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C o l o r a d o S ta t e Un i ve r s i ty / T H E U N I V E R S I T Y C E N T E R F O R T H E A R T S / VO LU M E 2 / I S S U E 17 / M A R C H 2 0 17

ALTERNATIVE HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF WITH

the Resistible Rise of


WELCOME TO

THE GREEN ROOM What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail? I read these words on a pretty little enamel plaque at my best friend’s house every time I’m there. How do you answer it? Is your answer different than what you’re doing now? A Dan Goble

Director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance

Jennifer Clary Jacobs Marketing Director

Mike Solo

Creative Director

Brandon Adams

Publicity and Marketing Assistant

variation of it? As I look through the content of the

March issue of The Green Room, the fallacy in that saying (and several variations of it) is glaringly apparent. From the weekly occurrences of Professor Manzurana’s beginning dance class and Dr. Johnson’s Middle School Outreach Ensemble program, to the upcoming live presentations of Arturo Ui by CSU Theatre, A Little Night Music by the Ralph Opera Program, and the new Music in the Museum Series, our students and faculty are risking failure daily. Yet, I’m certain that their answer would still be to dance, teach, act, design, and sing. The hypothetical motivational statement is momentarily inspiring, but ultimately lands you right back where you started. Obviously a 100% failure-free life is unrealistic, but proper tools and resources, combined with hard work and diligence, make living your passion conceivable. Ok, so the hole in my logic includes possessing a certain amount of raw talent, but what would you attempt to do if you were trained not to fail? Or trained to overcome your failures? I’ve know I’ve said it here before, but I’m constantly impressed with the artistic output, alongside the life-lesson progress of our students. I hope this issue of The Green Room inspires you to support our students as they risk failure while being trained to pursue their dreams.

Sincerely, Jennifer Clary Jacobs, Director of Marketing, University Center for the Arts

THIS IS YOUR UCA


TABLE OF TICKETS Online Sales: CSUArtsTickets.com Ticket Office: Griffin Lobby, University Center for the Arts (UCA) Spring 2015 Ticket Office Hours: M–F, 3:30–5:30 p.m., and 60 minutes prior to performances Information: (970) 491-ARTS (2787) / Email: CSUArts@colostate.edu Group rate: 15% off on ten or more tickets, applied at the time of purchase Tickets may be purchased, both online and at the UCA Ticket Office until 30 minutes after curtain. Print-at-home tickets are available online. All tickets are subject to a $1 ticket fee for both online and at-the-door purchases. At-the-door and phone purchases will incur a $3 processing fee per order. Advance ticket purchase is highly recommended to avoid lines and the at-the-door fee. Purchase Policy: All sales are final. No refunds or exchanges. Seating after the start of any performance is at the discretion of the house manager. Photography and recording of performances are strictly prohibited. Food and beverages prohibited in all theatres. Parents with disruptive children may be asked to excuse themselves if the performance is disturbed without refund.

CONTENTS Faculty Notes....................................................... 04 Mendelssohn Trio............................................... 09 In Progress: A Little Night Music..................... 12 The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui....................... 16 Award Winner Ayo Derbyshire......................... 22 A Gift Worth Exploring....................................... 28 Upcoming Music Performances....................... 36 Middle School Outreach Ensemble................. 38 Workshops and Masterclasses........................ 41 Class Notes.......................................................... 43

Music in the Museum......................................... 50 Summer Camps................................................... 53

EXECUTIVE EDITOR: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS CREATIVE DIRECTOR: MIKE SOLO GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERN: KADIN KOSTELIC PUBLICITY AND MARKETING ASST. BRANDON ADAMS

SOCIAL MEDIA This is your UCA! Stay connected with the University Center for the Arts by connecting with us on social media. Facebook: facebook.com/CSU.UCA Instagram: ColoradoStateUniversity_UCA Twitter: @CSUUCA Tumblr: ColoradoStateUCA Youtube: YouTube.com/ColoradoStateUniv Flickr: flickr.com/photos/csulibarts

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: BRANDON ADAMS JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS MCKENNA SHULER (UCA INTERN) BROOKE POULSON (UCA INTERN) ABBIE BLACH (UCA INTERN) FOR ADVERTISING PLEASE CONTACT: JENNIFER CLARY JACOBS, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING jennifer.clary@colostate.edu / 970.491.3603

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Risk and Reward: Third Coast Percussion..... 44

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FACULTY NOTES

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(LEFT) James Kim provides insights on Bach prior to a performance by the CBE (RIGHT) James Kim (center) backstage with Colorado Bach Ensemble soloists Abigail Nims, Dann Coakwell, James Kim, Andrew Garland, and Nola Richardson following their Dec. performance of The Messiah

Dr. James Kim, director of choral activities at CSU and director of the CSU Chamber Choir, is in the midst of his fifth season as artistic director of the Colorado Bach Ensemble. As the ensemble explores and interprets the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, it continues to create a new conversation around the distinctive yet varied musical style of the composer. The ensemble has earned rave reviews for their ability to provide a rare glimpse inside the mind of Bach. ‘It’s our hope to create an experience for young and old that mirrors what I and so many of my colleagues experience through the music of J.S.Bach. It empowers us, sustains us and does nothing less than help us to be better people. It is a necessity, not a luxury,” said Kim. Dr. Kim’s fascinating blog and tickets to events are available at coloradobach.org Don’t miss the Colorado Bach Ensemble’s last performance of the season: St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244 March 17, 7 p.m., Bethany Lutheran Church, Cherry Hills Village; March 19, 4 p.m., Montview Presbyterian Church, Denver Combining orchestra, chorale, and soloists, St. Matthew Passion displays the grandeur and power of Bach’s music. Don’t miss the pre-concert discussion with Dr. Dawn Grapes one hour before each concert. Dr. Grapes is the assistant professor of music history at Colorado State with a special focus on the music of early modern England, music history pedagogy and flute history.


T H E F O RT COL L INS L IN COL N CE NTER AND THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC, THEATRE AND DANC E PRESENT

A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn from “The Master of the Flute”. Students of all levels will benefit from listening to Sir James Galway as he assists and guides CSU flute students through complex passages and shares his years of experience and wisdom.

