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Colorado State University / THE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ARTS / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 5 / OCTOBER 2015


WELCOME TO

THE GREEN ROOM October gave a party; The leaves by hundreds came The Chestnuts, Oaks, and Maples, And leaves of every name. The Sunshine spread a carpet, And everything was grand, Miss Weather led the dancing, Professor Wind the band. Dan Goble

Director of the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance

Jennifer Clary Jacobs Marketing Director

Mike Solo

Publicity and Marketing Manager

~ George Cooper, October’s Party

As I glance out my window and watch a few leaves drift lazily ground ward, I recall a fall day I’ll never forget. Over a dozen years ago, while working from home in my little house on Matthews Street, the glorious strains of the CSU Fight Song suddenly wafted through my open window. The volume indicated that the CSU Marching Band was close by, but that didn’t make any sense… why would the band be in my neighborhood on a weekday afternoon? I grabbed my young daughter’s hand and we rushed out in search of the band, ending up on the field behind the empty Fort Collins High School. Growing up in Fort Collins, attending Fort Collins High School and CSU, and being in the marching band at both schools, seeing (and hearing) the CSU Marching Band on the old FCHS practice field was emotional and apropos. The old building, where the arts had once thrived, was getting a new chance. Not only the band, but all of the performing arts students were to have a collective space of their own. This band rehearsal signified that the creation of the University Center for the Arts was in motion. Whether you played in marching band, or had a kid who did, or just enjoy hearing one, a marching band represents fall: a hometown parade through crunchy leaves, the smell of damp wool uniforms during a rainy football game, and the swell of pride when a fight song is played to the home stands. The CSU Marching Band has had a particularly memorable start to fall 2015, and we’re excited to share that with you in this issue of The Green Room. Actually, this has been a banner semester so far for all of us at the UCA, including the opening of SCRIMMAGE in the University Art Museum; the premiere of the documentary How A Place Matters; music and dance partnerships with Bohemian Foundation and the Fort Collins Lincoln Center; a Center for Studies in Beckett and Performance exclusive reprise; and last week’s packed University Symphony Orchestra concerts featuring guest pianist Katie Mahan. Whether you are a student, parent, faculty/staff member, K-12 educator, donor, or community member, we can’t tell you enough how incredibly honored we are to have your attention and support; we look forward to connecting with you throughout the rest of the fall. Now grab a pumpkin-spiced beverage and your tablet, and enjoy this issue of The Green Room! Jennifer Clary Jacobs Director of Marketing, University Center for the Arts Cover: Carrie Beyerly, Haley Moss, and Hayden Hays, baritones, and Nicky Tisdall, trumpet, on the sideline before the Broncos halftime performance.

THIS IS YOUR UCA


TABLE OF TICKETS Online Sales: CSUArtsTickets.com Ticket Office: Griffin Lobby, University Center for the Arts (UCA) Spring 2015 Ticket Office Hours: M–F, 3:30–5:30 p.m., and 60 minutes prior to performances Information: (970) 491-ARTS (2787) / Email: CSUArts@colostate.edu Group rate: 15% off on ten or more tickets, applied at the time of purchase Tickets may be purchased, both online and at the UCA Ticket Office until 30 minutes after curtain. Print-at-home tickets are available online. All tickets are subject to a $1 ticket fee for both online and at-the-door purchases. At-the-door and phone purchases will incur a $3 processing fee per order. Advance ticket purchase is highly recommended to avoid lines and the at-the-door fee. Purchase Policy: All sales are final. No refunds or exchanges. Seating after the start of any performance is at the discretion of the house manager. Photography and recording of performances are strictly prohibited. Food and beverages prohibited in all theatres. Parents with disruptive children may be asked to excuse themselves if the performance is disturbed without refund.

CONTENTS Annual CSU Alumni Band Reunion................. 06 Adding Up the Journey..................................... 08 The Numbers Game of Marching Band.......... 10 Golden Poms Alumnae...................................... 15 Collaboration, Synergy, and Live Music......... 16 Guest Artists: Verb Ballets................................ 18 It’s the Little Moments that Count................... 22 All State Videos................................................... 24 19th CIIPE Opening............................................ 27 Music Therapy News.......................................... 33 In Progress: Step on a Crack............................ 38 Fall Workshops.................................................... 40 A Fond Farewell.................................................. 45 Solar Panels at the UCA.................................... 54 Upcoming Music Events.................................... 57 Warhol Wednesday: Monique Crine................ 61 Faculty Notes....................................................... 70 EXECUTIVE EDITOR: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS CREATIVE DIRECTOR: MIKE SOLO GRAPHIC DESIGN AND MARKETING ASST. SPENCER GILLARD COPYEDITOR: SANDRA SANCHEZ

SOCIAL MEDIA This is your UCA! Stay connected with the University Center for the Arts by connecting with us on social media. Facebook: facebook.com/CSU.UCA Instagram: ColoradoStateUniversity_UCA Twitter: @CSUUCA Tumblr: ColoradoStateUCA Youtube: YouTube.com/ColoradoStateUniv Flickr: flickr.com/photos/csulibarts

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: SPENCER GILLARD JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS RACHEL JOHNSON JEFF DODGE LAUREN SCOTT (UCA INTERN) STAR DONALDSON (UCA INTERN) PAMELA SHAPIRO (UCA INTERN) FOR ADVERTISING PLEASE CONTACT: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING jennifer.clary@colostate.edu / 970.491.3603

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Class Notes.......................................................... 51

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Have you heard about the Colorado State University Alumni Band experience? CSU’s Alumni Band began in 1993 when a group of enthusiastic alumni from the 80s and 90s rented a flatbed truck and participated in the Homecoming and Family Weekend parade. Over the years the group has grown in size, and annually joins the CSU Marching Band on the field – and in the stands – during the homecoming game.

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For 2015, the CSU Marching Band invites alumni from all decades for music, friends, and fun during the homecoming reunion on Oct. 16 and 17.

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Annual CSU Alumni Band Reunion Takes Place During Homecoming and Family Weekend By Jennifer Clary Jacobs

“We anticipate a large and energetic group for this year’s Homecoming face-off with Air Force,” said Richard Frey, director of the CSU Marching Band and associate director of Bands at CSU. “Whether you’re a recent graduate or have been an alum for years, we want you to join us for this special weekend as we celebrate our traditions and connect with old friends.” In a letter to alumni, recent graduate and former CSU Marching Band Drum Major Josh Garcia said, “It was during the years [in the band] that I found my passion, made friendships that will last a lifetime, and became part of a community that will forever hold a special place in my heart.” He encouraged former members to come back with an even larger presence. “Let’s make our alma mater proud by having even more alumni members accompanying the band in the stands and on the field! Bring your family, and let’s meet up– it’s bound to be another experience full of memories,” said Garcia. Homecoming activities start as early as Thursday night with a Symphonic Band concert and include a breakfast and rehearsal at the University Center for the Arts on Saturday, followed by the big game. “I look forward to seeing and meeting many alumni this fall as we share our memories and show our RAM pride,” said Frey. For a complete schedule and registration, visit www.bands.colostate.edu and click on Alumni Band.


Registration required; lunch available for $7 Theatre.colostate.edu or call (970) 491-2675

• Meet with faculty • Interactive workshops w/ current theatre students • Audition for the theatre major and scholarships • Tour the University Center for the Arts • Attend an informal performance by theatre majors • Design portfolio review

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OCTOBER 16, 2015 FEBRUARY 12, 2016 9 A.M. – 4 P.M.

