection Design, Dr. Eric Prince, CSU professor and Center director, Wendy Ishii, Bas Bleu artistic director, and Tricia Navarre, Bas Bleu production manager. CSU Theatre Professor Dr. Laura Jones accompanied the team. According to the festival’s website, the annual event is a “major cultural event bringing diverse communities together, mixing local and international audiences and artists.” The island community was selected as a locale for the celebration of the Irish writer Samuel Beckett as he attended the Portora Royal School there as a teen. The Center for Studies in Beckett and Performance at CSU started in 2002 and the trip to Northern Ireland was a culmination of over a decade of collaborative research, writing, and performance between the group from CSU and Bas Bleu.

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This summer, CSU theatre faculty and members of Fort Collins’ Bas Bleu Theatre Co. travelled to Northern Ireland for the fourth annual 2015 Happy-Days Enniskillen International Beckett Festival, held in Enniskillen, July 23 – Aug. 3. Colorado State University’s Center for Studies in Beckett and Performance and Bas Bleu Theatre Company were invited to the prestigious festival to present Beckett’s Women and Eh Joe.

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From left to right, Laura Jones, Price Johnston, Wendy Ishii, Eric Prince

“Giving Beckett’s plays new life and new audiences is our mission, and certainly attending the Happy-Days Festival with these two productions is a mile marker on the Center’s chronology,” expressed Prince. The team was the only American troupe at the international festival, and Beckett’s Women was especially anticipated as it was devised by Prince at the invitation of the 2015 Happy-Days Enniskillen International Beckett Festival, with the approval of Edward Beckett and the Estate of Samuel Beckett. “The entire process has turned out to be excellent outreach and visibility for us,” said Prince.

In addition to rehearsing and performing the double bill several times, and sightseeing as much as possible, Ishii and Prince were featured on BBC Radio Ulster’s “The John Toal Show.” Their segment starts at 6:00, but listen to the entire clip for rousing music and a delightful exchange about Irish vegetarian fare.

The Plays Beckett’s Women with Wendy Ishii: Moments from the Plays of Samuel Beckett: Some of Samuel Beckett’s memorable moments are provided by the voices of his women, characters that seem earthly and recognizable, yet inhabit strange and spectral places of torment. Beckett’s Women gently opens windows into an austere and imaginative universe.


Eh Joe, Beckett’s first play for television: Originally broadcast in 1966 by BBC Television, the rarely seen play remains one of Beckett’s distinctive dramas: chilling, poetic, and spellbinding. This re-visioning features Prince and Ishii, with design by CSU’s Price Johnston, in a visual and aural interpretation that remains true to Beckett’s vision.

Media Coverage for Eh Joe and Beckett’s Women Festival Website / 07.25.15

New York Times / 07.30.15 Northern Ireland town embraces Beckett

Wendy Ishii reading Beckett for a live broadcast on BBC Radio Ulster’s “John Toal Show”

There was lots else to see and hear in the festival’s first few days: A double bill of “Eh Joe,” created for television in 1966, with the actor Eric Prince, and “Beckett’s Women,” extracts from plays performed by Wendy Ishii. ~ Roslyn Sulcas

The Independent, UK 07.27.15 No Lack of Vision at Fourth Happy Days Enniskillen International Beckett Festival: “If, as Walter Pater said, all art aspires to the condition of music, then no artist exemplifies this more clearly than Beckett, and on the evidence of Enniskillen, his closest composer-confrere is Schubert. As well as in Stirrings Still, Schubert’s music played a key role in two other productions I saw – the unsettling dance piece May B, the work of the Maguy Marin Dance Company which was based on Beckett writings – and Beckett’s Women, in which the wonderful Wendy Ishii of the Colorado-based Bas Bleu theatre company, performed extracts from women’s roles in Beckett plays.” ~ Simon O’Hagan

[CONTINUED THROUGH PAGE 58]

St. Macartins Cathedral

I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

Today’s double bill of Eh Joe and Beckett’s Women was played to a packed house! Audiences exiting Eh Joe yesterday called it “spine chilling” and “psychologically thrilling” while Beckett’s Women was “engrossing, totally compelling.” ~ Happy Days Enniskillen International Beckett Festival

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The Daily Telegraph, UK 07.27.15

In a church hall, Beckett’s first TV play, Eh Joe (1965), relayed as if on retro black-and-white sets, featured a first-rate turn from Eric Prince as the silent, crazed, tormented Joe. Another highlight: a boat-trip at dusk along the Erne to Devenish Island, site of ancient monastic ruins and setting for a chamber revival of Ohio Impromptu…A chance to soul-search and sightsee at the same time. Can you have your Beckettian cake and eat it?

