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C o l o r a d o S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y / T H E U N I V E R S I T Y C E N T E R F O R T H E A R T S / V O LU M E 3 / I S S U E 1 9 / M AY 2 0 17


WELCOME TO

THE GREEN ROOM

Dan Goble

Director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance

Jennifer Clary Jacobs Marketing Director

Mike Solo

Creative Director

Brandon Adams

Publicity and Marketing Assistant

As the 2016-2017 academic year comes to a close at Colorado State University, we simultaneously wrap multiple performing and visual arts productions and exhibitions at the University Center for the Arts, recognize deserving students and faculty at a plethora of year-end awards events across campus, and conclude it all with the big deal of ceremonies – graduation!

I’ll spare you any words of wisdom or anecdotes about graduating, leaving that task to the true experts whose commencement day prose will be perfect! However, I recently read a letter my husband wrote to our step-son on the occasion of his graduation. These words are not only applicable to students leaving university life, but to all of us who walk out the front door each morning, embarking on life’s daily duties and opportunities. In order to keep this letter to one page, I have had to dispense with the notion that I can fill it with all of the advice and cautions I can muster (which are numerous, as you know). I will simply leave you with two words that I contend serve all of us well regardless of life situation, political or religious affiliation, sexual orientation, etc: Be good. Every day. Every way. To everyone. To yourself. Follow that advice and everything else will come out in the wash. There’s a lot there. Read it again. It’s been quite a year, but as we exit the 2016- 2017 season, I can recall many truly good aspects, not just the creativity, talent, commitment, and development, but the insightful and tender way our students take care of each other. It’s a refreshing display of altruism in these somewhat turbulent times. I like to think that the community we have created inside these walls will continue to nourish each other and serve as an example for the thousands of guests we welcome into our “home” here at the UCA every year. Keep it up, and may this summer be good to you!

Sincerely, Jennifer Clary Jacobs, Director of Marketing, University Center for the Arts

THIS IS YOUR UCA


TABLE OF TICKETS Online Sales: CSUArtsTickets.com Ticket Office: Griffin Lobby, University Center for the Arts (UCA) Spring 2015 Ticket Office Hours: M–F, 3:30–5:30 p.m., and 60 minutes prior to performances Information: (970) 491-ARTS (2787) / Email: CSUArts@colostate.edu Group rate: 15% off on ten or more tickets, applied at the time of purchase Tickets may be purchased, both online and at the UCA Ticket Office until 30 minutes after curtain. Print-at-home tickets are available online. All tickets are subject to a $1 ticket fee for both online and at-the-door purchases. At-the-door and phone purchases will incur a $3 processing fee per order. Advance ticket purchase is highly recommended to avoid lines and the at-the-door fee. Purchase Policy: All sales are final. No refunds or exchanges. Seating after the start of any performance is at the discretion of the house manager. Photography and recording of performances are strictly prohibited. Food and beverages prohibited in all theatres. Parents with disruptive children may be asked to excuse themselves if the performance is disturbed without refund.

CONTENTS Faculty Notes....................................................... 04 Trumpet and Organ............................................ 08 Searching for Sanctuary.................................... 12 5th Annual Organ Week.................................... 15 Dance Success!................................................... 17 KCACTF................................................................ 25 It’s ALIVE.............................................................. 26 Life’s Best Gift..................................................... 32 2017 Spirit of Philanthropy................................ 38 World Dance........................................................ 40 Senior Dance Capstone.................................... 44 Borromeo String Quartet................................... 52 Summer Camps................................................... 54 Class Notes.......................................................... 57

EXECUTIVE EDITOR: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS CREATIVE DIRECTOR: MIKE SOLO GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERN: KADIN KOSTELIC PUBLICITY AND MARKETING ASST. BRANDON ADAMS

SOCIAL MEDIA This is your UCA! Stay connected with the University Center for the Arts by connecting with us on social media. Facebook: facebook.com/CSU.UCA Instagram: ColoradoStateUniversity_UCA Twitter: @CSUUCA Tumblr: ColoradoStateUCA Youtube: YouTube.com/ColoradoStateUniv Flickr: flickr.com/photos/csulibarts

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: BRANDON ADAMS JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS MCKENNA SHULER (UCA INTERN) BROOKE POULSON (UCA INTERN) ABBIE BLACH (UCA INTERN) NATALIE HENDRICKS (UCA INTERN) FOR ADVERTISING PLEASE CONTACT: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING jennifer.clary@colostate.edu / 970.491.3603

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Gregory Allicar.................................................... 58

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FACULTY NOTES On April 11, the annual College of Liberal Arts Awards Ceremony took place in the Longs Peak room at the Lory Student Center. Dan Goble, director of the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance, won the Distinction in Advancement Award; Eric Hollenbeck, associate professor of percussion, won the; and Blythe LaGasse, associate professor of music therapy, won the Excellence in Teaching Award. Distinction in Advancement Award: Dr. Dan Goble

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Recipients of the Distinction in Advancement award make exceptional contributions toward strengthening the College of Liberal Arts by enhancing its image, increasing the financial support of its contributors, and creating sustaining relationships among the College’s many constituencies. The College of Liberal Arts is delighted to offer the award this year to Dan Goble, School of Music, Theatre, and Dance. Dr. Goble has been an outstanding partner to the development team and has dedicated countless hours of his time and expertise delving into long-term strategy, writing proposals, attending or initiating donor visits, and dedicating his staff and resources to assist with donor cultivation and stewardship activities.

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Dr. Goble is a dedicated partner on long-term strategy and understands the connection between our activities today and our future opportunities. His efforts range from offering a donor music lessons to committing staff and resources for donor events that not only promote our philanthropic activity but also continue to pioneer possibilities for collaborative partnerships for our faculty and students and showcase the talent and facilities in the department. He is a strategic and visionary partner, and he is excellent at creating meaningful and genuine relationships both internal and external. Through his dedication and experience, Dr. Goble has also been a wonderful mentor to the development office and his advocacy of the importance of development has championed new and innovative partnerships from the faculty and staff in his department. Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Blythe LaGasse The Excellence in Teaching Award for a faculty member at the associate professor rank goes to Dr. Blythe LaGasse, School of Music, Theatre, and Dance. Dr. LaGasse’s nominators begin their letter by noting that perhaps no other nominee for this award begins each semester’s course by composing and singing a “syllabus song... a rousing rendition of course policies and procedures and expectations, all sung to the tune of a popular song accompanied on her guitar.” The rest of the committee’s letter, together with Blythe’s own teaching philosophy and the comments of her students, all illustrated that her teaching is engaged, participatory, informed, and committed to forming communities of teaching and learning. As the leader of one of the strongest and most widely recognized music therapy programs in the country, Dr. LaGasse has demonstrated repeatedly that her high expectations produce results in shared scholarship and career advancement.


⊲ ⊲ ⊲ CO-PRESENTED BY THE LINCOLN CENTER AND COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY ⊳ ⊳ ⊳

Borromeo’s visionary performances include both fresh interpretations of the classical music canon and works by 20th and 21st century composers.

MAY 5, 7:30 P.M. | GRIFFIN CONCERT HALL | UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ARTS

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Ben Withers with Dan Goble and Blythe LaGasse


Of the many student comments offered in support of Dr. LaGasse’s nomination, this one particularly caught the attention of the committee: “Dr. LaGasse is a great teacher and a wonderful researcher. It’s cool when you’re seeing your professor being published in the music therapy journals on a regular basis. I worked with her when she led a Parkinson’s singing group, and she was an excellent example of how to lead such a group with consummate professionalism combined with warmth and a sense of humor with the clients. She goes to great lengths to demonstrate ethics and impart her considerable knowledge to her students.”