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C O L O R A D O S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y

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For the month of Sept., Sports Authority Field at Mile High was the CSU Marching Bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home away from home. For the third consecutive year, the band made a special appearance during halftime at a Denver Broncos game on Sept. 13. Less than a week later, the CSU Marching Band returned to the stadium for the or lose, college or pro football, the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performances were enthusiastically received, and it was an honor to represent Colorado State University in Denver.

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annual Rocky Mountain Showdown. Win

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THE NUMBERS GAME OF MARCHING BAND by Jennifer Clary Jacobs

Sometimes, it’s all about the numbers. In the first 6 weeks

found a place to belong; new uniforms have been fitted and

of the 2015 season, 230 CSU Marching Band members –

admired; gentle, yet firm correction has been given; nerves

including 24 color guard, 24 Golden Poms, and 33 percus-

have been tested; marching 8-5 (8 steps to 5 yards) has

sionists – led by 24 section leaders, 3 drum majors, and 5

become a habit; traditions have been embraced; hydration

graduate teaching assistants have followed the instruction

levels have waivered; insoles have been added; selfies with

of 3 directors and faculty, logging in over 200 hours and

CSU President Tony Frank have been captured; interperson-

performing 12 times… or 18 times if you count RamWalk,

al communication has been challenged; bus ride buddies

pregame, and halftime as separate performances…or over

have been picked; memorizing has become a discipline;

24 times if you count Presidential Pep Band gigs. 700 bot-

countless smiles and laughs have been gifted; and lifelong

tles of water are served, and about 6 miles are marched, at

bonds of friendship have been solidified.

every game. And figuring out how many times the band has played the Fight Song is mind-boggling (over 250 wouldn’t

With 12 weeks left to go in the season, college marching

be wrong and the drumline does keep track, revealing a

bands around the country are supporting their teams and

final tally at the band’s closing banquet in Dec.).

entertaining crowds, putting in the long hours, rigorous

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repetition, and work ethic required for a high level of pre-

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And sometimes, it’s not about the numbers at all. In the

cision and presentation. But behind the scenes, perhaps

first 6 weeks of the 2015 season, upperclassmen in leader-

the life skills and experiences to last a lifetime are what

ship roles have risen to the occasion; new marchers have

really count!

CLA Alum Susie Wargin Interviews CSU Marching Band Director on KOA News Radio Popular radio/television personality and CSU liberal arts alumna Susie Wargin interviewed CSU Marching Band director Richard Frey on KOA Radio Friday about the marching band’s performance at the Denver Broncos season opener, which happened on Sunday, Sept. 13. LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW ON KOA RADIO. Color Guard members Mariah Holcomb and Jordy Nicole wait for the Broncos halftime performance to start.


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Madisen Thero, first year drum major, conducts the CSU Marching Bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Broncos halftime performance.

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Comprised of 230 talented students from all eight colleges at CSU, the Marching Band has proven time and again its commitment to outstanding performances and inspiring Ram Pride. This year’s band is outfitted with new uniforms thanks to the generosity of over 200 individual donors. Last spring’s fundraising campaign raised over $210,000, complimenting an initial gift given by an anonymous supporter of the College. On Sept. 4, about 40 donors to the CSU Marching Band’s uniform campaign came to rehearsal for a preview of the opening game show and to see the new uniforms.

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The uniform design was given logo and trim updates, with a fitted construction. The previous uniform was worn with room to layer underneath for cold weather, whereas the new uniform comes with an outer cold-weather jacket, giving the band a leaner look.

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Everyone’s favorite component has turned out to be the Aggie/Orange-out accessories which were worn on Ag Day, for the Denver Broncos’ performance, and will show up again on Halloween. “For the first time that we know of, the band now has an orange option, allowing the students to fully participate in this important CSU tradition,” said Jennifer Clary Jacobs, director of marketing for the University Center for the Arts. Additionally, the four dozen members of the Color Guard and Golden Poms now have gorgeous, complimentary outfits, designed for mobility and elegance. There's only one thing the band can say:

CSU Drumline members Peter Hirschhorn, Spencer Poston, Anthony Lederhos, and Catie Pearson model the new uniform.


THANK YOU!


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Denver Broncos Cheerleaders: ( LEFT TO RIGHT) Angela Wood, ’14, Dance; Katie Martin, ’14, Business and Apparel Merchandising; Nikki Bronson, ’15, Business; Patricia Reimann, ’12, Apparel and Merchandising


Golden Poms Alumnae Are

Dancing Their Dreams Many CSU Golden Poms Dance Team alumnae have made the decision to become professional dancers and performers following graduation. “It's great to see the CSU game day experience has made such an impression on these ladies, so much so that they have decided to continue performing professionally,” said Brittany Wade-Pruett, Golden Poms director. When the CSU Marching Band recently performed at a Denver Broncos game, it was an opportunity for the Golden Poms to see their former teammates who are now Denver Broncos Cheerleaders. “I absolutely love watching our alumnae continue dancing and carrying out their dreams,” expressed Wade-Pruett. “I also believe it's great for the new members of the Golden Poms Dance Team to see that dancing and performing doesn't have to end once you graduate.”

Entertainer with Disney Fantasy Cruise Line: Allison Prewitt (CENTER), ’15, Business Administration Denver Nuggets Dancer: Sabrina Contreras, ’15, Communication Studies

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So when you’re at an NFL or NBA game, or even on a Disney cruise, look for these alumnae dancers!

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CSU / UCA PARTNERSHIPS

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Innosphere Vice President Doug Johnson

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An Evening of Collaboration, Synergy, and Live Music

O

n Sept. 17, an inspiring and collaborative event took place when the University Center for the Arts hosted a premiere screening of the documentary, How A Place Matters: How Place Can Shape Innovation. The film featured Post Paradise, who not only provided the soundtrack for the film, but appeared in it. Following the film, the full house enjoyed a Contemporary Artist Music Series concert – sponsored by Bohemian Foundation – showcasing Post Paradise. According to the Smithsonian Institution, Fort Collins represents 21st century innovation, so much so that it is included in an ongoing exhibit in Washington, D.C.  A new documentary, produced by Rocky Mountain PBS and Colorado State University, takes an in-depth look at what makes Fort Collins an important Place of Invention. “In tackling the documentary project, our premise was that the conditions that create the right synergy for an innovative community are not simple to build, but you know them when you see them in place,” explained CSU’s Vice President for External Relations Tom Milligan. “And we have them all right here in Fort Collins.” Groundbreaking clean-energy research being done at CSU and in Fort Collins is showcased in the Places of Invention exhibit at the Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the National Museum of American History. The exhibit, which also features such cultural and techno-


logical game-changers as Hollywood in the 1930s and Silicon Valley in the 1980s, will remain on display until 2020. The premiere was emceed by Innosphere Vice President Doug Johnson, and special guests included Fort Collins Mayor Wade Troxell, the President of KRMA and Rocky Mountain PBS, Harris Ravine, and the Director of the CSU Alumni Association Kristi Bohlender.

The Contemporary Artist Music Series encourages community support of local musicians, and the evening was also a tribute to that end. Post Paradise’s distinct alternative/ indie-rock sound, with a classical flair propelled by Amy Morgan’s electric cello, was beautifully supported by Griffin Concert Hall’s renowned acoustics. The band’s set was a perfect addition to the celebration. “I thought it was an amazing evening and was honored to be a part of it,” added Johnson. How A Place Matters will air on Rocky Mountain PBS on Oct. 1 and again on Feb. 18, 2016.

WATCH A TRAILER ABOUT THE DOCUMENTARY

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For Johnson, it was incredible to see so many people from all sectors of the community, many who had a part in helping to make the FortZED project a reality, at the event. “It was a true community effort in the UniverCity Connections spirit; this collaborative town/ gown relationship is in our DNA, is rare, and is hard to duplicate,” he declared. Johnson puts forth a simple equation to express what’s happening within the community. “Research + private enterprise = public benefit – it's a simple equation!”