M A S T E R C L A S S M A R C H 2 7, 2 0 1 7, 3 : 3 0 P. M . FREE BUT TICKETED / www.CSUArtsTickets.com For more information please visit music.colostate.edu/events/master-class

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SIR

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FACULTY NOTES

Wes Kenney, director of orchestras at CSU, had a rewarding start to 2017! It was announced by the Fort Collins Symphony Association’s board president Rhett B. Strom that Maestro Kenney signed a fiveyear contract extension as music director of the 67-year-old organization. Now in his fourteenth year with the symphony, the award-winning conductor will continue leading Fort Collins’ professional orchestra through 2022. “Fort Collins is incredibly fortunate to have such a talented and visionary Maestro who lives and works in our community,” said Strom. “By giving Maestro Kenney a five-year contract, the board honors his significant contributions to make our symphony vibrant while also recognizing how much more he has to give.” Kenney was hired as music director of the Fort Collins Symphony and director of orchestras at Colorado State University in 2003, and was named as music director of Opera Fort Collins in 2004. Additionally, Maestro Kenney is the music director of the Denver Young Artist Orchestra—the premier youth orchestra of Colo. Kenney and the DYAO were awarded first place in the prestigious American Prize Ernst Bacon Memorial Award in the Performance of American Music, Youth Orchestra division. Ernst Bacon (1898—1990) was one of that pioneering generation of composers who, along with Thomson, Copland, Harris, and others, found a voice for American music. Winner of a Pulitzer Scholarship (for his Symphony in D minor) and no fewer than three Guggenheim Fellowships, Bacon set out to create compositions that expressed the vitality and affirmative spirit of our country. The annual award recognizes and rewards the finest performances of American music by orchestras and choruses worldwide, based on submitted recordings. The DYAO received first prize for their recorded performance of Aaron Copland’s Billy the Kid Suite. Wes Kenney and the Denver Young Artists Orchestra

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Mr. Stroman has also been out about the state, working with Paul Wood’s percussion ensemble at Legacy High School, Karen Crews’ jazz band at Lyons High School and Kyle Freesen’s jazz band at Loveland High School. “It has been my pleasure to be a guest clinician – thanks to these directors for having me in to work with your fantastic students!”

(TOP) Shilo Stroman at the helm of Jazz I at Loveland High School (BOTTOM) Shilo conducts a clinic at UMEA

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Percussion Professor Shilo Stroman has had a full clinic calendar this winter. In Jan., he presented "Fundamentals of Accessory Percussion" at the Colorado Music Educators Association Clinic-Conference in Jan. “The end of the session was hands-on, and the directors were able to play through an excerpt I wrote for the clinic.” He presented his clinic, “The Modern Front Ensemble” at the Utah Music Educators Association Mid-Winter Conference held at the St. George Dixie Center on Feb. 3-4, 2017. “There were many questions and I enjoyed my first time at this conference,” he said. Enjoy a hand-out from this clinic here. Mr. Stroman also presented "Fundamentals of Accessory Percussion" to 400 students and directors from around the state of Colo. at the RMPA (Rocky Mountain Percussion Association) Day of Percussion and I&E Festival on Feb. 4. His presentation included a hands on section where the students were “much more energetic than the band directors!”

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FACULTY NOTES

Director of Bands Dr. Rebecca Phillips recently conducted the Maryland All-State Senior High School Band, presented by the Maryland Music Educators Association on Feb. 10-12. Dr. Phillips expressed her enthusiasm about the experience. “Congratulations to the extraordinary and talented students of the Maryland All-State Senior High School Band,” she said. “I had a great time with you this past weekend and it was a treat to hear the level of excellence that each of you brought to the ensemble.” She was also thankful for Maryland’s music teachers saying, “Your dedication to your students and music is evident!” In Feb., Dr. Phillips also worked with Travis Keller’s Symphonic and Concert Bands at Fairview High School in Denver, Colo, and Kyle Freesen’s band students at Loveland High School in Loveland, Colo.

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The CSU band directors were on opposite sides of the country as Associate Director of Bands Dr. Richard Frey traveled to Oregon on Feb. 10-12 to be the guest conductor for the Lakeridge High School Wind Ensemble Camp. Hailing from Ore., he said, “It's always wonderful to be home and to see the great teaching happening in Oregon schools!”

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The CSU Flute Choir, under the direction of Flute Professor Dr. Michelle Stanley has been accepted to perform at the National Flute Association Annual Convention in Minneapolis, Minn. on Aug. 10-13, 2017. Their performance is on Friday evening during the convention. Brava fluters!

Apr. 21 Guest artists Southwest University performing with The CSU Chamber Choir


The Mendelssohn Trio, almost 30 years strong BY BROOKE POULSON, PUBLICITY INTERN

T

he Mendelssohn Trio, formed nearly 30 years ago in 1988, consists of Erik

Peterson, violin; CSU faculty artist Barbara Thiem, cello; and Theodor Lichtmann, piano. The trio recently performed at the University Center for the Arts as part of the Virtuoso Series music faculty concerts. They’ve also been included on the Classical Convergence Series, co-presented with the Fort Collins Lincoln Center. Both Ms. Thiem, the cellist of the trio, and Mr. Lichtmann, the pianist, are original members from when the ensemble first formed, and have been playing together since 1980. The trio has performed not only nationally across the United States, but also toured internationally in countries such as Thiem’s home country of Germany, as well as Austria and Switzerland. The trio has even made an appearance at the International Mendelssohn Festival in Berlin. Over the years of performing together and learning one another’s playing style, it is no doubt that they hold a strong presence while performing as a group.

Thiem shared that for this performance, she was most excited about the long-term process of preparation, and ending with a confident professional presentation. “The result is much better when we have time,” stated Thiem. The spirited group’s concert featured iconic works, including Beethoven’s Trio op. 70, 1 (“The Ghost”) by Ludwig van Beethoven, Trio in e minor op. 67 by Dimitri Shostakovich, and Café Music by Paul Schoenfield. Schoenfield’s Café Music, has a strong jazz influence and is new to the ensemble’s repertoire this year. “We are going out on a limb this time, playing more of a jazz piece,” Thiem stated. All the trio members enjoy teaching, and gave a master class for CSU students as part of their time on campus, sharing their love of music and their own expertise to aspiring musicians.  “What moves me about music is being able to project to an audience. The concept of what I am doing is important, I pay very close attention to detail,” stated Thiem, and the audience at the trio’s recent concert could definitely tell! Look for more concerts by The Mendelssohn Trio in the 2017-2018 season at the UCA.

Mendelssohn Trio members Erik Peterson and Theodor Lichtmann work with CSU’s graduate trio: Frangel Lopez Cesena, violin; Julius Hochmuth, cello; and Sicong (Frank) Zhao, piano.

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As the founder of the Mendelssohn Trio, Thiem felt it was only fitting to name it after her great grandfather, Franz von Mendelssohn, who was not only a banker but a strong supporter of the arts as well. Mendelssohn (who was the nephew of composer Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy) played with a lot of famous musicians and became very devoted to supporting artists and musicians in Berlin during the early 20th century. So it is no wonder that his great granddaughter is as talented as she is.

