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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

W ednesday, jan. 31

saturday, feb. 3

col ora do co nve nti on c e nte r, de nve r

W W W .S AVING P LACES C ONFERENCE . ORG 1


Saving Places® 2018 Welcome to the 2018 Saving Places Conference! We are excited to host this annual gathering of preservation advocates, supporters, and professionals. In Dolores Hayden’s 1995 book, The Power of Place, she frames historic places and cultural landscapes as those where people find a sense of cultural belonging. These are places with personality and are where we find a connection to our past and current community. It is sometimes difficult to put that sense of place into words, but it is the power of these places that make us passionate about preservation. Our keynote speaker, Kevin Jennings of the Tenements Museum, will speak to the intersection of social activism and preservation, particularly as a venue for talking about difficult histories. Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk of the Ute Mountain Ute will speak at Thursday’s Endangered Places Luncheon about her ongoing advocacy work to preserve the Bears Ears National Monument. We are also trying out something new this year: a poster session. We hope the poster session will grow into a venue for presenters to share their work, particularly work in progress, through one-on-one discussion.

We are Colorado Preservation, Inc. Since 1984, Colorado Preservation, Inc. (CPI) has promoted historic preservation statewide through advocacy, education

and outreach. CPI works to ensure historic places across Colorado will be protected and preserved for the enjoyment of future generations. One of the ways that we do this is through our Saving Places Conference. For over 20 years, CPI has provided essential training and networking opportunities to individuals like YOU who are working to protect our state’s heritage. Thank you to the many people, organizations, and supporters who have helped (and continue to help) make the conference what it is today!

Preservation is challenging work, but it is the power of these places that make us strive to save them. We have endeavored to make this conference a place for different communities to feel like they belong; a place where they feel heard; and a place where they can share their preservation knowledge with others. We hope you find inspiration and technical know-how in our diverse line-up of over 75 conference sessions, workshops, and tours. And we look forward to learning what you believe is the Power of Place from the Mountains to the Plains.

Heather Bailey Conference Committee Chair

Jennifer Orrigo Charles CPI Executive Director

Our Mission in Action A special thank you to our Conference Committee, Board and Volunteers who helped make the annual Saving Places Conference possible!

Colorado’s history is important to us, as we know it is to you. Each year our conference attendees share ideas, make new connections, and learn new tools to advance the work of preservation in Colorado. Thank you for being a part of the preservation movement by attending this year! Thank you for your commitment to our shared history and places that collectively represent where we came from and shape the future.

CPI Staff

CPI works statewide with sites, community leaders, residents and organizations to ensure we build a future with Colorado’s historic resources. Through our signature initiatives like Colorado’s Most Endangered Places and our Preservation Services Program, we work with the public to identify and protect some of the state’s most important, yet threatened, sites. An example of our efforts to protect these sites is exhibited through the establishment of the Colorado Job Creation and Main Street Revitalization Act. In 2014, economic development organizations and historic preservation groups joined forces to help spur job creation and revitalization throughout the state. The result was an Act which passed through the legislature with broad bi-partisan support. Current tax credit projects in process, or completed to date, will generate more than $10 million in sales tax, with Colorado counties gaining over $500,000 and municipalities gaining $4.6 million of that total. This is in addition to local, county and state sales taxes generated by the economic activity in these newly renovated buildings.

Jennifer Orrigo Charles - Executive Director Megan Concannon - Events and Development Director Kim Grant - Endangered Places Program Director Cindy Nasky - Preservation Services Director

Nancy Rogers - Bookkeeper Hannah Clark - Saving Places Intern William Doyle - Endangered Places Intern Eva Price - Endangered Places Intern

CPI Board Members *Heather Bailey (Durango)   Ashley Bushey (Denver) *Elizabeth Hallas, Past Chair (Golden)   Graham Johnson (Denver) *Julie Johnson, Chair (Denver)   Kim Kintz (Grand Junction)