Post Paradise cellist Amy Morgan

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VISITING ARTISTS

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Photos by Melissa Mendise


This November, as part of the Fall Dance Concert, Verb Ballets will do a week-long residency at The University Center for the Arts, which will include master classes and the performance of a duet choreographed by CSU Dance Professor Chung-Fu Chang, originally conceived for the Lamentation Project. WHO WE ARE

EDUCATION AND OUTREACH Education is integral to the mission of Verb Ballets. Verb Ballets offers outreach residencies and lecture demonstrations in a variety of settings, including schools, community centers, arts institutions,and healthcare facilities. It is the goal of our community outreach programs to connect the experience of dance to people in exciting and vibrant ways. By participating individuals interact first-hand with dance, learn about the creation of dance works, experience new ways of moving, and stimulate their own creativity

For more information visit www.verbballets.org.

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Verb Ballets presents fresh and innovative works that highlight the classically trained dancers with cutting edge contemporary choreography. Under the direction of Director, Dr. Margaret Carlson and Associate Director, Richard Dickinson, MFA, the company presents a diverse array of contemporary choreographers while honoring modern dance classics. Verb Balletsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; focus is to push the envelope of classical dance in a way that each is appreciated by both new audience members and dance enthusiasts. The company strives to be a thought leader in cultivating dance appreciation and support through education and outreach programs in our community. In growing audience appreciation for dance, Verb Ballets enhances the vibrant arts scene in Northeast Ohio and beyond.

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Photo by Bill Naiman

When I watch Martha Graham's Lamentation, I can hear the sounds of ocean waves in my mind. Some things you want to hide and not reveal on your face, but grief is a very selfish emotion... It too is like ocean waves that keep calling in one's mind. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; CHUNG-FU CHANG, CSU Dance Professor


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It’s the Little Moments that Count  

Military Day performance at Hughes Stadium on Sept. 14.

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A few weeks ago during rehearsal, the CSU Marching Band abruptly switched gears, stopping in the middle of learning drill to play the Coast Guard song, “Semper Paratus.” At the time, the reason was only known by Director Dr. Richard Frey who had previously received a special letter from one of the three people watching from outside the practice field fence.

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Mary Beth Solano, who wrote the touching note, agreed that Dr. Frey should share her story with the entire band.

U N I V E R S I T Y C E N T E R F O R T H E A RT S PR E S E N T S :

percussion ensemble

CONCERT conducted by Eric

Hollenbeck

with special guest John

W. P

OCTOBER 18 TH ||| 7:30 P.M


Here is Ms. Solano’s original email to Dr. Frey:

Parks IV

M.

While sharing this personal note to the entire ensemble, Dr. Frey examined his own thoughts: “I often wonder how what we do, both in band and in our daily lives, has an impact on those around us,” he said. “Learning that Ms. Solano’s father was a Coast Guard veteran from WWII, it was right to honor him that way.”   While following up with Ms. Solano for permission to share this story in The Green Room, she relayed, from her perspective, the effect of the “Semper Paratus” moment.   I took dad to practice [again] yesterday and they were practicing their pieces for their military appreciation show. Bless their hearts; they played the coast guard hymn while we were there. He took his hat off, stood a little higher at attention, and cried...so did I. Another incredibly meaningful moment for his soul. With all the health issues he deals with, that is worth more than you will ever know.  

“Sometimes what we do is much bigger than just entertaining a crowd,” Frey told the band. “And I’m proud that our band could have such an effect on this family.”

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  Good afternoon! I got home a bit ago from witnessing the most wonderful moments...I brought my 89 year old father who can hardly walk and is suffering from some significant dementia, along with my granddaughter who just started Kindergarten, to watch the marching band practice today. I knew we could only stay a few minutes because he can't be out in the heat, but in those moments I watched my dad's face just light up and he started to remember marching band rehearsals he was in decades ago in college at the University of Minnesota. He played tuba back then (even took it up again about 20 years ago for a while) and has always LOVED listening to brass instruments anywhere he can find them, particularly in a good marching band like what we saw today. He became animated and talkative like he hasn't been for a long while. We heard about the different techniques the director of this band uses compared to the one who led his band and he noticed how straight the trumpet player’s arms were and how in-sync the bells on the sousaphones moved. I haven't heard him notice details like that in years!! My granddaughter was marching in her own little parade and had all kinds of questions about why and how and who. It was a very special time!!! I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for this afternoon. Your work lit a light in my granddaughter's heart and relit the light in my father's eyes and memories.

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MUSIC FACULTY OUTREACH CONTINUES

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For a second year, the music faculty at Colorado State University has created instructional videos designed to help prepare High School student instrumentalists for their upcoming auditions for Colorado All-State Orchestra and Colorado All-State Concert Band. Dedicated to its land-grant heritage, the music faculty at CSU are committed to promoting music and pedagogy of the highest quality, serving music education through actions that benefit the students, teachers, and citizens of Colorado. According to the co-producers of the videos, Wesley Ferreira, assistant professor of Clarinet and Chris Van Hof, assistant professor of Trombone and Euphonium, "The CSU Music faculty are delighted to once again present instructional videos to assist students, as well as teachers. The videos also serve to reinforce our faculty vision statement."

We invite High School students, and their instructors, to reference the list of  Instructional Videos on our YouTube channel.


COLORADO STATE U N IVERS I TY CON CE RT ORCHE S TRA P R ESENTS

the Lure of

London conducted by Leslie Stewart

Cost: FREE featuring works of great British composers including

Henry Purcell | George Handel | Edward Elgar

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October 18, 7:30 p.m. / ORGAN RECITAL HALL

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CLARA HATTON GALLERY

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19TH CIIPE OPENING:

COLORFUL AND INSPIRING By Jennifer Clary Jacobs

VIDEO OF OPENING NIGHT Featuring works from over 70 poster artists and designers from six continents, CIIPE – as it is known – features works of top poster artists and designers worldwide. Now in its 36th year, the biennial event is the only exhibition of its kind in North America, promoting international understanding and dialogue through outstanding design. “The 19th CIIPE presents a rewarding variety of international poster designs made for social, political, cultural and commercial interests,” said exhibition organizer John Gravdahl, professor of Graphic Design at CSU. “You will see art from numerous first time participants side by side with the new work of exhibition masters that returning visitors will remember from previous shows; notably we have new countries represented from Africa and Latin America.” Exhibition winners, selected by exhibition judge Alejandro Magallanes of Mexico City, were announced during the opening reception.

Patrons anticipate the ribbon cutting at exhibition opening.

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On Sept. 18, the 19th Colorado International Invitational Poster Exhibition hosted by the Department of Art and Art History at Colorado State University, opened in the Clara Hatton Gallery in the Visual Arts Building and the Curfman Gallery in the Lory Student Center.

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2015 CIIPE HONORABLE MENTIONS

2015 CIIPE WIN

Igor Gurovich, Russia Manotzkov

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Holger Matties, Germany Leben Eben [Life Now]

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From Bach to Bebop

Fons Hickman, Germany Heimatkunde (ABOVE)

Radovan Jenko, Slovenia Le Petit Festival Du Theatre


NNERS

Erich Brechbühl, Switzerland Salzhaus

The 19th exhibition space is also a renewed collaboration with the Clara Hatton Gallery and the spectacular new  Curfman Gallery. The main exhibition runs through Oct. 28.