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yeah

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HEY, DON’T FORGET!


CSU Students can attend any music, theatre, or dance performance*

FOR FREE.

*RAMCard is your ticket to the UCA! Full-fee paying students (enrolled in six or more credits) can receive one (1) no-charge ticket to all music, theatre, and dance department events at the UCA. Tickets are available in-person at the UCA Ticket Office, both in advance or at-the-door. A valid RAMCard must be presented for ticket redemption. Tickets are limited to one (1) per student for each performance/series of performances (i.e. multiple theatre or dance performances of the same show). Space is limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Excludes Classical Convergence and community produced events.

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For a full listing of events, visit uca.colostate.edu

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A Little Night Music by Stephen Sondheim / Photos by Jennifer Clary Jacobs March 30, 31, April 1, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, April 2, 2 p.m. MAY NOT BE APPROPRIATE FOR ALL AGES "Is it too much," Theatre Professor Patty Goble slyly asks, after keeping everyone in stitches while rehearsing a scene where she flirts with another woman's husband…in front of said woman. A recent rehearsal of A Little Night Music, being presented by the Ralph Opera Program at Colorado State University at the end of the month, foreshadows a hilarious and terrifically sung rendition of Stephen Sondheim’s popular musical. The intertwined lives of several couples are told through the romantic and beloved musical. Set in Sweden in the early 1900s, A Little Night Music, inspired by the Ingmar Bergman film Smiles of a Summer Night, debuted on Broadway in 1973 and features the hit song, “Send in the Clowns.”

Opera Dr. Tiffany Blake, director; Professor Chris Reed, conductor, run the Liebeslieders (pictured left to right) through an early scene: Matt Giallongo as Mr. Lindquist; Alexy Young as Mrs. Segstrom; Emily Gehman as Mrs. Anderssen; Dr. John Pierce as Mr. Erlanson; Anyaleen Bradley as Mrs. Nordstrom; with Alaine de Bellevue, pianist

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The production, directed by Dr. Tiffany Blake and conducted by Professor Chris Reed, features CSU’s vocal students, several professors, the opera orchestra, and the handiwork of CSU’s technical theatre area. Tickets are available at csuartstickets.com.

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(TOP) Matt Giallongo (background) as Mr. Lindquist; Dominc Aragon as Frederick Egerman; Professor Patty Goble as Countess Charlotte Malcom; Ivy Taylor (foreground) as Anne Egerman (BOTTOM) Dr. John Carlo Pierce as Mr. Erlanson


CSU CHAMBER CHOIR PRESENTS

Conducted by James Kim

The Chamber Choir performs four movements from the suite, “Songs of Ariel” by Swiss composer Frank Martin, a virtuoso work for acapella chorus based on The Tempest by William Shakespeare. Additionally, the choir will perform works by J.S. Bach, Josef Rheinberger, and Gustav Mahler in preparation for their European tour to Germany and Prague this summer.

In conjunction with Concert Choir’s performance, “Gloria” by Antonio Vivaldi with Concert Orchestra

March 3 | 7:30 pm | Griffin Concert Hall Youth (under 18) $1 / CSU Students NO CHARGE / Adults $12 (Full-fee paying students w/valid CSU I.D.)

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ariel songs

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CSU THEATRE

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(TOP) Katie Shriver (Roma, Roma Ghost), Zack Rickert (Arturo Ui), Nicholas Dunnigan (Giri), Bruce Gammonley (Givola) (BOTTOM) Costume Shop Manager Maile Speetjens applies makeup on Bruce Gammonley


UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 1400 REMINGTON ST. FORT COLLINS, CO, 80523

...the public could have resisted--but they didn’t. An interview with Walt Jones on “The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui.” By Abbie Blach, UCA Publicity Intern

“The words of the Arturo Ui script could be taken out of The New York Times or the Washington Post right now. The things that Arturo says are so Trumpian and Bannonesk, it’s pretty scary. It’s pretty frightening,” said Walt Jones, director of CSU Theatre’s upcoming performance of Bertholt Brecht’s The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui, opening March 3 at the University Center for the Arts. The play portrays the rise to power of the title character Arturo – mirroring the rise of Hitler, but told through the gang land setting of 1930s Chicago – appealing to a people who turned to him in an hour of need, though they didn’t fully understand the man, or at least didn’t want to. “The title is ‘The Resistible Rise,’ meaning the public could have resisted, but they didn’t,” stated Jones. For Jones, Stephen Sharkey’s translation of Brecht’s original work being a resemblance of any given American politician is just coincidence, and despite Jones’ perception about history repeating itself, the audience’s interpretation is strictly their own, as Sharkey’s translation didn’t need tweaking to become politically relevant.

[continued on page 18]

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S

ay tomorrow you wake up, make your morning coffee, take to Facebook to read the latest posts from your friends, and scrolling through your feed you read the headline, “The Chicago Sun is a failing newspaper,” whose words would you think inspired that declaration – or whose Twitter handle? You can give me three guesses, but I think I only need one.

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“The character a Marx, it’s not Ric

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as written is not Hitler. It’s not Capone, it’s not Groucho chard the Third, and it’s not Trump,”

“One of the things I want to make sure the audience understands is that we didn’t fool around with this text,” he said. “When Arturo calls The Chicago Sun Times a failing newspaper, that’s exactly what the script says...the big challenge for us it to make sure that the audience knows that this is word for word.”

“The character as written is not Hitler. It’s not Capone, it’s not Groucho Marx, it’s not Richard the Third, and it’s not Trump,” Arturo, as Jones deems, is a blend of all those figures, yet still stands alone. To call Arturo ‘Hitler’ would be too simple, to call him ‘Trump’ would modernize him, and to call him ‘Capone’ would be kind. So internally, Jones refers to him as ‘Rickert,’ after Zackery Rickert, the CSU student actor found to encapsulate all the thuggish behavior and complexities of one man’s rise to take power. Much like Jones, Zackery Rickert was faced with the difficulties of past and present political figures colliding. “Every time I read through a scene, I read a line that I suddenly realize I have heard somewhere before, and I realize that I have heard it all very recently from our current presidential administration,” Rickert explains. “So, anything our audience hears in the play that President

History and fiction are marred by coincidence for both Jones and Rickert, and the task of showing the character’s path, without being a direct impersonation, needed to feel organic. “The most challenging aspect of the role is copying somebody in history as best as I can without using their own words. The play is about the rise of Hitler, done as a gangster play, and it has been challenging to incorporate this real life person into my own physicality. It’s a challenge to show the rise of this man from a nobody, who can't stand up straight, to the notorious legend we all know today.” CSU Theatre invites campus and community audiences to watch the play, and perhaps enter into their own dialogue about its relevance.

