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COLORADO RUNNER

Colorado Sweeps NCAA Team Titles

9 Earn All American Rights Issue 9: January/February 2005 www.coloradorunnermag.com

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9

Colorado Runner Racing Series Winners

Plus: Maintaining Your Weight In The Off-Season


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Contents...

Features

Colorado Runner Racing Series Winners... Page 9 Avoiding Injury: Happy New Year!... Page 16 Navigating the Waters... Page 18 The Headlamp and the Running Transformation... Page 20 The Vanderheiden Brothers... Page 22 Maintain Your Body Weight in the Off Season... Page 24 Boston Marathon Mania... Page 26 Talking Your Way to Success... Page 27 Hit the Dirt: Running in Durango... Page 44 The Lighter Side: Stupid Things Nonrunners Say... Page 46

Departments Running Shorts... Page 6 Race Reports... Page 28 Race Results... Page 38 Race Calendar... Page 42

Credits

Publisher Derek Griffiths derek@coloradorunnermag.com

Contributing Writers Gary Barber, Colleen Cook, Marcie Glass, Steve Glass, Brock Quimby, Jeff Recker, Ken Sheridan, Lonnie Somers, Lydia Hope Wilson, Aaron Unterreiner, Marc Witkes Contributing Photographers Steve Glass, Kent Graham, Mike Leary, Bill Somers, Victor Sailor Front Range Advertising Derek Griffiths derek@coloradorunnermag.com, 720-570-3469

Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

Editor Jessica Griffiths jessica@coloradorunnermag.com

Member of the

Doug Smith runontrails@msn.com, 303-741-4065 Western Slope Advertising Marc Witkes marcwitkes@hotmail.com, 970-247-3116 On The Cover Brett Schoolmeester and Renee Metivier in the NCAA Cross Country Championship Photo by Victor Sailor In Partnership with Durango Motorless Transit Mesa Monument Striders Southern Colorado Runners Team Boulder Running Company



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Colorado Runner is printed on 20% recycled (10% post-consumer waste) paper. All inks used contain a percentage of soy base. Colorado Runner is a registered trademark. The contents of Colorado Runner cannot be reproduced, in whole or in part, without written consent of the publishers. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, race results or other materials are welcome. They can only be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed envelope. Colorado Runner is published 6 times a year. The publication deadline for each issue is one month prior to its release. A one year subscription costs $15. Please send address changes to the above address because bulk rate mail will not be forwarded. All photos by Derek Griffiths unless otherwise noted.

January/February 2005


I’m 43:09 Last year, I was 46:30 A personal best is a moving target. It never lets you bask in its glory. And it never lets you take the rest of the week off. Because the moment you get there, is the moment the next run starts.

I am what I am

Š 2005 Reebok International Ltd. All Rights Reserved. RBK, VECTOR,

and DMX are registered trademarks of Reebok International.


Running Shorts... Superior’s Paul South, 31, won the 42nd annual JFK 50 Mile race in Hagerstown, Maryland on November 20th. The top three men finished within minutes of each other. Paul ran 6:11:49, with Ian Torrence of Boulder City, Nevada finishing second in a close 6:12:50. Martin Tighe of Providence, Rhode Island placed third in 6:14:47. There were 876 official finishers, five of which were from Colorado.

Photos by Victor Sailor / www.PhotoRun.net

SEAFAIR, Seattle’s traditional summer festival, is hosting a marathon this summer that will take place in conjunction with the already popular half marathon and walk. The 2005 Virginia Mason Team Medicine Marathon and Half Marathon at SEAFAIR will be held on Sunday, July 10 and will start and finish at Bellevue Downtown Park. Notably, this marathon will be one of the only 26.2-mile distance races slated for the summer months in the Pacific Northwest.  A health and fitness expo will take place on Friday, July 8 and Saturday, July 9 along with packet pick-up and a post-race party with live music and a beer garden will wrap up the weekend’s events on Sunday. For more information, log onto www.seafair.com.

Molly Austin of Boulder (above) was the second American finisher at the ING New York City Marathon, finishing in 2:41:42. Austin’s time placed her 16th overall at the November 7th event. Boulder’s Dave Mackey won the men’s overall title in the Montrail Ultra Cup. For 2004, the series consisted of nine races throughout the country; three 50Ks, three 50 Milers, and three 100 Milers. To compete for the overall series championship, runners had to complete one of each distance, plus a second race at any distance for a total of four races. Thus, the series forced competitors to stretch their comfort zone a bit. Paul DeWitt of Colorado Springs finished second and Rick Hessek of Colorado Springs won sixth. On the women’s side, Crested Butte’s Anthea Schmid earned the second place title, Darcy Africa of Boulder earned fourth and Breckenridge’s Helen Cospolich placed fifth. The Smoky Hill High School girls cross country team placed second in the first ever Nike Team Nationals, a national club championship for teams composed of high-school-age athletes. The event was held Saturday, December 4th at Portland Meadows in Portland, Oregon. Smoky Hill had three runners place in the top ten overall. Katelyn Kaltenbach was fourth (18:24), Keara Sammons fifth (18:24), and Morgan Schultz eighth (18:47). However, the club from Saratoga Springs, New York had too much depth, as their fifth runner finished 23rd, compared to Smoky Hill’s 59th. Also competing for Smoky Hill were Erin Stratton (49th, 20: 13), Renee Mayer (59th, 20:24), Lindsey Dezman (87th, 20:48), and Michelle Wenino (99th, 21:03). 

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January/February 2005

D’Evelyn’s John McGuire and Summit’s Whitney Anderson both finished fourth overall at the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships National Finals at Morley Field in Balboa Park in San Diego California on Saturday, December 11th. All of the Colorado runners who competed in the event placed in the top 15. In the girl’s race, Anderson finished in 17:49 and Madeline McKeever of Heritage (right) ran 18:14, fast enough for ninth overall. Smoky Hill’s Keara Sammons placed 11th in 18:20 and Katelyn Kaltenbach, the defending champion, finished in 15th in 18:28 after battling a stress fracture. In the boy’s race, McGuire ran 15:27 and Mohamud Ige from Denver South finished in 13th in 15:44. The runners competed under sunny skies with good course conditions. The weather was unseasonably warm, with temperatures in the mid-70s for the girls race, and cooling down a bit as a fog rolled in for the boys race.


Jack Frost, running par tner. There once was a woman who

trained in the cold.

The frigid

conditions made her fingers numb and did little for her attitude.

In

time, she became a colder person. But one day, the

season changed and the temperature climbed to a

pleasant 58 degrees.

She learned that a summer

marathon was on its way. And she shed her winter clothes and

ran mer r ily ever after.

Seattle Area’s Summer Marathon July 10, 2005, in Bellevue, Washington

Marathon · Half Marathon Run & Walk · 5K Run & Walk www.seafairmarathon.com

· Benefiting Cancer Research at Virginia Mason


2004 - 2005

RunDenver Series Washington Park, Denver, CO

Feb 6, 2005 Super Bowl 5K

Feb 13, 2005

Feb 20, 2005

Valentine’s Day 5K

President’s Day 5K

- Proceeds benefit the Kipture Primary School and Library Foundation - Run the whole series and get a free one-year subscription to Colorado Runner (Series also includes Steve’s Rudolph Ramble, run on Dec. 19, 2004)

www.bkbltd.com - 303.694.2030


Racing Series Winners...

Winners of the Colorado Runner

Racing Series

In the Open 1 division for runners ages 25 and younger, PAUL DIGRAPPA, 23, of Highlands Ranch came out on top. He was followed by Charles Kamindo of Boulder and Adam Rich of Colorado Springs. The top runners won free apparel from Nike and the Boulder Running Company.

When and how did you start running? I started running my sophomore year of high school. I did it because I did not make the soccer team and I wanted to do something. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group and what is your favorite workout? I train with a lot of miles. I like to make sure I do at least two harder workouts a week. I would say that Maniac in Fort Collins is one of my favorites. Where is your favorite spot to train?  Either Highlands Ranch (more altitude and hills) or Fort Collins (great place to be and train) Why do you run? I run because I have a passion for it.  It is something that I have that most people wouldn’t try to do.  It is also very fun and there is always a race out there for anyone. Do you have a prerace routine? I like to run 15 to 20 minutes and then stretch. I like to be sweating when I hit the line. Any advice for runners looking to improve?  Don’t try to up your miles all at once, do it gradually over a few years.  And never try to do more than you think you can handle.  Everything that is good in running will happen over time, not all at once. In the series, which races were your favorite? I think the best race was Governor’s Cup because it provided great competition and a fun time. Place

Points

Time

Runnin’ of the Green 7K

Race

1

150

21:39

Cinco Cinco 5K

1

150

15:36

Classic 10K

3

125

31:56

The Human Race 5K

4

115

15:32

Georgetown to Idaho Springs 1/2

1

150

1:09:09

Governor’s Cup 10K

2

135

31:29

All Photos by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

KARA FORD, 26, of Thornton won the Open 1 division, followed by Lakewood’s Amita Chugh and Zoila Gomez of Alamosa. Ford is a case manager for long term care Medicaid. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group? I began working with a coach, Glenn McCarthy, last summer, and he has really helped me to take my running to a more competitive level.  During the summer, I was running track workouts once a week with one of his running club groups, “Glenn’s Gaitors”.  Now that track season is over, he has me doing tempo runs once a week instead, which helps me with my speed.  My most important workouts come over the weekend, though, when he has me run a marathon goal pace run on Friday, followed by two long runs over the weekend, followed by another goal pace run on Monday.  The back to back long runs over the weekend teach your body to convert glucose to glycogen during longer efforts of running and long distance races.  The goal pace runs (particularly the goal pace run on Monday) teach you how to stay on your goal marathon pace when your body is fatigued, which is obviously important in the last miles of a marathon.  Where is your favorite spot to train?  Since I live in Thornton, I do most of my running on the trails near my house.  I also like to run at Wash Park, which is close to where I work, and I have recently been exploring the trails in Boulder. I have really fallen in love with the Boulder trails that I’ve run on, and Boulder is probably my favorite place to train. Why do you run? I run for the same reasons that most people run.  I love being outside with nature.  I love the feeling of pushing my body to it’s limit.  I love setting a goal for myself and then going out and working hard to reach that goal - for me there is no greater sense of accomplishment than crossing the finish line of a marathon within the time goal that you set for yourself, because you know what it took to get there. Finally, I love running because it is the thing in life that makes me feel the most centered.  When I’m running consistently and running well, I just feel happier and more at peace with myself and with the world. In the series, which races were your favorite? I think the series has a lot of great races.  My favorite race that I ran in the series would either be the Evergreen Town Race or the Georgetown to Idaho Springs 1/2 Marathon. Place

Points

Time

Ten Mile Creek 10K

Race

1

150

39:17

Evergreen Town Race 10K

2

135

39:04

Georgetown to Idaho Springs 1/2

3

125

1:27:15

January/February 2005

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Racing Series Winners... ANDY BUPP, 32, of Denver won the Open 2 division of the series for runners ages 26-39. Second place was won by Derek Griffiths of Littleton and Erik Packard of Mesa placed third. When and how did you start running? I started running with my dad when I was eight, and five years later I could beat him in a 5K.  He can still beat me in an arm wrestle though.    What is your favorite workout? My favorite workout is going to the track and running an all out 200 meters.  That one always makes me feel like a cheetah.  But probably the workout that is the most productive for marathon training is mile repeats (five to six) at 5K pace. Where is your favorite spot to train? I know my least favorite place to train is on a treadmill in front of a television.  I never understood guys who could do two hour runs on a treadmill.  I would rather go out into a blizzard and jog around a lamp post.  I would have to say that my favorite place to train is Washington Park, early in the morning.     Why do you run? I run because I love danger - that, and the fame and glory.  Most people tell you they run for inner strength, or personal achievement, or some crap, but not me.  I run purely for the big money. Do you have a prerace routine? Yes I do.  Usually I like to wake up really early, like 5am.  Then I put on my shorts and race singlet, pin on my bib number, do some light stretching, and then go back to bed for awhile.  Then I get up 40 minutes before the race starts and drive to the race in a panic filled rage.  That is the best way to prepare for battle, and it provides me with that extra edge. Any advice for runners looking to improve? Yeah, get a full time chef to prepare all of your meals.  When you spend all of your time running, other activities start to get less attention.  So hire a chef and get at least nine hours of sleep a night.  What did you think of the series and which races were your favorite? I thought the series was great, except for the fact that I never beat Paul Digrappa.  He is one tough son of a gun.  Man, I wanted to beat that guy.  I’d have to say my favorite race in the series was the Runnin’ of the Green 6.8K.    What would you change about the series?  I think you should have more downhill races.  Maybe make the whole series downhill?  You already have the Evergreen Town 10K, the Ten Mile Creek 10K and the Georgetown to Idaho Springs Half Marathon, you only need another five or so.  I bet that would be the only downhill race series in the country. Place

Points

Time

Runnin’ of the Green 7K

Race

3

125

22:06

Steamboat Half Marathon

1

150

1:13:45

Garden of the Gods 10M

1

150

55:47

Place

Points

Time

Evergreen Town Race 10K

Race

1

150

31:23

Georgetown to Idaho Springs 1/2

2

135

1:09:16

Governor’s Cup 10K

5

105

32:09

KATIE BLACKETT, 27, trains in Boulder. Blackett won the Open 2 division of the series for runners ages 26-39. She works as a financial analyst and a professional runner. Blackett was followed in the series by Shannon Meredith of Colorado Springs and Tanya Poel of Boulder. When did you start running? I started running as a young girl with my dad growing up in Flagstaff, Arizona. I then became a sprinter and heptathlete and received a full ride scholarship to Villanova University as a heptathlete and triple jumper in college. As a sprinter/heptathlete, I hated distance running but when I graduated from college and moved closer to my dad, he got me back into distance running.  Now it’s a part time job for me! How do you train and what is your favorite workout? I train seven days a week, every day of the year.  I rarely take a day off, rather I’ll take a light day.  I do a lot of weight training and cross training to keep me injury free.  Training takes up so much time that I went to part time work so I could train at the level I need to be at to compete against my competitors since many of them run full time.  My favorite workout is hill fartlek at Teller Farms with Colleen and Darren De Reuck. We fly! Where is your favorite spot to train? My favorite spot to train is anywhere in the mountains Why do you run? I run because it is my passion and my spirituality. Do you have a prerace routine? My pre-race routine is to be silent, alone or with my boyfriend Matt, and to reflect on what I’m about to do.  Any advice for runners looking to improve? Get a coach or a fast running partner so you are pushed to your max.  Train hard and rest harder.  I do a lot of extra cardio work because it strengthens other areas of my body that running doesn’t so I would recommend slowly getting into cycling, stair master, elliptical, pilates, or whatever else you like to do for strength and variety.  In the series, which races were your favorite? I truly enjoyed all of the races but the Governor’s Cup 10K and the Stadium Stampede were two of my favorites.  John Tope puts on great races and takes good care of the elite athletes.

Race

Place

Points

Time

Race

Place

Points

Time

Runnin’ of the Green 7K

2

135

24:43

Stadium Stampede 5K

2

135

17:58

The Human Race 5K

3

125

17:14

Governor’s Cup 10K

2

135

Classic 10K

1

150

35:30

35:55

Boulder Backroads Half Marathon

2

135

1:22:00


ELLEN HART, 46, won the women’s Masters division. Firestone’s Sherry Buckner placed second and Amy Regnier of Colorado Springs was third. When did you start running? I started running in third grade in P.E. class. I loved to run, it was just that simple. And I was fast. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group and what is your favorite workout? I am still fairly goal-oriented, so I pick a race and train for it. I love to race so I enter lots of races along the way toward my big goal. My favorite workout is running with my friends in Boulder; I don’t much care what we do. Where is your favorite spot to train? Trails in Boulder and the Colorado Trail in South Park Why do you run? I was born to run. I just know that. I have been running for many years, sometimes competitively, sometimes not, sometimes injured and wanting to run, sometimes taking time off running to have babies, but always knowing that running is one of the very few things that I was just born to do. It’s not always easy, but it’s always right.  (I also, most of the time, like how it feels, and I like that I have some talent.) Do you have a prerace routine? Just the usual - get up, have some coffee and something to eat, get dressed, go to the race, warm up, then it’s show-time! Any advice for runners looking to improve? Find some combination of workouts - long, short, track, roads, trails, fast, slow, cross-training, etc. that keeps your interest, and keeps your running feeling fun.  It’s OK to take time off, even if it feels as if you’re playing hookey.  I’ve worried about it so often and then come back just fine.  (I’m in the middle of a month off, so maybe I’m trying to reassure myself!) What did you think of the series and which races were your favorite? I loved the races I ran - the Governor’s Cup (which I first ran in 1981), the Georgetown to Idaho Springs half-marathon (which is beautiful, and I always get to see a lot of friends), and the Boulder Backroads half-marathon (couldn’t have picked a prettier day, and it’s such a great surface to run on). Place

Points

Time

Georgetown to Idaho Springs 1/2

Race

1

100

1:27:52

Governor’s 10K

2

90

39:22

Boulder Backroads Half Marathon

1

100

1:28:39

ROB WELO, 41, won the men’s Masters division. Welo is from Casper, Wyoming and currently works as a payroll technician living in Aurora. Denver’s Steve Krebs placed second in the series and Robert Yara of Colorado Springs earned third. When and how did you start running? I started running age group track when I was 10, then went out for cross country as a high school freshman. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group and what is your favorite workout? Consistency by trying to run everyday.  My favorite workout is both six to eight 1000 meter repeats and three by two mile repeats. Where is your favorite spot to train? I have no favorite place to train. Why do you run? I like the chance to compete against others and see how I measure up. Do you have a prerace routine? I like to try to keep moving and jogging just before the start of a race and be the last one to line up for the start. Any advice for runners looking to improve? Be consistent in your training. What did you think of the series and which races were your favorite? I thought the series was great.  The Garden of the Gods 10 Mile is always my favorite.