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Peter Bankov, Russia Biennale Golden Bee

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You’re Invited

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 50 YEAR CLUB LUNCHEON Honoring the Class of 1965 and those before FESTIVAL ON THE OVAL Enjoy music, kid-friendly activities, and plenty of Ram pride

BONFIRE, LIGHTING OF THE A, AND FIREWORKS Enjoy the sights and sounds of what makes CSU special

GO RAMS!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 5K RACE Show your Ram power and run or walk with those who love CSU PREGAME TAILGATE AND FOOTBALL GAME Enjoy game-day fare and cheer the Rams to victory over Air Force

Visit homecoming.colostate.edu for frequent updates on Homecoming & Family Weekend events and activities.

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HOMECOMING PARADE Gather friends, family, and CSU spirit for a parade through campus

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M U SIC T H E RA P Y NEWS

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CSU professor’s book lands top honor from British Medical Association By Jeff Dodge CSU Public Relations Coordinator for the College of Liberal Arts

The Oxford Handbook of Neurologic Music Therapy, co-edited and co-authored by Thaut, was short-listed as one of three finalists to receive the much-coveted best book award from the British Medical Association, out of all neurology books published in 2014. The annual award ceremony took place Sept. 3 in London, and the Handbook received second place. “This was a huge and unlikely honor,” Thaut said. Thaut co-edited the book with internationally renowned neurologist Volker Hoemberg. In addition to Thaut and Hoemberg, Corene Thaut, a former CSU research associate in the Center for Biomedical Research in Music, contributed six chapters to the book.

> DEFINITIVE GUIDE The book, published by Oxford University Press in 2014, was one of about 630 entries for the BMA awards. It serves as the definitive, comprehensive guide to the field of neurologic music therapy, the only medically recognized branch of music therapy. “Since it’s such a small field in neurology, getting this honor is quite shocking, actually,” Michael Thaut said. “We were truly speechless. I had to read the email several times to believe it.” The Thauts attended the ceremony and received the award in person.

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Michael Thaut, director of the Center for Biomedical Research in Music at Colorado State University and pioneer in the neuroscience of music and neurologic music therapy, has received a major honor from across the pond.

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“It was certainly an experience of a lifetime to be invited and nominated; it felt a bit like being at the ‘Book Oscars,’” Thaut said with a laugh. In addition, this spring Thaut was named an overseas fellow of Great Britain’s Royal Society of Medicine, which was established in 1805 and is one of the country’s primary providers of postgraduate medical education. Fellows receive access to one of the finest medical libraries in the world, online and educational resources, exclusive club facilities and support for continuing professional development.

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> ABOUT NMT

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The Oxford Handbook of Neurologic Music Therapy, co-edited and co-authored by Thaut

Neurologic music therapy is a standardized, evidence-based system of music therapy developed by Michael Thaut and his original research team, which included Hoemberg and Corene Thaut as well as neurologist Gerald McIntosh and physical therapist Ruth Rice. Their efforts resulted in the founding of the Robert F. Unkefer Academy of Neurologic Music Therapy in 1999, which offers training in the field and has certified about 2,500 neurologic music therapists and other rehabilitation professionals in 25 countries. Neurologic music therapy uses music-based rehabilitation exercises to retrain the brain for regaining control of movement, speech, language and cognitive/emotional functions like attention, memory and executive function. The therapy is used to address a variety of conditions, including stroke, Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, dementia, autism, Alzheimer’s disease and developmental disabilities. Michael Thaut received his master’s degree and Ph.D. in music from Michigan State University with a minor in movement science. He also has a degree in music from the Mozarteum University in Salzburg, Austria. At Colorado State University he is a professor of music and neuroscience and is former director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance, which is in CSU’s College of Liberal Arts.


OCT. 2 AT 8:30 A.M. The CSU Music Therapy Student Association is hosting the Jammin' Ram Run 5k Prediction Race, benefiting Foundation Music School, a community non-profit supporting music therapy for children with special needs. The race, being held on the oval which is in gorgeous fall color mode, is a prediction race meaning no timing devices are allowed; winners are those who come closest to predicting their actual time and prizes will be given. A kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race will follow at 9:30 a.m.

TO REGISTER, CLICK HERE.


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DAN GOBLE

PETER SOMMER

FROM BACH TO BEBOP

Nuevo Histories

SAXOPHONE

SAXOPHONE

November 2, 7:30 p.m.

November 9, 7:30 p.m.

Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Organ Recital Hall, UCA


S E R I E S

C O N C E R T S

featuring

featuring

Chris van Hof, Joel Bacon, Eric Hollenbeck, John McGuire, Margaret Miller, and Barbara Thiem, Michelle Stanley, Margaret Miller, and Barbara Thiem, Copper Ferreira, with special guests Chris Jussell, and David McArthur.

Bach’s Clavierübung III and Prelude and Fugue in E-flat Major

November 16, 7:30 p.m.

November 30, 7:30 p.m.

Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Organ Recital Hall, UCA

CONDUCTED BY RICHARD FREY

ORGAN

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ENSEMBLE

JOEL BACON

FACULTY CHAMBER

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CeCe Webber and Chase Morris rehearse for upcoming performance Step on A Crack by Suzan Zeder opening Oct. 9 in the Studio Theatre

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Oct. 9, 10, 1 and Oct. 10,

at the University Center


r for the Arts located at 1400 Remington Street.

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16, 17, 23, and 24, 7:30 p.m., 11, 17, 18, 24, and 25, 2 p.m.

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FALL WORKSHOPS OcTUBAfest Special Guest Benjamin Pierce Featuring the CSU Tuba Studio Sunday, Oct. 11 Open Master Class, 3:30 p.m.; Solo Recital, 5 p.m.; Ensemble Concert, 7:30 p.m. UCA

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Guest artist Dr. Benjamin Pierce, University of Arkansas, joins the tuba studio at the second annual OcTUBAfest for a master class and a solo recital. CSU tuba students close the evening with a recital of solo and ensemble works. All events are free and open to public observation.

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Kodály Music Teaching Workshop Special Guest Rhona Brink Saturday, Nov. 7, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Instrumental Rehearsal Hall, UCA “Effective Lesson Transitions” – for classroom music teachers looking for new techniques, strategies, and repertoire – demonstrates ways to tie together music lessons activities for a smooth, meaningful experience. Ms. Brink (University of Houston) presents “(Just a Few of) My Favorite Things,” a buffet of stories, songs, games, movement and instrumental experiences, literacy transitions, and improvisation/ composition activities. Registration required: $40/ROCKE members $50/ non-members, $20/half day. Contact: rockeonline.weebly.com/ workshops.

OboeRAMa Special Guest Jacqueline Leclair Featuring the CSU Oboe Studio Friday, Nov. 20, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. UCA OboeRAMa brings oboists together from ages 12-72 with all levels of playing experience. This year features guest artist Jacqueline Leclair from McGill University in Montreal. Join us a masterclass, participant Double Reed Band (perform with more oboists in one place, at one time, than you have ever before), and closing recital featuring Ms. Leclair and other special guests. Registration required: $30 by Nov. 1; $35 after Nov. 1. Contact: Andrew Jacobson at ajoboe@gmail.com. Honor Band Festival and Concert Special Guest Rodney Dorsey, Honor Band Conductor Festival, December 10-12 Final Concert, Saturday, Dec. 12, 2 p.m., Griffin Concert Hall, UCA   Beginning this year, CSU’s nationally renowned Honor Band Festival has moved to Dec. This annual event brings together the finest high school musicians from the Rocky Mountain Region, selected from hundreds of applicants throughout the western United States. The three-day festival features guest conductors and clinicians from across the country and is capped off with a performance by the High School Honor Band, conducted by director of bands at the University of Oregon, Rodney Dorsey. Audition required. Contact: Copper.Ferreira@colostate.edu. $5/public for concert


State of Making Mu s ic Join CSU’s non-auditioned music ensembles this year!