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

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— Dominic Cavendish


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A scene from Eh Joe

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Festival Facebook Page Beckett’s Women just premiered at St Macartin’s Hall. Wendy Ishii gave a stellar performance, giving depth and feeling to each distinct character. Can’t wait to see Eh Joe tomorrow!

Reprise Join us at the University Center for the Arts for reprise of the productions. An Evening with Samuel Beckett, presented by the Center for Studies in Beckett and Performance at CSU and Bas Bleu Theatre takes place on Saturday, Sept. 5, 7:30 p.m. in the University Dance Theatre.

$5 tickets are available at

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

www.csuartstickets.com

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172 N. College Ave., Suite D ∙ (970) 492-4977

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Visit our new store

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Wendy Ishii from Beckett’s Women


Upcoming M U S I C

P E R F O R M A N C E S

Virtuoso Series Concert

Virtuoso Series Concert

Collaborating with fellow percussionists, Leo Canale, Shilo Stroman, and Julie Strom, this program includes Astor Piazzolla’s History of the Tango with CSU faculty Michelle Stanley,flute, Reconcilable Differences for marimba and percussion trio, and Code Switch for snare drum and prerecorded sound. The concert also features selected movements from Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major.

The Duo Francois, CSU faculty Ron Francois, violin, with Silvana Santinelli, piano, are joined by two of Colorado’s finest musicians, Deborah Marshall, clarinet, and Charles Tucker, cello. The concert features works by Milhaud, Brahms, and the incredible Contrasts by Béla Bartók.

CSU Faculty Eric Hollenbeck, Percussion Monday, September 14, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Post Paradise with a pre-concert screening of the documentary, Place Matters: How Place Can Shape Innovation Thursday, September 17, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

In conjunction with the concert, enjoy a screening of the documentary, Place Matters: How Place Can Shape Innovation, featuring Fort Collins’ own Post Paradise. Using the recent Smithsonian “Places of Invention” exhibition – which features Fort Collins – as a point of entry, the film examines what happens when the right mix of creative people, resources, and inspiring surroundings come together and spark invention and innovation. “Places of Invention” opened at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in July, and the documentary will be broadcast by Rocky Mountain PBS this fall. Approx. 30 mins. Break of Reality Friday, September 18, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA “Classic Rock” takes on a whole new meaning when Break of Reality hits the stage. The quartet’s boundary-breaking music blends classical technique and rock’n’roll into something that brings together the best of both genres. They appear on stage without the music stands or formal dress of a classical group and illuminate the music they play, be it an original composition, a song by Tool or Radiohead, or a J. S. Bach arrangement.

University Symphony Orchestra Concert Waltzes, Fox Trots, and Rondos: A Nationalistic Treat Special Guest Katie Mahan, Piano Thursday, September 24 and Friday, September 25, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA Featuring music by John Adams, Beethoven, and Dvořák, the Symphony Orchestra opens with Adams’ most charming version of minimalism, the “Chairman Dances—Foxtrot for Orchestra” from his opera Nixon in China. The concert ends with one of Dvořák’s most played works, Symphony No. 8 in G major. Rounding out the program, the ensemble is joined by internationally renowned pianist, Katie Mahan, for Beethoven’s singular Piano Concert No. 4.

Virtuoso Series Concert

CSU Faculty Margaret Miller, Viola Monday, September 28, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA Margaret Miller and Timothy Burns, new collaborative faculty pianist at CSU, bring a varied program of American music with tremendous creativity and expression for both solo viola and viola with piano. Jazz Ensembles Concert Jazz Ensembles I and II Play the Music of Duke Ellington Wednesday, September 30, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall Join the Jazz Ensembles, directed by Peter Sommer and Wil Swindler, for the annual Jazz Classics concert, this year featuring the music of The Duke and his orchestra. The concert includes classic and modern arrangements of his music, as well as music from his frequent collaborator, Billy Strayhorn.

ALUMNI Series Concert Pure Piaf: The Life and Music of Edith Piaf Britta Laree, ’04 Saturday, September 19, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA Set in New York City’s Versailles Club in the late 1940s, Pure Piaff is the gripping story of French chanteuse Edith Piaf – Paris' "Little Sparrow" – her tumultuous rise to international stardom, her loves, and her losses, all wrapped up in the beautiful music she brought to the world, enchanting the masses. As a vocal performance alumna of CSU who has focused much of her recent career on Piaf, Britta is joined by Karen Stoody, piano; Rich Valentino, accordion; and Maggie Sallee, violin; for this unique performance.