Place

Points

Time

Runnin’ Of The Green 7K

Race

1

100

23:21

Garden of the Gods 10M

1

100

58:22

Stadium Stampede 5K

1

100

16:42

Georgetown to Idaho Springs 1/2

1

100

1:15:15

Governor’s Cup 10K

1

100

34:26

January/February 2005

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Racing Series Winners... LOLA ACKERMAN of Longmont won the Grand Masters division of the Colorado Runner Racing Series for runners 50-59. Ackerman will be a threat in a new age division next year as she turned 60 on November 1st. Ackerman works as a supervisor at FirstBank. Robin Cunningham of Broomfield and Deb Anderson of Colorado Springs finished in second and third place in the series. When and how did you start running? I started running about 20 years ago with a friend and we are still running together. In the beginning I ran to stay fit, but now it’s a love of running, the quiet solitude of running alone, or running with a friend who also loves to run. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group and what is your favorite workout? My training varies with the type of racing I’m doing but I always attempt to run 25 to 30 miles a week. My favorite workout is a 400 or 800 speedwork session. It’s grueling but a great sense of accomplishment when finished. Where is your favorite spot to train? We have a beautiful place to train in Longmont, Golden Ponds. There are a wide variety of birds and we’ve seen beaver, fox and deer. Do you have a prerace routine? My prerace routine is rising early, a bagel three hours before the race, and an endurance drink one hour before. And I always affix a sticker to my racing bib, Isaiah 40:31: “Those who hope in the Lord shall renew their strength, they shall rise up on wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not be faint.” A perfect verse for runners. Any advice for runners looking to improve? My advice for runners looking to improve is to set a goal. My goal is to run faster than the year before. My running friend says it’s an unrealistic goal, however it motivates me to do the hard work that is necessary to keep up my speed. What did you think of the series and which races were your favorite? The racing series gave us a variety of places to run. I enjoy running in Colorado Springs, but it makes for an early morning to make it to the race on time. I believe the Lord has blessed me with the ability to run. I work hard and give my thanks to Him. Place

Points

Time

Place

Points

Time

5K on St. Patrick’s Day

Race

2

90

23:05

Classic 10K

Race

3

80

48:43

Cinco Cinco 5K

1

100

24:00

The Humn Race 5K

2

90

23:26

Garden of the Gods 10M

8

30

1:28:11

Georgetown to Idaho Springs 1/2

5

60

1:47:06

In the closest contest of the series, HERB TANZER of Woodland Park brushed by Kent Oglesby of Fort Collins to win the Grand Masters division by just 20 points. Dwight Cornwell of Fort Collins placed third. Tanzer, 52, is a hardware engineer at Hewlett Packard in Colorado Springs. When and how did you start running? I started a long time ago in high school for fun & competition. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group and what is your favorite workout? I can’t do intense workouts anymore because of too many past injuries, but a few sustained uphill or hard - easy repeats on rolling dirt trail per week can help sharpen. Where is your favorite spot to train? It used to be in the mountains, but now I like the local trails better. Why do you run? I can eat more than people twice my size. Plus I’ve made many great running friends over the years. Do you have a prerace routine? Spend a quiet minute thinking about why you’re at the starting line. Any advice for runners looking to improve? Train hard-easy, vary the training & racing distance, terrain, and try a few new events every year. Cross-training or planned down-time can help rejuvenate. What did you think of the series and which races were your favorite? Good quality events, lots of races to choose from, long and short. The downhill 10K in Evergreen was a blast. Would you change anything about the series? Nope. Thanks for holding the series. I recently moved to Colorado from Sacramento, and this was a great way for me to try some of Colorado’s finest. Race

12

Place

Points

Time

Garden of the Gods 10M

2

90

1:10:07

Boogie’s Diner Buddy Run 8K

2

90

34:21

Classic 10K

2

90

40:00

Evergreen Town Race 10K

2

90

39:01

The Human Race 5K

6

50

19:47

Governor’s Cup 10K

1

100

39:29

Boulder Backroads Half Marathon

3

80

1:29:08

Durango Marathon

1

100

3:16:48

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January/February 2005


Racing Series Awards The men’s award winners will receive the following prizes from Nike and the Boulder Running Company... 1st Place: Nike Sphere Pro Jacket and Tights (as shown);

September 25, 2005 Boulder, Colorado

2nd Place: Nike Sphere Thermal Top; 3rd Place: Nike Fleece Pullover The women will receive... 1st Place: Nike Sphere Pro Chill Jacket and Tights (as shown); 2nd Place: Nike Sphere Thermal Sleek Top; 3rd Place: Nike Fleece Hoody

Now a Boston Qualifier!

Travel along Boulder's scenic country roads in a race that Runners' World calls one of the nation's "Best Kept Marathon Secrets!"

January/February 2005

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Racing Series Winners... SALLY KENNETT, 62, of Salida won the Seniors division for runners ages 60 and over. Sally is retired, but works part time as the coordinator of the “Well Over 60” health, education and exercise program for the Upper Arkansas Area Agency on Aging. Wanda Willems of Laramie, Wyoming placed second and Constance Ahrnsbrak of Lakewood earned the third place crown. When and how did you start running? I began running in 1970 when my husband and I were married. When we went for our first runs together, I found it nearly impossible to complete one lap around the high school track. I complained a lot, about how hard it was to run, how long one lap took and how tired I was at the end of even the shortest distance! When I retired in 1997, I had more time to devote to running. I decided to attempt a marathon. I ran my first marathon in 1999 and recently completed the 2004 Boston Marathon. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group? Setting and meeting time and distance goals has become an important part of the run for me. I wish I had learned earlier in my life about choosing realistic but challenging goals and setting a pace for achieving them. Where is your favorite spot to train? We have many dirt roads in Chaffee County. My husband and I try to do a long run each weekend out in the country on a route that involves hills as well as flatter terrain. Our two favorite routes are one of 10 miles and one of 15. The scenery is beautiful and we see a variety of wildlife. We have a steep hill, Tenderfoot Mountain, near our home that I enjoy running during the week. Occasionally, during the week or when the weather is bad, I train indoors on the treadmill or the stair master at our local fitness club, ExerFlex gym. I also try to use the weights and do a yoga class during the week. Why do you run? I run because I feel better mentally and physically than when I don’t. I run because the challenge to continue through various “aging” aches and pains motivates me each day. Running helps me to maintain a positive outlook on life. Do you have a prerace routine? The night before a race I set out all of my clothing, pin my number to my shorts, check (and double-check!) the start time and location of the race, put any snacks or food I plan to take in my “Ironman” fuel belt and then try to put the race out of my mind until the next morning. Do you have any advice to offer runners looking to improve? I think entering a lot of races; choosing some routes that are harder than I ever thought I could do, maintaining a running routine, and keeping a training journal have helped me improve What did you think of the Colorado Runner Racing Series and which races were your favorite? I really enjoyed this running series. The variety of distances and locations motivated us to try events we might never have considered before. I think the number or runs in locations throughout the state are great. This series was a great way to get motivated in the spring and stay energized during the summer, and fall! I liked the challenge of preparation, racing, and recovery during this time. My favorite run was the last event in the series, the Rim Rock Run in the Colorado National Monument. While the course and distance were certainly challenging, the hills... both up and down... and the views across the canyons made this an exhilarating experience. The long descent to the finish left me with an almost euphoric feeling. It was so much fun to just give it all I had for those remaining miles.

Race

Place

Points

Time

5K on St. Patrick’s Day

1

100

26:26

Garden of the Gods 10M

1

100

1:33:38

Stadium Stampede 5K

2

80

26:38

Classic 10K

1

100

52:26

Governor’s Cup 10K

2

80

54:02

Rim Rock Run 37K

1

100

3:20:51

Join Team In Training, the world’s largest endurance sports training program and help fund research to find cures for leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. Visit www.teamintraining.org/rma or call 1.800.286.8159.

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LARRY AVERY, 63, of Boulder is the men’s champion of the Seniors division. Denver’s Jim Romero was a close second and Tom Lemire of Boulder placed third. Avery is the CEO of Avery Brewing Co. When and how did you start running? In 1980, a fellow worker was the race director of a three mile race. He talked me into signing up for the race, so about three weeks before the race I started running. It took several days of trying before I could run a 2.25 mile loop around my neighborhood without stopping, but I ran the race in 25 minutes (seems like only yesterday) and I was hooked. How do you train to stay at the top of your age group? I used to run 60-80 miles/week year round, but the last few years I’ve replaced 25-30 of those running miles with walking miles. I try to avoid “garbage” miles (slower than nine minute miles) and I try to get in a 1/4 mile interval session on a nearby track every couple of weeks.  My favorite workout is to run a race, so I run 30-35 races each year.  Where is your favorite spot to train? I run a lot of miles on the Foothills Trail (Wonderland Lake area), Eagle Trail (Boulder Valley Ranch), South Boulder Creek Trail, and I also enjoy the 10 mile loop at Hall Ranch, but I don’t get there as often as I’d like. Why do you run? Do you remember how much fun recess was in grade school? Running, for me, is recess. It’s a suspension of everyday life and allows for thinking, reflecting, relaxing, and even visualizing my next race. I’m big on visualization. The benefits continue even after running in that I feel better both physically and mentally. Any advice for runners looking to improve? First, you have to believe you can run faster. That’s where visualization comes in. You have to “see” yourself running faster. To race faster, you have to train faster, but only one or two days a week.  Intervals on a track are helpful, as is reducing your body fat to a low level and lots of sleep helps too. What did you think of the series and which races were your favorite? It made the summer more interesting and competitive. My favorite races in order are: Rim Rock Run, Georgetown to Idaho Springs, Evergreen Town Race, Copper Mountain to Frisco (Ten Mile Creek), the and Governor’s Cup. There’s a theme here - most are downhill! Race

Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

Place

Points

Time

Place

Points

Time

Steamboat 10K

1

100

50:21

Evergreen Town Race 10K

Race

3

60

46:31

Ten Mile Creek 10K

4

40

46:38

Governor’s Cup 10K

3

60

45:40

Stadium Stampede 5K

3

60

23:51

Boulder Backroads 1/2 Marathon

5

20

1:41:24

Boogie’s Diner Buddy Run 8K

3

60

39:01

Rim Rock Run 37K

1

100

3:06:46

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January 23

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Runnin’ of the Green 7K Denver, CO

Valentine’s Day 5K (Race 3/4)

Orphans of Violence 5K Denver, CO

President’s Day 5K (Race 4/4)

March 13

March 27

February 13

February 20

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January/February 2005

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Avoiding Injury...

Happy New Year! by Dr. Ken Sheridan

New Year’s Resolutions: 1. This year I’m going to do a 5K. 2. This year I’m going to break 18 minutes for the 5K. 3. This year I’m going to get in the pool and do a triathlon. 4. This year I’m going to lose those 20 pounds.

your lactate threshold re-evaluated or setting up next year’s race schedule to peak for certain races. I mean determining whether or not your resolutions address the right priorities.

I don’t know about you, but when it comes to New Year’s resolutions, most people are good at making them, bad at keeping them. You’re not alone; in fact the average person’s resolution to get regular exercise lasts only about six weeks. We’ve all experienced the inability to get on the aerobic equipment or find an empty pool lane at the health club from January 1st to late February when people traffic lightens up.

This type of training is often a reality for those of us with full time jobs, and while inspiring, it can take its toll. Not only on feet, knees and shoulders, but on the people in our lives who have enabled us to reach our goals. You see, this athlete had sons ages 3 and 4, and while he was out “playing” his wife was maintaining the house and raising the boys. Who’s the real ironman here??

For those of you who need help creating and maintaining your goals, here are some helpful hints: 1. Do a “here and now” assessment. Giving yourself an honest analysis of your starting point will allow you to start at a safe level and reduce your risk of injury. 2. Make your goals realistic. Making unrealistic goals will set you up for failure coming out of the blocks. Like wanting to lose 50 pounds in a month. 3. Make your goals specific. If you are planning on a certain distance to race, pick the actual race you want to do. If you want to get in the pool three times a week, schedule those exact times. 4. Write your goals down. Writing them down makes them more realistic, gives you the ability to review them weekly and adjust them as needed. 5. Make your goals measurable. Use a training log to track your progress (times/distances). Food diaries will tell you what you’re eating vs. what you think you’re eating. 6. Realize there are consequences to working toward your goals.

Time we spend in the pool, on the bike, or even at work, is time away from other people and activities. Sometimes it’s necessary to check in with our support groups and determine whether or not we need to spend more time supporting them.

Number six above is an interesting concept which is often overlooked by goal oriented people, and failure to realize this can lead to over committing your time. The classic example of this is the training partner who is always late because “things took them longer than they thought” before the training session. For those of you who don’t need help creating or maintaining your goals (type “A” triathletes for example – 7:07 AM, HR 155, time to sip some sports drink) it may be time to reassess your goals. I don’t mean getting 16

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Consistent training takes time, a lot of time. I once knew an ironman triathlete who rode his bike from 5-8 AM, swam for an hour at lunch and ran from 6-8 PM on a regular basis. This athlete finished near the top of his age group in several races, which is very inspiring.

I have found some ways to reach my goals and feed my support system at the same time: 1. Pushing a baby jogger may even out the pace of two people, enabling them to train together. 2. Instead of doing hill repeats, try snowshoeing with your family, a great workout can be had by carrying your 4 year old on your shoulders when she tires of hiking. 3. Leave for the pool early for your weekend swim workout, meeting your husband and kids later, allowing him to swim/Jacuzzi while you play sea monster with the kids. 4. Instead of dropping your kids off at their soccer game and riding away, set your trainer up on the sidelines and spin while you watch the game. These are just a few suggestions. If you have some that work for you, email them to me at sksheridan@aol.com but more importantly, share them with your training buddies. You may be surprised by how many people are in the same boat. Happy New Year! Dr. Ken Sheridan is a local road and trail runner who competes in a variety of events, from marathons to duathlons. He practices at Active Care Chiropractic and Rehab in Golden. To ask him your injury questions, call 303-279-0320.


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Nutrition...

Navigating the Waters How To Find the Perfect Bottled Water by Dame Lyvia Hope Wilson

“How,” Christina asked, “did something as simple as water become so complicated?” A country woman, Christina had enthusiastically accompanied me on a “superstore” shopping trip. But, when we turned down an aisle to find row after row of bottled water, Christina froze, shaking her head in wonder. Aside from a recognizable bottle of Evian, she was in unfamiliar territory. “How,” she asked, “am I supposed to pick one?” Whether you’re a country dweller like Christina or as cosmopolitan as they come, chances are you’ve asked similar questions. After all, our running performance is greatly affected by our level of hydration, and few items are more convenient than packaged bottles of water. If the world of bottled waters is a little murky for you, then read on. We’ll share the secret sources of these beverages, uncover government regulations, and answer that timeless question: is bottled water really better than tap? GETTING TO THE SOURCE

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any consider bottled water to be the hallmark of sophistication. After all, grasping a green bottle of Perrier is much more impressive than a Dixie cup filled with stuff from the tap. For those not swayed by image, there’s always the issue of health: With reports of contaminated public water and the fitness fascination that has taken hold in American culture over the last decade, it is not surprising that bottled water has blossomed into a $35 billion annual business with some 900 different brands and varieties available. But where do these waters come from? Unfortunately, the Fountain of Youth remains undiscovered. And no, the label’s little Alpine picture does not mean it comes from a mountain spring. The answer lies in the bottle’s words, not image. If it says “artesian,” or “glacial,” you can be sure of the source. But even that doesn’t mean workers traveled to Antarctica and melted huge chunks of ice directly into your bottle. In fact, some sources estimate that up to 40% of bottled water is taken from municipal sources, then purified by processes including deionization, active carbon filtration, and reverse osmosis. These waters are usually referred to as “drinking water.” As for “artesian” water: this exotic word simply describes underground reservoirs located above the water table. WET REGULATIONS

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o where does the government fit into this industry? The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) requires bottled waters to meet the same purification standards as tap water. (In some areas of the country, we can’t help but wonder if gutter water would pass the test…) However, federal laws do not apply unless a manufacturer sells the water outside the state in which it was produced. That means that a Colorado bottler is not required to meet federal regulations unless the water is shipped 18

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to, for example, Utah. But don’t spit out that mouthful just yet. Many states – including Colorado – carefully monitor the production of bottled water. In fact, the Colorado State Department of Health regularly inspects bottling facilities and analyzes their water quality. STOP OR SAIL?

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o, should you blissfully sail along on the (bottled) waters, or should you jump ship? That depends on you. Yes, it is true that the bottled water on your grocery store shelf may not be any purer than the stuff streaming from your shower faucet. And the comparative cost is almost ridiculous: Consumers pay 24010,000 times more per gallon for bottled water, and an estimated 90% of that goes to cover the cost of the bottle, label, and marketing. But there are benefits as well. First, there’s the taste factor. For many, the flavor of tap water is nothing short of repulsive. Bottled waters often boast a much cleaner, crisper flavor. And, if that’s what you need to stay hydrated, then bottle up! Second, there’s the convenience factor. The human body is 70% water overall. The brain is composed of 85% water, the blood 90%, and the liver 96%. Even a minor case of dehydration can greatly affect the body’s function. Most Americans suffer from mild dehydration. And, even when we do consume a beverage, it often contains caffeine and/or alcohol, which are both diuretics. When intense exercise is thrown into the mix – such as running a few miles a day – the risk of dehydration becomes even greater. This is where bottled water comes to the rescue. We are immersed in the age of speed: from fast food to fast Internet access, we want it now. There is precious little time to take a breath, let alone fill a glass with ice water, slowly sip it, and carefully wash the glass afterwards. And, with bottled water, we don’t have to. Rather than sinking in frustration over the effort it takes to get in our eight daily glasses, we can reach into the refrigerator for a 64-ounce bottle, sip it throughout the day, and, at day’s end, rest assured that we’ve done at least one good thing for our body. In short, don’t sweat it when it comes to bottled water. As I advised a puzzled Christina, select a brand whose taste you like and guzzle it down. If you choose to save yourself some money by refilling the bottle with tap water a couple times… well, we’ll drink to that, too. Whenever possible, Dame Wilson escapes to the mountain trails of Colorado for a little taste of Paradise, which can also be sampled in the products of her kitchen. She is employed as the Editor of an international culinary magazine.


Greenland Trail 50K 37.5K, 25K, 12.5K Presented by Colorado Runner Saturday, April 16, 2005 ~ 7:00 AM

Greenland Open Space, Douglas County, CO

www.coloradorunnermag.com ~ Featured Races 720-570-3469 derek@coloradorunnermag.com The Greenland Trail 50K is a new trail race located between Denver and Colorado Springs. It’s intent is to kick off the trail running season by offering a variety of distances to suit everone’s running needs.