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*Jim Kroll (Denver) *Karl Kumli (Denver) *Alan Matlosz (Denver)   Blair Miller (Denver) *Robert Musgraves (Denver)   Bill Nelson (Denver)

*Drew Notestine (Greeley)   Bentley Rayburn (Colorado Springs)   Dominick Sekich, (Denver)   Robin Theobald (Breckenridge)   Jane Watkins (Englewood) *Executive Committee

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

CPI continues to lobby to ensure this Act is strengthened and reauthorized in 2019 with our coalition partners. We encourage you to learn more about the State and Federal Historic Preservation Tax Credits, and bring this information back to your communities. This year, reauthorization of Colorado’s tax credit is the focus of CPI’s lobbying efforts, which extends to our conference. Participants at Wednesday’s Day at the Capitol will be speaking to their legislators about its importance and you can find many sessions, tours, and workshops focused on the incentive throughout the conference. If you have a site that could qualify for the credits and you would like to learn more, visit CPI’s tax credit information table in the lobby at the conference for more information.

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T h a nk y ou t o our 2 018 sp ons or s !

Copper Sponsors

Established in 1879, History Colorado—formerly the Colorado Historical Society—preserves Colorado’s rich heritage through the State Historical Fund, the Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, collections stewardship, statewide museums, and special programs for students, educators, and visitors of all ages. The State Historical Fund, a program of History Colorado, awards grants to public and non-profit organizations to

Robert E. Musgraves and Joan Prusse

preserve Colorado’s architectural and archaeological treasures for public benefit.

Platinum Sponsor

Silver Sponsor

Granite Sponsors

City of Black Hawk

AIA Colorado

Pinyon Environmental, Inc.

Atkinson-Noland & Associates, Inc.

Spectrum General Contractors, Inc.

Clarion Associates, LLC

Thomas & Tyler, LLC

Martin/Martin Consulting Engineers

wjmdesign

marble Sponsor Endangered Places Sponsor

Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety

Thank you to our Program Partners and Supporters Thank you to Otero County for their sponsorship of a workshop at the 2018 Conference.

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From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

Thank you to Susan Wehr Livingston for sponsoring student attendance at the Saving Places Conference.

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Saving Places Featured Speakers

Beyond the Sessions

Colorado Preservation, Inc. is proud to host preservation experts, community leaders, and property owners to present their expertise at the Saving Places Conference. This year you can expect to learn from over 150 speakers from across the state and beyond to provide you with new ways to advance historic preservation in your community!

Network, Shop, and Learn – in between sessions!

CPI is honored to welcome our 2018 keynote speakers and special guests who will address the Power of Place and what it means to the future of our communities. We strongly encourage you to attend the events these individuals will be speaking at and we guarantee you will leave inspired with new ideas for how to advance preservation in your community.

PLENARY PRESENTATION

Thursday, Feb. 1, 8:30am • Four Seasons Ballroom Join us Thursday, Feb. 1 at 8:30 a.m. for remarks by Governor John Hickenlooper, followed by our keynote presentation by Kevin Jennings, the new president of the Tenement Museum in New York City. JOHN HICKENLOOPER Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is a former geologist and entrepreneur who recently added “author” to his resume with the publication of his memoir, The Opposite of Woe: My Life in Beer and Politics. He champions innovation, collaboration and efficiency. When he was inaugurated Governor of Colorado in 2011, having run on his history of collaboration for community good, he became the first Denver mayor to be elected governor in 140 years. Since taking office in 2011, the Governor and his team have endeavored to make Colorado the most pro-business state, with the highest environmental and ethical standards. Governor Hickenlooper will help kick off the Conference with remarks, to be followed by questions from the audience. KEVIN JENNINGS President - Tenement Museum, New York City Prior to joining the Tenement Museum, Kevin Jennings held senior roles in the nonprofit, philanthropic, and governmental sectors. In 1990, Kevin founded the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, a national organization for LGBT and straight teachers, parents, students and community members. Kevin also served as the Assistant Deputy Secretary of Education in the first administration of President Barack Obama from 20092011. He holds degrees from Harvard University, Columbia University’s Teachers College, and Stern School of Business, New York University. He is the author of seven books and the Executive Producer of two historical documentaries. Kevin’s talk will address the importance of preserving things that at one point were considered unimportant and without value, drawing on his years of experience in social activism and his time at the Tenement Museum. The Tenement Museum preserves and interprets the history of immigration through the personal experiences of the generations of newcomers who settled in and built lives on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, America’s iconic immigrant neighborhood.