Faculty Development Award: Dr. Eric Hollenbeck Eric Hollenbeck, Associate Professor of Percussion. Eric’s project is to create a solo recording containing new, modern and significant repertoire to percussion with a focus on marimba. All of the pieces contained in

Celebrate! CSU Milestones Colorado State University will honor the faculty and staff who have reached service milestones during the 2016-2017 school year at the annual Celebrate!  CSU Milestones event. This allUniversity event to commemorate retirement and years of service takes place on Tuesday, May 2, 4 p.m. in the LSC Grand Ballroom. Thank you to the following School of Music, Theatre, and Dance and Department of Art and Art History faculty and staff for your service! TEN YEARS Paul Flippen, Associate Professor of Painting Jennifer Clary Jacobs, Director of Marketing Walt Jones, Professor of Theatre Blythe LaGasse, Coordinator of Music Therapy; Associate Professor of Music Therapy David McArthur, Dance Accompanist Roberta Mielke, Music Accompanist Eleanor Moseman, Associate Professor of Art History Michelle Stanley, Assistant Professor of Music, Flute Leslie Stewart, Special Assistant Professor of Violin; Director of Master of Music, Music Education, Conducting Specialization TWENTY-FIVE YEARS Patrice Sullivan, Professor of Painting RETIRED Paul Metz, Associate Professor of Music Theory, Emeritus Faculty, 30 years

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Dr. LaGasse’s own statement of teaching philosophy is compelling and memorable, and here are a few notable passages. She writes: “students often begin with an idea of helping ‘people with disabilities.’ However, interacting with the aging population, persons with mental health needs, and persons who have special needs allows the student to better understand the uniqueness of each person. They can then consider course concepts in terms of individuals, decreasing stereotypes and misconceptions of disability. Further, these experiences help the student to develop their professional identity, recognize their fears and biases, and begin to understand how they can be of assistance as a helping professional.” In her repeated engagements with students, Dr. LaGasse models the kind of living/learning that she hopes will become theirs. She writes, “I believe my passion helps students to develop their own passion for the field of music therapy. I regularly tell stories from my clinical experience, illustrate concepts through live examples, and let my excitement for the topic show.” The awards committee needed no further convincing, and are delighted to give this excellence in teaching award to Dr. Blythe LaGasse.

this solo CD have not been recorded before specifically with this instrumentation and approach to range and warmth of sound. The project is a substantial addition to the established cannon of percussion repertoire. Faculty Development Awards are granted annually with funding from participants in the Great Conversations series.

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CSU MUSIC

“Trumpet and organ are kind of a classic combination, like ham and cheese.” — JOEL BACON

18th Century Timbre

Italian Concertos for Trumpet and Organ

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BY BRANDON ADAMS

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There are many things about music that create its sense of beauty. Dynamics, tone, intonation, blend, instrumentation, and style all combine to create a sense of wonder to our ears. On May 9, CSU faculty members Joel Bacon and Caleb Hudson take their very opposite sized instruments – organ and trumpet, respectively – and collaborate to create a rather unique result. The booming, colorful sounds of Dr. Bacon and the Casavant Organ, blended with the strong and brassy flair of Professor Hudson’s trumpet, will yield a sound both powerful and classic. In addition to the strength of these two instruments, the music explores the exceptional sensitivity of the period. According to Hudson, the two musicians are intentionally capitalizing on this instrumentation, “highlighting some of the most beautiful, flashy, yet contemplative solo music of the baroque era.” After some deliberation, the duo landed on a theme of Italian Concertos, drawing on music composers such as Bach, Vivaldi, and Marcello created that defined the first half of the 18th century. This all-Italian program of solos and duos is predominately filled with works transcribed by Johann Sebastian Bach. Dr. Bacon revels in the cleverness of J.S. Bach’s transcriptions, which use the different keyboards and pedalboard of the organ to allow the ear to naturally distinguish the original solo lines. “One hand will be on one keyboard playing the first violin part, while the feet are playing the cello and bass part. The left hand gets second violin and viola on a different keyboard as Caleb adds the unbelievably virtuoso solo part,” he explained. “It is great fun!” Profess Hudson takes a similar approach to his music, performing concertos that were intended for violin and oboe. “I will be performing these pieces on piccolo trumpet, which is half the size of a regular trumpet and plays in the stratosphere of the instrument's range,” explained Hudson. “Since these pieces were not originally written for trumpet, the technical and virtuosic demands present many exciting challenges.” Joel Bacon and Caleb Hudson / Photo by Jennifer Clary Jacobs


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Despite the technical hurdles both musicians will encounter, they look forward to the upcoming performance. “I’m really excited to work with Caleb,” said Bacon. “For one thing, we’re both very passionate about Baroque music. Both of our instruments have a lot of great repertoire from the 18th century.” Hudson echoed these thoughts, praising the organist on his musicianship. “I can’t wait to present this recital together.” If you aren’t already committed to attending this concert, Dr. Bacon perfectly explains why you shouldn’t miss it. “Trumpet and organ are kind of a classic combination, like ham and cheese.” Tickets are available online at www.csuartstickets.com

PROGRAM FOR TRUMPET AND ORGAN: Antonio Vivaldi (transcribed by J. S. Bach), Concerto in D Major, BWV 972 Antonio Vivaldi, Concerto in G Major, RV 310 Allesandro Marcello, Concerto in D minor FOR ORGAN SOLO: Vivaldi (transcribed by J. S. Bach) Concerto in A minor, BWV 593 Vivaldi (transcribed by J. S. Bach) Concerto in D minor, BWV 596


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A look inside how Dr. Richard Frey sees this Spring’s Symphonic Band Concert BY ABBIE BLACH, SMTD PUBLICITY INTERN The trouble has not yet subsided. TV stations are accused of running fake news, your social media feeds are clouded with political bickering in 160 characters or less, and even some friendly exchanges a year ago have now become, well, less friendly.

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It can all be summed up in one word: tension. It seems we are still pushing through the thorns of divide since the Nov. election, and it is something that CSU Associate Director of Bands Dr. Richard Frey can attest to—expressed through two separate concerts.

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In the past, Dr. Frey has found an overarching theme for the four concerts a year he conducts in the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance, but much like many Americans he has heard the discourse heat up, and it presented him with a unique opportunity in deciding what this spring’s Symphonic Band Concert, titled Sanctuary, could be.

trouble people seemed to be having. With the election and the tension in society, it just felt right.” This concert is the opposite, as darkness has made way for light with works like Only Light by Aaron Perrine, Radiant Joy by Steven Bryant, and Suite Française by Darius Milhaud that offer an escape. “They’re all pieces that focus on comforting or sanctuary or joy, so some sort of positive message that can somehow be a counter to what people are feeling.” The sense of peacefulness and joy not only belongs to the audience, it belongs to Dr. Frey as he beams about the students he’s known since the beginning of their collegiate music career. “Seeing students who came in as freshman and being able to see them in their last concert – remembering their first semester in my band and being able to see their growth and development in four years – is as freshman and being able really cool.”

“Seeing students who came in to see them in their last concert – remembering their first semester in my band and being able to see their growth and development in four years – is really cool.”

“Sometimes I look at concerts as a group. I’ll look at all four of them as one big idea, or like this semester, I thought of the first and second concerts as being together in opposite sorts of ways.”

Prior to last fall, it was a different world, but the unrest was something Dr. Frey chose to highlight, then rebound from, this spring. “The first program [Feb.] was all a bit darker and more aggressive sort of music, like Carmina Burana” he stated. “The experience for the listener and performers was one that was a little, not even a little, it was a lot heavier. In some ways, it was a response to some of the angst in society, to the

Yet Dr. Frey does not have a monopoly on the delight this concert evokes. The playing challenges are working their way out, and the performers are beginning to embrace the emotional aspect of the pieces, allowing the seniors to end their time with Dr. Frey on an even sweeter note. “For a lot of them, it’s their last concert, and I’m really excited for them to have that positive experience – hopefully it’s a great concert and something that will be memorable for them.” Feel the joy yourself and find your own Sanctuary on May 4 at 7:30 p.m. in the Griffin Concert Hall.


CSU SYMPHONIC BAND CONCERT M AY 4 | 7 : 3 0P M | G R IFFIN C O N C E RT HA L L

SANCTUARY

CSUARTSTICKETS.COM Youth (under 18) $8 / CSU Students NO CHARGE / Adults $18

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A program of peace, solitude, strength, and protection with the music of Ray Magnuson, Steven Bryant, Aaron Perrine, and Darius Milhaud.

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— By Jennifer Clary Jacobs —

For the fifth consecutive year, Organ Week, a summer music camp and organ festival at Colorado State University, takes place the first week of June. Daily instruction for high school students, and nightly performances featuring world-renowned soloists performing major solo and collaborative works, are scheduled at both the University Center for the Arts and First United Methodist Church in Fort Collins.