FOR A FULL LISTING OF EVENTS, PLEASE VISIT

uca.colostate.edu

I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

Blending strong lyrical and melodic influences from multiple genres and sources of inspiration, Post Paradise’s distinct alternative/indie-rock sound has a classical flair with edgy riffs. The foursome’s fresh sound and theatrical edge has brought them opening gigs for acts such as TwentyOne Pilots, Walk the Moon, and Panic at the Disco.

Duo Francois and Friends Monday, September 21, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

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Foster The People Robin Raye

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5


Heimatkunde Fons Hickman

Die Zeit Mehmet Ali Turkmen

Fall French Market Yann Legendre

The 19th biennial Colorado International Invitational Poster Exhibition hosted by the Department of Art and Art History at Colorado State University features works of top poster artists and designers worldwide. Now in its 36th year, the biennial event is the only exhibition of its kind in North America. The main exhibition opens Sept. 18 and runs through Oct. 28 in the Clara Hatton Gallery in the Visual Arts Building and the Curfman Gallery in the Lory Student Center, both are located on the main CSU campus. The exhibition will open with a public reception at 7 p.m. at the Hatton Gallery and a poster sale in both galleries from 7-9 p.m. Exhibition winners will be announced during the opening reception by the 19th CIIPE exhibition judge. A limited number of exhibition posters and full-color catalogs will be available for purchase on a first-come, first-served basis. Featuring works of over 70 poster artists and designers from six continents, leading international graphic designers and many emerging artists, the 19th Colorado International Invitational Poster Exhibition – or CIIPE – showcases examples of global visual communication to an American audience, promoting internation-

al understanding and dialogue through outstanding design. The unique exhibition provides CSU students and the community first hand-exposure to a diverse presentation of prevailing social, cultural, and commercial perspectives. Each biennial year, the exhibition features an exhibition judge and honor laureate; these positions spotlight artists with lifetime records of excelling in the poster medium. This year’s Exhibition Judge is Alejandro Magallanes of Mexico City, whose work has been shown extensively internationally. Magallanes has dedicated his work to politics and fun. He has written six children’s books varying from poetry to cartoons, and has designed and illustrated many posters and books. Magallanes believes that the image becomes most valuable – worth a 1,000 words – when it evokes emotions, making it unforgettable.  The judge’s lecture will take place at 5 p.m. Sept. 16 in the Lory Student Center Theater, followed by an opening reception. Magallanes’s work will be highlighted at the Curfman Gallery in the LSC from Sept. 18 - Oct. 28.

I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

19 th Biennial Colorado International Invitational Poster Exhibition at Colorado State University by Jennifer Clary Jacobs

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19TH COLORADO INTERNATIONAL INVITATIONAL POSTER EXHIBITION SCHEDULE (chronological)

Judge’s Lecture: Alejandro Magallanes / Sept. 16, 5 p.m. Reception to follow, 6-9 p.m.  Lory Student Center Theatre

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

Judge’s Exhibition: Alejandro Magallanes / Sept. 16-Oct. 28 Curfman Gallery, Visual Arts Building Monday – Saturday, 12 p.m. - 7 p.m.

>>> MAIN EXHIBITION Sept. 18 - Oct. 28 Clara Hatton Gallery, Visual Arts Building Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Curfman Gallery, Lory Student Center Monday – Saturday, 12 p.m. - 7 p.m. Opening Reception, Remarks and Ribbon Cutting / Friday, Sept. 18, 7 p.m. Clara Hatton Gallery, Visual Arts Building  Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

>>> POSTER SALE Begins opening night, Sept. 18, and continues throughout the exhibition. Clara Hatton Gallery, Visual Arts Building Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Curfman Gallery, Lory Student Center Monday – Saturday, 12 p.m. - 7 p.m. Honor Laureate Exhibition: Rene Azcuy / Sept. 18 – Oct. 28 Directions Gallery, Visual Arts Building Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