If you don’t have an instrument with you on campus, don’t worry! Many instruments are available for rental. The positive environment has provided sophomore Stephanie Lane with many performance opportunities, fantastic memories, and chances to meet new people. “It is incredible that even though we are all studying different majors, we are still united through music and through the hard work we put into it,” she said. Lane hopes more students will discover reasons to continue in music. “I love concert band where it’s low-stress and super fun,” she said enthusiastically, “Continuing music in college is something I encourage everyone to do!” Information about all non-auditioned and auditioned ensembles is at music.colostate.edu

The collaborative Concert Orchestra (MU 206) is a an ensemble of 30 string players who perform with choral, wind, and percussion students and faculty. M/W, 1 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Contact: Leslie2.Stewart@ colostate.edu With over 100 men and women singers, the University Chorus (MU 202) is the largest mixed choir on campus. T/TH, 5:30–7 p.m. Contact: Stuart.Dameron@colostate.edu Men’s Chorus (MU 201) performs a wide variety of music specifically for men’s voices. T/TH, 2–3:15 p.m. Contact: Ryan.Olsen@colostate.edu

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At CSU, there are four ensembles open to all majors that do not require an audition to be a member. Students in these ensembles come from biological sciences, business, engineering, computer sciences, English, political science, zoology, and music. Simply register and show up.

Concert Band (MU 205) is an exciting, dynamic group of 100 instrumental musicians. W/F, 4:15–5:45 p.m. Contact: E.Johnson@colostate.edu

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CSU Wind Symphony Concert Begins Cornerstone Series

by Star Donaldson (UCA Intern)

The CSU Wind Symphony begins its four-part symphony series with a concert featuring the work of German composer Paul Hindemith on Wednesday, Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m. in Griffin Concert Hall. This season, the Wind Symphony celebrates outstanding cornerstones written for the winds and percussion genre, each featuring one of the great original symphonies by Hindemith, Ticheli, Hovaness, and Gould.

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“[Symphonies of Wind and Percussion], Series is a vehicle for exploring composers who’ve written in these areas,” said Dr. Rebecca Phillips, conductor of Wind Symphony. “It allows our students to perform some of the finest literature in the genre in a new way.”

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The opening concert, conducted by Dr. Phillips and graduate conductor Chase Morin, features Paul Hindemith’s Symphony in Bb for Band. The symphony, one of Hindemith’s last orchestral compositions, was completed in 1951, and premiered the same year in a performance by the United States Army Band, “Pershing’s Own” conducted Hindemith himself. The CSU concert also features works by Beethoven, Whitacre, and Kurka.

About Rebecca Phillips Dr. Rebecca Phillips is the director of bands at Colorado State University where she conducts the CSU Wind Symphony and guides all aspects of the band and graduate wind conducting program. Prior to this appointment, she served as the associate director of bands, director of athletic bands, and associate professor at the University of South Carolina where she was responsible for directing the Symphonic Winds Concert Band, “The Mighty Sound of the Southeast” Carolina Marching Band, “Concocktion” Pep Bands, teaching undergraduate instrumental conducting, and directing the Carolina Summer Drum Major Clinic. Read more.

About the CSU Wind Symphony The Colorado State University Wind Symphony performs the finest literature of yesterday, today, and tomorrow with a flexible instrumentation that includes as few as eight or as many as seventy-five players. Membership, determined each semester by a blind audition, includes the most accomplished graduate and undergraduate CSU music and non-music majors. In addition to commissioning and premiering new works, the CSU Wind Symphony regularly features faculty artists and the ensemble tours throughout the state and region, performing at conventions, conferences, and other venues across the west.


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“What I think is a priority is continuing to find ways to make the liberal arts relevant, in terms of change that people want to see in the world, in terms of people’s individual lives, in terms of how people work with and improve their communities.” — Dean Ann Gill

Gill known for her engaging speeches, addreses graduates at a College of Liberal-Arts commencement ceremony.


Summarizing the long and successful career of a decidedly humble leader can seem like a daunting task – that is, until speaking to the people who have come to know and love her. By Rachael Johnson, Assistant to Dean for External Relations College of Liberal Arts Dean Ann Gill recently announced her retirement, effective July 1, 2016, after nearly 36 years of teaching, mentoring, and leadership at Colorado State University. While Gill might not be one for self-aggrandizement, the people who have built deep and lasting relationships with her over the years are unreserved in their praise. From her generous, selfless, caring nature to her quick wit, brilliant mind, and strategic insight, it is clear that Gill is a special person.

A voice for change

Gill’s down-to-earth, hardworking personality can be traced back to her roots growing up on a farm in Merino, Colo. It was there that she developed her strong work ethic as well as an enduring love of athletics, always showing up to cheer for the home team. Gill excelled at public speaking from the time she was a young girl, displaying a unique ability to connect with others through her skill in weaving words and imagery into a captivating story.

“There was a point in time when I thought I was actually going to leave school because of the financial burden,” he recalls. “Ann helped me navigate through that to the point that she kept me in school and allowed me to fulfill my dreams of being the first in my family to get a college degree. It is the reason that I created the Bohling-Gill scholarship with her, so that we might be able to help others in the way she helped me. For those who have the privilege and the honor to get to know Ann, she was more than just a college professor or dean. She was someone who became not only your friend, but someone who you would cherish and consider part of your family.”

She has often used this voice to advocate for those who need it most. Gill was deeply impacted by the 1960s era of the civil rights movement.

Talk to anyone who knows Gill well, and countless stories like this will emerge. Gill has a particular love of working with student-athletes and has continued mentoring them throughout her time as dean. Albert Bimper, senior associate athletics director for diversity and inclusion and professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies, says Gill is an invaluable resource to CSU athletics.

“There’s a recognition she has of systemic inequalities and a real effort on her part to address that,” says Greg Dickinson, chair of the Department of Communication Studies. “She thinks about it on a global scale, but on a more personal level, she knows she can reach out to a student or a young faculty member and can help create a shift for them. If you look at her scholarship, it all has to do with social justice and people who want to make a change in the world.”

“One of her greatest qualities is she takes that time or goes that extra mile to understand our student-athletes, to understand their stories, and then really help build an opportunity for them to be successful academically,” he says. “Some of them live in the CSU limelight, they live under a microscope, but Ann breaks down that mystique. She isn’t enthralled with who they are as athletes, but gets to know who they are as people.”

Kim Tobin, associate vice president for University advancement and former director of development in the College of Liberal Arts, saw the depth of these relationships firsthand. Gill and Tobin would often travel together to connect with college alumni across the country. Tobin described a time when Gill was devastated

Beloved mentor

Gill has certainly impacted the many students she has mentored over the years. During her years as a speech communication

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faculty member, she coached the forensics team, driving students across the country in a van to attend tournaments. One of those students, Joe Bohling (speech communication, ’90), recalls the deep impact she had on the trajectory of his life.

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College of Liberal Arts Annual Donor Luncheon, often held at the University Center for the Arts

“We had an alumni breakfast and a fellow came in, a former football player, and immediately asked for her,” Tobin recalls. “When I explained that she wasn’t able to make the trip, his face fell. From behind his back, he pulled out a corsage he’d brought to thank her for all she had done for him and to represent the impact she had on the many football players she’d helped over the years. He traveled a long distance and left his home at 4 a.m. so he could have breakfast with her. To have a dean that has made that kind of impact is pretty extraordinary.” But that’s just who Gill is. Her favorite part of the job, the piece she is most passionate about and where she finds “great joy,” is working with students. For her, crafting these deep, genuine relationships comes down to being a good listener. Underlying this is a real belief in her students’ ability to succeed – a belief that “you can do this; and not only can you do this, I expect you to do this.”