“Our guest artists regularly play with some of the best orchestras in the world, but always enjoy working with Wes Kenney, and playing our fabulous organ,” said Joel Bacon, Stewart and Sheron Golden Chair of Organ and Liturgical Studies at CSU. For 2017, guest performers and instructors include Dr. Bacon; James David Christie, professor and chair of organ at Oberlin Conservatory; Joyce Jones, professor emerita at Baylor University School of Music; Ken Cowan, head of organ at Rice University, Shepherd School of Music; and Andrew Steinberg, organist at Trinity Lutheran Church in Moorhead, Minn., and chapel organist at Concordia College. This summer, Dr. Bacon is particularly excited about the Fort Collins Symphony concert at the beginning of the week. As his PhD dissertation was on organ and orchestra, he’s been fascinated with the development of this portion of the annual festival and revels in the

repeated opportunities to study and perform major concertos that it provides. “I’ve learned new repertoire and we’ve created many unique and powerful concerts,” he mused. “It’s almost an overwhelming experience as there’s something really special about being in the organ hall and having all of those strings up close and personal.” Regular patrons of Organ Week, as well as the Halloween Organ Extravaganza, have come to expect unusual and creative aspects when Dr. Bacon is involved, and his solo recital on Tuesday, June 6, will be just that! Zwei Brewing Co. of Fort Collins will provide beer outside of the Organ Recital Hall lobby prior to the concert (included with your ticket purchase for patrons of legal drinking age). Zwei owners Kirk and Eric Lombardi are excited to contribute to the festivities. The brothers, who both attended high school when the University Center for the Arts was Fort Collins High School, have been friends of the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance since the brewery opened a couple of years ago. Their flagship lager, NeueVienna, was originally brewed for the School’s polka band, Neue Polka Colorado, and will

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From June 5-8, the community is invited to nightly concerts, including guest artist solo recitals, and an evening of organ concertos with the Fort Collins Symphony Orchestra conducted by Wes Kenney.

Wes Kenney and Joel Bacon / Photo by Jennifer Clary Jacobs

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be served in honor of the recital’s large Viennse piece, Chaconne, by Franz Schmidt. It will be paired with a special Gose brewed for the occasion. Gose, an unfiltered wheat beer that is slightly tart and salty, was introduced to the German city of Leipzig in 1738. Dr. Bacon’s interest in the beer style has a direct connection to his recital, which features pieces by J.S. Bach. “Bach moved to Leipzig in 1723 and lived there until his death in 1750, so you know Bach and his boys knocked back a Gose or two in their day!” Of course Organ Week would not exist without the educational component designed for high school students interested in expanding (or beginning) their organ study. Led by the faculty of prominent concert and church organists, the program includes oneto-one instruction, master classes, and recitals on the finest pipe organs in northern Colo. Students will also study the art of organ building, develop skills in choral conducting, and receive harpsichord instruction as well.

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Dr. Bacon welcomes the wide range of playing experience represented at the camp, and many students return year and after year.

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Dr. Bacon was recently contacted by such a student who is already prepared for 2017. “He is so excited to come back as he’s made some of his best friends during Organ Week,” said Bacon. “He’s learned Bach’s Fantasia in G major and can’t wait to play it for his friends.” The camp also meets a need for students without organ training in their region, including a new high school student from Wyo. “She had a hard time finding a teacher, so she’s taught herself the Toccata and Fugue [Bach] and can’t wait to come so she can work with an actual organist,” he recounted. The level of playing is often highly advanced. “It surprised me last year during the closing camp concert that it was some of the highest playing I’ve ever heard by high school students anywhere,” said Bacon. Organ Week has become a cherished summer staple at the University Center for the Arts. We hope you’ll join us!


SCHEDULE OF TICKETED AND FREE EVENTS An Evening of Organ and Orchestra With the FC Symphony conducted by Wes Kenney Soloists: Joel Bacon, James David Christie, Ken Cowan Monday. June 5, 7:30 p.m., Organ Recital Hall, UCA Reception following Organ concertos by George Frederic Handel, Marco Enrico Bossi, Malcolm Arnold, and Jean Langlais. Tickets: No charge/CSU students; $19/adults; $1/youth Joel Bacon, Solo Organ Recital Tuesday, June 6, 7:30 p.m., Organ Recital Hall, UCA Beer reception prior to the concert; sponsored by Zwei Brewing Co. Tickets: No charge/CSU students; $16/adults; $1/youth Music in the Museum Concert Series Reprise / FREE Joel Bacon, harpsichord; Eleanor Moseman, art historian Wednesday, June 7, 11 a.m., Gregory Allicar Museum of Art, UCA

Ken Cowan, Solo Organ Recital / FREE Wednesday, June 7, 7:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 1005 Stover St, Fort Collins. Camp Recital / FREE Thursday, June 8, afternoon (time TBA), Organ Recital Hall, UCA Organ Week All Stars Featuring: Joyce Jones, James David Christie, Ken Cowan, Joel Bacon, Andrew Steinberg and the NOCO Artists String Quintet Thursday, June 8, 7:30 p.m., Organ Recital Hall, UCA Tickets: No charge/CSU students; $16/adults; $1/youth

Tickets are available at the University Center for the Arts ticket office 60 minutes prior to performances or online at CSUArtsTickets.com. Due to event popularity, advance ticket purchase is highly recommended.

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Originally performed in April, the popular recital/lecture will be performed against the backdrop of works of art includeing Renaissance and Baroque paintings and sculpture. Please make a reservation online at www.artmuseum.colostate.edu

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CSU DANCE

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Success! at the American College Dance Association Conference By Jennifer Clary Jacobs

According to the American College Dance Association’s (ACDA) website, the “association exists to support and affirm dance in higher education through regional conferences, the adjudication process, and national festivals.” As a component of the conference, two pieces from an institution may be adjudicated by a panel of nationally recognized dance professionals in what the ACDA proudly considers an open and constructive forum. Adjudicated works receive immediate feedback and are eligible for selection in the culminating gala concert.

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At the end of March, six CSU performing arts students, along with dance faculty member Chung-Fu Chang, travelled to the American College Dance Association 2017 Conference, held at the University of Oregon in Eugene. CSU’s School of Music, Theatre, and Dance was well-represented by dance majors Mohammed York, Katelyn Doyle, Samantha Lewis, Aminta Remisosky, Avery Jones, and theatre major David Van Name. Two pieces of original choreography were presented for adjudication, and another work was performed at an informal concert. The three-day conference was rounded out with master classes and lectures, including a presentation by Professor Chang.

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— Jane Slusarski-Harris

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CSU Dance submitted two works that originally premiered in the Spring 2016 Dance Concert: Riding Cloud Away, choreographed by Chung-Fu Chang and danced by Avery Jones and Samantha Lewis, as well as Mohammed York's solo dance, Running. The sophomore dance major’s piece was chosen for a reprise presentation at the ACDA Gala Concert based on excellent adjudicator feedback. Out of forty-five dance works from twenty-seven universities, York’s was one of eleven to receive the honor. “Congratulations to Mohammed,” enthused Jane Slusarski-Harris, director of dance at CSU, in an email message to the group. “I am thrilled that you were able to perform your solo in the Gala Concert and share your artistry with so many. It is a powerful and moving piece that you have created!” Senior dance major Katelyn Doyle's solo, Exposed,  was performed at the Informal concert, an opportunity for additional performances, but without adjudication. “Many students and faculty came to me and mentioned her beautiful performance and choreography,” recounted Chang. "It was a beneficial opportunity to show her work.”

Adjudicated performances are fully produced, so CSU Theatre’s David Van Name accompanied the team in the role of lighting designer and technical director. Light cues are sent ahead for pre-programming, and directors are given twenty minute slots to communicate with the ACDA staff and crew to set the cues and run the piece. It’s a meaningful experience similar to that of a professional touring dance company. “David’s work as a tech director for this trip [went] above and beyond,” exclaimed Chang. It seems Van Name’s expertise extends beyond the stage to navigator, drive, and all-around assistant. “He was extremely organized for this trip, he had packed a medical aid kit and sewing kit, and before the adjudication concert, he was sewing and fixing a costume...all duties I have been doing over 10 years at the conference,” recalls Chang. “I was so glad to have someone to help!” Costume shop manager and designer, Maile Speetjens, also contributed to the conferences success, making new costumes for the whole team. With a strong educational mission, the association strives to “honor multiple approaches to scholarly and creative research and activity, as well as give presence and value to diversity in dance.” For

Doyle, who took many interesting classes during the conference, Pilates and Incorporating Wellness presentations were at the top of her list. “After taking those classes, I have taken with me the idea of how important our bodies are, and that it is important to listen to our bodies and take care of them, physically, mentally, and with what we eat.” The annual conference has many residual effects for students, including a broader understanding of what people their own age are doing at colleges and universities across the country, and even internationally. Not only are they exposed to distinct academic ideas and movement styles through workshops, performances, and presentations, it’s a chance to meet peers with similar aspirations. “You make lifelong connections. You’re inspired and encouraged. You may end up working with some of them in the future,” commented Slusarski-Harris. “It opens doors and exposes students to new things in the dance community,” she added, citing the association’s role as a service and networking organization. Doyle agrees. “I got to spend the week not only surrounded by my amazingly talented classmates at CSU, but I also got to meet so many amazing people from so


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Mohammed York's solo dance, Running.