Prize Money to 50K winners, plus age group awards in all events. Greenland Trail, November 2004. Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner


The Headlamp and our Night Running Transformation Photo and article by Steve Glass Running under full moons on crisp winter nights has always been a favorite time. The cold air on you face, billows of cloud vapors pouring from you mouth and nose, and the sound of grass blades crunching as the frost crystals explode under your running body. There is a feeling of a freedom, oneness, and an abominable spirit on runs such as these. But running at night on the evenings when the clouds cover the moon, or when the moon is nigh, the event is different and lacking. In fact these runs in the darkness of an oily night are often filled with trips, stumbles, curses and near crashes as the runner finds his way along a dark lonely night. This sort of running has plagued most of my running life. Growing up in Washington state, in the winter months it is dark, completely black by 4:30pm and many of my runs were run on faith that I would miss the potholes, mud puddles, curbs and other runner destroying obstacles. My faith was challenged as my steps often found the potholes, mud puddles, and who know how many sudden curbs, sidewalks and unsuspected elevation changes sent me flying out of control trying to stay on my feet. I remember squinting through the sheets of rain on dark nights trying to see as oncoming car lights blinded my vision. Yes, in fact I have run more runs in these

conditions then I have in the beautiful light of a full moon, and I figured I would for the rest of my life. But this is not the case. A few days after last Christmas the stumbling, fumbling and bumbling all came to a screeching halt. My wife and I each bought each other the same small headlamp. We gave each other the TIKA Plus, made by Petzl. The first few nights running with our new 2.25 oz headlamp I could not stop raving about how incredible it was to see at night. Soon we were venturing down trails that I would have not dared without the light of a full moon. And those trails only worked because there are no trees that would block the light of the moon. Our world opened up, to endless possibilities of night running. Being night owls by nature our nocturnal habits were freed as now any street, trail, or alleyway are easy pickings with the addition of a headlamp. If you love running, and even if you only occasionally run at night we suggest that you invest in a lightweight LED headlamp. Once you run with one, you will never begin a run at night without one, unless of course you enjoy the stumbling, bumbling and fumbling that comes with no light. I hope your night runs become illuminated. 20

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Colorado Runner Racing Series Sponsored by Nike and the Boulder Running Company

The Colorado Runner Racing Series is a scored series of races throughout the state. Runners will be scored based on their finishing place in each race. The winners in each division will be featured in Colorado Runner magazine and the top three runners in each division will receive awards from Nike and the Boulder Running Company, including watches, sunglasses, heart rate monitors, running shoes and running apparel.

Criteria used in determining Racing Series races: 1. Location 2. Race distance 3. Quality of the Field

4. Size of the race 5. Date of the race 6. Race organization

2005 Racing Series Schedule

Photo by Brock Quinby / Boulder Running Company

Date

Name

Distance

Location

March 12

5K on St. Patrick’s Day

5K

Colorado Springs

March 13

Runnin’ Of The Green

7K

Denver

April 3

Platte River Trail Half Marathon

13.1M

Littleton

May 1

Make-A-Wish Half Marathon

13.1M

Denver

May 8

Old Town Marathon

26.2M, 13.1M

Fort Collins

May 22

Colorado Rockies Home Run

5K

Denver

May 29

Narrow Gauge Run

10M

Durango

June 12

Strawberry Shortcut

10K

Glenwood Springs

June 12

Garden Of The Gods

10M

Colorado Springs

June 26

Stadium Stampede

5K

Denver

July 4

Boogie’s Diner Buddy Run

5M

Aspen

July 4

FireKracker 5K

5K

Fort Collins

July 10

Trespass Trail Challenge

10M

Nederland

August 7

Evergreen Town Race

10K

Evergreen

August 13

Georgetown To Idaho Springs

13.1M

Georgetown

September 5

Colorado Run

10K

Fort Collins

September 10

Imogene Pass Run

17M

Ouray

September 18

Governor’s Cup

10K

Denver

September 25

Boulder Backroads

26.2M, 13.1M

Boulder

October 9

Rocky Mountain Festivel For Runners

26.2M, 13.1M

Durango

November 12

Rim Rock Run

37K

Grand Junction

Racing Series Scoring

In each race, points will be awarded to the top 15 male and female finishers in the open division 1 (runners ages 1-29) and the top 15 runners in the open division 2 (ages 30-39). In the masters competition, the top 10 men and women will be scored (for runners 40-49). Points will be given to the top 10 finishers in the grand masters competition (runners ages 50-59). Points will be given to the top 5 men and women in the senior division (runners 60 and over). Runners may participate in as many races as they choose but only their best 10 races will count towards scoring (or any number of races up to 10). For races with multiple starts, finish time will be used to calculate points. If a race has scoring trouble, it may be removed from the series. For races with multiple events, only the events listed will be scored. Your division is based on the first race of the year that you score in.

Example of the points scored Place

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Open 1 & 2

100

90

80

70

60

50

45

40

35

30

25

20

15

10

5

Masters & Grand Masters

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

Seniors

100

80

60

40

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Inspirational Runners...

The Vanderheiden Brothers Leading the Way

I

Paul Vanderheiden

Photos by Steven Glass / Glass Photography

by Marcie Glass

f you have participated in many running events, you have probably found that Colorado’s core running community can become a small world fairly rapidly. This is especially true if you are the Vanderheiden brothers. Paul and Dennis Vanderheiden have been running for years, but these two, rather than just participating in the running community, have become pioneers - not because of setting blazing times or winning all the races, but because of their involvement. Dennis has been the main force behind several youth running programs in Fort Collins and Paul is currently organizing the Wild Wild West Relay, a 192 mile, 12 person relay from Fort Collins to Steamboat Springs. Their energy and dedication, or maybe obsession, has made them a well known pair in the local running community. It doesn’t hurt that it is a comical sight to see these two together with their brotherly antics. They throw mock insults and compliments at each other and are, in turns, animated, enthusiastic, funny, and sincere. I just happened to interview them on a beautiful October day after Paul had finished helping with the timing of the Flame Out 5K, part of his race director in-training education, and Dennis had rushed over after his cross country team’s first race of the season. This was just a typical day in the life of these two running zealots. The brothers were full of energy, casually dressed, with Paul’s crazy grey hair sticking out of the baseball cap he seems to perpetually be wearing, and Dennis wearing his “Fort Collins Track Club 22

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Junior Cross-Country” sweatshirt, as they sat down to tell me their story. Paul, a free spirit, who has chosen a life avoiding the corporate world and nine to five jobs, initially moved from King of Prussia, Pennsylvannia to Fort Collins in 1973 to attend CSU. His chosen profession as a river guide took him out west but he eventually returned to Colorado and is now living in Englewood. He credits himself with having discovered Colorado – the rest of the Vanderheiden family made a mass migration over the years, including mom, dad, and sister, Sandy. Dennis and wife, Cindy, moved to Fort Collins in 1996. Paul dabbled in running periodically but his first foray into the world of racing was in 1981 when he decided to run San Francisco’s Bay to Breakers with some persuasion from an attractive woman (at which Dennis quipped, “Paul, you are such a simple person.”); however, it wasn’t until his first marathon, Big Sur, in 1993, that he became hooked on running. At the time he was an unemployed flight instructor with extra time to devote to running. Despite having no idea how to train for a marathon and not even signing up until the day before the race, he soon transferred his obsession with river guiding to running. Since then he has done a myriad of races, including 14 marathons, but he has also worked with the Leukemia Society Teams in Training, managing several teams for the Honolulu, Orlando, Vancouver and Anchorage Marathons, and mentoring a team for the Chicago Marathon. In recent years, however, Paul’s interest has turned more and more towards 24 hour team relays. One of Paul’s most memorable running experiences occurred on the last leg of his first Colorado Relay, while running in complete darkness at two in the morning. With a pondering look at the memory, he shakes his head and says, “It was the most surrealistic experience I’ve had.” Since then, the two brothers have participated together in several Colorado Relays (170 miles), Hood to Coast (197 miles), and this year, will be running the Providian Relay (199 miles) in California. The idea for the Wild Wild West Relay evolved when Paul, disappointed with some issues in another relay, decided, “I could do this better.” I’m just guessing, but Paul seems like the type of person who, once he’s got an idea in his head, takes off running with it. In November 2003, he pulled out his maps and started studying possible routes from Fort Collins to Steamboat Springs, and in August 2004, had one team unofficially run the proposed course. It was during this

January/February 2005

unofficial run that Dennis had his most memorable running experience. Similar to Paul’s, it was at 10:30 p.m. in Wyoming, and he felt like a pioneer, reveling in the “thrill of running” when, out of nowhere, a group of ATV riders came out. Dennis says with an attempted country twang, “It was like out of a bad B grade movie” where the bad guys “are gonna go to threaten us, you know, and mess with our women.” Despite the B movie interlude, the run went without a hitch. Paul is currently in the permit process and plans to have the inaugural run on August 19-20, 2005. This event is his baby, a project he has been looking for “when he grows up” and seems to fit his organizational talent and self described anal-ness. Paul is excited about the relay, not only because he can justify new toys like a GPS system and computer upgrade, but also because he feels that relays are the next big thing in running. He concedes that adventure racing seems to be the fastest growing sector of events but he describes relays as “manageable adventure races” for ordinary people.

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ennis, in sharp contrast to Paul, is the family man with three children - Alyx, Kylie, and Kelly - and the “real” job as a developer consultant. Dennis began his adult running career in 1999 after finding himself winded in a softball game running to first base. Inspired by a neighbor who was on a record number of days of exercise in a row, Dennis took up the sport. Running clicked right away and besides immersing himself in the sport, he has also been promoting youth running in the Fort Collins community for several years now. In 2002, he helped the gym teacher at Tavelli Elementary start a running club for that school. It wasn’t long before he came up with the idea for a duathlon event where parents could participate alongside their kids. The result was the Tavelli Duathalon – a bike, run, bike event for parents and children grades K-6. The event has run for three years, with this year’s attendance at about 180 participants. As an observer at the event this year, I saw that it was not only beneficial for promoting health and fitness in kids but also for


self esteem and confidence. For an adult who is sometimes timid about venturing into new experiences, the exuberance of little kids in big helmets embracing the event was delightful to see. Also, during the same time period, Dennis’s middle daughter, Kylie, was enjoying running and Dennis’s thoughts soon turned to starting up a junior high crosscountry program in Fort Collins. Despite the presence of junior high cross-country programs in neighboring communities, the Poudre School District was not interested in sponsoring a program. Dennis turned to the Fort Collins Track Club and with their help was able to create a club crosscountry program. The program, first run in the fall of 2003, is now in its second year. It has been a labor of love for Dennis, who has put tremendous amounts of time into the program between practices, meets, administration, and promotion. He says he has no more youth events in the works but somehow I’m left with the impression that his mind keeps ticking. The brothers have an impressive race resume. Paul traveled all the way to New Zealand to do the Millennium Marathon on January 1, 2000. Dennis has traveled to Cordova, Alaska to participate in the Salmon Runs Sockeye Half Marathon. They name events like the Boston Marathon, Bay to Breakers, Big Sur, Honolulu Marathon, Philadelphia Marathon and Mardi Gras Half Marathon. When asked if they are competitive the two brothers good naturedly banter about how Paul, who was the first to start running, used to have bragging rights but now Dennis is knocking off all of Paul’s PR’s. Only his marathon PR of 3:09 remains standing. Dennis claims that the last race Paul beat him in, several years ago, was due to Paul stealthily feeding him ultra-dense whole wheat waffles before the race. Paul defends himself vigorously, “It’s what I was used to eating.” Dennis responds, “I gained ten pounds.” But when serious they acknowledge that running has brought them closer together. I ask what their personal running goals are and they go into a discussion of the evolution of running in their lives. At a youthful 50 years old, Paul is no longer at a point where personal records are important. Even Dennis, at 45, says PR’s are getting old. Dennis would now like to venture toward triathlons and Paul mentions his goal of running a marathon in all 50 states. He already has eleven checked off his list. But, then, he ponders, it might be easier to try to do a marathon on each continent. Both of them have run the cycle from PR’s to marathons to new events to relays. It seems now that the two of them are more interested in just having fun. They comment that one of the greatest joys for them is the people they meet in the running community. They stress how grateful they are for the down to earth, friendly attitudes they find there, even from elite runners. Paul and I have a hard time believing when Dennis says he was introverted and shy as a child. He now has no problem approaching runners and networking, always trying to find new members for their relay teams. In fact, they were a few minutes late for the interview because he was meeting a local runner

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Dennis Vanderheiden who he wanted to recruit for next year’s Colorado Relay. It’s no wonder their team, No Small Feet, has won the mixed division in the Colorado Relay the past two years. I wonder how much time they devote to running considering racing, training, volunteering, planning, promoting, and dreaming. They laugh and Paul replies, “Most of my waking hours” and Dennis responds, “Probably more than half of my waking hours”. I review their recent race schedule. They both ran in the Colorado Relay at the end of September and the next weekend Paul ran a marathon and Dennis ran the Coopersmith Half Marathon. Coming up, three weekends later, is the Providian Relay. It seems obsessive but not unhealthy, despite email addresses like “COrunboy” and “runriverrun”, a combination of Paul’s running and river guiding passions which he took from an old Loggins and Messina song of the same name (being a few years younger than Paul and Dennis, they had to explain to me who Loggins and Messina were). Paul says he has gotten over his running obsession of previous years and has stepped back, taking the time to backpack and enjoy other areas of his life. For Dennis, who has gotten most of his family into the sport, running is something to share with them and seems to give him a deep sense of fulfillment. Despite the mass amounts of time these two brothers devote to running, it is far from an obsession for them – it is a way of life. As I walk out of the interview, I have a smile on my face. There are some people who elevate your spirits and inspire you and, maybe most importantly, make you laugh. Dennis and Paul are two such people. I look forward to seeing them at races and am curious to know in the future what else they have up their sleeves.

January/February 2005

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Training Smarts...

Maintaining Your Body Weight Through the Off Season By Colleen Cooke, MS, RD You’ve trained hard all spring, raced all summer, and maybe even finished your season with a fall marathon. Now you’re ready for some recovery time. This is typically the time of year when athletes tend to significantly decrease their training volume and intensity, but do not think to decrease their caloric intake. An endurance athlete during training can often consume 3000 to 5000 calories per day without gaining weight. But when the training volume is halved, the caloric intake also must be decreased in order to prevent unwanted weight gain. The “off-season” or transition period of your training program is valuable because it gives your body a much-needed break from strenuous training and it allows your musculoskeletal system an opportunity to repair. This is a good time to try new activities and make nutrition changes. Perhaps you want to race lighter next season, or maybe you want to increase your muscle mass. Now is the time to focus on these changes, not during your season. Let’s look at how to maintain your weight through these periods of lighter training. The number of calories, or energy, an athlete needs each day depends on their age, body weight, gender and training volume. Daily energy needs (or total energy expenditure – TEE) are composed of two primary components: resting energy expenditure (REE, the amount of calories needed to maintain basic body systems and body temperature at rest) and activity energy

expenditure (AEE, calories needed to fuel exercise and activities of daily living). TEE = REE + AEE. Your REE can be calculated by a mathematical formula or measured by a physiologic test. Your AEE can be calculated by multiplying your REE by an activity factor or can be measured while you exercise. During times of heavy training one’s AEE is higher than in periods of light training volume (i.e. more training equals more food needed, less training equals less food needed). For most athletes, REE changes very little between seasons (provided they remain relatively weight stable). Therefore, this number is a good place to begin assessing one’s caloric needs. Table 1 provides you with two formulas for estimating your REE. Once you have calculated this number, or have had it measured, you then multiply it by an activity factor from Table 2. For example, Jane has just completed her final race for her season and is decreasing her training volume to more of a moderate level. She weighs 138 pounds and would like to maintain this weight until she starts her next training cycle in the spring. How many calories should she eat per day if she exercises moderately? Using Table 1 we calculate Jane’s REE to be 1380 calories (138 x 10). The Activity Factor for moderate exercise is 1.6. Therefore, her total energy expenditure is 2208 (1380 x 1.6) calories per day. (Her AEE would be 828: this is derived by subtracting REE (1380) from TEE (2208).) This means that Jane needs to consume 2208 calories per day to maintain her current body weight if she continues to be moderately active. If she wanted to lose weight, she could decrease her calories, increase her activity, or do a combination of the two. As mentioned earlier, for more accuracy, REE can be measured by a simple physiologic test. The athlete comes into the office in the morning before eating and lies on a table for ten to twenty minutes while breathing into a small device that looks like a scuba snorkel. The device measures oxygen uptake, which is translated into calories

Table 2: Modified Activity Factors (AF) for Different Levels of Activity

Activity Level

Activity Factor Male

Resting Sedentary Light Moderate Very Active Extremely Active 24

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1.0 1.3 1.6 1.7 2.1 2.4 January/February 2005

Female 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.9 2.2

Table 1: Resting Energy Expenditure (REE) Formulas for Estimating Calories Needs

Formula 1 Males: REE calories = 11 x wt in pounds Females: REE calories = 10 x wt in pounds

Formula 2 Males: REE calories = 66.47 + 13.75(wt in kg) + 5(ht in cm) - 6.76(age) Females: REE calories = 665.1 + 9.65(wt in kg) + 1.84(ht in cm) - 4.68(age) Key: wt = weight, ht = height, kg = kilograms (pounds/2.2); cm = centimeters (inches x 2.54); age = age in years

burned. These test results, combined with a consultation from a Registered Dietitian trained in sports nutrition, will improve an athlete’s training program by providing specific information on how many calories they need per day to reach their goals. A Registered Dietitian can also perform a computerized diet analysis, assess eating habits and patterns, and provide specific education to help an athlete reach their “off-season” and “in-season” goals. The off-season is crucial to a quality training program because it allows the athlete time to reflect on their previous season and performances, gives time to strengthen their weaknesses, and is useful for repairing overused muscles. It is also the best time to incorporate any new dietary changes and to focus on developing a complete nutrition program. This off-season seek the guidance of a Registered Dietitian to design a personalized nutrition plan to maximize your recovery period and lead to a stronger and faster racing season! Colleen Cooke, MS, RD is the Sports Dietitian at the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine and an avid endurance athlete with 13 marathons and three Ironman race finishes. She can be reached at nutrition@bch.org.


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Boston Marathon Mania by Jeff Recker

I

Photo by Victor Sailor / www.PhotoRun.net

can’t imagine trying to explain this race to anyone other than a runner. Although that’s exactly what I tried to do this morning while ordering my favorite sin; a Mocha Frappuccino – hold the whip please. Having noticed my shirt with the Boston insignia over my heart, a Starbucks employee asked innocently enough, “now how long is that marathon?” If it’s pre-Mocha, I’m not responsible for what slips from my mouth. “Forty-eight miles,” I told her. “Nearly won it – again.” From now on that’s my canned response to anyone who has to ask. All of you know why.