Champion for the liberal arts

While Gill has made an impact on numerous students’ lives through her dedicated mentorship, she has also had a profound

impact on the College of Liberal Arts. At CSU, the name Ann Gill has become synonymous with liberal arts. Gill works tirelessly on behalf of the college as well as the University, and those around her have taken notice. According to Tobin, the College of Liberal Arts has begun to be “recognized as a fundamental component of CSU,” and Gill played a large role in leading that transformation. This commitment to scholarship has not replaced excellent teaching, but rather complemented it. As liberal arts faculty have produced a steady increase in publications, research, and grants, they have continued to win awards for teaching. This has resulted in what Dickinson refers to as a “transformation [to a] profoundly different place. Ann’s ability to maintain a personal touch while overseeing the transition to a more scholarly department is really remarkable and irreplaceable.” Behind the transition of the college is a knowledge within Ann that the fate of liberal arts lies in not only talking the talk but walking the walk in terms of real-world impact. “What I think is a priority is continuing to find ways to make the liberal arts relevant, in terms of change that people want to see in the world, in terms of people’s individual lives, in terms of how people work with and


improve their communities, however community is defined,” Gill says. “I think that’s the biggest thing we do for our students: give them the skills in all parts of their lives to be everything that they can be. And I see that happening in wonderful ways.” Near the heart of the University, there is a statue with a quote from Isaac Newton: “If I have seen further than others, it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.” Liberal Arts Development Council member and scholarship donor Thad Smith (sociology, ’74) refers to this campus landmark when talking about what Gill has accomplished in her tenure. “I would put her in that category; we will be standing on her shoulders for what she accomplished for the college and all the people involved,” he says. “Ann has muscled her way to making this college very relevant – it’s very much a part of the University and very much a part of its reputation. Whoever comes in behind her will get to build on what she did.”

There will be many opportunities to connect with Gill this year. During Homecoming & Family Weekend she will be at Festival on the Oval giving away free hugs at the Ann Gill Hugging Booth. This will take place Friday, Oct. 16, from 3:30-6 p.m., and the College of Liberal Arts will be on hand to take photos of individuals with Gill. Gill is also the featured guest at the Tailgate Tribute to Dr. Ann Gill sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies and the Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts program on Oct. 17 from 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. at RamTown outside Hughes Stadium.

. (TOP RIGHT) CSU supporters Dave and Paula Edwards with Gill at a College of Liberal Arts event (MIDDLE RIGHT) Art Museum Expansion Groundbreaking (BOTTOM RIGHT) Gill poses for a photo with speech communication colleagues at the 1985 commencement ceremony

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Events planned for Homecoming & Family Weekend

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7 p.m. 9 p.m. & 11 p.m.

(Full-fee paying students with valid CSU I.D.)

$12/adult, $1/youth

CSUArtsTickets.com

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Cost: NO CHARGE/CSU students,

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UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ARTS PRESENTS

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

guest artist series Jennifer Black, soprano

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7

th

October

6 p.m.

Lyric soprano Jennifer Black is “gleaming and glorious, with wonderful nuances of light and shade and complete dynamic control.” (Santa Fe New Mexican) This Metropolitan Opera Winner gives a recital of art song, arias, and an operatic duet with CSU’s own John Seesholtz. The recital will be accompanied by pianist Chris Reed, CSU special assistant professor of Voice.

ORGAN RECITAL HALL The Guest Artist Series is FREE and open to the public


Grady Soapes, ’09, B.A. Dance, is artistic coordinator and dance educator at the Denver Center for Performing Arts, where he works on casting; helps manage the Colorado New Play Summit; coordinates the theatre testing initiative, Off-Center at the Jones; and hosts and manages the Playwright Fellow. He also serves as New Works Festival coordinator at the Perry-Mansfield Performing Arts School and choreographed for Drag Machine, which recently ran at the Denver Center for Performing Arts.

Irina Yakubovskaya, ’12, Interdisciplinary M.A., French & Theatre, is working on her PhD at Tufts University in Boston, Mass., where her research combines Neuroscience and Theatre Practice. At Tufts, she teaches Intro to Acting and some theatre history courses. Irina has also been an assistant director, dramaturg, and director on several departmental and student theatre productions. Her translation of Daniil Kharms’ texts was recently performed by the award-winning Boston theatre company Imaginary Beasts.

Victoria Arias, ’14, B.A. Theatre; B.F.A. Art, graduated from the Cinema Makeup School’s Master Makeup program in June and was awarded a fellowship with the school’s Director of Education Emeritus and current Vice President of the Academy of Motion Pictures and Sciences, Leonard Engleman. The fellowship requires participation in the IMATS Battle of the Brushes, and Aria will be competing in Sydney, Australia in Nov.

Robert Stahly, ’08, B.M. Music Education, Tuba, is currently the director of Orchestras and Music Technology at Longmont High School in Longmont, Colo. where he conducts three orchestras, teaches AP Music Theory, and Music Technology. He also teaches the tuba section and serves as the visual caption head and head sound designer/mixing engineer for Loveland High School Marching Band.

Elizabeth Stewart, ’13, B.A. Theatre, currently works as a production assistant at the Art Underground in Louisville, Colo. She also works on various other productions in the area.

Dana Kinney, ’15, M.M. Music, will be serving as assistant director at Dallas Opera for their production of Manon by Jules Massenet in Feb. E. Loren Meeker is the director.

Jaclyn Bradley Palmer, ’14, M.M. Music Therapy, has had her first study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology; A first-of-its-kind study finds that music therapy lessened anxiety for women undergoing surgical breast biopsies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The two-year study out of University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center involved 207 patients. Jaclyn was the lead author and is a music therapist at UH. “Our aim was to determine if music therapy affected anxiety levels, anesthesia requirements, recovery time, and patient satisfaction with the surgical experience,” she said in a press release. Read more about the study.

To submit your Class Note, email Jennifer Clary Jacobs at jennifer.clary@colostate.edu

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Brittany Adams, ’13, B.A. Dance, has signed on for a third season with the Saint Paul Ballet in Minn. Brittany is also the outreach and communications manager, and oversees a team in charge of PR, social media, and community events. In her first year with the company, Britany started the Take Back the Tutu campaign which asks dancers to be honest about body image and dance; the entries are accompanied by photos by Caroline Yang. CSU Dance alum, Anna Roehr, ’12, B.A. Dance, also joined the company in 2014.

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N O V E M B E R 6 , 13 , 1 4 , 7 : 3 0 P. M .

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

a children’s opera, by E N G E L B E R T H U

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CSUArtsTickets.com


A N D 8 , 2 P. M .

UMPERDINCK

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T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

DO YOU KNOW THAT ENERGY IS NOT ONLY BEING CREATED ON THE GRIFFIN CONCERT HALL STAGE, BUT IS BEING MADE ABOVE YOU AS WELL!

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Six different solar installation sites at Colorado State University are now complete, including installs at the University Center for the Arts, Colorado State University Campus Rec, Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, and three dorms. The arrays were constructed and installed by Namasté Solar and are a partnership between CSU and the City of Fort Collins – all made possible by The Atmosphere Conservancy. Part of a campus and city-wide renewable energy initiative, the total of CSU’s solar installation is 1.2 megawatts of clean power. Here's to promoting a carbon-free future!