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The status of dance programs at the college level is not only significant, but showing tremendous growth and many ACDA regions and more conferences have been added in the past decade, according to Slusarski-Harris. “What an opportunity to show what the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance is doing with our program! It is great for our students to meet others and make connections, but also to measure their educational and artistic progress against other university dance programs.” Doyle is incredibly grateful for the chance to explore a new state and new ideas, as well as spend time with the tightknit group. “This is definitely a trip I will remember for a lifetime and I will take what I learned to help me continue to grow as dancer, as well as the wonderful memories I made,” she said. “We all were so close by the end of the trip, we didn't want it to end!”

(LEFT PHOTO, LEFT TO RIGHT) Samantha Lewis, Katelyn Doyle, Mohammed York, David Van Name, Avery Jones, and Aminta Remisosky

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many different universities; I can use it for networking and just to simply have connections with other universities for the future.”

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CSU Theatre Production Given High Marks by Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival BY JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS

The following written response for The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui, performed on March 10, 2017, was submitted to the KCACTF Regional Chair by Laura Cuetera, theatre faculty member at the University of Colorado at Denver, College of Arts and Media: Irene Ryan Dept: Zack Rickert Irene Ryan Respondent: Bruce Gammonley Irene Ryan Participating: N/A but if alternate is needed: Katie Shriver Merit 1 (for Costume Design): Kyle Pibbs (Costumes), Shelby Vicino (Hair/make-up) Merit 2 (for Scenic Design): Shay Dite Merit 3 (for Lighting Design): Jorrey Calvo (Lighting), Cooper Adams (Projections) Merit 4 (for Sound Design): Lindsay Davis Merit 5 (for Ensemble): Performance and Design Ensemble

In 2012, CSU Theatre’s original production of The Kafka Project, written by Walt Jones and the COMPANY, with music by Assistant Professor of Composition James David, was a KCACTF regional finalist after receiving excellent marks. Officially called a 'response,' ratings given by Ms. Cuetera now qualify many CSU Theatre cast members and design students for KCACTF sponsored awards. Students will compete at the KCACTF Region 7 conference in Spring 2018; categories include Design and Technology Awards and the Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship Auditions for monologues and two-person scenes.

Zack Rickert as Arturo Ui / Photo by John Eisele

Merit 6 (for Stage Management): Adam Oconnell and Run Crew Other: Walt Jones (Director) and Associate Directors: Heather Adams, Heather Salyer, and Maon Weiss Acting/Directing Rating: Excellent (10 pts) Design/Tech Rating: Excellent (10 pts)

A final component of Ms. Cuetera's written response was a concluding description that described The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui as an “extraordinary and richly detailed achievement of a provocative and enormously demanding text. Uncompromising in its focus on the historical context as dictated by the playwright, the production's committed authenticity to its truth offers a chilling reflection of times today and seems to have emerged as a ‘must see’ for entire campus community.” Reflecting on the time spent preparing Arturo Ui, Professor Jones was extremely satisfied with the production. “The cast, creative team, and crew worked tirelessly throughout the rehearsal process to crack this text and bring an important work to the stage,” said Jones. “I’m pleased that they can be validated this way.”

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CSU Theatre received excellent scores from Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival representative Laura Cuetera for the recent production of The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui by Bertolt Brecht, directed by Walt Jones. It is standard practice for the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF) - the national theatre program dedicated to the improvement of collegiate theatre in the United States - to send representatives to score and provide feedback on submitted productions.

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CSU THEATRE

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CSU Theatre Presents Little Shop of Horrors – The Musical By McKenna Shuler, SMTD Publicity Intern, with Jennifer Clary Jacobs

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lants are generally non-threatening, unless you’re talking about a giant Venus fly trap with a thirst for blood! This is exactly what audiences will see as CSU Theatre brings the infamous plant to life in its musical production of Little Shop of Horrors by Howard Ashman, with music by Alan Menken. According to Dr. Laura Jones, the musical’s director, was selected because it is “total fun” for audiences, as well as CSU Theatre performers. Additionally, “the visual production elements present unique and welcome challenges for designers and technicians.” The musical has been in the works for almost a year, with design ideas swirling around since last summer and evolving during production meetings that commenced last fall; rehearsals have been ongoing since early Feb. With the production now only weeks away, the best part for Dr. Jones has been, as she says, “sharing the enthusiasm and the energy of my cast and production team.” For Dr. Jones, this particular directing experience has been a long time coming. “I'd forgotten how much I enjoy directing Broadway musicals,” she said. “This is my first in 15 years, and that was before the amazing facilities and equipment we now have at the University Center for the Arts.”


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Dr. Jones has provided a great deal of oversight and guidance for everyone involved, including sophomore theatre major Sydney Fleischman, who plays one of the lead roles. Dr. Jones has “definitely helped me prepare me to play Audrey. She gives great feedback and always has an open mind on how I personally want to portray [her].” For Sydney, performing in Little Shop of Horrors is a novel occurrence. “This is my first time playing a character that has huge significance to the plot,” she said. “It's a lot different from being in the ensemble or being a minor character.” There is one small caveat to Sydney’s enthusiasm, but you’ll have to get a ticket to find out what happens in Act II. The Little Shop of Horrors musical, which debuted Off-Off Broadway in 1982, is based on the 1960 black comedy of the same name. Because of this, many design elements are mid-century inspired.

Of course, while the human characters are interesting in their own right, there would not be a story without the plant. The Venus fly trap, affectionately named “Audrey II” by Seymour, is an integral part of the musical that Roger Hanna, associate professor of set design at CSU, brought to life. “[Costume Director] Maile Speetjens and I started out really thinking about options,” he said. “The one thing that bugs both of us often in productions of this show is that as the plant grows, it becomes bigger but less interesting, and usually is a rip-off of the original stage show. Just as it should get scary, it gets sort of static, especially in comparison with the movie.” In terms of making the plant scary, there was only one rule: no liquid blood. So, to give Audrey II her commanding presence, the team drew on multiple inspirations. “We looked at lots of creepy meat-eating plants, but also undersea creatures, which are sort of otherworldly,” said Hanna. “We also looked at old horror movie monsters, and the gimmicks of those movies.”

Abby and Hannah, who have worked closely to ensure cohesive looks for each character, found that communicating the characters’ evolution through their physical appearance was the most interesting thing about their designs. “Seymour wants fame, money, and renown, and as the show progresses, [he] gets less pathetic,” Abby said. “Audrey wants to be pure and have a lovely little house in the suburbs, and goes visually from looking a little like a tramp, to looking like the 50s’ ideal, sweater-set and all.”

A great deal time and effort has gone into bringing such a unique and creative musical to the stage, just for you! Please join us!

See CSU Theatre’s production of A Little Shop of Horrors on May 4, 5, and 6 at 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on May 7.

Seymour Krelborn / Brandon Fisher and Audrey / Sydney Fleischman. Photo by John Eisele

www.CSUArtsTickets.com

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Senior theatre major Abby Jordan, the show’s costume designer, describes her creative method. “My research process began For CSU’s production, three versions of the horrifying plant are by looking into iconic figures of the 50s, then looking into who being built: the smallest is remote controlled; the next largest is these characters actually are.” Describing Little Shop of Horrors as a The inspiration came from this idea of taking the ideal – Donna Reed, satire that makes fun of other muJames Dean, Gene Kelly, or Audrey Hepburn – and then making about sicals, and whose characters aspire 90 photocopies of the ideal. What you end up with is a rough idea of an to an archetype, but aren’t quite original theme, but dirtied and a little wrong. there yet, Abby continues. “The — SENIOR THEATRE MAJOR ABBY JORDAN inspiration came from this idea of taking the ideal – Donna Reed, James Dean, Gene Kelly, or Aua puppet controlled by Junior communications major Brandon drey Hepburn – and then making about 90 photocopies of the Fisher, who also plays Seymour; and the largest, also a puppet, is ideal. What you end up with is a rough idea of an original theme, controlled by multiple puppeteers. but dirtied and a little wrong.” Junior Hannah Honegger chimes in. “As a hair and makeup designer, it is important to make sure Naturally, Hanna’s favorite part of the plant is the scare factor. there is continuity to your design so that it doesn’t clash with the “I think it will be increasingly animated and surprising, and incostume design.” creasingly scary,” he promised.