The funny thing, explaining Boston to veteran runners can be just as frustrating. Some things really need to be experienced. After all, what can I write about Boston that hasn’t already been written? So, it’s with this in mind that I precariously strike the keyboard and hope the words I choose don’t fall from purpose the way petals fall from a rose. Boston, of course, is that rose. Boston is the one thing that when faced with you marvel at its significance. It’s the Mecca of running, and if you need proof, I welcome you stand on its starting line and witness the runners who have journeyed from every corner of the world to gather in this tiny, unassuming town of Hopkington. The din of foreign languages buzzes the air. Singlets are chosen with obvious prejudice; the names of respective cities, running clubs, or persons printed, scribbled, and pinned on them. Of course, as culturally diverse as this gathering is, we’re more similar than not and we all understand the word Go. So then it begins. Well, not quite. The very, very low seeds set out. The rest of us stand in place and wait our turn to cross the starting line. A walk turns into a shuffle, then a jog, a walk again, a shuffle once more. You get 26

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January/February 2005

the picture. It’s in these moments that any thoughts of PR’s are surrendered. Fortunately, few panic. There’s an uneasy understanding that one missed step might result in being scraped off the asphalt some eighteen thousand runners later. I’ll spare you the mile-by-mile details. That would no more describe a rose than by telling you its red. After all, the Boston Marathon is bigger than any one individual. It’s about collectiveness and tradition. It’s about a love affair the Boston citizens have with this race. It’s about the million spectators that line the course from start to finish screaming, taunting, wishing, and pleading for you to finish. It’s about the children that hand out high-fives and orange slices, and knowing that a few of these kids will one day lay claim to this course and beat you at your own aging game. It’s about a starting line scratched in the dirt in 1897 and the symbol of the Boston Athletic Club – the Unicorn. It’s about the legacy of Johnny Kelley, Clarence DeMar, Tarzan Brown and his jump into Lake Cochituate to cool off in the middle of the race (he eventually won), and the greatness of Joannie and Boston Billy. It’s about great battles: Jock Semple pushing Kathy Switzer, “get off my course!” and Alberto Salazar vs. Dick Beardsley in the greatest dual ever. It’s about an imposter, Rosie Ruiz, and her one-mile run to fame. When asked if she did intervals to prepare for Boston, she replied “What’s an interval?” It’s about an entire city falling in love with a bright-eyed smiling East German named Uta Pippig as she waved and blew kisses on her way to three victories. It’s about the dominance of the Kenyans, the pasta, the North End, the Mylar blankets and the volunteers. It’s about dashing off the course at mile twenty-two to find a portajohn and having to explain to a cop waiting in line why it’s very important that he lets you cut in front of him. Oh, but I promised not to tell you about my experience. It’s about the traditional starting-line photo, the tunnel-of-noise at the all-women’s Wellesley College, a tradition since year one. It’s about Heartbreak Hill and the mad dash down Boylston Street to the finish line, and of course, it’s about the laurel wreath.


Motivation...

Talking Your Way To Success by Gary Barber

When he stepped into the ring, everyone knew that Muhammed Ali, arguably the greatest boxer ever, had arrived. Taunting his opponents, verbally sparring with the crowd, teasing the television cameras with promises of a quick knockout, Ali exuded a huge sense of presence in this sporting arena. He was an ebullient mix of cockerel and tiger, strutting and snarling on the stage. What was often interpreted as sporting hubris was also the action of a supremely confident athlete declaring to the world his heightened state of preparation and competition readiness. Muhammed Ali believed he was the master of his opponents, the master of the ring; although his verbal sophistry sometimes bordered on the eloquent, it was clearly designed to intimidate. He used his words to unsettle his rivals, “I’m so bad I make medicine sick!” and put them on edge “I’m going to float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” Ali recognized that bold statements, whether they are brash and extroverted, or almost subliminal, have powerful ways of enhancing performance. Sports psychology has labeled this phenomenon self-talk (also known as affirmation statements). Self-talk research studies have shown that athletes using such statements stay focused on the challenge and do not give a thought to past mistakes. They have been used to help athlete’s technical proficiency. Runners evaluate their form in the race, if feeling tense, or they are over-striding, they might employ statements that concentrate on relaxation. The key is to give oneself specific instructions, such as, “For the next mile I am going to concentrate on bringing my breathing under control. I am going to have relaxed, easy flowing strides.” These strategies can also be used to help the athlete feel confident with their tactical choices. Doubts can quickly have a corrosive effect on the athlete’s confidence. Self-talk can help remind the runner of the tactical plan they have developed and reinforce the athlete’s perception that things are

EISENHOWER MARATHON Half-Marathon, Team Relay, 10K, 5K

APRIL 2, 2005

going well. While the crowds that support runners are often a welcome boost, sometimes the accompanying surge in adrenaline pushes the athlete into a pace that they are not able to sustain. Mental discipline to avoid this urge can be achieved through self-talk statements. Calming statements, focusing on effort control, pace distribution and relaxation can help a runner through such situations. Self-talk statements can also help in the emotional control of the performance. Things don’t always go to plan. When the runner that you have wanted to beat pulls away from you – yet again – it can send a range of emotions charging through your mind. Should I give up? What’s the point? I am curious to know of the thoughts of Brazilian athlete Vanderlei de Lima as he was leading the Athens Olympic Games marathon race. You will recall that in the latter stages of the race, with a 40 second lead, he was pushed off the road and into the crowd. Credit to this athlete that he picked himself up and tried to regain his concentration. I can only speculate that he used selftalk statements to help him through this situation. His third place finish was testament to impressive resilience and inner strength. Two sports psychologists, Mallett and Hanrahn (1997) reported that self-talk statements significantly improved the performance of sprinters. They found that these athletes were better able to execute their skill and exert more emotional control when they talked themselves through their race before it started. When the self-talk has a motivational component it enhances confidence, helps the athlete to monitor their effort input (i.e. preventing the “too fast, too soon” syndrome that plagues neophyte marathon runners) and helps to create positive moods. But does this really help? Well research is increasingly showing that it does, what is equally evident is that no amount of negative thinking has ever been proven to improve performance. As Muhammed Ali would put it, “I figured that if I said it enough, I would convince the world that I really was great.”

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Race Reports...

Rocky Mountain Festival For Runners A Hit!

Take advantage of a subscription special on Colorado’s only running magazine!

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Now through February 15th with this coupon!

One Thousand Runners Gather In Durango For Races

Rocky Mountain Festival For Runners Marathon, Half Marathon, 50K, 25K, 10K, 5K Durango, CO October 9 and 10, 2004 Finishers: Marathon - 218, 1/2 Marathon - 219, 10K - 94, 50K Trail - 44, 25K Trail - 104 Full results at www.coloradorunnermag.com

D For just $12 a year, you’ll have your copy of Colorado Runner delivered to your door. The regular subscription price is $15. Each issue is filled with information on your favorite activity. Read about the people, the training, and the races that make running in Colorado unique. It’s easy to start your subscription. Just fill out the form below.

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Name Street Address City, State and Zip Code Phone # and Email

Mail check to Colorado Runner 28 Tecoma Circle Littleton, CO 80127

urango’s Rocky Mountain Festival for Runners is a jam-packed weekend full of running with an event for everyone. This year on Saturday, runners could take part in the Telegraph Trail 50K and the Horse Gulch Trail 25K. There was also a pasta dinner with a health and fitness expo and a kids 1K fun run. On Sunday, the Durango Marathon was held, along with the San Juan Mountains Half Marathon, the Mesa to Main 10K and the Healthy Lifestyle Coalition 5K. The weekend was topped off with a post race block party. Are you tired yet? The third annual festival attracted runners from 29 states and benefited from the last minute cancellation of the Denver Marathon. “We still had registration open Sunday morning for the runners who drove all night from Denver,” said race director Matt Kelly. With the changing colors of the leaves and perfect weather, many runners said racing in Durango was heaven. In the marathon, Clay Marathon Results: Male Overall 1. Clay Moseley 2:52:20 2. Richard Paradis 3:04:04 3. Ken Flint 3:05:37 Female Overall 1. Lisa Loughran 3:27:44 2. Lilia Abaibourova 3:39:13 3. Anette Mullikin 3:42:47 Male 25 and Under 1. Mark Wilcox 3:41:11 2. Brent Fleming 3:44:15 3. Craig Baker 3:44:15 Female 25 and Under 1. Brittany Johnson 3:54:44 2. Aimee Bodily 3:57:22 3. Kim Hendrix 3:59:32 Male 26-39 1. Michael Miller 3:11:08 2. Chad Thompson 3:12:11 3. Jarrod Clark 3:22:41 Female 26-39 1. Christy Burns 3:43:20 2. Angela Sorrentino 3:55:55 3. Marie Rolfing 4:03:24 Male 40-49 1. Dan Kerns 3:05:56 2. Rodney Scharberg 3:28:20 3. Lee Hurwit 3:52:59 Female 40-49 1. Christine Baade 3:48:07 2. Maxine Begay 3:56:04 3. Dianna Sulser 3:57:42 Male 50-59 1. Herb Tanzer 3:16:48

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2. Jeff Kremer 3:35:11 3. Michael Heitz 3:42:45 Female 50-59 1. Melinda Bobell 4:11:42 2. Ruth Ripley 4:43:48 3. Carolyn Fields 4:57:22 Male 60 and over 1. John Wallace 3:43:17 2. Runn Hedrick 4:17:22 3. Glen Walker 4:35:20 Female 60 and Over 1. Corinne WIllison 5:45:25

1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1.

1/2 Marathon Results: Male Overall Paul South 1:15:25 Sampson Sage 1:18:22 John Sillery 1:19:34 Female Overall Sheena Oyler 1:33:31 Lisa Rainsburger 1:35:16 Heather Lutz 1:35:22 Male 25 and Under Lavar Curley 1:28:56 Brian Olmsted 1:34:15 John Grisham 1:37:16 Female 25 and Under Kendra Christiansen 1:48:41 Lera Main 1:55:29 Catherine Cooper 2:06:23 Male 26-39 Amdrew Holton 1:24:57 Michael Aronson 1:30:15 Calvin Hadley 1:37:20 Female 26-39 Carrie Carlson 1:38:18

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Moseley of Los Alamos, New Mexico beat runner up Richard Paradis of Denver. Tuba City, Arizona’s Lisa Loughran was the first female finisher over Denver’s Lilia Abaidbourova. Jack Speer of Alburquerque was the only wheelchair contestant. He finished in two hours and forty minutes. In the half marathon, Paul South of Superior finished in one hour, fifteen minutes to win the race by three minutes. Durango’s Sheena Oyler won the women’s race in 1:33:31. Scott Laidlaw of El Prado, 28, won the 50K trail run in four hours, 42 minutes and Sarah Evans of Alta, Utah finished fourth overall and as the first woman in four hours, 50 minutes. In the 25K, Eric Walecki of Durango edged out John Stroud of Carbondale by one minute. Carrie McCalvin, 40, of Phoenix finished seventh overall and first woman in 2:11:08. Several runners doubled by taking advantage of back-to-back racing days. Everyone who completed the 25K Saturday and the half marathon Sunday or the 50K Saturday and the full marathon Sunday received a special award. Marathoners were treated to a fast, runner friendly course. After beginning with a loop around the Fort Lewis College campus, it was nothing but downhill around the golf course and a descent on Goeglein Gulch. With Main Avenue blocked off and plenty of crowd support, runners proceeded on the north end of the river trail to 32nd street and East Animas. After the turn-around point on East Animas, the course was again slightly downhill all the way to a downtown finish. 2. Kori Gouge 1:45:27 3. Suzi Goudzwaard 1:45:51 Male 40-49 1. Richard Garn 1:34:46 2. Jim Casey 1:35:19 3. Jim Newton 1:36:43 Female 40-49 1. Terryl Leroux 1:37:40 2. Molly Gibb 1:55:31 3. Julie Yarsa 1:57:16 Male 50-59 1. Mike Beagles 1:41:43 2. Bart Carrig 1:48:46 3. Bob Hawley 1:51:08 Female 50-59 1. Carolyn Erdman 1:50:48 2. Kate Sweeney 2:09:23 3. Octavia Hays 2:11:16 Male 60 and over 1. Keith Paris 1:39:40 2. Leo Lloyd 2:14:29 3. Joe Tassone 2:26:27 Female 60 and Over 1. Margaret Speer 2:51:37 2. Maryj Hall 2:54:19 3. Margaret Gard 3:43:48

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1.

10K Results: Male Overall Michael Whitson Don Bartrip Richard Blegel Randy Sauer Daryl Bryant Female Overall Molly Marquez

January/February 2005

30:00 43:08 47:53 48:42 48:45 46:52

2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Miranda Jones Kayla Garling Yodit Gidey Melissa Trahan

48:52 49:08 50:05 50:05

Horse Gulch Trail 25K Male Overall Eric Walecki 1:58:31 John Stroud 1:59:30 Scott Simmons 2:06:49 Steve Mahieu 2:07:10 Richard Garn 2:10:09 Female Overall Carrie McCalvin 2:11:08 M. Voss-Patterson 2:16:36 Julie Ramsden 2:19:18 Nancy Dolan 2:20:47 Sherry Kae Mahieu 2:26:55 Telegraph Trail 50K Male Overall Scott Laidlaw 4:42:14 Todd Purves 4:48:54 Charles Corfield 4:49:05 Jeffrey Smith 5:01:50 Douglas Beach 5:01:57 Female Overall Sarah Evans 4:50:06 Steph Schwartz 4:59:31 Audra Duke 5:23:16 Paula Bowman 5:34:22 Jamie Justice 5:45:35


Littleton Adventist Hospital TTTS Race for Hope Promotes Awareness of Syndrome Killing 5,000 Babies A Year Male Overall 1. Mark Warmby 2. Scott Poston 3. Steve Pye

15:14 17:34 17:42

Female Overall 1. Colleen Stroud 2. Jocelyn Petrella 3. Kristin Johansen

18:04 18:53 18:55

Male 12 and Under 1. Matthew Fritschen 31:14 Female 12 and Under 1. Casey Clearwater 26:34 2. Allyson Paige 32:30 3. Paige Maney 32:42

Race founders Lonnie and Michelle Somers hold their miracle babies, Ashley and Aspen, while posing for a post-race picture with Dr. Quintero TTTS Race for Hope Washington Park, Denver, CO November 14, 2004 223 Finishers Full results at www.coloradorunnermag.com

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hat does a Naked Juice chugging contest, twin girls and an elite field of athletes all have in common? They were all part of the Littleton Adventist Hospital TTTS Race for Hope 5K Run and Walk on Sunday, November 14 at Washington Park. Mark Warmby of Colorado Springs won the overall male title by finishing in a blistering time of 15:14, beating second place finisher Scott Poston, from Littleton, by two minutes, 20 seconds. Third place went to Steve Pye of Highlands Ranch in a time of 17:42. The women fought it out with the top three overall all finishing under 19 minutes. Denver’s Colleen Stround won in 18:04. In a tight race for second place, Jocelyn Petrella of Denver just beat Kristin Johansen of Englewood by two seconds in a time of 18:53. The day offered more than running, with food, fun and family at the post event expo. Tom Terwilliger, Mr. America 1986, served as the event Emcee and Grand Marshal. Walkers and runners received duffle bags from Littleton Adventist Hospital. Family activities included face painting, a juice chugging contest, and balloon jumpers.

Refreshments were provided by Go Fast Sports, Panera Bread, The Olive Garden, Daz Bog Coffee Company, and Naked Juice. Also, participants were rewarded with a prize drawing offering more than $3,000 in prizes. “The event was a huge success,” said Lonnie Somers, event director and founder. “Our goal was to create a fun family atmosphere for participants to enjoy. I could not be more amazed at the wonderful turnout and success of this year’s event. I am truly humbled and look forward to next year when we are not just in Denver, but cities around the country.” TTTS is a potentially life-threatening condition in pregnancy that exists when blood passes disproportionately between babies with a shared placenta. TTTS can strike at any time in a pregnancy with multiples that share a placenta.  There are no guarantees with any available treatment but no treatment is almost always a guarantee of loss.  Statistics indicate that over 5,000 of 8,500 unborn babies affected by TTTS are lost each year; on average that’s 15 babies a day.  The TTTS Race for Hope was organized by a local family to generate awareness about TTTS, to offer hope to those affected by it and to raise funds for those researching and treating it. Somers’ twin girls, Ashley and Aspen were affected by TTTS. The event raised between $15,000 to $20,000.

Male 13-19 1. Jordan Levandowski 2. Daniel Bailey 3. Bradley Manley

18:49 19:32 22:08

Female 13-19 1. Samanatha Metsger 2. Jill Walker 3. Anne Bellingrath

24:46 24:53 26:06

Male 20-29 1. William Gillaspie 2. Ryan Wess 3. Tim Moore

17:58 20:24 20:41

Female 20-29 1. Natalie Napier 2. Aili Fahlsing 3. Casey Perry

22:01 25:34 25:36

Male 30-39 1. Ed Steinhauser 2. Abe Sauer 3. Scott Kukel

17:49 17:53 18:46

Female 30-39 1. Michelle Sukle 2. Fernanda Bravo 3. Kristen Benson

23:22 23:24 24:04

Male 40-49 1. Dave Cleveland 2. Dave O’Sadnick 3. Jim Jackson

18:38 19:18 20:55

Female 40-49 1. Monica Ryan 2. Polly Aimmerman 3. Sally Munoz

22:06 23:51 24:25

Male 50-59 1. Michael McConnell 2. Brian Frank 3. Paul Thomas

21:02 21:04 21:07

Female 50-59 1. Peggy Muhn 2. Roxanne Ahlbrecht 3. Kathy Starostka

21:31 31:36 34:21

Male 60-69 1. Charles Engel 2. Victor Starostka

26:03 34:23

Female 60-69 1. Lola Ackerman 2. Chris Matchett

23:49 55:00

Male 70 and Over 1. Earl Turner 2. Len Mazzi 3. Dan Matchett

44:42 45:39 55:02

Female 70 and Over 1. Maggie Radcliffe 36:16 2. Nancy Eldridge 42:24

January/February 2005

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Race Reports...