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C O N T E M P O R A RY

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

brought to you by Bohemian Foundation

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with special guest

172 N. College Ave., Suite D ∙ (970) 492-4977

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CSU STUDENTS NO CHARGE / $10 PUBLIC / CSUARTSTICKETS.COM An equal opportunity university

Visit our new store

Purchases over $60

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Wendy Ishii from Beckett’s Women


Upcoming M U S I C

P E R F O R M A N C E S

Wind Symphony Concert Symphonies of Winds and Percussion: Hindemith Wednesday, October 7, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA This season, the Wind Symphony celebrates outstanding cornerstones written for the winds and percussion genre, each featuring one of the great original symphonies by Hindemith, Ticheli, Hovaness, and Gould. This opening concert, conducted by Rebecca Phillips and graduate conductor Chase Morin, features Paul Hindemith’s Symphony in Bb for Band along with works by Beethoven, Adams, and Kurka. Concert Choir and Chamber Choir Concert Music Near and Far Friday, October 9, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Virtuoso Series Concert

CSU Faculty Barbara Thiem, Cello and Special Guest Theresa Bogard, Piano Monday, October 12, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA Internationally acclaimed cellist, Barbara Thiem, who combines her teaching and coaching with her active schedule of performances in Europe and the U.S. has been performing with Theresa Bogard, music department chair at the University of Wyoming, for many years. For this concert, the performing duo presents a program of Dohnanyi, Debussy, and more. Men’s Chorus and University Chorus Concert Romantic Men and Music Around the World Tuesday, October 13, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA The Men’s Chorus, conducted by Ryan Olsen, performs a set entitled “Romantic Men,” including repertoire from 19th and 20th century composers from Germany, France, Russia, and the U.S. that celebrates the emotional aspects of male chorus singing. On the second half of the program, the University Chorus, conducted by Stuart Dameron, presents a set of standard choral repertoire and new works from around the world, representing a variety of historical periods in the canon.

The Symphonic Band, conducted by Richard Frey, presents a concert of classic wind band pieces from the mid-twentieth century. The program includes  Persichetti’s famous  Symphony for Band, as well as  Morton Gould’s Ballad for Band, led by graduate conductor Georgianna Oswald. The highlight of the evening comes as Tiffany Blake joins the band on Bernard Gilmore’s Five Folk Songs for Soprano and Band. This was the first large work ever composed for soprano and band, and more than fifty years later, it still sounds fresh and original. CSU Homecoming and Family Weekend! October 15-18, Colorado State University Alumni, families, community members, and visitors are invited to visit campus to celebrate with us! Alumni Band Reunion, Oct. 16 and 17. For a full schedule of concerts, events, and family activities, visit Homecoming.colostate.edu. Concert Orchestra Concert / FREE The Lure of London Sunday, October 18, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA The orchestra, conducted by Leslie Stewart, performs some of London’s most celebrated composers, including Henry Purcell, considered the greatest native English composer for almost 200 years; the popular Edward Elgar; and George Frederic Handel, who was born in Germany but spent most of his life in London. The program includes music from Purcell’s Fairy Queen Suite; Handel’s First Organ Concerto, featuring graduate student Nathan Fry, organ; and Elgar’s Serenade for Strings. Percussion Ensemble Concert With Special Guest John W. Parks IV, Percussion Sunday, October 18, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA The Percussion Ensemble, conducted by Eric Hollenbeck, performs a concert that includes several pieces for traditional western percussion ensemble and the steel drum band. The concert also features Florida State University professor John W. Parks IV, who has performed with diverse organizations ranging from the Eastman Wind Ensemble; the Schlossfestspiele Orchestra of Heidelberg, Germany; to the Kansas City and Tallahassee Symphony Orchestras, and more.

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The Concert Choir, conducted by Ryan Olsen, presents a program of women’s choral repertoire focusing on aspects of social justice, including Gwneth Walker’s “Tree of Peace,” highlighting gender and social issues; “Famine Song” by Matthew Culloton, which tells of the strife of women in Africa; and Jocelyn Hagen’s “Moon Goddess,” which is a song of Native American women. The program also includes pieces by Mendelssohn and Schutz. On the second half of the program, the Chamber Choir, conducted by James Kim, performs a set of Italian songs by Rossini, as well as Brahms’ famous Zigeunerlieder song cycle.

Symphonic Band Concert Mid-Century Masterpieces With CSU Faculty Tiffany Blake, Soprano Thursday, October 15, 7:30 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

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[MUSIC EVENTS CONTINUED]

Virtuoso Series Concert

The Traditions of the Flute: Bach CSU Faculty Michelle Stanley, Flute Monday, October 19, 7:30 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA This all-Bach program features the repertoire that helped make the flute a solo voice. Bach’s compositions show off the flute in all its glory: melody, harmony, gymnastics, and meditation. Works include solo and chamber music for the flute.

Halloween Organ Extravaganza Saturday, October 31, 7 p.m., 9 p.m., and 11 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA The organ studio and CSU faculty Joel Bacon perform classic (and notso-classic) works, including the famous Toccata and Fugue in D minor of Bach. Spooky sounds are sure to put you in the Halloween spirit. Come in costume, if you like, and be prepared to have ghoulish, fun at this popular family-friendly event.

FOR A FULL LISTING OF EVENTS, PLEASE VISIT

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

uca.colostate.edu

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Support the Arts and Humanities at CSU Give to the Lilla B. Morgan Memorial Endowment, the premier fund for arts and culture at Colorado State University. Your gift will help make possible: • exhibitions and performances, • guest lecturers and visiting artists, • purchase of items for the University’s permanent collections, • events showcasing the breadth of human cultural endeavor, and, • enhance the cultural awareness of the CSU community.

Donate today at advancing.colostate.edu/2085


Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chorus and University Chorus Concert

conducted by

and

Ryan Olsen

Stuart Dameron

October 13 | 7:30 p.m. cost: No Charge/CSU students $12/adult $1/youth (Full-fee paying students with valid CSU I.D.)

GRIFFIN CONCERT HALL | CSUArtsTickets.com |

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conducted by

A scene from Eh Joe

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FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, CSU STUDENTS CAN ATTEND ANY MUSIC, THEATRE, OR DANCE PERFORMANCE*

FOR FREE.

charge ticket to all music, theatre, and dance department events at the UCA. Tickets are available in-person at the UCA Ticket Office, both in advance or at-the-door. A valid RAMCard must be presented for ticket redemption. Tickets are limited to one (1) per student for each performance/series of performances (i.e. multiple theatre or dance performances of the same show). Space is limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Excludes Classical Convergence and community produced events.

For a full listing of events, visit uca.colostate.edu

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*RAMCard is your ticket to the UCA! Full-fee paying students (enrolled in six or more credits) can receive one (1) no-

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(TOP) NFL tight end Jake Ballard, Oil on Canvas (BOTTOM) Vicki, Oil on Canvas. 30” x 58”, 2009.


THIS MONTH: MONIQUE CRINE

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The Denver-based artist spoke at length about her work as part of the lecture series connected to the University Art Museum’s current exhibition Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present. Scrimmage gives an in-depth look at the American relationship with its favorite sport and its portrayal in art in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Crine recently concluded her solo exhibition, Critical Focus, at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, an exhibition that focused on her most recent project, Eden Prairie: a series of paintings portraying retired football players. Influenced by mid-century American film, and her grandfather Leslie Crine – a press photographer in the 1960s – Crine’s paintings, typically oil on canvas and based upon photographs taken by Crine herself, capture a realism rarely seen in such a medium. As an avid film photographer who still works with 35mm film and her grandfather’s camera, Crine uses her talents as both an accomplished photographer and an award winning painter to create this stunning and life-like work.