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BY BROOKE POULSON SMTD PUBLICITY INTERN

brought together people from diverse backgrounds, it has united enemies, ultimately is has shaped society into what it is today. From a historical perspective we have always creat-

ed, enjoyed, and lived with music. So, when we try to comprehend the amount of influence music has on our lives, it may not actually be fully understandable, but, for some, they recognize the physical influences or alterations that music has had on them. Out of the seven billion people living on earth, ten million are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Out of those ten million people with the condition, I was able to meet one of the most incredible ones. Willa Mac Pawlikowski or “Billie” has Parkinson’s disease, but she sees it far differently than how her doctors define it as, not a disease at all, actually. She believes that the condition is one of her life’s best gifts, and music is one of the best medicines. Parkinson’s may denotatively mean a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement, but to Billie, her movement was simply just being redefined when she was diagnosed. Being an observer of CSU Music Therapy’s Parkinson’s singing group, I was lucky enough to be introduced to Billie. Before I even met her face-to-face, I was inspired by her, and I think that says a lot. Billie may be retired now, but her youthful charm is contagious, really everything about her is contagious. She was formally diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2013, but she knew long before that she had the condition. Of five first cousins in her family, all were diagnosed with Parkinson’s, herself included.

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M

usic is known as one of the most influential mediums.It has

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Willa “Billie” Mac Pawlikowski

Hearing her talk about it, Billie makes Parkinson’s sound like a

As mentioned, Billie attends the Parkinson’s Outreach Sing-

blessing, and it literally has been, to her. She worked as a nurse

ing group at CSU and also sings in the Silvertones Senior

and an elementary and secondary school teacher before retir-

Choir, an outreach program of the Larimer Chorale. She will

ing around the time of her diagnosis. Through her various ca-

begin teaching a class in July that talks to children about

reers, she found that there are four magic words in life: music,

Alzheimer’s, Dementia, and Parkinson’s, and attends several

movement, friends, and humor, all values that have become

other Parkinson’s support groups; on top of that, she is one

prominent aspects of her daily experience with Parkinson’s.

of the founders of the Parkinson’s Advocacy Group of Larimer County. Involvement is key for her, and these groups

She also believes that every job and stage of life has led her

are important because of the relationships and connections

to where she is today, and that all of those stages were nec-

constantly being built. Not to mention, all participants agree

essary. “I worked with brilliant, brilliant people and I always

that there is no room for negativity, which is exactly the type

learned something from all of them. I looked to the one

of environment where improvement can thrive.

who was better than me,” she described when asked about her role models. She explained that some people look to the

Billie shared with me the small, but significant improve-

ones who are less than them so they can put themselves on a

ments she has experienced. Before she began going to sup-

pedestal, but real learning occurs when you look to the one

port groups, she could not even get up. “I am a completely

who is better than you, feeding off their knowledge.

different person, that’s why we sing, not because we’re good,


but because we need to. If you use your voice, articulate, and exercise the muscles, you can avoid aspiration pneumonia, which is one of the first things Parkinson’s patients develop with the condition,” she answered about her experience going to CSU’s Parkinson’s singing group. Billie believes that mind over body is a make or break attitude for any condition, which is why she is very active with meditation singing, dancing, Tai Chi, and even boxing. Her experience working in the medical field, and seeing many conditions first hand, has helped her realize the ways in which she wants to handle her own condition. “This is nothing compared to what others have. You see 24-year-old men who have come back from Iraq who lost their legs, and I’d think this is nothing,” she explained.

kinson’s, she was given something else, her life’s purpose, which she has found is giving back to the community by sharing her experiences, knowledge, and insight, while continuously maintaining a strong supportive environment for others. Since her formal diagnosis in 2013, Billie’s involvement in the Parkinson’s community has already made undeniable impact. Billie has found her purpose, discovered new hobbies, made lifelong friends, and even in the short time we spent together, made me change my outlook on life. Her go-to life motto is a quote by Mark Twain that reads, “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Billie has certainly found out why, and is inspiring one person after another to find their purpose as well.

For more information about the Parkinson’s Outreach Singing group, please visit music.colostate.edu/therapy

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Even though Billie was given the condition of Par-

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yeah

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HEY, DON’T FORGET!


CSU Students can attend any music, theatre, or dance performance*

FOR FREE.

*RAMCard is your ticket to the UCA! Full-fee paying students (enrolled in six or more credits) can receive one (1) no-charge ticket to all music, theatre, and dance department events at the UCA. Tickets are available in-person at the UCA Ticket Office, both in advance or at-the-door. A valid RAMCard must be presented for ticket redemption. Tickets are limited to one (1) per student for each performance/series of performances (i.e. multiple theatre or dance performances of the same show). Space is limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Excludes Classical Convergence and community produced events.

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For a full listing of events, visit uca.colostate.edu

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Director of Gregory Allicar Museum of Art receives 2017 Spirit of Philanthropy Award

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By Shannon Dale Assistant Director of Development, College of Liberal Arts

Associate Vice President of Advancement Kim Tobin and Gregory Allicar Museum of Art Director Linny Frickman at the Celebrate! Colorado State Awards

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he Gregory Allicar Museum of Art would not exist at Colorado State University without Linny Frickman.“Whenever the subject of the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art arises, the one indistinguishable presence of Linny Frickman automatically surfaces, for it is impossible to separate the two. Linny is the Museum,” explains Gary Voss, professor emeritus of the Department of Art and Art History. “Through her vision, diligence and unselfish service since its inception, we now have a named art museum on our campus. She has been the main driver for every gift, fundraiser, staff addition, hammer and nail that has built what we have today. ”As the museum’s director, Frickman’s passion for art, donor-centric focus, and dedication to strengthening donor relationships has established the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art as one of the best college art museums in the region. Due to Frickman’s dedicated and meaningful philanthropic work at CSU, she received this year’s Spirit of Philanthropy Award at the Celebrate! CSU Awards Event. She has generously given her time and energy to build relationships with donors, actively engaged with alumni, and made meaningful connections throughout the community, and truly embodies the spirit of philanthropy. Every major gift that has been made to the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art was influenced by Frickman. Frickman was an integral part of the process


I was very honored to receive this award that embodies the ideas of giving because CSU has that established to the HartfordTandstad Collection, a 2011 gift from Larry Hartford and Torleif Tandstad, which served as the catalyst for the expansion of the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art. The extraordinary gift is the largest ever received by the museum and has been valued at more than $1.5 million. Further, the $2M anonymous gift that supported the renovation, expansion, and naming of the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art wouldn’t have been received without the relationships built and strengthened by Frickman.

In her role as the founding director of the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art, Frickman has created exhibitions that promote interdisciplinary, cross-university collaborations and emphasize the importance of the liberal arts to

“Linny’s impressive knowledge of art, tireless work, and wonderful show designs have resulted in displays that draw visitors to the museum. We not only would not have the Gregory Allicar museum without Linny, we would not have the significant collection of art nor the recognition we have in the art community,” explains Ann Gill, Dean Emerita of the College of Liberal Arts. Now, after more than 28 years in the Department of Art and Art History, the museum and its worldrenown collections are Frickman’s legacy at CSU as she prepares to retire this summer. Linny Frickman embodies the spirit of philanthropy at CSU and her work will continue to impact students, faculty and staff, and community members for years to come. You can celebrate Frickman’s CSU legacy by making a gift in her honor to the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art.

given so much to me, foremost, the opportunity to have an extraordinary career. I think of myself as the “accidental museum director.”I never expected that I would have the opportunities to work with so many generous donors, donors of funds and of works of art. I never expected that I would have the opportunity to work with an extraordinary team of builders, architects, and CSU project managers on a new building to house works of art. I’m so pleased to receive this award because I’m so pleased to have spent my career at an institution that has allowed me to grow and to build something that will be a resource for generations of students and community members to come. - LINNY FRICKMAN

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Frickman began as an art history instructor at CSU in 1988 before becoming the director of the Clara Hatton Gallery, where she planned and executed all exhibitions, gallery programs, and continues to be responsible for collection documentation and development. Her impressive CSU resume also includes serving as Director of the Critic and Artist Residency Series, as well as curating the Colorado International Invitational Poster Exhibition for 19 years, and she continues to teach as a senior art history lecturer.

the broader community. Through the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art, Frickman has established a space to better serve the CSU campus and to welcome the community, embodying CSU’s land-grant mission and providing experiential learning opportunities.

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Master Classes Bring Diversity to CSU Dance

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BY JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS It continues to be increasingly important, for both students and faculty, that diversity is an element of coursework at CSU. For CSU Dance students, learning how other cultures express meaning through dance – including when, where, and why the dance exists – was a more readily available opportunity this semester.