ENDANGERED PLACES LUNCHEON

Thursday, Feb. 1, 12:00pm – 1:30pm • Four Seasons Ballroom REGINA LOPEZ-WHITESKUNK, Education Director - Ute Indian Museum, Montrose A member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of Towaoc, Colorado, Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk was born and raised in southwestern Colorado. Regina is one of many voices who fought and continue to fight for the honor and protection of Bears Ears National Monument. Since 2013 she has been a member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Leadership and she currently works as the Education Director at the Ute Indian Museum in Montrose, Colorado. Regina will discuss the Power of Place as it relates to Ute culture, Bears Ears National Monument, and her efforts to protect this important cultural and historical resource. The Endangered Places Luncheon is included in attendee registration. The luncheon will also include the announcement of Colorado Preservation, Inc’s 2018 resources listed as Colorado’s Most Endangered Places!

WESTERN HERITAGE LUNCHEON

(a ticketed event)

Friday, Feb. 2, 12:15pm – 1:30pm • Rooms 205/207 DR. JIM POTTER, Principal Archaeologist - Paleowest Archaeology Dr. Potter has worked collaboratively with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe since 2002, when he began directing the Animas La Plata project near Durango, Colorado. This project is the largest tribally administered cultural resources project ever done. Since then, Jim has helped the Tribe attain their status as an official Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO). Since then he has worked closely with the Tribe conducting grant-based preservation projects on tribal lands. Dr. Potter will speak to attendees at the Western Heritage Luncheon about the current preservation efforts in the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Park.

Tattered Cover – This year the Tattered Cover will be selling books related to preservation and the history of Colorado throughout the Conference! Make sure to visit their booth in the lobby on Thursday and Friday of the Conference. Voices of the Plains – We are excited to have the Voices of the Plains join us for the 2018

Conference! This collaborative community project records the stories of individuals from and/or living on the plains. Stop by the recording booth and share your story!

Colorado’s Historic Preservation Tax Credits – Interested in learning more about tax credits for

your project? We have two sessions presented by experts on the topic, but you can also stop by this informational booth and learn more about CPI’s advocacy efforts on behalf of the tax credit as well as information on how to use the credits for your work.

Colorado’s Most Endangered Places Silent Auction – Leave the Conference with a

souvenir and/or unique experience that supports CPI’s Endangered Places Program! Bid on an item in the Silent Auction or purchase a necklace featuring one of Colorado’s Most Endangered Places. Your purchases will support CPI’s Endangered Places Program that works to protect at-risk sites across the state. The auction will once again feature paintings of Colorado’s Most Endangered Places done by renowned Colorado artists from Plein Air Artists Colorado.

Extracurriculars Wednesday:

Stephen Hart Awards (Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. – History Colorado) – History Colorado invites Saving Places attendees to join them for the annual Stephen H. Hart Awards, honoring some of the best preservation and archaeological projects in Colorado.