The Resistable Rise of Arturo Ui runs March 3-11 in the Studio Theatre at the University Center for the Arts. Tickets: csuartstickets.com

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Clarity for the audience is hardly the only challenge Jones encountered in his direction of Arturo Ui, it may have just been the first. The second? Casting the title character.

Trump or his administration has said was not added by us, it is merely an unfortunate coincidence.”

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“Do not rejoice in his defeat, you stopped the bas


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u men. For though the world has stood up and stard, the bitch that bore him is in heat again.”

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CSU Music Major Ayo Derbyshire wins the Engelbert Schmid Horn Contest

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Reprinted with permission from the Siegried’s Call-Engelbert Schmid Contest

L

ast fall, Engelbert Schmid Horns and Siegfried’s Call, Inc. collaborated on a contest to award an American horn player owning an Engelbert Schmid French Horn the experience of a lifetime. According to the original call for applications, “the award is based on having chosen a Schmid Horn as your instrument and your current performance ability.” The prize is a round trip ticket (plus accommodations) to Munich, Germany, with a stop in New York, to attend Mindelzell Horn Days, organized and hosted by Engelbert Schmid. The event is at Schmid’s impressive workshop, with a full concert hall and outdoor amphitheater. The winner will take lessons from some of the world’s foremost orchestral and solo players, such as: Prof. Bruno Schneider, Szabolcs Zempléni, Frank Lloyd, and Peter Arnold. The stop in New York includes accommodations from the owners of Siegfried’s Call, Inc., a tour of the shop in Beacon, N.Y., and service of the winner’s Engelbert Schmid horn. On Feb. 22, the judging committee of the Siegfried’s Call-Engelbert Schmid Contest announced Ayo Derbyshire, an undergraduate student at Colorado State University, as the winner of the contest. Also, the judges named Michael Woodard, a graduate student at the University of Houston, as the runner-up.

CHOOSING THE WINNER

The decision to identify the winner and runner up was a challenge for the committee as the contest featured an incredibly high level of playing. In turn, this high level of playing lead to a delay in this announcement, as many judges on the panel had to review the contest entries multiple times.

THANK YOU!

We could not be more thrilled with the quality of the entries and applaud each competitor on the artistic accomplishments within their individual submissions. The judging committee would like to extend their thanks to both Siegfried’s Call and Engelbert Schmid for their sponsorship of this endeavor. Again, we congratulate Mr. Derbyshire and Mr. Woodard, as well as all the entrants.

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AYO DERBYSHIRE'S STORY

A dual-citizen, Swiss-American, hailing from Denver, Colorado, Ayo Derbyshire's musical path began with an alto sackbut around the age of three. Ayo attributes "Family Music" nights for the opportunity to experiment at an early age with a variety of string, woodwind, and brass instruments. This early exposure would eventually lead to him receiving his first horn as an intriguing Christmas gift. Since then Ayo has studied with Kevin Rivard, Carolyn Kunicki, Fritz Foss, and Kolio Plachkov, all musicians with the Colorado Symphony. Performing in the Denver Young Artists Orchestra sparked Ayo's passion for playing professionally. He received his Engelbert Schmid horn in high school and studied Horn Performance as a sophomore at the Colorado State University School of Music under Professor John McGuire, playing Principal Horn in the CSU large ensembles. Ayo enjoys exposure to different styles of life and horn playing. He offsets his musical ambition with running and soccer, leaving room to be a spectator, following his favorite team, Derby County from Derbyshire, England. Watch a video about the contest


CSU CONCERT CHOIR AND CONCERT ORCHESTRA PRESENT

Conducted by Leslie Stewart | Directed by Ryan Olsen The Concert Choir and Concert Orchestra perform Gloria by Antonio Vivaldi, a masterwork of choral-orchestral repertoire, and one of the most beloved and quintessential pieces from

the Baroque era. In conjunction with the Chamber Choir’s performance,

“Songs of Ariel” by Frank Martin

March 3 | 7:30 pm | Griffin Concert Hall Youth (under 18) $1 / CSU Students NO CHARGE / Adults $12 (Full-fee paying students w/valid CSU I.D.)

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vivaldi’s gloria

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⊲ ⊲ ⊲ CO-PRESENTED BY THE LINCOLN CENTER AND COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY ⊳ ⊳ ⊳

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With over 30 million recordings sold worldwide, Sir James Galway is globally renowned as the supreme interpreter of the classical flute repertoire. Having collaborated on film soundtracks such as The Lord of the Rings, his appeal transcends all musical boundaries.

MARCH 26, 7:30 P.M. LINCOLN CENTER

LCTIX.COM


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CSU DANCE

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BY AMBER MAZURANA CSU Dance Faculty

For starters, you won’t need your headphones for your trek across campus, for there is no music to inspire you throughout your day. There are no colorful collages or sculptures along your walk to captivate your imagination, and no movies or theatrical performances to carry you on new adventures. There is no dance; no moment in time when you feel the internal pull to explore the natural flow and movement of your own body. Never a time when you gather together with friends to let loose on the dance floor, whether at a wedding, dance club, in a class, or maybe just by yourself in your bedroom. It’s impossible to imagine, isn’t it? As a professor of Understanding Dance, at the beginning of each semester as I stand looking at a new classroom full of students from all across campus, I ask them this question. Some may think, “Wait a second, I thought I just signed up for a dance class? Why is she so serious?” While it’s true, we do have quite a bit of fun exploring dance throughout the semester, I feel it’s important to begin my class with this question. You see, I want my students to understand, from the first day, what a privilege it is that we are able to gather together and spend a semester learning the art of dance. Many take the arts for granted, not realizing how essential it is in their daily lives. Yet, the arts have remained a vital form of expressing who we are as a people since the dawn of time. Our first tool in the quest of person-

Amber Mazurana leads students from Understanding Dance in the choreography of the mazurka

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magine the world without the arts. No, seriously. Just stop for a moment, close your eyes and try to picture it. Can you? What does it look like? Feel like? Sound like? How would your day unfold without the arts?

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al expression was with our bodies and continues to be. It is what makes dance unique. We are all given this wonderful gift to express who we are.

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As I look out at my class, I am always aware of the diverse experiences in dance that my students represent. Students from all over the world share throughout the semester what their cultures hold sacred in reference to the form. This diversity is present among my American students as well. Some have come from a background of rigorous training, spending most of their adolescent lives in the dance studio or on competition floors. Some come from areas of the country where gathering together at the local club on the weekends for country dance or the Texas Two-Step is just what you do. Most have danced at weddings, proms, or festivals. Others have been told they shouldn’t dance and that it is not appropriate.