CSU Dance Director Jane Slusarski-Harris and the dance faculty wanted the diversity represented on campus to be reflected through dance at the University Center for the Arts. “Even a little dose of it that can be injected into their schedule is important, and we are very thankful to Dean Withers, and his help in securing the funding,” said Mazurana. In a message to Dr. Ben Withers, Slusarski-Harris expressed her thankfulness as well. “On behalf of the dance faculty, staff, and students… thank you…we have been so excited to bring guest teachers with diverse cultural expertise to the CSU Campus!” Training and hands-on exposure to a multitude of world dance styles has been sparse at CSU. The dance major core curriculum includes dance history, but students primarily study modern and ballet genres. “We felt they needed to have more of an understanding and the opportunity to learn new styles,” said Professor

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With financial support from the College of Liberal Arts, the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance offered a widely-varied selection of World Dance master classes the last few months. With a funding request from Dan Goble, director of the School, and led by dance faculty members Chung-Fu Chang and Amber Mazurana, the popular classes were organized around student schedules, but were free and open to the CSU campus and Fort Collins community members as well. Classes included Mexican Folklorica, Bollywood Indian Popular Dance, African Drumming and Dance from Ghana, and many more. The School of Music, Theatre, and Dance at CSU also partnered with the Fort Collins Lincoln Center Dance Series to facilitate master classes with  Illstyle Peace Productions  (Hip-hop) and  Complexions (Contemporary Ballet). For over a decade, the FC Lincoln Center has annually provided professional dance company master classes for free to the community, hosted in the CSU dance studios.   Additionally, CSU Dance partnered with RAMEvents to bring additional master classes and performances in Hip-hop this semester. This segment, called Xpression!, was organized and directed by CSU theatre major, Kent Washington.

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Mazurana, who also teaches the Understanding Dance course that is popular with non-majors (see the story, A Gift Worth Exploring, in the March 2017 issue of The Green Room). “It’s very refreshing for our majors to get out of their box as artists and learn something completely new.”

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The guest artist residency sessions were available to both dance majors and non-majors, including the Understanding Dance sections, which have always had a world-view approach; students enjoying the dance elective come from across all majors, including veterinary science, engineering, journalism, and nutrition. “It’s a way for them to step into a new environment and creative space and learn something new about themselves,” educational elements Mazurana finds rewarding to provide and observe. For Slusarski-Harris, increasing diversity in CSU course offerings has always been important and even more so in our global community. “I’ve always been interested and committed to it over the years,” she said. “If you can get a group together for an hour to learn about a culture through movement, music, dance, and storytelling, it can help us all to be more inclusive and understanding.” The dance director is a proponent of learning through doing it, and World Dance master classes provide a vital cultural intersect. “There should always be a component of world and cultural dance forms at CSU since dance is a universal language and every culture has a form. It’s such an exceptional way to understand the world, like learning another language,” said Slusarski-Harris. Additionally, the forms necessitate different types of physicality, awareness, and athleticism. “Each style requires you

to carry your weight differently and has a different focus on body parts,” explained Mazurana, “like Bollywood, for instance, where the focus is on the eyes and hand placement, which may not have been included in their training so far.” The historical value of the world dances also provides deeper understanding and appreciation for the contemporary forms, which all have their roots in cultural, historical, and religious dances, and Slusarski-Harris is compelled to provide these experiences to CSU students. “It can change someone’s world perspective to be exposed to it, to understand the seriousness, complexity, or sacred nature of a dance form, and when you can do it, you really get it.” Mazurana’s dream is that non-dance majors will be inspired to seek out cultural dance classes in their community. “I hope we’ve allowed them to see ways they can experience movement without it having to be in the traditional way we think, like a dance school teaching standard techniques. It’s something they can seek out right here in Fort Collins, and I hope we’ve planted a seed.” Holistically, CSU has a commitment to making diverse topics and knowledge available, both in and out of the classroom. The performing and visual arts are a perfect vehicle, and the faculty are readily available to embrace and explore the possibilities. CSU Dance hopes to continue the World Dance master classes, opening the UCA doors to the entire campus and city communities. “When you see dance in the popular context, like Dancing with the Stars, all the ballroom dances come from social dances from around the world,” points out Slusarski-Harris. “Music and movement together is so powerful. And it’s so fun!”

SPRING 2017 DANCE MASTER CLASSES AT CSU BHARATANATYAM CLASSICAL INDIAN DANCE with Ranjani Vedanthan MEXICAN FOLKLORICA DANCE with Sara Roybal GHANIAN AFRICAN DRUMS AND DANCE with Maputo Mensah ORIENTAL DANCE INCLUDING EGYPTIAN, TURKISH, AND LEBANESE INFLUENCES with Seemie Xavier BOLLYWOOD INDIAN POPULAR DANCE with Ranjani Vedanthan ILLSTYLE PEACE PRODUCTIONS, HIP-HOP COMPLEXIONS CONTEMPORARY BALLET XPRESSION, HIP-HOP

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By Natalie Hendricks, SMTD Publicity Intern

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In preparation for graduation at Colorado State University, most students take a capstone course within their department, and as a CSU Dance major, a senior capstone course is required. This course consists of putting on a performance, demonstrating the choreography and production skills the dancers have learned during their studies at CSU. The Senior Capstone Dance Concert features students Ashley Shute, Devon DeSpain, and Chloe Milton. The three seniors are set to take the stage on Friday, May 5 and Saturday, May 6. The performance both nights takes place at 7:30 p.m. in the University Dance Theatre, located within the University Center for the Arts. The performance is a collaboration of ideas and feelings set to a Cirque du Soleil theme, but with a twist of “Freak Show” style. Showcasing the senior’s choreography and dancing skills, the concert will have elements of ballet, modern, jazz, and contemporary. The performance consists of a personalized group and solo piece from each senior, but for the finale, the three seniors have an exciting surprise for the audience. Something that has never been done before, the three seniors will end the show with a trio performance. They have spent almost every waking hour of the day rehearsing, learning, choreographing, and dancing. Having gone through the program together, the three chose to collaborate on a piece that shows all of their personalities. “We decided that a trio would be a good idea because we’re really close and it’s kind of completely different because it’s more of our personalities and how we act around each other,” said Devon. “Like how we’re super crazy around each other all the time and we always do our weird dances [for] each other.” The concert put on by Chloe, Ashley, and Devon is a senior capstone you will not want to miss. As the dancers bring you on an emotional journey ranging from happiness to sorrow, they have you feel the performance as an art of sensations. Come on down to the circus, you will not be disappointed by the Cirque du Trio.


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Chloe Milton, a student from Colorado Springs, Colo. has been involved in the dance community since middle school, for as what may seem to her feels like forever. Although, she may be an outstanding dancer, her career did not originally start from there. As a young child, she was initially involved in gymnastics; dance did not find her until her best friend encouraged her to audition for the yearly dance performance in their town, A Christmas Carol. Since that performance, dance has stuck with her and has been a part of her life that has shaped Chloe into the person she is today. Coming to CSU was an easy choice for Chloe, it was close to home to visit but far enough away to feel like somewhere new. It also “had the best dance program in the state, especially when it comes to technique and I really wanted to work on refining my technique and [become] a strong versatile dancer,” said Chloe.

Keeping the Cirque du Solei theme, Chloe’s capstone consists of a large cast, but also utilizes smaller groups during the performance. The group and solo pieces put on by Chloe, show her versatility as a dancer and exhibits the different styles of dance she has learned at CSU. Dance is something that can help define and shape a person, “it helps with memory, focus - everything. It’s physical activity, but it’s also an art, so it kind of doubles as both, which is really awesome,” said Chloe, “I think it’s important to keep [the arts] in schools because it keeps kids active and engaged.”

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In her final piece, Chloe hopes to inspire the audience by showcasing her work and skills she has developed during her studies at CSU through the art of dance. Chloe’s performance is about petty desires; demonstrating her emotions she has overcome through dance. Even though the central theme is about pettiness, the choreography is upbeat and filled with energy. The emotion shown through her performances demonstrates Chloe’s journey of becoming an independent individual and accomplishing goals she never thought possible. Overcoming the thoughts and opinions of others, this piece shows her accomplishments of concentrating and loving herself.

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Originally from Colorado Springs, Colo., Ashley Shute initially started her dancing career as a gymnast. The journey began when Ashley’s mom put her in a dance class; from there she began dance lessons and started competing in dance within the first year and hasn’t stopped since.

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Her senior showcase piece expresses her story of applying to Colorado State University and declaring a dance major.