But it is not simply creating paintings of the photographs that make her work so captivating. Crine looks for what she calls “cinematic perspective” in her paintings, displaying many of pieces in larger-than-life size and scale with ratios commonly associated with film and cinema, giving her work a widescreen or landscape display and feel to them. The film influences don’t end there. With the meticulous detail, Crine can take up to weeks or sometimes even months translating the film to paint, incorporating elements such as distortions of light – like lens flares – and texture captured only in analogue film and the inherent “flaws” representative of the medium. So why paint something that has already been photographed? “Painting from the photographs gives [the paintings] a quality of realness that you can’t find in film,” said Crine. “The textures, the lights, things come out of the painting… that can’t be seen on the film.” That’s where the magic really begins. Crine finds a converging road between two mediums often seen as separate and unequal.

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There’s an old football term known as a dual-threat quarterback, referring to the once-rare phenomenon of a quarterback who not only threw the football well but could create positive plays with his legs: in the art world, Monique Crine is just that.

Written by Spencer Gillard

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Now on her sixth series of hyper-real paintings, Crine, whose subjects revolve around iconic American imagery, takes her large, cinematic art style to tackle larger-than-life figures, noting with a smile: “There’s nothing quite as American as football.”

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

When Crine began the project, she admits her ignorance towards the sport, but that didn’t diminish her captivation with her subjects. “When I started this project, I didn’t know anything about football, but I was drawn to these largerthan-life, literally, figures.”

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Crine’s focus is on retired players (retirement often due to injury) and their post-football journey. Though expecting personalities of these athletes to match the intensity and ferocity of the figures she saw on the field, Crine was amazed at the humble and gentile giants she encountered. “I was surprised, getting to meet many of these players and hear their stories, they were all very kind, and gentile, and absolutely nothing you would expect,” adding, “They’re gladiators, they’re absolute spectacles.” Crine’s next project features the first generation of black football players in the South Eastern Conference. You can see Crine’s painting Richard, 1961 a painting of her father based upon her grandfather’s photograph, and part of her series Wooden Nickels, in Scrimmage at the University Art Museum in the UCA now through Dec.18. The Art Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Richard, 1961, 2014. Oil on panel University Art Museum, Colorado State University, Gift of Linny and Elmo Frickman

“When I started this project, I didn’t know anything about football, but I was drawn to these larger-than-life, literally, figures”


NOVEMBER 6, 2015 FEBRUARY 5, 2016 9 A.M. – 4 P.M. $20 registration required Dance.colostate.edu or call (970) 491-2675

• Meet with faculty • Take master classes in modern and ballet technique • Audition for the dance major and dance scholarships • Tour the University Center for the Arts • Attend an informal dance performance by CSU dance majors

I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

Join us for Dance Visit and Audition Day at Colorado State University

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2015 Alumni Band Reunion at Homecoming & Family Weekend T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

A Note from CSU Marching Band Director, Dr. Richard Frey:

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We are excited to announce this year’s Alumni Band Reunion dates and invite you to join us on Friday, Oct. 16 and 17 this fall for food, friends, and fun! Have you heard about the Alumni Band experience? We anticipate a large and energetic group this year to march with the band during pre-game and halftime for this year’s Homecoming face-off with Air Force! Whether you’re a recent graduate or have been an alum for years, we want you to join us for this special weekend as we celebrate our traditions and connect with old friends. Homecoming activities start as early as Thursday night and include a special Alumni Band breakfast at the University Center for the Arts. I look forward to seeing and meeting many of you this fall as we share our memories, experiences, and show our RAM pride!

Stay updated on the latest Alumni Band Reunion news at Bands.colostate.edu and by joining the Facebook event

GO RAMS!


registration/details: music.colostate.edu/bands/alumni

Friday, October 16

Saturday, October 17

CSU Homecoming & Family Weekend Parade Parade Route, Downtown Fort Collins

Alumni Band Brunch & Rehearsal Instrumental Rehearsal Hall, UCA

Friday Night Lights: Pep Rally, Bonfire, Fireworks & Light of the A West Lawn, Campus

Rehearsal with CSU Marching Band Sonny Lubick Field, Hughes Stadium

Alumni Band Hot Spot The Mayor of Old Town, 632 S. Mason St.

Homecoming & Family Weekend Tailgate RAM Town, Hughes Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Alumni Association Tent

Homecoming Football Game: CSU vs. Air Force Sonny Lubick Field, Hughes Stadium

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Pre-Game Show Sonny Lubick Field, Hughes Stadium

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Benton Spruance (American, 1904 – 1967) Shovel Pass, 1935, Lithograph on paper Private collection

August 28 to December 18, 2015

NOW OPEN For a complete list of programs, please go to ArtMuseum.colostate.edu 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; closed Fall break (Nov. 21–28)


SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM

a series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage. / Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10  Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art. Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1 Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29 Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players. Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12 Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game. Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3 Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues. More events for Scrimmage will be announced during the course of the exhibition. Visit ArtMuseum.colostate.edu for updates.

WATCH A VIDEO PREVIEW OF SCRIMMAGE

I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5 / T H E GRE E N ROOM T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15 Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

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FACULTY NOTES

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John McGuire at the IHC with former University of Alabama student Cynthia Simpson and CSU Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s student Emelie Pfaff

This summer, Horn Professor Dr. John McGuire performed with the Boulder Brass at the Mt. Saint Abbey Bach Festival in Mt. Angel, Ore. According to the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, the event, established in 1971, invites national and international musicians for a threeday classical music celebration. Guests enjoy vespers with the monks, a picnic supper, and featured performances. In late Aug., Dr. McGuire took his studio to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for the biennial International Horn Competition of America. With over 100 competitors from around the world, the event is one of the most prestigious in the genre, with university and professional divisions judged by world-renowned panelists from around the county. During the competition, the organization formally awarded the 2017 edition of the competition to Colorado State University.


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Mt. Saint Abbey in Mt. Angel, Ore.

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FACULTY NOTES

Support the Arts and Humanities at CSU

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 5, O C TO B ER 2 0 1 5

Dr. Blythe LaGasse, associate professor of Music Therapy and coordinator of Music Therapy at CSU, and Music TherGive to the Lilla B. Morgan Memorial Endowment, the premier fund for arts and apy alum Tricia Hickle, were notified in Sept. that Oxford culture at Colorado State University. Your gift will help make possible: Journals published their article titled Perception of Com• exhibitions and performances, munity and Learning in a Distance and Resident Graduate • guest lecturers and visiting artists, Course in Music Therapy Perspectives. The piece examines • purchase of items for the University’s permanent collections, the following: Distance-learning opportunities have in• events showcasing the breadth of human creased cultural endeavor, and, drastically in higher education over the past decade; • enhance the cultural awareness of the CSU community. however, there is little research on music therapy student perceptions of distance and online education. The purpose Donate today at of this study was to measure perception of community (POC), perception of learning (POL), and academic peradvancing.colostate.edu/2085 formance in students enrolled in a graduate course offered Dr. Blythe LaGasse Tricia Hickle face-to-face to resident-instruction (RI) students and online to distance-learning (DL) students.

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Summer Keyboard

FESTIVAL

July 24-28, 2016

Internationally renowned pianists, including Van Cliburn stars, set the stage for five nights of riveting concerts, daily masterclasses, and compelling competition! ®

MORE INFORMATION AT IKOF-SKI.COM


A FINANCIAL MASTERPIECE FOR YOUR WALLET.

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APPLY TO DAY www.RamCardPlus.com

First National Bank is located in room 272 next to the RamCard Office in the newly remodeled Lory Student Center, (970) 495-9450

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an artful combination of your university ID and First National Bank Debit Card, is also your library card, rec center card, Visa Debit Card

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C S U A r t s T i c k e t s . c o m

photo by Kell Baldwin / www.kellbaldwin.com

D E C E M B E R 20 15 | U N I V E R S IT Y TH E ATR E


The Green Room / October 2015