The arts are a mirror of society. It is impossible to separate the arts from the influence of the culture they are created within.

Yet, even with this diversity, one belief I always encounter from my students is this: I am not really a dancer. Almost everyone in my class, at the beginning of the semester mind you, says this. Most feel they are not dancers if they are not professionals or studying dance academically. Many feel dancing is only for the purpose of entertainment. Do you think this is true? While there is no doubt that humans have evolved and trained over time to perform with amazing levels of athleticism, grace, and beauty in dance, is this necessary in order to be considered a dancer? What makes someone a dancer? What qualities do they have? You can guess what I think. Let’s begin by imagining the first time you danced. My belief is that the first moment you played with the many movement possibilities of your body was

in your mother’s womb. Any mother can assure you of this, remembering distinctly the feeling of kicking legs and arms, expanding fingers and shifting bodies. What a wonderful place to explore creative movements, with your mother’s heartbeat accompanying your growing body. No one is judging you. Not even you are judging you! As children, most of us explored expressing ourselves through dance. Children seem to naturally incorporate dance into their daily lives as the rituals of our prehistoric ancestors still resonate in the soul. There is both freedom and exuberance in the dance of children. As you grow into adulthood, the culture in which you live influences your views and beliefs about dance, as well as how you experience dance in your daily life. The arts are a mirror of society. It is impossible to separate the arts from the influence of the culture they are created within. Many societies across the globe weave dance into their daily lives, much the way their ancestors have for centuries. In other societies, dancing is not even allowed. How does dance in our American culture affect the views and beliefs we have about dance and our capabilities to dance? Currently, in our culture, dance is overwhelmingly motivated by competition. This is a trend we see in many aspects of our society and it is reflected in dance. There is a plethora of competitive dance on television and in movies. All across the U.S.A., you find competitive dance studios and travelling dance competitions. You may be nervous about dancing because you feel you won’t look like what you see on TV, in music videos, or movies.


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“

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Many societies across the globe weave dance into their daily lives, much the way their


� ancestors have for centuries. In other societies, dancing is not even allowed...

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Likewise, in our society the body is often sexualized and displayed in unrealistic images. This affects how we view our bodies and how comfortable we feel exploring our bodies through dance. Rather than allowing yourself to relax into free expression and motion, you may be thinking, “How should I or shouldn’t I move? How do I look when I am dancing? What will people think of me?”

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An important aspect of exploring movement in my Understanding Dance class is shedding the layers of self-doubt and judgment we may have upon walking into the dance studio. Simple exercises, which begin with our breath and carry us forward into larger movements, help us to claim ownership of our bodies.

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Dance not only allows for deeper personal exploration; learning about the rich history of dance also allows students to connect with something that has resonated throughout societies from prehistoric to contemporary time. Through the arts we learn about who we are as individuals and as a community. As our country is built upon diversity and cultures from all over the world, we see this reflected in dance. In Fort Collins alone, classes are offered in African dance, Latin dance, belly dance, swing, country line dance, Irish step dance, ballroom, Bollywood, traditional Indian dance, Flamenco, ballet, modern, tap, and hip hop! As my class explores many different styles of dance throughout the semester, students are able to try new forms of movement and experience their bodies’ potential in a variety of ways. By the end of the semester my hope is that each student feels the pure joy derived from immersing fully into the movement and letting go of fear and judgment. During our last class I ask my students “Are you dancers?” In response I get an enthusiastic, “Yes!” Although dance may not be incorporated into our daily lives the way it has been for generations across thousands of centuries past, it is still a pertinent form of expression, one that should not be taken for granted. I encourage you to explore the world of dance in your own way. You are a dancer. It is a gift given to you upon your creation Amber Mazurana’s Understanding Dance course is offered each semester, including a session in the summer, along with other dance classes that are open to all majors. For more information, please see the course schedule and consult your advisor. 


CHRIS REED CSU FACULTY / piano

MICHELLE STANLEY CSU FACULTY / flute

ORGAN RECITAL HALL

JANET LANDRETH CSU FACULTY / piano

ALL CHOPIN ORGAN RECITAL HALL

7:30 P.M. / MAR. 27

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7:30 P.M. / MAR. 6

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MARCH/APRIL MUSIC PERFORMANCES

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Classical Convergence Concert / Third Coast Percussion

March 1, 7:30 p.m.

GCH, UCA

Chamber Choir and Concert Choir Concert

March 3, 7:30 p.m.

GCH, UCA

Concert Band Concert / FREE

March 5, 7:30 p.m.

GCH, UCA

Virtuoso

March 6, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Music in the Museum Concert Series / John Seesholtz, Voice

March 7, 12 p.m., 6 p.m.

GAMA, UCA

Voice Area Recital / FREE

March 7, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Sinfonia Concert / Concerto Competition

March 7, 7:30 p.m.

GCH, UCA

Guest Artist Concert / Blue Shift Percussion Ensemble / FREE

March 20, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Classical Convergence Concert / Sir James Galway

March 26, 7:30 p.m. LC

Virtuoso Series Concert / Janet Landreth, Piano

March 27, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Oboe Studio Recital / FREE

March 29, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Guest Artist Concert / Kirsten Warfield, Trombone / FREE

April 3, 6 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Virtuoso

Series Concert / Faculty Chamber Music

April 4, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Jazz Combos Concert

April 5, 7:30 p.m.

GCH, UCA

Polaris String Quartet / Graduate String Quartet

April 5, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Men’s Chorus & University Chorus Concert

April 7, 7:30 p.m.

GCH, UCA

Virtuoso

April 10, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Trombone Fest Concert / Guest Artist James Nova / FREE

April 11, 7:30 p.m.

GCH, UCA

Voice Area Recital / FREE

April 11, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Keyboard Area Recital / FREE

April 12, 7:30 p.m.

ORH, UCA

Series Concert / Tiffany Blake, Voice

Series Concert / Wesley Ferreira, Clarinet

ORH ORGAN RECITAL HALL

FOR A FULL LISTING OF EVENTS PLEASE VISIT UCA.COLOSTATE.EDU

GCH GRIFFIN CONCERT HALL LC LINCOLN CENTER RH RUNYAN HALL IRH INSTRUMENT REHEARSAL HALL UDT UNIVERSITY DANCE THEATRE UT UNIVERSITY THEATRE UCA UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ARTS ST STUDIO THEATRE


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MAR. 30 – APR. 2

P R E S E N T S P R O G R A M O P E R A R A L P H T H E

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MUSIC EDUCATION

As a Community of Learners, the Middle School Outreach Ensembles Program Is Forging New Paths BY SHANNON DALE, COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS DEVELOPMENT

Video about MSOE

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Each week, the University Center for the Arts at Colorado State University is filled with local middle school students and music instructors eager to be part of something special: a community of learners who develop their expressive language through music in order to understand themselves in an ever-changing world.