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“For my solo, it’s actually about the story of me auditioning and trying to get into CSU as a school. I’m a transfer student and I had auditioned for the dance program twice before I was accepted,” said Ashley, “so, it’s actually kind of about the story of applying to the school and then finally getting in and eventually graduating.” Coming from a competitive dance background, learning the artistic aspect of dance has been something Ashley has taken away from her studies and is incorporating into her capstone piece. Her final choreography project examines one’s view on self-image in relation to society’s view of perfection. Dancers are viewed as entertainment, therefore criticized on their looks, form and rhythm. Taking in the criticism, Ashley wants others to take away the message of, “you’re only as good as you feel.” “You’re dancing to say something, and you’re dancing for a reason, not just because it looks pretty and I think that’s one of the most important things that I’ve learned, not only at CSU, but in my college career as a dance major,” said Ashley. Ashley’s performances will make you stop and think before you judge the person next to you. Keeping the theme of Cirque du Soleil, the inspiration derives from vintage freak shows to capture the audience’s attention on how we view ourselves and others. “It’s so personal and it deals with concepts that [are] personal to me, as well as I think personal to a lot of the dancers,” said Ashley, “I think it makes it more intense and I think it will leave a greater impact on my dancer career than the previous choreography or performances that I’ve done.”


P R E S E N T E N S E M B L E S J A Z Z C S U

I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7 / T HE GRE E N ROOM THE U NIV ERSIT Y CE NT ER F OR T HE ARTS

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T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7


Dance Major Devon DeSpain, originally from Parker, Colo., has been dancing since he can remember. A selftaught hip hop artist from YouTube, Devon did not start dancing like a dance major until college. From there, he incorporated his hip hop skills and applied them in courses such as ballet and modern dance classes at CSU. Beginning his college career as a computer science major, Devon started taking dance classes for fun. In his first Understanding Dance class at CSU, he realized his passion for dance after doing movement labs. He then auditioned for the dance department and after accepting, he then made dance his primary focus in his studies at CSU.

Devon’s piece is titled “A Place Where…” leaving the interpretation of the title for the audience to determine a place where you fit in and belong. Keeping the piece an open-ended question where the audience can answer however they want to. The piece is a metaphor for Devon’s life, a journey to find where you belong and do what you want to. “When you see the piece it’s these three individuals who are different in their own way, but they have to go through struggle, hard work, and termination and ultimately finding that place where they belong and they fit in and are accepted,” said Devon. “That is kind of how my life was like, I went through a lot of struggle and then I realized what I actually wanted to do and then I had to work hard to get to where I was, but now that I’m getting to that place, I have to be happy where I end up and succeed.” Devon’s solo is similar to his group piece, but more about discovering that thing that makes you, you. “The solo is more of just us, like us individually and then our group piece is like our choreography and our work like what our movement looks like on stage,” said Devon. His solo strives to make the audience think about what makes them different from everyone else and embrace that. During his studies at CSU, Devon has gotten the opportunity to work with many guest artists and see different companies come through that have taught him actual movements for performances on stage to help grow as a dancer. He has felt that his studies have been very nurturing and inspiring, giving the encouragement to pursue a career in dance as he hopes to after graduation.

I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7 / T HE GR E E N ROOM THE UN IVE RSIT Y CEN T ER FO R TH E ARTS

“Dance has definitely made me a lot more creative and it gave me kind of that outlet to expand my thinking, that is one of the big things you learn in choreography and improvisation is learning to take something and change it into something else,” said Devon, “that’s kind of how I ended up working through computer science, I was on the more creative side of it - out of the box thinking, and I think that spurs from dance.”

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T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7

with The Borromeo String Quarte

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et

By Allison Baumgartner, Publicity/ Marketing Specialist, Fort Collins Lincoln Center For 11 years, Borromeo has been in residency at Colorado State University and captivating its audiences with their contemporary take on classical music. “Only a few groups in the world can do what the Borromeo achieve; it’s an honor to be a part of that experience here at CSU,” said Ron Francois, coordinator of strings at CSU. Borromeo’s story is much lengthier than their residency at CSU. Twenty-eight years ago, four students played a series of concerts north of Milan. They named themselves Borromeo after the picturesque Borromeo Islands nearby, and have been performing ever since. While that may seem like a long history, Borromeo roots go even deeper. First violinist Nick Kitchen and cellist Yessun Kim had been performing together since they were 16, before they cofounded Borromeo.

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Even after all these years, their vision has remained fresh and forward-thinking. “String quartet is such an amazing tradition,” says Kitchen. “If you love the richness of how classical music fits together, the string quartet is the ideal thing to see.” But don’t expect them to just blow the dust off of some old classics when they come to CSU. “We are always rediscovering and recreating what we think the meaning of classical music is.” In fact, their music has been described as taking “a private tour through a composer’s mind,” by Cathy Fuller, Classical Radio Boston host on WCRB radio.

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7

During their residency at CSU, Borromeo has educated numerous students with new perspectives and a modern view of classical music.

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We are always rediscoveing and recreating what we think the meaning of classical music is. — NICK KITCHEN

All of the members of Borromeo are passionate about music education. For Kitchen, it’s “a shared process,” and one that students at CSU, and the general public, can be a part of via their Master Class. Borromeo brings certain expertise to help students develop skills, but they are still learning new thoughts and ideas through teaching. Education is more complex than the symbiotic relationship between student and teacher. To Borromeo, music education is two-sided. Those who listen can learn from it just as much as those who play the instruments. “We feel that music is beautiful enough that if we give it an honest and spirited reading we can making someone enjoy it even if they don’t know anything about music,” says Kitchen. Conversely, when a student learns to make the music, they learn incredible physical skills through creating mood and compelling rhythm and melodies. “Music education is a fantastic thing for people to learn even if it’s just a little bit. Even if it’s just a scale,” says Kitchen. “I personally believe that if we find ways to get people to learn an instrument, and what it means to make a melody, you’ve taught them something important.” “The Borromeo are excellent teachers. They connect with the students, are really downto-earth, and inspire everyone,” said Francois. “I love working with [them] because I am attracted to their way of playing. […] I learn new things from them every year.” You can see Borromeo String Quartet on May 5, 2017 in the Griffin Concert Hall at CSU. Tickets available at LCtix.com Their master class is May 6 at 10:30 a.m. and is free and open to public observation.


SUMMER WORKSHOPS AND CAMPS FOR ALL AGES CSU offers a wide range of summer experiences! Fees are associated with each program and registration is required. Details, registration, and schedules can be found online or by emailing the contacts listed. Many programs have concerts or presentations that are free and open to the public. YOUTH THEATRE: theatre.colostate.edu

Kids Do It All in Todos Santos, Mexico: July 24-29 The popular summer music-theatre camp camp to the to the CSU Todos Santos Center in Baja California Sur, Mexico, hosting dozens of children (ages 7-13) from Mexico and the U.S. Contact: Gaby Ocádiz at g.ocadiz.v@ gmail.com K-12 MUSIC: music.colostate.edu/workshops-camps Organ Week: June 4-9 The camp features prominent organists instructing high school students interested in beginning or expanding their organ study. Festival concerts are free and open to the public. Contact: Joel.Bacon@colostate.edu

Colorado Kodály Institute: July 15-29 Designed for elementary, secondary, and independent music educators, the unique program combines online curriculum with hands-on experience and features the annual Institute residency. Contact: Bonnie.Jacobi@colostate.edu

Drum Major & Leadership Academy: June 18-21 Emphasizing conducting, peer teaching, and team building skills, the Academy prepares high school drum majors and section leaders for enhanced roles in their school band program. Contact: Richard.Frey@colostate.edu

ADULT DANCE: theatre.colostate.edu/teachers-seminar

LIFT Jr. Clarinet Academy: June 19-23 Action-packed five-day journey designed for students ages 12-17 who are seeking to expand their clarinet study within a supportive and engaging musical environment. Contact: Wesley.Ferreira@colostate.edu Children’s Singing Camp: July 24-26 A fun day-camp of singing games, choir, folk dancing, keyboard improvisation, and movement with sessions for 1st – 6th graders. Contact: Bonnie. Jacobi@colostate.edu ADULT MUSIC: music.colostate.edu/workshops-camps LIFT Clarinet Academy: June 12-16 Unique focus on the musical, technical, and artistic goals of each adult participant. Through planning prior to the academy, individualized programs ensure a musical boost for each student. Contact: Wesley.Ferreira@ colostate.edu

Professional Development Seminar for K-12 Teachers: June 19-23 Colorado K-12 teachers and administrators are invited for five exciting days of presentations, exploration, sharing resources, and expanding awareness and knowledge about the benefits of movement in the classroom. Guest speakers, university faculty, and education specialists present the latest research and tools, helping you create innovative ways to teach the core curriculum, while learning how our state is supporting these efforts. Contact: Lisa. Morgan@colostate.edu

I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7 / T HE GR E E N ROOM THE UN IVE RSIT Y CEN T ER FO R TH E ARTS

Kids Do It All: Summer Music-Theatre Camp at Colorado State University 6 one-week sessions for 2017: June 12-17, June 19-24, June 26 – July 1, July 10-15, July 17-22, July 24-29 Day camp leads youth (ages 7 – 12) through the entire theatre process resulting in original plays created and performed by the students. Contact: Maile.speetjens@colostate.edu

Pre-College Percussion Camp: June 8-9 Instruction for high school students on mallets, timpani, snare drum, and drum set, and preparing/auditioning for acceptance as a collegiate music major. Contact: Eric.Hollenbeck@ colostate.edu

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— CSU Dance Presents: A Carl A. Bimson Humanities Seminar —

INTEGRATING DANCE/MOVEMENT INTO THE K-12 CURRICULUM

JUNE 19-23, 2017 9 A.M. – 4:30 P.M. Join leading Dance Movement Educators & Education Specialists from Colorado State University and the region to explore how we can bring more movement into our K–12 classrooms!