The 19th CIIPE exhibition Honor Laureate is Rene Azcuy of Mexico, formerly of Cuba. Mr Azcuy’s work has been at the top levels of international achievement for over 50 years. He is particularly known by his inventive imagery in posters of Cuban and Latin-American cinema and theatre. CIIPE directors are honored to host Mr. Azcuy for the opening reception ribbon cutting. A valuable extension of the biennial exhibition is the International Poster Collection which holds past and present CIIPE poster entries. The collection, created through the collaboration between CSU Libraries and the Department of Art and Art History, is part of Morgan Library’s Archives and Special Collections. The online display features a searchable database of posters from the 7th show (1991) to the present, and an artist database of biographical information.  “Visitors  to the 19th show  will  recognize the  CIIPE  signature  commitment  to gather the best efforts of the highest level of poster  artists in the world,” said exhibition organizer John Gravdahl, professor of Graphic Design at CSU. “It is an ever changing cross section of diverse artistic achievement and cultural perspectives. Each poster is unique. Each show is unique.” The Colorado International Invitational Poster Exhibition was founded in 1979 at Colorado State by Phil Risbeck, professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Colorado State University; Bob Coonts, CSU retired affiliate faculty; and John Sorbie, former art professor at CSU, now deceased.  The 19th exhibition is made possible in-part through a grant from the Lilla B. Morgan Memorial Fund, which was established to enhance the cultural development and atmosphere of Colorado State. All events and exhibitions are free and open to the public.

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Machicao, Susana - La Paz Jazz Festival


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Benton Spruance (American, 1904 – 1967) Shovel Pass, 1935, Lithograph on paper Private collection

August 28 to December 18, 2015

NOW OPEN For a complete list of programs, please go to ArtMuseum.colostate.edu 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; closed Fall break (Nov. 21–28)


SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM

a series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage. / Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10 Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art. Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1 Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29 Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players. Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12 Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game. Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3 Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues. More events for Scrimmage will be announced during the course of the exhibition. Visit ArtMuseum.colostate.edu for updates.

WATCH A VIDEO PREVIEW OF SCRIMMAGE

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Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15 Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

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T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

FALL WORKSHOPS

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Choral and Voice Day: Real Men Sing! Wednesday, Sept. 23, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. UCA The choral and voice faculty invite middle school, high school, and adult men to join in a celebration of singing. The day includes workshops regarding the male voice (including the changing voice) and singing technique, chorus repertoire, rehearsal techniques for men’s choirs, and culminates in a special performance featuring men’s choirs from around the state and a combined intergenerational festival ensemble. Registration required: $5/student for school groups by Sept. 15, $10 after Sept. 15, $10/ individual students. Contact: Ryan.Olsen@colostate.edu.

TAKE THE NEW MUSIC, THEATRE AND DANCE ALU We want to connect with you – our CSU music, theatre, and dance alumni. Whether you graduated last year or many years ago, please take some time to fill out our alumni survey. Let us know what you’re up to these days and how you’d like to stay connected with the School of Music, Theatre and Dance – we’d love to hear from you!

Visit https://advancing.colostate.edu/3208


OcTUBAfest Special Guest Benjamin Pierce Featuring the CSU Tuba Studio Sunday, Oct. 11 Open Master Class, 3:30 p.m.; Solo Recital, 5 p.m.; Ensemble Concert, 7:30 p.m. UCA Guest artist Dr. Benjamin Pierce, University of Arkansas, joins the tuba studio at the second annual OcTUBAfest for a master class and a solo recital. CSU tuba students close the evening with a recital of solo and ensemble works. All events are free and open to public observation. Kodály Music Teaching Workshop Special Guest Rhona Brink Saturday, Nov. 7, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Instrumental Rehearsal Hall, UCA

UMNI SURVEY!

OboeRAMa brings oboists together from ages 12-72 with all levels of playing experience. This year features guest artist Jacqueline Leclair from McGill University in Montreal. Join us a masterclass, participant Double Reed Band (perform with more oboists in one place, at one time, than you have ever before), and closing recital featuring Ms. Leclair and other special guests. Registration required: $30 by Nov. 1; $35 after Nov. 1. Contact: Andrew Jacobson at ajoboe@gmail.com. Honor Band Festival and Concert Special Guest Rodney Dorsey, Honor Band Conductor Festival, December 10-12 Final Concert, Saturday, Dec. 12, 2 p.m., Griffin Concert Hall, UCA Beginning this year, CSU’s nationally renowned Honor Band Festival has moved to Dec. This annual event brings together the finest high school musicians from the Rocky Mountain Region, selected from hundreds of applicants throughout the western United States. The three-day festival features guest conductors and clinicians from across the country and is capped off with a performance by the High School Honor Band, conducted by director of bands at the University of Oregon, Rodney Dorsey. Audition required. Contact: Copper.Ferreira@colostate.edu. $5/public for concert

I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVE RSIT Y CEN T ER FO R TH E ARTS

“Effective Lesson Transitions” – for classroom music teachers looking for new techniques, strategies, and repertoire – demonstrates ways to tie together music lessons activities for a smooth, meaningful experience. Ms. Brink (University of Houston) presents “(Just a Few of) My Favorite Things,” a buffet of stories, songs, games, movement and instrumental experiences, literacy transitions, and improvisation/composition activities. Registration required: $40/ROCKE members $50/non-members, $20/ half day. Contact: rockeonline.weebly.com/workshops.