Thursday:

Thursday’s Plenary Presentation (Thursday, 8:30 a.m. – Four Seasons Ballroom) – Enjoy breakfast and the official start to the Conference with Governor John Hickenlooper and keynote speaker Kevin Jennings. This presentation will invigorate you and prepare you for a day full of education! Thursday’s Endangered Places Luncheon (Thursday, 12:00 p.m. – Four Seasons Ballroom) – Join us for the reveal of the 2018 Endangered Places, the announcement of the 2018 SAVED sites, and a presentation by Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk, Education Director of the Ute Indian Museum and member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of Towaoc, Colorado. Preservation Marketplace and Endangered Places Silent Auction (5:00 p.m. – Four Seasons Ballroom) – Enjoy drinks and appetizers while you visit with our exhibitors and browse the Endangered Places Silent Auction! Always a popular event, this is the perfect opportunity to introduce yourself to someone new and make contacts sure to help you in your preservation work. New this year, attending the Preservation Marketplace could win you a free registration to the 2019 Saving Places Conference! In the back of this program is a bingo sheet, complete the bingo card by visiting all of the exhibitors at the Preservation Marketplace and be entered to win a complimentary registration! Young Preservationists Gathering (7:00 p.m. – Stout Street Social) – Keep the party going and join this gathering for young preservationists, and the young at heart! Discuss your career and preservation in your community with passionate professionals just like you.

Tours - Explore preservation!

Experience preservation in action on one of our many tours this year! We are excited to invite attendees to explore places like the Stanley Marketplace, the new Punch Bowl Social at the Stapleton Airport, the McNichols Building… and more!

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WEDNESDAY

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

WEDNESDAY ALL DAY W1 W2

8:30am – 10:15am

8:00am – 3:00pm

DAY AT THE CAPITOL (Required pre-event sign up to participate) Capitol Building, 1525 Sherman St. 6th floor, Conference Room 603

9:00am – 4:00pm

PROJECT ARCHAEOLOGY CURRICULUM WORKSHOP History Colorado - Martin Room

THURSDAY MORNING PLENARY SESSION BREAKFAST Four Seasons Ballroom

THURSDAY MORNING | BLOCK A

WEDNESDAY TOURS

CREDIT

COLORADO’S HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMERCIAL TAX CREDITS: WHY 10:30am – 11:45am TAX CREDITS ARE IMPORTANT AND HOW THEY CAN BE USED TO WORK FOR YOUR PROJECT

102

THA2

10:30am – 11:45am GIVING YOUR VOICE TO HISTORY

113

THA3

10:30am – 11:45am

MID-CENTURY MODERN ARCHITECTURE FROM THE MOUNTAINS TO THE PLAINS DOCUMENTATION AND PRESERVATION: TECHNOLOGY OF RECORDING THE PAST AND PRESENT

WT6 WT1

PRESERVING THE PLACES THAT MATTER: A TOUR OF THE STAPLETON AIR CONTROL TOWER 11:00am – 1:30pm Meet at Convention Center for Bus Transportation

THA4

10:30am – 11:45am

WT3

1:30pm – 4:00pm

GOVERNOR’S RESIDENCE - PRESERVATION OF COLORADO’S HOME Meet at Convention Center for Bus Transportation

THA5

10:30am – 11:45am DEFEND THE SACRED

WT4

1:00pm – 4:00pm

TOUR OF COLFAX AVENUE: THE LONGEST, WICKEDEST STREET IN AMERICA Meet at Convention Center for Bus Transportation

THA6

10:30am – 11:45am

WT5

4:30pm – 6:00pm

FOUNDATIONS OF DENVER: TOUR WITH HISTORICITY Meet at Convention Center

APA

12:00pm – 1:30pm

LOCATION

CREDIT

WM1

9:00am – 12:00pm

STATE HISTORICAL FUND GRANT WORKSHOP - BEGINNER

113

WM2

9:00am – 12:00pm

STATE HISTORICAL FUND GRANT WORKSHOP - INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED

111

WM3

9:00am – 10:15am

PRESERVING PLACES THAT MATTER - BREATHING NEW LIFE INTO OLD BUILDINGS IN DENVER

WM5

UNLOCKING THE CITY’S SECRETS: HOW DENVER’S CITYWIDE BUILDING 10:30am – 11:45am SURVEY IS OPENING DOORS TO THE PAST

WM6

WESTERN CENTER FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION: IMPROVING STEWARDSHIP 10:30am – 11:45am OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE’S HISTORIC PROPERTIES

WM7

10:30am – 11:00am

HOT TOPIC: WHEN HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMES OF AGE: CAN HISTORY BE FOUND IN A 1960S RESORT COMMUNITY?