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and bright high school students to consider serving the future through a career in music education, and to cultivate teaching excellence in our college students who have chosen to serve their community by becoming a K-12 teacher. “MSOE is about several things: social justice, teacher training, access, musicianship, community, and inspired instruction. However, the most important aspect of MSOE is that we all strive to forge lasting connections with young people to better their lives through music,” shares Erik Johnson, assistant professor of music education and instrumental music education at CSU.

The Middle School Outreach Ensembles (MSOE) program is an internationally recognized, community-based music outreach program sponsored by CSU that provides music instruction to local middle school students. More than 60 music educators, including advanced high school students, college music majors, As the program continues to MSOE is about several things: social justice, teacher collegiate faculty, practicing grow, private support is vital training, access, musicianship, community, and inspired teachers, and retired sages to ensure participation costs instruction. However, the most important aspect of MSOE provide instruction to more remain low, allowing students is that we all strive to forge lasting connections with than 200 young musicians. All to easily access these services local middle school band and long into the future. The MSOE young people to better their lives through music. orchestra students are invited program was recently featured — ERIK JOHNSON to participate and develop muin a video at CSU’s 1870 Dinsical artistry over a period of ner, a gathering of the Univer14 weeks through small and large group work. The program sity’s greatest supporters, which explored how MSOE is embodies CSU’s land-grant mission, providing equal opporforging new paths for music students and instructors in the tunity and equal access to its music programming through Fort Collins community. loaned instruments and expert music lessons at an extremely low cost. Gifts to the MSOE program will help keep this meaningful community resource active and will provide opportuniThe program’s approach to “mutual community” helps to ties to grow and expand. To support MSOE, click here. inspire middle school students to love music, expose talented


Kathy Brazelton from East District Naturalist, Rocky Mountain National Park, speaks to middle school students in the MSOE band about the anniversary of the state parks and as a component of the 2016 social justice theme, American Consciousness.

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Music Education senior Stephanie Marie Lane (center) and Alumna Dana Kettlewell, 2015, M.M. Music (right) at the 2016 MSOE final concert. Both were teachers with the program last year.

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C S U

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T R O M B O N E

S T U D I O

P R E S E N T S

trombone fest 2017 featuring JAMES NOVA, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA C H R I S V A N H O F, A S S I S T A N T P R O F E S S O R O F T R O M B O N E , C S U CSU TRAMBONE CHOIR / S. E. SHIRES CUSTOM BRASS INSTRUMENTS

M U S I C . C O LO S TAT E . E D U / W O R K S H O P S - C A M P S / T R O M B O N E - F E S T


WORKSHOPS, MASTER CLASSES, AND SPECIAL EVENTS Master Class with Sir James Galway / FREE but ticketed Monday, March 27, 3:30 p.m., Organ Recital Hall, UCA A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn from "The Master of the Flute." Students of all ages and levels will benefit from listening to Sir James Galway as he guides CSU flute students through complex passages and shares his years of experience and wisdom. The master class starts with a 45-minute warm-up open to all flute-playing attendees, so bring your instrument! The class is free, but a ticket is required for entry. Contact: Michelle.Stanley@colostate.edu

Trombone Fest: “A Night at the Movies” Tuesday, April 11, all day

Percussion Ensemble Festival With guests Pendulum Percussion Duo Saturday, April 15, All Day; Final Concert (FREE): 6 p.m., Instrumental Rehearsal Hall, UCA The fifth annual festival features several Colo. high school ensembles, the esteemed Pendulum Percussion Duo featuring Susan Powell and Joe Krygier, and the CSU Percussion Ensemble. Guest clinicians work with high school ensembles in master classes and clinics, followed by an evening concert. Registration for the daytime event is free, but required. Contact: Eric.Hollenbeck@colostate.edu

The festival showcases Colorado’s outstanding concert bands, giving them the opportunity to perform in a superb concert hall and be critiqued by the nation’s finest music educators. Performances are FREE and open to the public. Information: coloradobandmasters.org

Dalcroze Workshop: “Dare to Dabble with Dalcroze Eurhythmics” Saturday, April 29, 8:30 a.m. – noon, Instrumental Rehearsal Hall, UCA Swiss music educator Emile Jaques-Dalcroze (1865-1950) believed in movement as our “sixth sense.” This workshop introduces participants to Dalcroze Eurhythmics, where, through movement, sound is experienced in an entirely new way. The workshop is designed for K-12 music teachers, applied music instructors, as well as anyone who teaches or performs music, and is a sample of content for MU 524 Dalcroze Eurhythmics at CSU. Registration required. Contact: Katrina.Hedrick@colostate.edu

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The 2017 Trombone Fest at CSU features James Nova from the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and an exciting theme. Join our special guest, James Nova; Chris Van Hof, assistant professor of trombone at CSU; the CSU TRAMbone Choir; and S.E. Shires Custom Brass Instruments for a full day of trombone activities including a master class, clinic, High School ensemble, recitals, a concert, and more. The event is free, but registration is required. Contact: Christopher.Van_Hof@colostate.edu

Colorado Bandmasters Association State Concert Band Festival Monday, April 17 and Tuesday, April 18, All Day, Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

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WORKS BY

ÅSTRAND  BUTLER    CAMPBELL    DAVID    PÄRT    PEREZ    SKIDMORE

BLUESHIFT PERCUSSION

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NEW MUSIC FOR MALLET QUARTET

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MARCH 20 COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY MARCH 21 IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY MARCH 22 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MARCH 24 UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE AT MARTIN MARCH 26 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY


The School of Music, Theatre and Dance thanks Hayden for returning to campus for the 2016 Homecoming and Family Weekend and his participation in the Alumni Marching Band.

To submit your Class Note:

Email Brandon Adams at brandon.adams@colostate.edu

John Hermanson, 2006 B.M. Music, 2008 M.M. Music – I graduated with my bachelor’s degree in 2006 and my master’s degree in 2008. Since then, I have taught in three different school districts. My first job was director of Instrumental Music at Summit High School between Frisco and Breckenridge where I taught band, jazz band, orchestra, IB Music Theory, and guitar. I loved the students, parents, and administrative support at Summit High School, but I missed the Front Range. So, I accepted the job as director of Instrumental Music at Conifer High School, which is in Jeffco. I taught marching band, concert band, jazz band, orchestra, AP Music Theory, and guitar at Conifer. However, my heart has always been in Fort Collins; I missed living here and wanted to return. And, with every year that passed, I learned that my heart truly belonged to teaching orchestra. So, when the job at Fort Collins High School opened, I applied and was selected to be the next director of orchestras at FCHS. It’s a big job. Steve McNeal was the orchestra director at FCHS for 36 years, so there are big shoes to fill. I have loved every moment at FCHS, and I plan to stay for the remainder of my career. I love being back in Fort Collins. In my free time, I enjoy cycling, hiking, and exploring all that Fort Collins has to offer!