Photo by Brock Quimby / Boulder Running Company

Panicking Poultry Attracts Top Runners Panicking Poultry 5K November 14, 2004 Boulder, CO Finishers: Run - 275, Walk - 80 Full results at www.coloradorunnermag.com On Sunday, November 14, the third annual Panicking Poultry 5K Run and Walk benefiting the National Multiple Sclerosis Society Colorado Chapter gave participants and spectators something to remember and be exceptionally proud of. “When I arrived at the gates to the reservoir that morning it was snowing considerably, and I was concerned for everyone involved,” said race director Brock Quimby. “However as the morning progressed and the weather cleared, the turnout was amazing!” “Amazing” was an understatement as more than 350 participants lined up for the out and back course. The unpredictable Colorado weather cleared for the race start. There was an eclectic mix of participants from elite walkers and runners to casual participants. Quimby awarded the top three finishers in each age group with handmade medallions 30

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for both runners and walkers. “I’ve been to far too many races where walkers are not equally appreciated, and I absolutely believe that they are equally important to the success of any race, and I will always recognize their accomplishments equally,” Quimby said. Alan Sirhal, a three-year participant and Denver Sheriff said, “This event is old school in that everyone hangs out afterwards and shares a common sense of community. The awards are awesome, the food is awesome, and the raffle prizes are overwhelming.” With unconditional help from the Boulder Running Company and its’ expert staff, the race awards are employee made, and the event generates approximately $15,000 in raffle prizes. With the generosity of sponsoring companies such as Nike, Seagate Technologies, Ryder’s eyewear, Carrabba’s Italian Grill, Foothills Event Management, and the Boulder Running Co., this event will be on Colorado radar for years to come! “We work extremely hard and cut no corners because we want to continue to grow this event into one of Colorado’s premier events,” says co-race director Lance Jaeger. “The participation we’ve had, the growth, and the involvement in

January/February 2005

sponsoring companies has been humbling, and we want to give back to those companies by supporting them year round!” 5K Results: Male Overall 1. Mike Callor 16:47 2. Greg Weich 17:33 3. Brian Glotzbach 17:55 Female Overall 1. Katie Blackett 18:26 2. Colleen De Reuck 18:27 3. Sara Callor 20:00 Male 14 and Under 1. Curtis Halley 22:54 2. Manuel Steinbach 27:30 3. Kingston Wagner 27:38 Female 14 and Under 1. Kelly King 20:09 2. Lindsay Warner 20:46 3. Rachel Baum 21:24 Male 15-19 1. Zach McCabe 18:48 2. Jeff Plumer 19:02 3. Mike Campbell 21:09 Female 15-19 1. Heather Meacham 23:20 2. Ashley 23:20 3. Monica Salazar 23:42 Male 20-29 1. Mike Callor 16:47 2. Brian Glotzbach 17:55 3. Antonio Molina 18:07 Female 20-29 1. Katie Blackett 18:26 2. Sara Callor 20:00 3. Brooke Lissy 21:26 Male 30-39 1. Greg Weich 17:33 2. Jason Stueve 18:15 3. Darren De Reuck 18:17

Female 30-39 1. Katie Fether 20:48 2. Terra Scott 24:48 3. Carrie Wagner 24:49 Male 40-49 1. Ned Otey 19:46 2. Mark Stevens 22:08 3. David Bachrach 22:09 Female 40-49 1. Colleen De Reuck 18:27 2. Lorie Moreno-Roch 20:23 3. Kris Warner 23:14 Male 50-59 1. Rich Sandoval 19:50 2. Jesse Tijerina 21:28 3. Hudson Philips 22:57 Female 50-59 1. Rima Lurie 23:10 2. Susan Hering 24:32 3. Gail Moore 24:40 Male 60 and Over 1. Richard Hiegert 27:07 2. Howard Demuth 41:10 Female 60 and Over 1. Connie Ahrnsbrak 25:19 2. Carole Hiegert 33:26 3. Sue Sherman 43:16 5K Walk Results: Male Overall 1. Dan Pierce 2. Paul Klammer 3. Jeff Andre Female Overall 1. Marianne Martino 2. Sherrie Gossert 3. Bardb Amador

27:37 35:55 38:42 30:06 31:21 31:38


700 Runners & Walkers at New Highlands Ranch Turkey Trot Turkey Day 5K November 25, 2004 Highlands Ranch, CO Finishers: Run - 529, Walk - 173 Full results at www.coloradorunnermag.com

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hen the Highlands Ranch Chamber of Commerce decided to host a Thanksgiving Day race, the organizers planned for 200 runners at their inaugural event. However, with sunshine and early morning temperatures in the 40s, the race day registration line was 50 meters long. All in all, there were 700 runners and walkers in the 5K race and a handful more in the kids fun run. No one could have predicted the success of the metro area’s newest Thanksgiving Day Race.

Photos by Allen Griffiths / Colorado Runner

Keith Johnson, 43, won the race in 17 minutes flat, an average of 5:29 pace over the 5K course. Just two seconds behind, Josh Tate, 21, finished second. Thirteen-year-old Kait Vanatta won the women’s race in 20:12 with master’s runner Tania Pacev close behind in 20:55. Colorado Runner Magazine’s best dog, Lucy, was the first four-legged runner through the finisher’s chute in a personal best of 19:24. The course took runners through the western side of Highlands Ranch, making sure to avoid all of the steep hills. Runners finished on the field in Shea Stadium at Redstone Park. Finishers were awarded with goodie bags full of treats, sample products and t-shirts. Post-race beer was provided by Big Horn Brewing Company.

5K Results: Male Overall 1. Keith Johnson 17:00 2. Josh Tate 17:02 3. Nicholas Campbell 17:50 Female Overall 1. Kait Vanatta 20:12 2. Tania Pacev 20:55 3. Lindsey Wilbur 21:48 Male 15 and Under 1. John Reynolds 2. Joe Kappes 3. Nick Taylor Female 15 and Under 1. Madison Neher 23:43 2. Kara Pellowe 25:42 3. Lauren Seyfarth 26:14 Male 16-19 1. James Heelan 19:00 2. Riley Joyce 19:48 3. Brad Titley 21:24

Female 16-19 1. Tara Borman 2. Staci McCabe 3. Casey Superchi Male 20-29 1. Jonathan Titley 2. Michael Dennis 3. David Place Female 20-29 1. Amita Chugh 2. Megan Buczek 3. Lauren Rapacki Male 30-39 1. Patrick Rutty 2. Phillip Buckley 3. Gary Holt Female 30-39 1. Kimberly Stewart 2. Amy Mclean 3. C. Brazdziunas Male 40-49

25:20 25:21 26:48 17:51 18:36 19:15 22:23 24:42 25:32 17:55 18:08 18:13 22:31 22:35 22:37

1. Tim Gentry 2. Mike Valentine 3. Dave O’Sadnick Female 40-49 1. Mary Spear 2. Dezi Kappes 3. D. Vanderhoeven Male 50-59 1. Edward King 2. Gary Lindauer 3. Bruce Turner Female 50-59 1. Sue Lindauer 2. Janet Hagen 3. Sylvia Strubel Male 60-69 1. Ross Westley 2. John Jacobs 3. Robert Fancher Female 60-69 1. Helen Geoffrion

18:22 19:18 19:34 23:05 23:09 23:24 23:00 24:05 25:01 27:27 28:30 30:03

2. Bonnie Driste 35:26 3. Jan Spain 46:35 Male 70 and Over 1. Len Mazzi 45:54 5K Walk Results: Male Overall 1. Don Murphy 2. Ted Hartl 3. Kevin Turner Female Overall 1. Emily Holcomb 2. Laura Lane 3. Kathryn Judge

42:36 43:02 44:34 41:00 42:15 42:25

23:46 27:14 27:26 34:21

Durango Turkey Trot Feeds Scholarship Program Durango Turkey Trot 5M November 25, 2004 Durango, CO 150 Finishers Full results at www.coloradorunnermag.com by Aaron Unterreiner Courtesy of the Durango Herald On a beautiful and sunny Thanksgiving morning at the Fort Lewis College campus, there was a taste of something familiar and not so familiar to placate the palates of the competitors in the Turkey Trot. The familiar: Tad Elliott and Steve Flint finished 1-2 in the 5 mile run. The not so familiar: Brent Brown lying on his back and gobbling like a turkey on center stage during the awards ceremony. “I did the whole dead turkey thing: lie on my back and wiggle,” Brown said, “like a turkey with his head cut off.” Brown, who finished 14th in 34:02, joined Phil Wharton (fifth, 30:07) and Mike Freeburn (seventh, 32:17) as the pumpkin pie winners in the postrace gobble-off contest hosted by race organizer James Nichols. “This race is all about having fun,” Nichols said. “And there was a good turnout. Now people can feel good about pounding food.” On the women’s side, Sheena Oyler was the first female at 32:40, and ninth overall. Melissa

Bouren was second at 35:18. Heidi Flint finished third in 35:47. The 5-mile course, part road and part trail, was especially tricky off road. “It was a challenging run,” said Brown, whose son Rogan, age 12, finished 25th. Cully Brown, 8, competed in the 1-mile fun run. “The trails were muddy, but it was awesome.” “The mud was great,” Nichols joked. “Every time I mentioned the trail to the runners they would all boo. But the last three years we’ve just had great weather.” Thursday was no exception. All of the proceeds - between $1,200 and $1,300 - were donated to the Durango Motorless Transit Scholarship Fund. Four years old, the fund has accumulated more than $10,000 in scholarship money in an attempt to keep local runners running at Fort Lewis. DMT plans on issuing its first scholarship next year. “This is the best race of the year,” Nichols said. “There’s hardly any expenses, and all the profits go to a good cause.” Male Overall 1. Tad Elliott 2. Steve Flint 3. Jim Flint 4. Sampson Sage 5. Phil Wharton 6. Darrell ROberts 7. Mike Freeburn 8. Gerry Geraghty 9. Stuart Gregori 10. Roy Rohan

January/February 2005

28:15 28:48 29:29 29:56 30:07 31:22 32:17 32:34 32:54 32:58

Female Overall 1. Sheena Oyler 2. Melssa Bouren 3. Heidi Flint 4. Ellen Stickler 5. Stephanie Anderson 6. Terryl Leroux 7. Maggie Casey 8. Gary Gianniny 9. Katie McLean 10. Jeanne Pastore

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32:40 35:18 35:47 37:15 37:20 37:47 38:27 39:19 39:23 39:57

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Race Reports...

Rim Rock Run XII

Photo by Jeff Recker / Colorado Runner

A View From the Bench

Bernie Boettcher wins his second straight Rim Rock Run. Rim Rock Run Grand Junction, CO November 13, 2004 246 Finishers Full Results at www.coloradorunnermag.com By Jeff Recker

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hen the red, slick cliffs are struck by the morning sun they appear as walls of flame, shooting a thousand feet in the air. This is the Colorado National Monument, a 23 mile-long gem, a mosaic of color and contour, which rises boldly on the southern boundary of Grand Junction. Standing at its base the sight is awe-inspiring, intimidating, and in a funny sort of way, inviting. For locals it’s a year round playground, a sandbox, and a well known friend that never lacks for attention. It’s also host to the Rim Rock Run, having emerged as one of Colorado’s finest races. 32

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I’m sitting on a giant red boulder in the warmth of the morning sun watching ranks of clouds pass brimming with a soft glow on their bellies. I’m surrounded by a sea of blue sage, grotesquely twisted juniper trees, freakish rock outcroppings, and the din of three hundred runners readying themselves for the impending race. It’s a lot of runners for an event on the western slope, but a gathering nonetheless that is no match for the grandeur, the vastness, of this place. We’re simply swallowed up by the scale of our surroundings. I feel lost in it. So open is this high desert I can see the monument’s entire length, where it falls away like the end of the world, dropping into the plains of Fruita where the race finishes. It looks impossibly far away but a distance that the better runners of this group will arrive at just a little more than two hours from now. Wish I’d been one of them, but injuries have sidelined both me and my better half. Instead

January/February 2005

we’re playing hosts, just two of many volunteers required to stage a race of this magnitude. Others are up on the monument at various aid stations, likely shaking off the chill of the morning air, and feeling lucky that the forecasted rain seems nowhere in sight. It’s an opportunity to witness this race from the sidelines, not a bad thing by any means. A race like this is a coming together of a community for a common good. In this case, all the proceeds benefit the women’s cross country team at Mesa State College. Being on the race committee I’m delighted to see the patchwork of plans meld together. I’m also delighted to see so many new faces as I watch the runners stride out in front of the starting line. The fine reputation of this race continues to grow. It was also added as the final race in Colorado Runner Magazine’s point series; two reasons that I might be witnessing the best field in the race’s history, particularly on the women’s side. Leanne Whitesides is back, a two time winner of this event. Last year’s defending champion is back, Lisa Goldsmith. Here too are Patty Rogers, Heather Hunt, and so many more of Colorado’s more accomplished runners. There’s going to be fireworks up there today, I tell a friend. The men’s side is highlighted by last year’s winner, Bernie Boettcher. He’s no stranger to victory these days and rides a seven race winning streak, which includes Imogene Pass and The Other Half, in Moab, Utah. Though the field includes some young guns from Western State College and I’m aware he’ll have his work cut out for him. The race gets underway and the runners begin their journey up the serpentine road into the monument, slowly disappearing into the panorama of light and space and time. There are few things as beautiful as the start of a race; this race in particular. Though in an instant the excitement, the movement, and thunder of six hundred feet is replaced with silence. It’s an eerie feeling to be left behind at the start of a race. Katie Hill, the Race Director, watches the runners disappear too. She looks relieved, hands in pocket, unassuming and austere. She’s the proud, adoptive parent of this race; her kid in its twelfth year. “Let’s go see who wins,” she says breaking into a warm smile, motioning to meet her at the finish. I’m with ya, Katie. Let’s drive. The finish line has a similar feeling of solitude and emptiness, much like the start did just minutes after the race began. In a sense I’m reliving the start, but in reverse – the silence coming in advance of the action. Then I go live on the PA system, my job for the morning to announce the finishers as they cross the line. But there’s time to kill, and to the desperate pleads of many to stop, I launch into the only song I know word for word, Born to Run. Go figure. My apologies go out to Springsteen fans, and anyone with a good voice, a bad hangover, or just good taste. Haven’t you ever wondered what goes on at the finish line


while you’re racing? After a polite applause and the promise that I will never do that again – at least for the next hour or so – I’m able to give a race update. A pack of five male runners led the charge up the four mile climb onto the flats of the monument. Shortly thereafter, Rich Tveden, 23, from Gunnison, a Western State runner, opens up a commanding lead that at one point stretches for nearly a half a mile. Behind him defending champion, and nineteen years his senior, Bernie Boettcher, runs for second. In the women’s race, Grand Junction’s Leanne Whitesides is unaware of the strong women’s field giving chase. She’s running with her husband, Bryan, a first timer at this distance, and considers a shot at the course record. She’s taken it out hard. Scattered reports are radioed down and not much changes over the next hour. Still Rich, still Bernie, and a local from Mesa, Erik Packard, are leading the men’s race. Behind them Leanne continues her charge. I’ve still got a microphone in my hand and consider launching into another song, though I think better for fear of death by stoning. There are lots of rocks here and though I’m rather excited by the reports I’m getting which makes me want to break out and sing, most people, in all honesty, look somewhat bored and edgy. Finally, at the last aid station we get word that it’s still Rich in the lead. I doubt that anyone is going to catch him. In a highly embarrassing moment that follows, I prematurely annunciate: “Let’s bring him home, the new champion of Rim Rock Run, Rich….” And then I see Bernie, wearing number one, charging toward the line. Rich is nowhere in sight. Two miles up, Bernie had brought him back and passed him. “I thought I was running for second place today,” he later commented, after winning

in 2:18:47. Bernie is a Photo by Jeff Recker / Colorado Runner brilliant downhill runner and proved it today. The two would later exchange congratulations over a battle hard fought. Respect is sincere and lasting. Then the story quickly changed to the ladies. Leanne Whitesides ran to victory with her husband in tow. Can you imagine – twenty two and a half miles of all out racing, stride for stride with the one you loved at mile one? Bryan looked a bit broken when he crossed and complained that Leanne put the hurt on him in those final miles. Incredibly, they’re still happily married. Though, in Leanne Whitesides (with husband Bryan before the race) Bryan’s words, “Never, became the first three time winner. never, never again will I run that far.” We’ll see Rock Run, and exactly twice as many as last year. Bryan. This race has a way of pulling you back. Congratulations to all who ran this year. Though not a course record, Leanne’s time was It was a privilege to watch and wish. And to all 2:36:26, a solid performance that bested a solid the volunteers who worked the finish line with me, field, despite having a cold the week before. “Baby this town rips the bones from your back, Soon after, the class of women streamed it’s a death trap, a suicide rap, we’ve gotta get out in – Patty Rogers, followed by Lisa Goldsmith, and while we’re young, ‘cause tramps like us, baby we Heather Hunt, and Katie Mazzia, Laura Wheatley were born to run.” In other words, let’s get training and Kristi Jordan. In all, sixteen women crossed for next year’s race. the line in under three hours, a record for Rim

Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

Judy Beckenbach (L) of Denver and Gwen Martinez of Colorado Springs.

Male Results: Overall 1. Bernie Boettcher 2. Rich Tveden 3. Erik Packard 19 and Under 1. Devon Sigler 2. Luke Pennington 3. Garrett Brady 20-24 1. Rich Tveden 2. Ben Frederiksen 3. William Lowder 25-29 1. Kevin Koch 2. Matthew Clay 3. Derek Griffiths 30-34 1. Scott Drum 2. Thomas Popadich 3. Lonnie Pilkington 35-39 1. Erik Packard 2. Antonio Holguin 3. Bryan Whitesides 40-44 1. Bernie Boettcher 2. Henk Moorlag 3. Roger Cain 45-49 1. Eric Binder 2. Raymond Blum 3. Bryan Baroffio 50-54 1. Kurt Dallow 2. Heath Hibbard 3. Mike Fightmaster 55-59 1. Mickey Lackey 2. Ed Green 3. Joe Stommel 60-64 1. Larry Avery 2. Dan Williams 3. Bill Faulkner 65-69 1. Carl Schwenk 2. Tom Alford 3. Richard Friedmann 70 and Over 1. Carl Tenpas

2:18:47 2:20:37 2:22:53 2:33:13 2:40:11 2:53:10 2:20:37 2:48:51 3:31:03 2:26:58 2:44:35 2:45:53 2:23:28 2:31:45 2:41:31 2:22:53 2:33:21 2:36:26 2:18:47 2:36:56 3:04:40 2:37:38 2:52:08 2:56:40 2:52:11 2:52:55 3:05:11 3:14:17 3:28:20 3:32:50 3:06:46 3:22:52 3:36:13

Female Results: Overall 1. Leanne Whitesides 2:36:26 2. Patty Rogers 2:39:12 3. Lisa Goldsmith 2:43:11 19 and Under 1. Shannon Filar 2:51:46 2. Gabriella Sterne 3:28:14 3. Prudence Daniels 4:02:18 20-24 1. Keri Nelson 2:53:43 2. L. Mueller-Patrick 4:19:22 25-29 1. Laura Wheatley 2:47:25 2. Andrea Culp 3:11:40 3. Brie Hyslop 3:25:11 30-34 1. Leanne Whitesides 2:36:26 2. Patty Rogers 2:39:12 3. Heather Hunt 2:44:23 35-39 1. Katie Mazzia 2:47:09 2. Jane Tunnadine 2:50:45 3. Gwen Martinez 2:57:05 40-44 1. Lisa Goldsmith 2:43:11 2. Kristi Jordan 2:48:45 3. Jill van Tiel 2:48:52 45-49 1. Tania Pacev 2:52:36 2. Jeanie Grooms 3:13:23 3. Priscilla Allen 3:24:42 50-54 1. Sandee Miller 3:24:06 2. Gail Leedy 3:25:20 3. K. Cavanaugh 3:56:43 55-59 1. Patricia Emigh 4:21:27 Francoise 2. 4:23:42 Carpenter 3. Pam Penfield 4:28:56 60-64 1. Sally Kennett 3:50:51

3:25:17 3:25:51 4:25:04 4:08:42

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State HS Cross Country Meet a.

b.

c.

e.

d.

f.

g.

h.

i.

a: A pack of runners nears the first mile in the 3A boys race. b: Steven Weeks of Arvada wins the 5A boys race. c: John McGuire of D’Evelyn clocks the fastest time of the day (15:05) to win the 4A race, making him a three time champion. d: Mohamud Ige of Denver South, John McGuire of D’Evelyn, and Glenn Randall of Palisade (front to back) lead the 4A race. e: Whitney Anderson of Summit dominates the 4A girls, winning by 90 seconds. f: Tim Hilt of The Classical Academy reflects on his win in 3A. g: Rachel Gioscia of Buena Vista defends her title in 3A. h: Molly Palmer of Coronado surprises the field in winning the 5A girls title. i: Ashlyn Rhule of Mountain View leads a pack of runners with one half mile to go in the girls 4A race. For full results and to purchase race photos, log onto www.coloradorunnermag.com. All photos by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner 34

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January/February 2005


Foot Locker Midwest Regional a.

c.

b.

f.

d.