104

APA

WM7

11:15am – 11:45am

HOT TOPIC: PUBLIC HISTORY & HOMESTEADS: A CASE STUDY OF BRIGHTON’S HISTORIC FARMSTEAD INVENTORY

104

APA

LOCATION

CREDIT

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

103/105 102

APA

107/109

WA1

1:30pm – 4:30pm

PRESERVATION 101

111

WA2

1:30pm – 4:30pm

COLORADO MAIN STREET WORKSHOP

113

WA3

1:30pm – 2:00pm

HOT TOPIC: GRAND JUNCTION ATOMIC LEGACY LEARNING CENTER

104

WA3

2:15pm – 2:45pm

HOT TOPIC: NEW LIFE FOR A REGIONAL LEGACY - THE HIGH LINE CANAL

104

WA4

1:30pm – 2:45pm

ALCATRAZ - PRISON TO PARK: HSRS AND NEW TECHNOLOGY

WA5

1:30pm – 2:45pm

PUTTING THE “HISTORIC” IN THE COLORADO SCENIC & HISTORIC BYWAYS

102

WA6

3:00pm – 4:15pm

FRUITDALE SCHOOL: A TEN-YEAR TALE OF PERSISTENCE AND PARTNERSHIP

104

WA7

3:00pm – 4:15pm

BRINGING HISTORIC CEMETERIES BACK TO LIFE

103/105

WA8

3:00pm – 4:15pm

NATIONAL HERITAGE AREAS: AMERICA’S OTHER BEST IDEA

107/109

107/109

APA

AIA

APA

WEDNESDAY EVENING 5:30pm – 8:00pm

STEPHEN HART AWARDS | History Colorado Center, 1200 Broadway From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

DEVELOPING SENSITIVE INFILL; CASE STUDIES IN DENVER’S HISTORIC DISTRICTS

CREDIT

107/109 104

AIA HSW

111 103/105

AIA HSW APA

LOCATION

CREDIT

COLORADO’S MOST ENDANGERED PLACES ANNOUNCEMENT LUNCHEON Four Seasons Ballroom

THURSDAY TOURS THT1

APA

LOCATION

THA1

TOUR: THE MCNICHOLS CIVIC CENTER BUILDING 10:30am – 12:30pm Meet at Convention Center - walking tour

WEDNESDAY MORNING

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THURSDAY

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

2:00pm – 4:45pm

OLD MEETS NEW: TOUR OF FRUITDALE SCHOOL LOFTS Meet at Convention Center for Bus Transportation

THURSDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK B THB1

1:45pm – 3:00pm

RAISING MATCH - A ROUNDTABLE ON CLOSING THE FUNDING GAP

113

THB2

1:45pm – 3:00pm

LIGHTNING TALK: FOUR FACETS OF PRESERVATION IN COLORADO

102

THB3

1:45pm – 3:00pm

WHERE WAS THAT? PRESERVING AND UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY HISTORY WITH GIS TOOLS

111

THB4

1:45pm – 3:00pm

HOW TO UPDATE YOUR MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEM AND NOT WRECK YOUR HISTORICAL BUILDING

THB5

1:45pm – 3:00pm

RESTORATION OF THE SOCIEDAD PROTECCIÓN MUTUA DE TRABAJADORES UNIDOS’ (SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF UNITED WORKERS) BUILDING IN ANTONITO