OboeRAMa Special Guest Jacqueline Leclair Featuring the CSU Oboe Studio Friday, Nov. 20, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. UCA

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FACULTY NOTES The American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) convened an historic and innovative research symposium, “IMPROVING ACCESS AND QUALITY: MUSIC THERAPY RESEARCH 2025” (MTR 2025), July 16-18, 2015. This visionary special event was designed to recommend guidance for future research in music therapy. Dr. Blythe LaGasse, associate professor of Music Therapy and coordinator of Music Therapy at CSU, was the invited presenter on the topic of research in music therapy and individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Dr. LaGasse was also involved with the work group focused T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

on making recommendations for the future of

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music therapy research for autism.

Blythe LaGasse presents at American Music Therapy Association MTR2015


cation, assistant professor of Music Education, and director of the Colorado Kodály Institute, received the 1905 Alumnae Fellowship Award from Mount Holyoke College. It is Jacobi’s second time receiving the competitive award from her alma mater, and will enable her to return to the Mount Holyoke College Library Archives in South Hadley, Mass. in 2016 to continue her study on the role of music in the lives of the earliest college women. The anticipated result of her research will be a national-level presentation and an article for publication in a major, peer-review music education journal that chronicles the interest early college women had in music (prior to it becoming a major in 1935) and details the types of music activities that were integral to life at Mount Holyoke College. In July, Dr. Jacobi presented her Dalcroze-based research in Vienna, Austria at the University for Music and Performing Arts as part of the 2nd International Conference of Dalcroze Studies (Dalcroze created the first modern method of music education). “A moving ceremony opened the conference at Dalcroze's birth house in Vienna where a plaque was bestowed in honor of his 150th birthday,” she reflected. “This man has had a substantial

(TOP) Dalcroze’s birth house is the orange one in the middle (BOTTOM) Plaque honoring Emile Jaques-Dalcroze

I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

In May 2015, Dr. Bonnie Jacobi, coordinator of Music Edu-

impact on my life and work.”

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In July, Dr. Wesley Ferreira attended the annual International Clarinet Association’s annual ClarinetFest held for 2015 in Madrid, Spain where he performed on the featured evening concert, judged the ICA Young Artist Competition, and performed with his former teacher Robert Riseling, professor emeritus at the University of Western Ontario. Ferreira’s student, Music Performance Major Emily Kerski, also attended the conference.

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

Ferreira and teacher Robert Riseling

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D’Addario Artists Wesley Ferreira and Michael Norsworthy performing Theresa Martin s Live Wire (ClarinetFest 2015)


mony Internationales Musik-Festival in Arcidosso, Italy. The annual intensive summer performance festival includes a concert series of international solo musicians and young performers, and an institute for students of solo, chamber music, and orchestral playing. CSU flute students Gabriela Bliss, Samantha Post, and Katie Miswell joined their professor for the festival. "I'm especially sad to leave my magical time with my students," said Stanley. "They made me so proud with their musical development and growth and I genuinely enjoyed spending time with them and having fun together. Miss you...what a great festival!"

(TOP) Michelle Stanley (far right) is joined by CSU students Katie Miswell (3rd from the left), Samantha Post (4th from the left), and Gabriela Bliss (3rd from the right), Fossil Ridge student Emma Shelby (4th from the right), and other flutists from around the world in the InterHarmony Internationales Musik Festival orchestra flute section. (BOTTOM) Standing room only at the final orchestra concert in Santuario dell’Incoronata

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In June, Flute Professor Dr. Michelle Stanley taught at the InterHar-

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Jazz Ensembles I and II Present the Music of

DUKE

ELLINGTON September 30 7:30 p.m.

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

directed by

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PETER SOMMER WIL SWINDLER

GRIFFIN CONCERT HALL NO CHARGE/ CSU students (full-fee paying students w/vaild CSU I.D.)

$1/youth $12/adult

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and

his orchestra


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brought to you by Bohemian Foundation

with a pre-concert screening of the Smithsonian documentary,

PLACEmatters: How Place Can Shape Innovation

S E P T E M B E R 1 7, 7 : 3 0 P. M . griffin concert hall / university center for the arts FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! VISIT CSUARTSTICKETS.COM FOR DETAILS

photo by Kell Baldwin / www.kellbaldwin.com

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 4 , S EPT EM B ER 2 0 1 5

C O N T E M PO RARY

The Green Room / September 2015  

The School of Music, Theatre and Dance at Colorado State University is proud to welcome new director, Dr. Dan Goble.

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