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7

Presented by the School of Music, Theatre & Dance and the College of Liberal Arts at the University Center for the Arts, Fort Collins, Colorado

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Guest Presenter and Key Note Speaker, Ann Biddle M.A., Dance Education, Columbia University, B.A., English Literature, Kenyon College and Fulbright Scholar. Ms. Biddle has been a dance educator, staff developer, curriculum consultant, writer and choreographer for the past 25 years. She is the Founding Faculty of the Dance Education Laboratory (DEL) at the 92nd St Y with Jody Arnhold (1994 to present). Ms. Biddle has designed and taught numerous courses for DEL including Foundations in Dance Education, DEL Essentials, Planet Dance-Multicultural Dance Education, Dancing in Early Childhood, Dance and Nature,Teaching from Transformation to Inspiration (Tina Curran), Dance and Literacy (Barbara Bashaw), Generation DEL, and the DEL Facilitators Course.

SEMINAR TOPICS: • Let’s Move! Dance Skills, Concepts, and Comprehensive Learning • Colorado Dance Standards, Assessment, and Curriculum Planning • Dance Collaboration Across K-12 Higher Education and the Broader Community • Integrated Arts Initiatives in Education • Dance Movement Science and the Human Brain • Social & Emotional Learning in the Classroom

HONORARIUM / REGISTRATION INFORMATION Seminar enrollment is limited to 30 Colorado K–12 Educators. Each participant will receive an honorarium for attending the entire seminar. Registration is now open, please fill out the online application at dance.colostate.edu/bimson-seminar/registration TEACHERS MAY SIGN UP FOR CSU CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT (FEE REQUIRED) FOR TEACHER ENHANCEMENT PURPOSES.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT US:

Lisa Morgan, Dance Faculty, CSU / Lisa.Morgan@colostate.edu Jane Slusarski-Harris, Director of Dance, CSU / J.Slusarski-Harris@colostate.edu


Andrew King, 2005, B.M. Music; 2014, M.M. Music (Conducting) After graduating from CSU, I taught band, choir, and elementary music in Hotchkiss, Colo. for three years. While there, I developed a deep love of teaching and a great work ethic for music education. My next job was at Wasson High School in Colorado Springs. There I taught the usual assortment of band classes as well as reopening a feeder middle school program. In 2012, Wasson closed as a traditional high school and I moved to Mitchell High School where I am now the band teacher and performing arts department chair. I am also the assistant conductor, tuba section leader, and board member for Little London Winds, a local adult wind symphony. I have been married to my beautiful wife Lyndsey for seven years. She is from upstate New York and an accountant for Compassion International. Together we have a very amazing daughter, Daphne, who knows all the words to the CSU fight song!

MacKenzie Sutphin, 2014, B.M. Music Since graduating, I am so lucky to still be living in Fort Collins. I have taught in several school districts. I began teaching right after graduation at El Sistema music program in Denver Public Schools as a brass specialist. In Fall 2015, I began teaching at Ann K Heiman in Evans, Colo. as a kindergarten through fifth grade music specialist. I am now in my second year at AKH and I absolutely love it. The students are so sweet and enthusiastic about music. My most exciting project is a full production of The Wizard of Oz with my fourth and fifth grade choir! The students’ excitement and joy make teaching such a pleasure. In addition to elementary education, I am a coach for the Crimson Regiment Marching Band at Loveland High School. When I am not teaching, I play trumpet and sing in a rock/ ska band called “The Swashbuckling Doctors”. We play all around Fort Collins and surrounding states.

To submit your Class Note: Email Brandon Adams at brandon.adams@colostate.edu

I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7 / T HE GR E E N ROOM THE UN IVE RSIT Y CEN T ER FO R TH E ARTS

Shannon McGee, 2013, B.A. Dance Since graduation, Shannon has been a freelance dancer, choreographer, and instructor in Los Angeles and New York City. She has worked with companies and choreographers such as IMPACT Dance with Judy Bejarano, DamageDance with Jessica Taylor, Antonio Brown, Paula Present, Rachel Oliver, and many more. She was previously a member of Benita Bike’s Dance Art Company and is currently dancing with Inclined Dance Project and Jennifer Muller/The Works Company. Along with her dance career, Shannon is also a passionate fitness instructor. She is currently an advanced certified instructor for Pure Barre Brooklyn where she teaches a barre based fitness class.  Shannon resides in New York City and is continuing to perform and teach.

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GREGORY ALLICAR

MUSIC IN THE MUSEUM CONCERT SERIES The Gregory Allicar Museum of Art presents this new series exploring the cross-fertilization between music and the visual arts, with performances by CSU Music faculty and brief historic background given by faculty from the Department of Art and Art History and the School of Music, Theatre and Dance. We invite you to holistically absorb the power of music and the visual arts and the relationships between them through these unique presentations. Concerts are FREE, but registration is required due to limited seating. artmuseum.colostate.edu/music

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7

Music in the Museum Concert Series Reprise Joel Bacon, harpsichord; Eleanor Moseman, art historian Wednesday, June 8, 11 a.m., Gregory Allicar Museum of Art, UCA

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Originally performed in April, the popular recital/lecture will be performed against the backdrop of works of art includeing Renaissance and Baroque paintings and sculpture. Please make a reservation online at www.artmuseum.colostate.edu

SPRING 2017 EXHIBITIONS NOW ON DISPLAY • Survivance: Native North American Arts from the Past and Present, curated by students from ART 317. • Drawing on Tradition: European Works On Paper From the 17th and 18th Centuries • Identity/Perspectives: Contemporary Art from the Addison Collection M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition (NOW OPEN!) April 28 – May 20 Opening Reception on April 28, 5-7 p.m. The annual Master of Fine Arts Exhibition makers the culmination of a three-year degree program in the visual arts that fosters individual research and creative studio practice. Students in the program focus on a particular area of study and complete

a mature body of work in their chosen field – art work that is situated within the discourse of contemporary art practice. This year’s exhibition features work of Katie Gabriel and Tim Schwartz.

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS Crossing Communities: Beer Culture Across Africa May 16 – Sept. 23 Griffin Foundation Gallery Cultures across the African continent have incorporated beer into their respective rituals, ceremonies, and social gatherings for centuries. Much like our local cultures in Fort Collins, the production and consumption of beer is an established facet of building community and often becomes a focal point for engagement in interpersonal exchange. Crossing Communities: Beer Culture Across Africa features a variety of ceramic pots from 27 cultures and 17 countries to showcase their beautifully distinct styles, while highlighting the visceral experience of brewing, storing, and serving beer across the African continent and its parallels with our own beer culture in northern Colorado. This exhibition is organized in collaboration with MAXLINE Brewing. Exhibition Reception on June 29, 5-7 p.m. UCA Sculpture Garden A celebration of brewing in Africa and Fort Collins with Maxline Brewing MUSEUM HOURS AND INFORMATION 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday University Center for the Arts, 1400 Remington St., Fort Collins, CO 80523 Phone (970) 491-1989 | Fax (970) 492-4027 Closed all University holidays and fall, winter, and spring breaks.


IN CO LL

TION WITH ORA B A

CROSSING COMMUNITIES

BEER CULTURE ACROSS AFRICA

THE GRIFFIN FOUNDATION GALLERY Reception June 29, 2017 – 5 - 7 P.M. Sculpture Garden GREGORY ALLICAR MUSEUM OF ART A celebration of brewing in Africa and Fort Collins with Maxline Brewing

1400 Remington Street, Fort Collins, CO artmuseum.colostate.edu (970) 491-1989 TUES - SAT | 10 A.M.- 6 P.M. ALWAYS FREE

I S S UE 1 9, M AY 2 0 1 7 / T HE GR E E N ROOM THE UN IVE RSIT Y CEN T ER FO R TH E ARTS

MAY 16 - SEPT. 23, 2017

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Apr.28

The Green Room / May 2017  

Organ and Trumpet, A Classic Combination! Read all about Joel Bacon and Caleb Hudson's performance, and get a little preview of Organ Week 2...

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