Six Coloradans Qualify For Foot Locker National XC Meet

e.

a: Keara Sammons (232), Katelyn Kaltenback (1) and teammate Morgan Schultz (center) at the begining of the race. All three runners compete for Smoky Hill High School in Aurora. Katelyn finished fifth and Keara finished sixth, both qualifing for the national meet. Morgan finished a disapoiniting 33rd after qualifing last year. b: Madeline McKeever of Heritage High School finishes fourth (17:59), qualifing for the national meet in San Diego. c: Mahamud Ige of Denver South High School leads the seeded boys race at the Midwest Regional Foot Locker Meet. Ige finished third in 15:33. d: Whitney Anderson of Summit High School in Frisco leads the Foot Locker Midwest Regional XC Race. She finished second in 17:29. e: Kateyln Kaltenbach (L) and Keara Sammons (R) celebrate their finishes with Katelyn’s older sister Megan. f: Golden’s John McGuire of D’Evelyn High School outruns Glenn Randall of Palisade (long sleeve shirt) for the fianl qualifing spot. Both were timed in 15:42. Daniel Roberts of Michigan (4) finishes just in front of both runners. Other Colorado Runners Who Competed: Girls; 11. Molly Palmer (18:25), 37. Elsabeth Goshu (19:16), 41. Christy Severy (19:18), 47. Jessie Gulsvig (19:21), 56. Rachel Gioscia (19:30), 63. Kristen Johansen (19:41), 97. Emily Hanenburg (20:24), 151. Lisa Short (21: 13), 161. Oriana Beemer (21:20). Boys; 12. Yusaf Ahmed (15:51), 15. Noah Shannon (16:02), 61. Steven Weeks (16:34), 65. Cameron Carter (16:38), 77. Grant Duin (16:45), 78. Daniel Standke (16:46), 85. Andrew Mauk (16:50), 100. Paul Ringenberg (16:57), 102. Cheyne Heiny (16:58), 129. Derek Munoz (17:09), 130. Bryan Eicher (17:09), 136. Matt Williams (17:15), 146. Todd Griffith (17:19), 157 Chris Sweeney (17:25), 166. Michael Haas (17:29), 189. Tim Hilt (17:39), 199. Nathan Hatleback (17:45), 203. Trevor Ruwitch (17:47), 228. Zach Mares (18:15), 229. Cameron Clayton (18:15), 236. Sean Adams (18:21).

Results of the December 11th Foot Locker National Meet in San Diego can be found on page 6. For photos, please visit our website at www.coloradorunnermag.com. Full results at www.coloradorunnermag.com. All photos by Victor Sailor / www.PhotoRun.net January/February 2005

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NCAA XC Meets... a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

g.

h.

a: CU freshman Liza Pasciuto’s remarkable surge to 13th place was the key to Colorado’s victory. Photo by Mike Leary / www.DyeStat.com b: Brent Vaughn (L) and Bret Schoolmeester celebrate Colorado’s mens team title at the NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships. The victory marks just the fourth time in the history of the NCAA meet that one school swept the team titles. Photo by Kent Graham / www.DyeStat.com c: CU’s Christine Bolf (169) finished in 14th place, earning All-American Honors. Photo by Victor Sailor / www.PhotoRun.net d: Western State fans get ready for the NCAA Division II Cross Country Championships. Photo courtesy of Western State College e: Adams State’s Reid Ellis runs to 15th place finish at the NCAA Division II Cross Country Championships. Photo courtesy of Bill Somers f: Not to be outdone by the fans from Western State, these Adams State fans get ready for the action. Photo courtesy of Bill Somers g: The Adams State Women’s Team sets off on their way to another NCAA Championship. Photo courtesy of Bill Somers h: The Western State Men’s Team celebrates their NCAA Championship. Photo courtesy of Western State College Full results can be found at www.coloradorunnermag.com 36

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January/February 2005


Highline Canal 10M Run 5K Run/Walk Presented by Colorado Runner

Saturday, July 16, 2005 ~ 7:00 AM www.coloradorunnermag.com ~ Featured Races 720-570-3469 derek@coloradorunnermag.com


Race Results...

Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

6. Nicola Levosi 7. Ammilee Oliva 8. Amanda Garton 9. Leilani Buessnet 10. Diane Brown

Rusha Pearson rounds the turn for home at the 10K Run For The Environment Credit Union Harvest 5K October 10, 2004 Broomfield, CO Finishers: Run - 186, Walk - 53 Male Overall 1. Nick Cramer 16:46 2. Jeremy Thompson 16:47 3. Rick Bruess 17:53 4. Darin Hasley 18:02 5. Andrew Maxwell 18:40 6. Charles Schultz 18:46 7. Jordan Levandoski 19:24 8. Don Tubbs 19:40 9. Dan Valdez 20:09 10. Bruce Kirschner 20:23 Female Overall 1. Laura Bruess 20:45 2. Lindsay Hale 22:53 3. Mia Gaw 24:05 4. Rosanne Allen 24:15 5. Kelly McNutt 25:03 6. Kristin Kellogg 25:06 7. Taylor Paschall 25:08 8. Pat Henry 25:33 9. Anya Allen 25:36 10. Kristin Imo Male Overall Walk 1. Howard Tuttle 41:27

2. Max Howard 48:02 3. Dan Mazotti 48:06 Female Overall Walk 1. Donna Tuttle 41:25 2. Patrina Walker 41:37 3. Regina Defalco 41:56 Mayor’s Cup 10K/5K October 16, 2004 Colorado Springs, CO Finishers: 10K - 157, 5K - 257 Male Overall 10K 1. Jeffrey Prata 34:40 2. Jim Hallberg 35:29 3. Matthew Ringer 36:25 4. Gerald Romero 37:33 5. Anthony Surage 37:59 6. David Peacock 38:09 7. Steve Moon 38:11 8. Mark Riem 39:19 9. Ronald Dean 39:51 10. Mike Barnes 39:56 Female Overall 10K 1. Amy Regnier 40:15 2. Leighann Lawrentz 43:35 3. Sandie Hubbard 45:58 4. Vicki Meier 48:24 5. Dawn McArthur 48:34

49:13 49:31 49:41 49:55 50:03

Male Overall 5K 1. Mark Warmby 15:10 2. Levi Brathall 15:24 3. Greg Augspurger 15:31 Female Overall 5K 1. Amanda Occhi 18:44 2. Sarah Shepard 18:51 3. Tina Gray 18:54 Male 14 and under 1. Jeff Warren 21:26 2. Tucker Hamilton 22:01 3. Robert Stevens 22:22 Female 14 and Under 1. Terissa Angell 25:47 2. Tessa White 30:05 3. Ande Barry 34:45 Male 15-19 1. Tim Crennen 17:02 2. Dan Pinter 17:15 3. Jared Klajnbart 17:19 Female 15-19 1. Shannon Payne 19:07 2. Sarah Collie 21:53 3. Whitney Lund 22:41 Male 20-24 1. Levi Brathall 15:24 2. Adam Rich 15:39 3. Brad Winn 16:24 Female 20-24 1. Sarah Shepard 18:51 2. Tina Gray 18:54 3. Megan Lund 19:48 Male 25-29 1. Mark Warby 15:10 2. Greg Augspurger 15:31 3. Timothy Bollard 16:52 Female 25-29 1. Amanda Occhi 18:44 2. Laurel Lev 22:09 3. Kate Gilbert 22:36 Male 30-34 1. Jason Hodgson 15:33 2. Ray Cameron 18:45 3. Aaron Sever 19:02 Female 30-34 1. Kendra Schleiker 21:04 2. Celiann Gonzalez 22:00 3. Fran Lindau 23:03 Male 35-39 1. Rob Gilliam 17:56 2. Melvin Watson 18:13 3. Bennie Barnes 21:55 Female 35-39 1. Shelley Bailey 23:36 2. Susan Elkington 23:37 3. Cindy McQueen 27:11 Male 40-44 1. David Minter 17:22 2. Lile Budden 18:06 3. Ken Lefrancois 18:58 Female 40-44 1. Linda Staines 20:32 2. Rosalie Hodgson 24:58 3. Jo Anne Gonzalez 25:16 Male 45-49 1. Robert Yara 17:35 2. Steve Rischling 19:41 3. Danny Canini 19:47 Female 45-49 1. Eileen Wilfong 23:14 2. Laurie Yakish 26:53 3. Karen Barry 27:02 Male 50-54 1. David Berge 20:15 2. Goeffrey Ames 20:53 3. Craig Ewing 21:11 Female 50-54 1. Sharon Dieter 23:22 2. Deb Anderson 24:55

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3. Kathleen Letner 26:57 Male 55-59 1. Lynn Dougherty 20:19 2. George Greco 20:44 3. Bob Launsby 21:07 Female 55-59 1. Lorrie Werner 32:19 2. Cindi SMith 34:22 3. Alice Brill 36:25 Male 60-64 1. Grant Stephens 22:08 2. Jeff Smith 25:12 3. Dennis Normoyle 25:25 Female 60-64 1. Kathleen Goldsmith 34:31 2. Marilyn Munkres 38:16 3. Anne Ganley 49:51 Male 65-69 1. John Read 31:56 2. Louis Ravetti 47:06 Female 65-69 1. Darlene Leathers 38:40 Male 70 and Over 1. Neal Kinsinger 35:38 Female 70 and Over 1. Martha Kinsinger 29:41 Elevation Outfitters 10K Run For The Environment October 17, 2004 Denver, CO 317 Finishers Male Overall 1. Paul Digrappa 31:16 2. Ben Payne 31:26 3. Travis Daniels 34:37 Female Overall 1. Lynn Foutch 38:16 2. Jocelyn Petrella 39:18 3. Rusha Pearson 40:14 Male 19 and under 1. Austin Schwadeier 35:16 2. Ben Jones 43:19 3. Anthony Hoffman 1:08:49 Female 19 and Under 1. Meghan McKee 46:12 2. Kristin Kellogg 52:12 Male 20-29 1. Paul Digrappa 31:16 2. Ben Payne 31:26 3. Travis Daniels 34:37 Female 20-29 1. Jocelyn Petrella 39:18 2. Rusha Pearson 40:14 3. Becky Peebles 42:12 Male 30-39 1. Charles Bedford 34:52 2. Matthew Segur 35:28 3. Terre Jefferson 38:23 Female 30-39 1. Valerie Shockley 44:02 2. Kelly Burke 44:52 3. Joy Wobido 48:21 Male 40-49 1. Dan Nielsen 36:49 2. Kevin Bax 37:05 3. Rick Edrich 39:08 Female 40-49 1. Lynn Foutch 38:16 2. Karen Jones 44:23 3. Jana McKee 47:54 Male 50-59 1. Gary Erickson 44:47 2. Gary Lindauer 48:52 3. Blaine Rodgers 50:06 Female 50-59 1. Dann Kramer 51:43 2. Sue Lindauer 54:42 3. Jan Sharoff 55:45 Male 60 and Over 1. Ross Westley 46:59 2. Lew Babcock 1:05:05 3. Jan Hewell 1:05:56 Female 60 and Over

1. Pam Murdock

1:21:14

The Other Half Marathon October 23, 2004 Moab, UT 364 Finishers Male Overall 1. Bernie Boettcher 1:15:37 2. Erik Packard 1:16:34 3. Ross Olson 1:23:41 Female Overall 1. Shannon Scherer 1:27:00 2. Lisa Goldsmith 1:28:04 3. Michelle Kelley 1:30:14 Male 12-15 1. Toby Rogers 1:43:23 Female 12-15 1. A. Engebretsen 2:30:40 Male 16-19 1. Dallin Bailey 1:45:19 2. Tanner Bugger 1:47:00 3. Jacob Clark 1:47:32 Female 15-19 1. Jennifer Johnson 1:53:15 2. Allison Clement 1:55:07 3. Natalie Quinn 2:02:03 Male 20-29 1. Derek Cleaver 1:33:31 2. Paul Fisher 1:34:15 3. C. Muller-Landau 1:35:51 Female 20-29 1. Maria Paegle 1:32:57 2. Betty Mohler 1:42:35 3. Coleen Boddy 1:43:22 Male 30-39 1. Jose Garcia 1:23:47 2. Lance Dalleck 1:26:09 3. Chad Derum 1:26:30 Female 30-39 1. Kathaleen Recker 1:36:06 2. Beth Drees 1:41:52 3. Denna Loyola 1:42:48 Male 40-49 1. Greg Stucki 1:36:11 2. Harvery Miller 1:42:24 3. Greg Remmenga 1:44:08 Female 40-49 1. Jeanne Blatter 1:52:51 2. Michelle Brown 1:55:38 3. Nancy Gilmore 1:57:26 Male 50-59 1. Bradley Rich 1:41:01 2. Ralph Pettit 1:43:04 3. George Adams 1:45:10 Female 50-59 1. Barbara Hanan 2:11:51 2. Lynn Carpenter 2:16:53 3. Katherine Olsen 2:18:08 Male 60-69 1. Dan Pope 1:38:43 2. Gene Hofeling 1:51:42 3. Lynn Forsberg 1:55:18 Female 60-69 1. Kathy Migliaccio 2:41:09 Male 70 and Over 1. Carl Tenpas 2:15:32 Animas Mountain Mug Run 6.6 Miles October 23, 2004 Durango, CO 40 Finishers 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Male Overall David Hughes 47:41 Brett Sablett 49:25 Eric Pierson 50:37 Harry Niedl 51:40 Michael Aronson 53:11 Female Overall Jen Kowalski 59:48 Erin Hughes 1:02:33 Kelly Ryan 1:09:31 D. Van Winegarden 1:11:32

5. Sabina Kuss

Male Overall 1. Adam Rich 2. Greg Augspurger 3. Sam Shewan 4. Daniel Castaneda 5. Alex Nichols 6. Andy Rinne 7. Robert Waldelk 8. Tony Krupicka 9. Ben Landsman 10. Justin Quintana Female Overall 1. Ann Marie Schwabe 2. Amanda Occhi 3. Amy Regnier 4. Ashley Poland 5. Besha Deane 6. Jennifer Jorgensen 7. Angela Kremer 8. Jeanine Stewart 9. Allison Rowe 10. Christy Sweaney

38

coloradorunnermag.com

January/February 2005

16:04 16:25 16:37 16:45 17:04 17:23 17:26 17:30 17:31 17:35 18:37 18:58 19:46 19:53 19:54 20:06 20:30 20:38 20:57 21:14

Eerie Erie 10K/5K October 30, 2004 Erie, CO Finishers: 10K - 222, 5K - 282 10K Results: Male Overall 1. Andy Ames 33:31 2. P. Michael Henin 35:26 3. Chris Parks 36:33 Female Overall 1. Noelle Green 38:58 2. Tanya Poel 38:59 3. Kelly Carlson 39:51 Male 13-19 1. Brice Young 36:58 2. Scott Pearson 43:41 3. D.illion Dewoina 58:05 Female 13-19 1. Miranda Liddle 1:02:20 Male 20-29 1. Antonio Molina 38:44 2. Jordan Kemp 39:39 3. Jeff Mullen 41:35 Female 20-29 1. Patty Bowling 51:13 2. Kathi Goossen 51:17 3. Amy Ann Baisley 51:50 Male 30-39 1. P. Michael Henin 35:26 2. Chris Parks 36:33 3. John Raveling 37:47 Female 30-39 1. Noelle Green 38:58 2. Tanya Poel 38:59 3. Kelly Carlson 39:51 Male 40-49 1. Andy Ames 33:31 2. Steven Sellars 37:08 3. Terrance Onsager 40:21 Female 40-49 1. Catriona Dowling 41:20 2. Adriane Stewart 42:32 3. Sherry Buckner 46:50 Male 50-59 1. Dave Dooley 37:53 2. Steve Huda 41:25 3. Rich Holston 41:40 Female 50-59 1. Bogie Bogner 47:26 2. Cindy Maynard 53:51 3. Sue Lindauer 55:44 Male 60-69

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1:12:02

Manitou Springs Mayor’s Cup 5K October 30, 2004 Manitou Springs, CO 191 Finishers

4340 Tennyson Denver, CO 80212 Tel: 303-458-7700


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The Screamin' Snowman 5K & 10K Snowshoe Race February 13, 2005 at Eldora Mountain Resort

Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

The start of the Halloween Hustle in Denver’s Washington Park 1. Michael Schssone 46:07 2. Rich Romero 47:03 3. Ross Westley 47:47 Female 60-69 1. Teresa Burbano 53:22 2. Pat Peterson 57:31 3. Chris Ames 1:02:15 Male 70 and Over 1. Warren Barker 1:07:38

1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1.

5K Results: Male Overall Peter Julian 15:41 Tim Geldean 16:05 Dean Maruna 17:33 Female Overall Emily Oates 19:55 Bree Schrader 21:17 Cindy Strzelec 21:23 Male 12 and Under Kyler Auernhamer 24:15 Riley Rodenburg 26:51 Justin Rodenburg 26:52 Female 12 and Under Bree Schrader 21:17 Marion Steinback 26:06 Katlyn Auernhamer 26:11 Male 13-19 Mike Campbell 20:44 Dimitri Connell 51:49 Chris Campbell 22:04 Female 13-19 Maddee Schrader 22:55 Haley O’Connor 26:36 Jennifer Lewis 27:49 Male 20-29 Josh Wilkin 19:24 Matthew Cobb 24:03 Nick Darschewski 25:09 Female 20-29 Emily Oates 19:55 Stephanie Murphy 27:12 Meg Kelly 28:47 Male 30-39 Peter julin 15:41 Tim Geldean 16:05 Vince Calvo 17:50 Female 30-39 Cindy Strzelec 21:23 Nina Lopez 22:9 Jon Leslie 23:11 Male 40-49 Dean Maruna 17:33 Kevin Bax 18:17 Ted Goodwin 18:42 Female 40-49 Liz Beasley 25:05 Kim Massey 25:29 Laura Taht 28:38 Male 50-59 Ernie Petrocine 21:38 Dan O’Brien 22:44 Jess Tijerina 22:46 Female 50-59 Cathy Nicoletti 21:58 Lorraine Green 24:45 Susan Bennett 26:03 Male 60-69 Terry Hackney 26:40

2. Mike Foster 31:22 3. G. Victor Weese 32:18 Female 60-69 1. Connie Ahrnsbrak 25:15 2. Nina Roudebush 30:29 3. Michele Obermeier 34:10 Male 70 and Over 1. Don Robinson 27:36 2. Ken Whitney 29:36 3. Donald Weis 36:19 Female 70 and Over 1. Maggie Radcliffe 35:21 2. Eunice Shephard 38:29 3. Barbar Kipp 55:07 Harbert Lumber 5K November 5, 2004 Grand Junction, CO 368 Finishers Male Overall 1. Bernie Boettcher 2. Erik Packard 3. Kevin Koch 4. Marty Wacker 5. Alan Versaw 6. Larry Ingram 7. Bryan Baroffio 8. Dave Younger 9. Luke Younger 10. Bruce Waitman Female Overall 1. Leanne Whitesides 2. Amy Davis 3. Suszie Steel 4. Phaelen French 5. Mallory Reams 6. Kari Sanford 7. Kim Lisenby 8. Marlyn Waitman 9. Whonda Jones 10. Jeanne Blatter

16:53 17:04 17:36 17:56 18:02 19:09 19:24 19:48 19:52 20:03 18:51 19:59 20:57 21:53 22:21 22:44 23:10 23:21 23:25 24:24

Loveland Half Marathon 10K/4K November 6, 2004 Loveland, CO Finishers: 1/2 - 257, 10K - 135, 4K - 22, 4K Walk - 9

1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1.