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Hayden Hays, 2015, B.S. Biology – Being a member of the CSU Marching Band, among many other groups, has had a profound impact on my life. Not only did marching band enhance my physicality and musicality, but it also trained me to be more diligent and to have more discipline in my life. Since graduating from CSU, I have continued my education and am a member of the Masters of Science in Biology program at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. I have managed to include music into my everyday life in a variety of ways, including participation in community bands and giving private lessons to beginner baritone players. I have also been working on a project to factor my musical talents into my thesis research project.

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CLASSICAL CONVERGENCE

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Risk and Reward: An interview with Sean Connors of Third Coast Percussion BY ABBIE BLACH, UCA PUBLICITY INTERN Called “commandingly elegant” by the New York Times hardly draws a single thought of risk. Sounds of over 125 bells glide off walls at the hands of quartet Third Coast Percussion, but not a single sound resonates to the silence that could have been, had the quartet not decided to embark on full-time performance adventure four years ago. “One of the scary things was that there isn’t exactly a formula for how to make a full time job out of a percussion ensemble, so each one of us had to commit to it and take the risk of quitting our

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“Between the four of us, we have experience teaching every level of music from beginners to collegiate level and professional

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teaching. So when

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we are on tour, we really do love to interact with students, and sometimes they’re percussionists, but often times they’re not.”

other jobs. We were all teaching at the time, some of us full-time with jobs at universities, or private studios.” That decision was described as ‘scary’ by Third Coast’s Sean Connors. That seems to be putting it elegantly, commandingly so. He, along with his co-Third Coast performers, David Skidmore, Robert Dillon, and Peter Martin all met while studying music at Northwestern University, and that camaraderie propelled the decision to take Third Coast to the full-time level. “The trajectory of the group was really positive and we were all very excited about it, and so we were comfortable committing to putting everything else on hold and throwing ourselves in,” said Connors. Trajectory and risk could catapult you anywhere. To failure. To settling. To a ditch. But then again, trajectory could also mean being one of the most applauded percussion names in the arts. Connors doesn’t take that positive outcome for granted. “We’re very passionate about what we do. When we’re ever on stage we strive to connect with our audience and hold ourselves to that highest standard, and we’ve been really fortunate to gain accolades from the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and so it’s been a gradual widening of our fans,” he said. Before hiring a lead administrator, the full-time percussionists also had to act as their own managers – something to an extent they still do. But Connor's sees his role in Third Coast like any other job, except he has a role every day, night, and weekend. It’s constant work, fueled by the passion that brought the group together in the first place. Yet regardless of the lives they left behind, the quartet found a way to rekindle their talent for teaching to thrive in a world now filled with touring. “Between the four of us, we have experience teaching every level of music from beginners to collegiate level and professional teaching. So when we are on tour, we really do love to interact with


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students, and sometimes they’re percussionists, but often times they’re not.” Performance, tours, teaching, all while experimenting for the most innovative sounds, the functions that Connors and Third Coast play are as diverse as the music they fill a performance hall with. The role that makes Connor’s beam with pride? The role of collaborator. Since Third Coast started touring four years ago, a critical component was the inception of their collaboration series Emerging Composer Partnership, a project designed to bring new compositions for percussion to the stage.

Maybe the first and second year with a little over fifty applicants. The next two? Not so much. “The third [year] we got 100, and this year we got 189 applications, and they represented every continent except for Antarctica actually. We were really thrilled and we were way overwhelmed because we listened to everything that people submit and we read everything people submit.” For Connors, the challenge not only comes from the amount of applications, but from the level of talent he and his group come across. But unlike other collaboration programs, Connors and Third Coast aren’t interested in a ‘call for scores’ as he put it. They’re looking to work with composers in all stages. “What we’re more interested in is the collaborative process and really getting to know a composer that we really believe in, and interacting with him or her several times, in our studio, in Chicago, and building a piece that we’re really passionate about together.”

Her fellow selected composer Tim Page, a PhD candidate at the University of Chicago who had applied before, applied again for the 2017 season, much to Connors delight. “He sent us a proposal of dipping these pipes he built in water, and dipping them and lowering them in the water to create intricate melodies.” Page’s proposal also included a Third Coast performance implementation plan, something that later earned him his spot as one of the final two Emerging Composers. “We sort of looked at who needs this opportunity more, or who is ‘emerging,’ you know you can take that word for whatever it means – we don't set any limits on it. It’s completely self-identified by the artists and composers who apply to this.” Much like the lack of limits the ensemble sets on their budding artists, the only boundary in front of Connors and Third Coast are would-be walls that can’t be pierced, and once witnessed live, you know they’ll never find one. Four years ago Sean Connors and Third Coast took a risk – it became our reward.

Third Coast Percussion March 1 at 7:30 Griffin Concert Hall University Center for the Arts. LCTIX.COM

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Connors and Third Coast have a simple process: they listen and read through applicant’s scores, samples, and proposals. They narrow their applicants down a few times, then pick two each year. Simple right?

For the 2017-2018 season, one chosen composer was young Chicago native Ayanna Woods, whose breadth of talent, reaching from composing film scores, her own vocals, a hip hop compilation, playing bass, culminated with her youth as a recent undergrad, made her a huge stand out.

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GREGORY ALLICAR

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MUSIC IN THE MUSEUM CONCERT SERIES

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The Gregory Allicar Museum of Art presents this new series exploring the cross-fertilization between music and the visual arts, with performances by CSU Music faculty and brief historic background given by faculty from the Department of Art and Art History and the School of Music, Theatre and Dance. Why do we so often separate and differentiate visual and performing arts? In this series music is performed against the backdrop of works of art ranging from Renaissance and Baroque paintings and sculpture to expressions by contemporary artists from around the globe. We invite you to holistically absorb the power of music and the visual arts and the relationships between them through these unique presentations. Concerts are FREE, but registration is required due to limited seating.

SPRING 2017 CONCERT #2 Tuesday, March 7, noon and 6 p.m. The Griffin Foundation Gallery

In conjunction with the Identity/Perspectives Exhibition, this concert features baritone Dr. John Seesholtz, joined by other CSU faculty artists. Background on the exhibition will be given by art historian Dr. Emily Moore.