Half Marathon Results: Male Overall Peter Tanui 1:06:38 Bryan Archuleta 1:09:16 Bill Fanselow 1:14:24 Female Overall Patty Rogers 1:24:20 Laura Wheatley 1:25:31 Valerie Friedman 1:25:42 Male 19 and Under Cody Bordewyk 1:21:36 Matthew Whitney 1:31:21 Jeff Dailey 1:32:56 Female 19 and Under Danielle Cohan 1:42:27 Starr Herr-Cardillo 1:54:47 Kristi Thomas 2:05:23 Male 20-29 David Liebowitz 1:15:22

January/February 2005

2. Ben Gherardi 1:20:01 3. Jeb Watts 1:22:45 Female 20-29 1. Emily Steel 1:25:54 2. Cristi Carman 1:29:25 3. Alison Steele 1:30:44 Male 30-39 1. Matt Maske 1:20:50 2. Vince Calvo 1:21:07 3. James Webber 1:22:01 Female 30-39 1. Marlo Crosby 1:32:04 2. Jennifer Lee 1:37:41 3. Trish Casson 1:39:32 Male 40-49 1. Forrest Newman 1:18:45 2. Ed Freygang 1:18:59 3. Phil Ware 1:22:57 Female 40-49 1. Kim Jones 1:30:35 2. Amy Hayes 1:32:13 3. Heather Hunley 1:43:24 Male 50-59 1. Jonathan Zeif 1:35:32 2. Rob Fisher 1:39:14 3. Steven Watts 1:43:48 Female 50-59 1. Nancy Denniston 1:51:40 2. Jana Campbell 1:58:09 3. Sue Lindauer 2:02:51 Male 60 and Over 1. Ken Randall 1:43:28 2. Jim Romero 1:46:34 3. Female 60 and Over 1. Fern Oliner 2:29:27 10K Results: Male Overall 1. Antonio Molina 2. Ray Butera 3. Erlemp Pgoyenguim 4. Brian Giaugue 5. Steve Barker 6. Joe Gerard 7. Dan Porter 8. John McMillan 9. Pete 10. Michio Watanabe Female Overall 1. Kim Grant 2. Jane Welzel 3. Cassi Wilbanks 4. Jan Hughes 5. Martha Buttner 6. Heather Scheumann 7. Denae Hafner 8. Jenny Kerrigan 9. Valerie Shockley 10. Tami Boday

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

4K Run Results: Male Overall Jake Woddard BJ Cambrel Royce Grover Darren De Leandro Richard Crawford Female Overall

coloradorunnermag.com

37:56 38:27 39:02 39:16 39:20 39:59 40:08 40:42 40:53 41:04 41:14 42:59 43:57 44:19 44:33 44:45 44:58 45:08 46:47 46:56

14:04 14:09 18:08 19:02 19:11

39

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Race Results...

The start of the Kids 1K at the Beaver Creek Snowshoe Festival #1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 1. 2. 3.

Anna Davenport Linda Hudson Jessica Jorgensen Katy Nold Jane Sanders

19:22 24:10 25:05 26:27 26:50

4K Walk Results: Male Overall Ivan Nikolaeff 1:04:04 Female Overall Laurel FOster 24:28 Jessica Heverly 25:27 Millisen Nold 27:40 Gobbler Gallop 5K November 20, 2004 Ft. Morgan, CO 92 Finishers

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Male Overall Tyler Marsh Ray Laws Chris Nickell Trevor Vaughn Raymond Texter Female Overall Jamie Christensen Sharon Strauss Sandy Engle Shelly Langford Kate Jilek

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Overall Run Emily Borrego Ashlee Withrow Kathy Hruby A. Solomatova Stacey Diaz Overall Walk Kay Perkins Teri Boyce Nancie Beery R. Kemmer-Beier Marcie Nava

18:00 18:24 18:59 19:28 19:28 20:37 20:56 24:19 25:08 25:14

21:12 22:53 23:21 24:34 24:40 41:06 41:57 42:24 43:10 43:12

Brighton Turkey Trot 5K November 20, 2004 Brighton, CO 134 Finishers Male Overall 1. Fernando Herrera 2. Steve Bramble 3. Steven Sellars 4. Joel Duttera 5. Jerrett Swarr 6. Bob Archie Gardner 7. Daniel Price 8. Eric Windholz 9. Bruce Kirschner 10. David Taylor Female Overall 1. Tanya Poel 2. Susan Brooker 3. Jessica Cooney 4. Vanessa Escatel 5. Ashley Kelly 6. Rachel Lopez 7. Jill Zancanelli 8. Kristen Martinez 9. Xenia Flores 10. Nichole Downs CU Turkey Trot 5K November 25, 2004

40

1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3.

Atalanta Women’s Run 5K November 20, 2004 Pueblo, CO Finishers: Run - 54, Walk - 14 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Boulder, CO 899 Finishers

16:51 17:54 17:59 18:46 18:54 19:08 19:18 19:31 20:12 20:32 18:43 19:56 20:11 21:05 21:45 23:11 23:47 24:00 24:29 24:47

1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3.

5K Results: Male Overall Andy Ames 16:10 Greg Castro 16:19 Darren De Reuck 16:20 Female Overall Colleen Stroud 18:00 Noelle Green 18:54 Alexis Skarda 19:32 Male 13 and Under John McCarthy 20:14 Ben Jones 21:53 Alex Weinheimer 22:16 Female 13 and Under Melissa Roberts 22:24 Ryan Russ 22:44 Molly Joyce 24:05 Male 14-19 Greg Castro 16:19 Karch Hickman 16:55 Brice Young 17:18 Female 14-19 Alexis Skarda 19:32 Reba Slivka 22:23 Joanna Larsen 24:10 Male 20-29 Travis Bussy 16:31 Tate Behning 17:10 Phillip Schumacher 17:29 Female 20-29 Megan Hunter 19:43 Maria Hennessey 20:18 Amanda Ewing 21:03 Male 30-39 Darren De Reuck 16:20 James Johnson 16:22 Peter Valentyik 18:08 Female 30-39 Colleen Stroud 18:00 Sarah Krakoff 19:39 Laurie Edwards 19:53 Male 40-49 Andy Ames 16:10 Dan Skarda 17:27 Steven Sellars 17:48 Female 40-49 Noelle Green 18:54 Catriona Dowling 19:57 Lorie Moreno-Roch 20:29 Male 50-59 Dave Dooley 18:09 Ron Harmon 19:31 Rich Holston 19:50 Female 50-59 Cathy nicoletti 22:27 Rima Lurie 23:40 Corinne Reinhard 24:10 Male 60-69 Tom Lemire 20:57 Geroge Antoine 22:04 Johnny Chapin 24:13 Female 60-69 Anita Gonzales 25:38 Barbara Brockman 30:55 Joyce Lemire 34:36 Male 70 and Over Warren Barker 31:03 Kenneth Wright 32:42 Charles King 37:39 Female 70 and Over Nancy Smalley 37:50 Ruth Wright 51:45 Lynn Oppermann 53:16 Briargate YMCA Turkey Trot 5K November 25, 2004 Colorado Springs, CO

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16:43 17:34 17:43 17:58 18:02 18:14 18:18 18:27 18:43 18:45 18:50 18:51 18:55 19:08 19:31 19:34 19:41 19:43 19:50 19:51 20:05 20:43 21:15 21:21 21:33 21:37 21:42 21:49 21:50 22:08 22:26 22:26 22:41 23:03 23:07 23:09 23:14 23:17 23:45 24:03

Mile High United Way Turkey Trot 4M November 25, 2004 Denver, CO Finishers: Run-3704, Walk-398 Male Overall 1. Cele Rodriguez 19:30 2. Matt Mosman 20:06 3. Charlie Gruber 20:18 4. Jon Clemence 20:23 5. Art iemers 20:42 6. Travis Daniels 21:13 7. Mark Cucuzzella 21:18 8. Hector Martinez 21:26 9. Grant Scott 21:40 10. Mike Callor 21:44 11. Rob Gilbert 21:54 12. Charles Bedford 22:03 13. John Gaudette 22:06 14. Peter Hopkins 22:17 15. Chuck Schwartz 22:19 16. Isaiah Rubio 22:21 17. Steven Busch 22:24 18. Tyler Pennel 22:28 19. Miguel Cazares 22:36 20. Sean Larnin 22:45 21. Lenny Laraio 22:55 22. Matt Provencio 22:59 23. Dash Victor 23:01 24. Fritz Rogers 23:04 25. Russell Slade 23:06 26. Caj Lohman 23:13 27. Kevin Bax 23:16 28. Steve Kovisto 23:18 29. Henry Scott 23:19 30. Zach Victor 23:24 Female Overall 1. Cassie Ficken 23:49 2. Patty Rogers 24:05 3. Jessica Wyant 24:19 4. Valerie Friedman 24:51 5. Paige Higgins 25:04 6. Jena Pohle 25:21 7. Noreen Shea 25:23 8. Laura Kwiatkowski 25:31 9. Sarah Lewandowski 26:11 10. Lauren Brownrigg 26:21 11. Melissa Hillier 26:37 12. Colleen Perkins 26:42 13. Mary Pellegrini 27:00 14. Kellie Faircloth 27:04 15. Shelby Fircloth 27:05 16. Christine Crabb 27:16 17. Andrea Keglovits 27:18 18. Melissa Larkin 27:27 19. Mariann Roebken 27:27 20. Susan Bellard 27:45 21. Erin Manzanares 27:49 22. Edit Maszlaver 27:54 23. Michele Jensen 27:59 24. Jacqueline Hjelden 28:00 25. Carline Turtle 28:02 26. Sue Taddeucci 28:04 27. Holly Kolquist 28:09 28. Kris Ray 28:21 29. Erin Noonan-Wright 28:24 30. Lindsay Hamilton 28:28 Male Overall Walk 1. David Benke 29:34 2. David Gair 29:48

January/February 2005

3. Dvid Merrick 30:17 4. Nick Geraci 30:52 5. Vipin Worh 33:13 Female Overall Walk 1. Beth Robertson 32:20 2. Dawn Kessler 32:35 3. Marissa Willims 33:09 4. Paige Brandt 33:52 5. Patricia Harriston 33:52 Thanksgiving Day 4M November 25, 2004 Ft. Collins, CO Finishers: Elite - 25 Open - 1131, Walk-206 Male Elite 1. Austin Vigil 2. Bill Michel 3. Charles Kamindo 4. Peter De La Cerda 5. Kim Gillrd 6. Michael Aish 7. Carl Blackhurst 8. Greg Mitchell 9. Peter Tanui 10. Nelson Laux 11. Mohamed Aden 12. John Kimaiyo 13. James Thie 14. Jonoh Rono 15. Larry Lucero 16. Sam Ngatia 17. Forrest Newman 18. Josh Vance 19. Chris England Female Elite 1. Lidia Simon 2. Katie Blackett 3. Nicole Aish 4. Rebekah Walter 5. Tany Poel 6. Klein Blackhurst Male Overall 1. Jason Holt 2. Paul Brown 3. John Nichols 4. Kip Taylor 5. Steve Cathcart 6. Marc Long 7. Charlie Cox

18:34 18:42 18:49 19:01 19:12 19:21 19:22 19:28 19:45 19:53 20:19 20:24 20:26 20:50 20:58 21:00 21:12 21:50 22:19 20:59 22:52 23:07 23:45 24:10 21:03 21:35 21:39 22:45 22:57 23:01 23:06

8. Pablo Vigil 23:06 9. Jaime Yebra 23:07 10. Paul Murphy 23:26 11. Ray Butera 23:30 12. Scott Foley 23:34 13. Steve Vigil 23:39 14. Stan Emery 23:55 15. Casey Nold 24:04 16. Andy Macnqughton 24:06 17. Matt Schneider 24:16 18. Doug mason 24:18 19. Bruce Pulford 24:24 20. Sean Wilde 24:44 Female Overall 1. Kara Roy 23:22 2. Dnielle Korb 23:27 3. Emily Willems 25:24 4. Emily Steele 25:25 5. Alison Steele 25:49 6. Heidi Suder 25:50 7. Marcie Class 26:02 8. Mrgaret Kritzer 26:14 9. Jne Welzel 26:16 10. Mary Shore 26:25 11. Karlie England 26:27 12. Mrie Eismann 26:40 13. Julie Hudetz 26:41 14. Ericka Scott 26:52 15. Laurie Rogers 27:03 16. Jamie Rosenquist 27:43 17. Kim Jones 27:43 18. Lin Wilder 27:44 19. Michele Cassidy 27:47 20. Tiffny Green 27:56 Male Overall Walk 1. Mark Layman 30:32 2. Jim Durr 36:17 3. Pete Madsen 38:09 Male Overall Walk 1. Lynne Klirgelsmith 36:40 2. Susan Raikes 38:41 3. Amy Balmer 39:21 Greeley Turkey Trot 5K November 25, 2004 Greeley, CO 1031Finishers 5K Results: Male Overall 1. Mark Stenbeck 2. Gannon White

15:15 15:47

3. Bill Raitter 16:07 Female Overall 1. Annie Bersagel 16:31 2. Sarah Raitter 18:39 3. Leah Larson 18:47 Male Masters 1. Raul Carrizalez 16:45 2. Doug Bell 16:56 Female Masters 1. Amy Hayes 20:07 2. Marilyn Stapleton 20:58 Male 12 and Under 1. Chris Buhler 21:23 2. Tanner McManus 22:40 3. Jake Winn 22:41 Female 12 and Under 1. Savahanna Garcia 23:24 2. Allie Parks 24:01 3. Alexis Serrano 27:00 Male 13-15 1. Austin Adams 19:41 2. Tyler Hornback 19:53 3. Isreal Sandoval 20:20 Female 13-15 1. Casi Reckard 20:06 2. Tessa Livermpont 23:27 3. Erica Hinchcliffe 23:47 Male 16-19 1. Andrew Adams 17:24 2. David Baars 19:27 3. Kevin Carlberg 19:35 Female 16-19 1. Mallory Kendall 20:01 2. Melanie Peddle 20:46 3. Brittani Borden 22:04 Male 20-29 1. Darren Brungardt 16:45 2. Peter Derk 17:35 3. Chris Schaumberg 17:58 Female 20-29 1. Alyssa Shaw 20:00 2. Jessica Cooney 20:04 3. Lara Johnson 20:27 Male 30-39 1. John Gutierrez 16:59 2. Matt Maske 17:19 3. Abe Sauer 17:27 Female 30-39 1. Ana Reutinger 20:03 2. Andrea Gregory 21:19 3. Brenda Lynch 23:22 Male 40-49

Fernando Herrara wins the Clear Creek 4 Mile in Wheat Ridge

Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

661 Finishers Male Overall 1. Adam Rich 2. Joel Hamilton 3. Ryan Price 4. Brian Harnisch 5. Ryan Lowen 6. Derek Taylor 7. Andy Rinne 8. Andrew Abdella 9. Kyle Reno 10. Jim Hallberg 11. Dean Black 12. Paul Hamilton 13. Kiel Lowen 14. Tom Hamilton 15. Patrick Caballos 16. Lile Budden 17. Mark Riem 18. Keith Mertz 19. Rob Gilliam 20. Brett Pierce Female Overall 1. Amanda Occhi 2. Tina Gray 3. Cindy O’Neill 4. Rochelle Hyatt 5. Elizabeth Helland 6. Catherine Carpenter 7. Kirsten Anthony 8. Lisa Rainsberger 9. Connilee Walter 10. Christi-Marie Butler 11. Erika Parry 12. Erin Wittich 13. Rebecca Huffman 14. Carla Augenstein 15. Joni Fehrenbacher 16. Chantelle Erickson 17. Adrinne Parry 18. Jan Burger 19. Kerry Page 20. Kristin Abernethy


1. Daniel Burton 2. Rich Michelson 3. Dave Mamich Female 40-49 1. Maureen Neville 2. Elaine Holbrook 3. Jenny Weber Male 50-59 1. Kurt Dallon 2. Jim Fuller 3. Thomas Maar Female 50-59 1. Carol Smith 2. Diane Gutierrez 3. Darlene Helzer Male 60-69 1. Mark Collins 2. Allan nickels 3. Bill Grady Female 60-69 1. Jane Wheeler 2. Eileen Croissant 3. Kathy Franson Male 70 and Over 1. Ken Whitney 2. Richard Burns 3. Joe Tennessen

18:48 19:38 20:54 21:18 21:49 21:59 18:52 19:50 20:09 24:48 26:56 28:24 25:18 25:57 26:22 26:35 33:51 35:19 28:20 30:12 49:29

Photo by Steven Glass / Glass photography

Jingle Bell Run For Arthritis 5K December 4, 2004 Colorado Springs, CO 235 Finishers

Austin Vigil, Charles Kamindo, and Bill Michel (L to R) in the Elite Race at the Thanksgiving Day 4M in Ft. Collins

Male Overall 1. Adam Rich 2. Jason Hodgson 3. Andy Rinne 4. Chris Lear 5. Mark Riem 6. Tim Allison 7. Gerry Adams 8. Rick Shoulberg 9. John Howerton 10. Gerald Romero 11. Nic Mahoy 12. Tyler Holt 13. Jeff Warren 14. Mike Lloyd 15. Eric Swihart Female Overall 1. Lisa Short 2. Shawn Lear 3. Linda Staines 4. Andrea Wagner 5. Desiree Romero

15:50 16:08 17:22 18:13 18:30 19:29 19:39 19:42 19:59 20:02 20:03 20:17 20:37 20:42 21:13 20:39 20:44 21:09 21:39 21:47

6. Terri Walters 7. Kara Slavoski 8. Nicole Vettese 9. Tina Cassens 10. Kelly Worth 11. Lex Miller 12. Sandi Brandl 13. Sandee Miller 14. Katie Walker 15. Brianna Suppers

22:39 22:56 22:59 23:14 23:44 23:45 23:56 23:59 24:19 24:29

Rock Canyon Half Marathon December 4, 2004 Pueblo, CO 313 Finishers Male Overall 1. Chris Borton 1:13:31 2. Scott Balcao 1:17:24 3. Mike Wasson 1:19:12 4. Ed Freygang 1:21:19 5. Robert Yara 1:22:13 6. Jim Hallberg 1:22:47 7. Chad Halsten 1:22:55 8. Steve Roch 1:23:53 9. Phil Ware 1:24:54 10. Tim Boilard 1:27:06 11. Michael Orendorff 1:28:03 12. Jared Klajnbart 1:28:06 13. Neal Oseland 1:29:36 14. Rich Hadley 1:29:49 15. Glenn Strebe 1:30:46 Female Overall 1. Tanya Poel 1:25:36

3. Cindy O’Neill 4. Laura Wheatley 5. Kit McCaffrey 6. Amy Reguier 7. Leah Ann Larson 8. Gwen Martinez 9. Kaija Staley 10. Amanda Ewing 11. Katherine Carpenter 12. Connilee Walter 13. Tinya Duffy 14. Bridget MacKinnon 15. Sheila Van Cuyk

1:29:28 1:30:21 1:32:27 1:33:19 1:33:41 1:33:43 1:33:57 1:35:10 1:35:42 1:35:58 1:36:27 1:36:41 1:37:36

Tennessee Pass Kick-Off Classic 5M Snowshoe December 4, 2004 Leadville, CO 57 Finishers 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Male Overall Josiah Middaugh Bernie Boettcher Travis Macy Dan Nielson Mark Burgess Female Overall Helen Cospolich Lindsey Krause Lisa isom Sarah Tarkenton Katie Mazzia

43:23 43:31 43:43 43:52 44:18 48:51 49:52 50:00 52:59 53:13

For complete race results, please visit our website:

www.coloradorunnermag.com 2. Patty Rogers

1:26:16

Race Directors:

Send us your race results and we will print them in our print edition and place them on our website.

Email: derek@coloradorunnermag.com Fax: 720-570-3469

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January/February 2005

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Race Calendar... patlockhart@worldnet.att.net www.pprrun.org

january

Turquoise Lake 20M Snowshoe 10:00 AM Sugar Loafin’ Camp, Leadville, CO 719-539-4112 info@racingunderground.com www.racingunderground.com

january 01 PPRR Nielson Challenge 2M 8:00 AM Colorado Springs, CO N. Monument Valley Park 719-633-2055 zguntam@juno.com, www.pprrun.org Rescue Run 10K, 5K, Kids Fun Run 9:30 AM Palmer Park, Colorado Springs, CO 719-473-7848 www.pprrun.org New Year’s Day 5K 10:00 AM Runner’s Roost, Ft. Collins, CO 970.224.9114 www.runnersroostftcollins.com

Colorado Governors Cup 5K/10K Snowshoe Race 11:30 AM Frisco Nordic Center, Frisco, CO 303-635-2815 emgmh@emgcolorado.com www.emgcolorado.com january 09 RMRR Trophy Series 10K 9:00 AM Twin Lakes, Denver, CO 303-871-8366 rmrr@rmrr.org, www.rmrr.org

january 08

Beaver Creek Snowshoe Series #2 11:00 AM Beaver Creek, CO 970-476-6797 info@gohighline.com www.bcsnowshoe.com

Lake Arbor 5K 9:00 AM Lake Arbor, Arvada, CO 303-422-3745 www.comastersrun.org Salomon Nordic 10K/5K Snowshoe 9:00 AM Frisco Nordic Center, Frisco, CO 970-668-0866 emgmh@emgcolorado.com www.emgcolorado.com Living Well Fun and Fitness 5K 9:00 AM Goodson Rec Center Englewood, CO 303-798-7515 reedd@sspr.com, www.sspr.org Lafayette Oatmeal Festival 5K 9:30 AM Pioneer School, Lafayette, CO 303-926-4352 www.boulderroadrunners.org PPRR Winter Series #1 5K/10K 10:00 AM Fox Run Park Colorado Springs, CO 719-598-2953

january 15 Swift Skedaddle 3K/10K Snowshoe 10:00 AM Raven Glaf Club, Silverthorne, CO 970-389-4838 danelle@colorado.net www.racingunderground.com january 16 Chilly Cheeks Winter Duathlon 10:00 AM Cherry Creek State Park Denver, CO 303-642-7917 info@racingunderground.com www.racingunderground.com january 21 Grand Lake Snowshoe Festival Grand Lake, CO www.grandlakesnowshoe festival.com

january 22 Best XC Race on the Planet 9:00 AM Harlow Platts Park, Boulder, CO 303-332-6427 lgeventmgmt@aol.com www.boulderrunningcompany.com Pazzo’s Colorado State Championships 9M Snowshoe 10:00 AM Meadow Mtn. Forest Service Vail, CO 970.845.0931 pedalpwr@vail.net www.pedalpowerbike.com/ events.html PPRR Winter Series #2 4M/8M 10:00 AM El Pomar Center, Col. Springs, CO 719-598-2953 patlockhart@worldnet.att.net www.pprrun.org january 23 Polar Bear 5K Run/Walk 10:00 AM Washington Park, Denver, CO 303-694-2030 info@bkbltd.com, www.bkbltd.com january 26 Nighthawks Nordic Series Snowshoe Race 5:30 PM Eldora Ski Resort, Nederland, CO 303-440-8700 x267 info@racingunderground.com www.racingunderground.com january 28 Snowdown Hash Weekend 5:00 PM Durango, CO 970.375.2413 mkelly@durangomarathon.com www.snowdownhash.com january 29 Cordillera 10K Snowshoe Race 11:00 AM Cordillera Nordic Center

Edwards, CO 970-581-5254 Info@altituderacing.com www.altituderacing.com

february february 02 Nighthawks Nordic Series Snowshoe Race 5:30 PM Eldora Ski Resort, Nederland, CO 303-440-8700 x267 info@racingunderground.com www.racingunderground.com february 05 PPRR Nielson Challenge 2M 8:00 AM Colorado Springs, CO N. Monument Valley Park 719-633-2055 zguntam@juno.com, www.pprrun.org Cordillera Moonlight Snowshoe 5K 7:00 PM Cordillera Nordic Center Edwards, CO 970-581-5254 info@altituderacing.com www.altituderacing.com february 06 RMRR Trophy Series 7M 9:00 AM Cherry Creek State Park Denver, CO 303-871-8366 rmrr@rmrr.org, www.rmrr.org Super Bowl 5K 9:00 AM Washington Park, Denver, CO 303-694-2030 info@bkbltd.com, www.bkbltd.com Frozen Foot 5K 9:00 AM Duane Physics Building Boulder, CO 720-308-4144

www.colorado.edu/studentgroups/ triteam Frisco Gold Rush 5K/10K Snowshoe 9:00 AM Frisco Nordic Center, Frisco, CO 970-668-0866 emgmh@emgcolorado.com www.emgcolorado.com Chilly Cheeks Winter Duathalon 10:00 AM Cherry Creek State Park Denver, CO 303-642-7917 info@racingunderground.com www.racingunderground.com Frisco Gold Rush 5K/10K Snowshoe 11:30 AM Frisco Nordic Center, Frisco, CO 303-635-2815 emgmh@emgcolorado.com www.emgcolorado.com february 12 40 Furlongs 8K 9:00 AM South Suburban Golf and Tennis Club Littleton, CO 303-282-7521 www.comastersrun.org PPRR Winter Series #3 5M/10M 10:00 AM Baptist Rd Trailhead Colorado Springs, CO 719-598-2953 patlockhart@worldnet.att.net www.pprrun.org Beaver Creek Snowshoe Series #3 11:00 AM Beaver Creek, CO 970-476-6797 www.bcsnowshoe.com february 13 Valentine’s Day 5K 9:00 AM Washington Park, Denver, CO 303-694-2030 info@bkbltd.com, www.bkbltd.com

Colorado Runner’s Race In A Box Putting on a race? Let Colorado Runner help promote your event! Our Race In A Box program offers race directors all of the following: • Printed race numbers with your race name

• Tile ad on our website

• Advertising in our print publication (any size)

• Your own race web page

• Online registration through Sign-Me-Up Sports

Contact Derek at derek@coloradorunnermag.com or 720-570-3469 for information and pricing. 42

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January/February 2005


march 05

Screamin’ Snowman Snowshoe 9:00 AM Eldora Ski Resort, Nederland, CO 303-642-7917 darrin@racingunderground.com www.racingunderground.com february 20

PPRR Nielson Challenge 2M 8:00 AM Colorado Springs, CO N. Monument Valley Park 719-633-2055 zguntom@juno.co, www.pprrun.org

President’s Day 5K 9:00 AM Washington Park, Denver, CO 303-694-2030 info@bkbltd.com, www.bkbltd.com

North American Snowshoe Championships 5K/10K 11:00 AM Beaver Creek, CO 970-479-6797 www.bcsnowshoe.com

february 26 PPRR Winter Series #4 10K/20K 10:00 AM Wolford Elementary Colorado Springs, CO 719-598-2953 patlockhart@worldnet.att.net www.pprrun.org february 27 Boulder Fitness Challenge 9:00 AM Fairview High School, Boulder, CO 303-444-7223 race@bolderboulder.com www.bolderboulder.com

march

Billy’s Island Grill 5M Snowshoe 7:00 PM Billy’s Island Grill – Lionshead Vail, CO 970.845.0931 pedalpwr@vail.net www.pedalpowerbike.com/ events.html march 06 RMRR Trophy Series 3M 9:00 AM Crown Hill Park, Denver, CO 303-871-8366 rmrr@rmrr.org, www.rmrr.org Lucky Clover 10K 9:00 AM Chatfield State Park, Littleton, CO 303-674-5446 www.eclecticedgeracing.com

Flying Horse Fling 10K/5K 9:00 AM Event Center, Castle Rock, CO 303-694-2030 info@bkbltd.com, www.bkbltd.com Spring Runoff 10M/10K/5K 9:00 AM Dutch Clark Stadium, Pueblo, CO 719-547-2777 www.socorunners.org march 12 Canyonlands Half Marathon, 8K 9:30 AM Moab, UT 435-259-4525 rrr@citlink.net www.moabhalfmarathon.org 5K on St. Patrick’s Day 10:00 AM Old Colorado City, Col. Springs, CO 719-635-8803 director@csgrandprix.com www.csgrandprix.com march 13 Runnin’ of the Green Lucky 7K 10:15 AM LoDo, Denver, CO 303-694-2030 info@bkbltd.com,

www.bkbltd.com march 19 Swift Skedaddle 10K/3K Snowshoe 10:00 AM Frisco Nordic Center, Frisco, CO 970-389-4838 danelle@colorado.net www.racingunderground.com march 26 Snowshoe Shuffle 10K/5K 11:00 AM Vail Mountain, Vail, CO 970-476-6797 info@gohighline.com www.snowshoeshuffle.com march 27 Spring Spree 10K 9:00 AM Twin Lakes, Denver, CO 303-693-2278 www.comastersrun.org Orphans of Violence 5K 9:30 AM Washington Park, Denver, CO 303-694-2030 info@bkbltd.com, www.bkbltd.com

Race Directors: For $25 you can have your listing in bold. Email: derek@ coloradorunnermag.com

What is your Foot Type?

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Assess your feet and analyze your gait Try several shoes outside or on our treadmill Experience our COMPUTERIZED video gait analysis system Co Spgs Denver Aurora

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(719) 632-2633 (303) 759-8455 (303) 766-3411 coloradorunnermag.com

43


Hit The Dirt...

Trail Running In Durango by Marc Witkes

“The lycra-bound athletes are especially smitten that in the late 1980’s, USA Today named Durango the worst dressed town in America. However, that’s another story; this one is about soft, dirt trails and spectacular vistas.” Those areas are plentiful. Trails2000 has had a part in improving and maintaining trails on Animas City Mountain, in the West Side Mountain Park, Horse Gulch and on the Fort Lewis College Campus. Local resident and avid trail runner, Deborah Van Winegarden loves the Animas City Mountain trail system. She says, “Given its ready access, sterling views, and nice little uphill, the Animas City Mountain 6.5 mile loop trail is a local favorite. Allow one to two hours - one if you are really fast and two if you are really slow (no offense).” I have a special place in my heart for the trails within the West Side Mountain Park. One access on Avenida del Sol is right across the street from my residence. Once in this area, you can explore some of the easier rolling trails or if you are really daring, you can tackle the “Hogsback.” Following a steep, exposed naked ridge, the top of Hogsback offers a spectacular view of the city below and challenges the fittest of runners. Only the strongest can run this baby. Most runners will be reduced to a thigh shivering power hike. Horse Gulch, which contains the Telegraph trail system, is accessible from the eastern intersection of 3rd St. and 8th Ave. There are 30-plus miles of trails within this area. With names like Cuchillo, Sidewinder and Cowboy, these trails are almost as fun writing and reading about as they are running. Regina Fallace, who moved to the area three years ago, says, “The Telegraph Trail provides the runner a glimpse of the expansive, beautiful wilderness that surrounds Durango. Running this trail, on a non-race day, allows you to enjoy the solitude, trees and rock formations.” Besides the plethora of opportunities for runners to go out any day of the week to nearby trailheads and prance about the wilderness, Durango and the surrounding area is also a hotbed of racing activity. In addition to the Telegraph 10K on Mother’s Day and Animas Mountain Mug Run on the last Saturday in October, the Durango area boasts enough races to keep any competitor busy. The Kennebec Challenge in August

Photo by Derek Griffiths / Colorado Runner

D

A view from the majestic San Juans, just outside of Durango

urango is a trail runner’s paradise. Located in the high mountain desert in the Four Corners Region near the common corner boundary of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona, Durango residents see the sun shine about 330 days a year. On the few days when running might be problematic, there is probably fresh snow on the trails that would also make for great snowshoeing. Will Rogers says, “Durango is pretty far out of the way,,, and glad of it.” The lycrabound athletes are especially smitten that in the late 1980’s, USA Today named Durango the worst dressed town in America. However, that’s another story; this one is about soft, dirt trails, spectacular vistas and all of those poorly dressed runners who frequent the Colorado Trail, Sale Barn and Crites. Founded in 1881 by William Palmer, he envisioned Durango as an important smelter site to process ore that was to be delivered by the Narrow Gauge railroad from nearby Silverton. Times 44

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have changed and now the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad hauls little of anything except for thousand of tourists. Trails2000 is a local group that maintains, builds, and plans trails which provides for multiple uses, including running. Trails2000 was founded in 1990 in conjunction with the World Mountain Bike Championship that was being held in Durango that year. Bill Manning, happily unemployed, was walking down a street in historic downtown Durango in 1993 when a friend tapped him on the shoulder and said, “Manning, there is this new trails group in town and they could really use your help.” Manning thought that becoming involved would be a neat little hobby so he decided to sign up. That was 10 years ago and Manning is now full-time director of a group that has put more trails in Durango than developers have put in new subdivisions. “It’s all about legitimacy and trust and bringing partners together,” Manning said. “We now have a huge network of Western Trails. We already had a large system of trails and old roads as part of our heritage but Trails2000 has successfully brought many partners together from different jurisdictions to improve all of the areas.”

January/February 2005


Marc Witkes runs the 2002 Durango Marathon

takes place in La Plata Canyon. Just to start the race, a 10-mile drive over a rocky road is mandated. Notice all of the abandoned mining history that engulfs you. Thirteen miles through the “Notch” and a seated slide down the steep snow-covered slope on the other side, is required to get through this adventure run. With views of the Lewis Mine and Snowstorm Peak, this race is as much of a sightseeing outing as it is a trail race. Nearby Silverton hosts the Hard Rock 100-mile Endurance Run during the second weekend in July and Kendall Mountain Run, also in Silverton, is one week after that. Durango Motorless Transit (DMT), the area’s running club, boasts nearly 300 members. Two years ago, Runner’s World mentioned DMT as best club name. Founded in the early 1970’s, DMT has had its share of good times and bad times. Recently, however, DMT has seen tremendous growing participation in all of its activities including the famous “Thursday night group trail runs.” It started out simply in 1999 with the notion that anybody who wanted to come along for an early evening 6 p.m. trail run would meet at the Colorado Trailhead, at the end of 25th St. on Thursday nights. The route was always the same; out and back along Junction Creek with a steep ascent to Gudy’s rest and the easy run back down the switchbacks. Incidentally, the Colorado Trail traverses 14 National Forest areas and 25 peaks while winding its way 480 miles all the way to Denver. That routine stayed intact for the first

year. On a good night, participation exceeded a dozen but on a poor night, attendance might be only two or three. Towards the end of the first year, people were generally happy with an opportunity to get in a good run with friends, do a little socializing and maybe have a beer in town at Storyville or Steamworks before retiring for the evening. During the next year, Nick Nichols and Vic Rudolph did some serious thinking and decided that it would be more fun to meet in a new place every week. They made a schedule, posted it around town at a few key locations and also put it up on the running club’s website, www.godmt.org. The success was immediate and dramatic. Participation escalated with as many as 20 fit Durangoans and folks from the surrounding towns participating in the runs. I wouldn’t say that A Star Was Born, but a Durango tradition was well on its way. Robin Favreau, frequent trailrunner and also an avid cyclist loves the Thursday night trail runs. “I started doing the group trail runs and found out how much fun it was and I also made many new friends.” Pack your bags and come to Durango for a day, a weekend or a lifetime. I’m glad that I did. Marc Witkes is a free-lance writer and has lived in Durango for 13 years. Always looking for new adventures, Marc is currently busy training for Ironman Arizona this spring.

January/February 2005

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The Lighter Side...

12 Stupid Things Nonrunners Say To Runners

As runners and endurance athletes, we inevitably have to listen On nutrition… to our nonrunning friends and family members express their 5. Do you know how many carbs are in that? horror over our training habits, our personal hygiene, and our 6. You only weigh 150 pounds? I haven’t weighed that eating schedules. We train for countless hours each week, yet little since junior high! they still don’t understand the distance of a marathon nor our During the middle of a race… dedication to complete one. Here are a few things that the staff 7. You’re almost there! You’re looking good! The finish at Colorado Runner has heard a nonrunning friend say in the is just around the corner! last year. On training… 8. I don’t run unless I’m being chased. On marathoning… 9. You ran up that? 1. How far is that marathon? 10. Yeah, back in high school I ran a mile in three 2. You’re running Boston? Is that your first marathon? minutes. 3. 26 miles? I don’t even like to drive that far. 11. Look Karlyn! That man’s wearing a bra! (When it’s 4. Congratulations on the Chicago Marathon. Did you clearly your heart rate monitor strap) win? 12. I couldn’t run two blocks without getting winded. 46

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Issue 9