SPRING 2017 CONCERT #3

Tuesday, April 18, noon and 6 p.m. Hartford-Standstad: Dialogues with Power Gallery Dr. Joel Bacon, Stewart and Sheron Golden Chair of Organ and Liturgical Studies, offers an all-Bach harpsichord recital with background on the works of art given by art historian Dr. Eleanor Moseman and music historian Dr. Angela Christian.

artmuseum.colostate.edu/music

Spring 2017 Exhibitions now on display

• Survivance: Native North American Arts from the Past and Present, curated by students from ART 317. • Drawing on Tradition: European Works On Paper From the 17th and 18th Centuries • Identity/Perspectives: Contemporary Art from the Addison Collection

MUSEUM HOURS AND INFORMATION 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday University Center for the Arts, 1400 Remington St., Fort Collins, CO 80523 Phone (970) 491-1989 | Fax (970) 492-4027 Closed all University holidays and fall, winter, and spring breaks.


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CSU Flute Professor Dr. Michelle Stanley – with John Seesholtz, baritone, Jeff LaQuatra, guitar, and Tim Burns, piano

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SCOTT ARTIST SERIES COMING SPRING 2017

The Scott Artist Series aims to encourage the exchange of ideas among artists from multiple disciplines, varied places and backgrounds. We aspire to attract inspirational speakers and artists to share creative and innovative ideas aimed at broadening the horizons of Colorado State University Art & Art History Department students.

DEPARTMENT OF ART & ART HISTORY COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER WORKSHOPS AND CAMPS FOR ALL AGES CSU offers a wide range of summer experiences! Fees are associated with each program and registration is required. Details, registration, and schedules can be found online or by emailing the contacts listed. Many programs have concerts or presentations that are free and open to the public. YOUTH THEATRE: theatre.colostate.edu

Kids Do It All in Todos Santos, Mexico: July 24-29 The popular summer music-theatre camp camp to the to the CSU Todos Santos Center in Baja California Sur, Mexico, hosting dozens of children (ages 7-13) from Mexico and the U.S. Contact: Gaby Ocádiz at g.ocadiz.v@ gmail.com K-12 MUSIC: music.colostate.edu/workshops-camps Organ Week: June 4-9 The camp features prominent organists instructing high school students interested in beginning or expanding their organ study. Festival concerts are free and open to the public. Contact: Joel.Bacon@colostate.edu

Colorado Kodály Institute: July 15-29 Designed for elementary, secondary, and independent music educators, the unique program combines online curriculum with hands-on experience and features the annual Institute residency. Contact: Bonnie.Jacobi@colostate.edu

Drum Major & Leadership Academy: June 18-21 Emphasizing conducting, peer teaching, and team building skills, the Academy prepares high school drum majors and section leaders for enhanced roles in their school band program. Contact: Richard.Frey@colostate.edu

ADULT DANCE: theatre.colostate.edu/teachers-seminar

LIFT Jr. Clarinet Academy: June 19-23 Action-packed five-day journey designed for students ages 12-17 who are seeking to expand their clarinet study within a supportive and engaging musical environment. Contact: Wesley.Ferreira@colostate.edu Children’s Singing Camp: July 24-26 A fun day-camp of singing games, choir, folk dancing, keyboard improvisation, and movement with sessions for 1st – 6th graders. Contact: Bonnie. Jacobi@colostate.edu ADULT MUSIC: music.colostate.edu/workshops-camps LIFT Clarinet Academy: June 12-16 Unique focus on the musical, technical, and artistic goals of each adult participant. Through planning prior to the academy, individualized programs ensure a musical boost for each student. Contact: Wesley.Ferreira@ colostate.edu

Professional Development Seminar for K-12 Teachers: June 19-23 Colorado K-12 teachers and administrators are invited for five exciting days of presentations, exploration, sharing resources, and expanding awareness and knowledge about the benefits of movement in the classroom. Guest speakers, university faculty, and education specialists present the latest research and tools, helping you create innovative ways to teach the core curriculum, while learning how our state is supporting these efforts. Contact: Lisa. Morgan@colostate.edu

I S S UE 1 7, M A R C H 2 0 1 7 / T H E GRE E N ROO M T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

Kids Do It All: Summer Music-Theatre Camp at Colorado State University 6 one-week sessions for 2017: June 12-17, June 19-24, June 26 – July 1, July 10-15, July 17-22, July 24-29 Day camp leads youth (ages 7 – 12) through the entire theatre process resulting in original plays created and performed by the students. Contact: Maile.speetjens@colostate.edu

Pre-College Percussion Camp: June 8-9 Instruction for high school students on mallets, timpani, snare drum, and drum set, and preparing/auditioning for acceptance as a collegiate music major. Contact: Eric.Hollenbeck@ colostate.edu

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OFFICIAL HOTEL SPONSOR OF COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY’S UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2015 – 2016 SEASON

T HE UN IVE RSI TY C ENT E R F OR T HE ARTS THE GRE E N R OOM / I S S UE 1 7, M A R C H 2 0 1 7

CSU DANCE

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Across from CSU • Four Blocks from the University Center for the Arts • Within Walking Distance from Historic Old Town • Free High Speed Internet Access • Meeting Room • Pet Friendly Rooms • Laundry Facilities Group Rates • Complimentary Breakfast • Locally Owned and Operated

SPECIAL GROUP RATES! 15% OFF for family and friends attending performances!

914 S. College Avenue | Fort Collins, CO 80524 Fax: 970.484.1987 | bwui@bwui.com

970.484.1984 Toll Free: 888.484.2984 | www.bwui.com All Best Western Hotels are independently owned and operated.


State of Generosity Your gift provides crucial scholarship support, enables the evolution of our programs and performances, and gives our students the opportunity to obtain their education in one of the region’s most distinctive facilities for arts students.

Make your gift online today at uca.colostate.edu/giving

An Elevated State Want to make a bigger impact? The Champion an Artist Scholarship program gives donors a dynamic opportunity to provide one student with high-level tuition support throughout their arts education while giving faculty a powerful recruitment tool to bring the best and brightest talent to Colorado State. Champion donors have a unique opportunity to experience the immediate impact of their transformative gift while engaging with students, faculty, and VIP backstage experiences.

To learn more or make a gift visit uca.colostate.edu/giving or call (970) 491-3558

I S S UE 1 7, M A R C H 2 0 1 7 / T H E GRE E N ROO M T HE UN IVERS ITY C ENT ER F OR T HE ARTS

Every gift matters.

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Apr.28

The Green Room / March 2017  

Resist the Rise! Read all about the Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui, Third Coast Percussion, and the gift of dance!