104

THB6

1:45pm – 3:00pm

THE NEW NORMAL: GRAPPLING WITH REHAB OF MID-20TH CENTURY BUILDINGS

107/109

THURSDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK C

103/105

LOCATION

AIA

AIA

CREDIT

THC1

3:15pm – 4:30pm

“ONE OF THESE THINGS IS NOT LIKE THE OTHER:” ARCHITECTURE TRIVIA

111

THC2

3:15pm – 4:30pm

PARTNERS IN PREPAREDNESS: HOW TO PREPARE YOUR SITE OR INSTITUTION FOR DISASTER – AND GET HELP IF ONE OCCURS

102

APA

THC3

3:15pm – 4:30pm

FAÇADE RESTORATION & CLEANING: A MULTIFACETED APPROACH

103/105

AIA

THC4

3:15pm – 4:30pm

ASPEN: CHALLENGES AND REWARDS OF ADHERING TO BEST PRACTICES IN CONSERVATION

104

APA

THC5

3:15pm – 4:30pm

REFLECTED IMAGES: DOCUMENTING LANDSCAPES AND SITES THROUGH IMAGES

107/109

THC6

3:15pm – 3:45pm

HOT TOPIC: CPI AT THE CAPITOL: AN OVERVIEW AND UPDATE ON CPIS EFFORTS TO REAUTHORIZE THE JOB CREATION AND MAIN STREET REVITALIZATION ACT

113

THC6

4:00pm – 4:30pm

HOT TOPIC: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND LANDSCAPE SCALE HISTORIC PRESERVATION

113

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THURSDAY

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

FRIDAY MORNING | BLOCK e continued

THURSDAY EVENING THN1

5:00pm – 7:00pm

PRESERVATION MARKETPLACE AND RECEPTION WITH SILENT AUCTION Four Seasons Ballroom

YOUNG PRESERVATIONISTS RECEPTION THN2 7:00pm – 10:00pm Stout Street Social Hosted by CPI with help from Shannon Haltiwanger and Stefanie Baltzell THN3

7:30pm – 9:00pm

(ask for them when you arrive)

SKI TOWN FORUM DINNER The Irish Rover Pub

FRIDAY

10:30am – 11:45am

FE6

10:30am – 11:45am HOW TOURISM CAN SUPPORT AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

FE7

10:30am – 11:45am

FE8

10:30am – 11:45am GLASS AND WINDOW BASICS - PAST TO FUTURE

TOUR OF THE STANLEY MARKETPLACE Meet at Convention Center for Bus Transportation

1:30pm – 4:00pm

TRIUMPH OF VISION - UNION STATION TRANSFORMATION AND ACTIVATION Meet at Convention Center - Walk to Union Station

FD1

9:00am – 11:45am

WORKSHOP: HISTORIC TAX CREDITS: KEYS TO REVITALIZATION SUCCESS

FD2

9:00am – 10:15am

ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL INVESTIGATIONS ALONG THE OLD SPANISH TRAIL IN COLORADO

9:00am – 10:15am

CREDIT

FF1

1:45pm – 3:00pm

PRESERVATION: AN EXERCISE IN PERSEVERANCE AND PATIENCE

FF2

1:45pm – 3:00pm

THE POWER OF PLACE IN THE SAN LUIS VALLEY

103/105

FF3

1:45pm – 2:15pm

HOT TOPIC: ALTERNATIVE ROOFING MATERIALS

107/109

FF3

2:30pm – 3:00pm

HOT TOPIC: RESTORATION OF THE SPIRES AND TOWERS OF DENVER’S BASILICA

107/109

FF4

1:45pm – 3:00pm

GETTING CREATIVE WITH SECTION 106: EXPLORING ALTERNATIVE MITIGATION

111

102

AIA

APA

COLORADO ASIANS: A HISTORY OF ADVERSITY AND RESILIENCE

201

FF7

1:45pm – 3:00pm

GENTRIFICATION: COMING SOON TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU?

203

FF8

1:45pm – 2:15pm

HOT TOPIC: COMBINING PRESERVATION AND INFILL DEVELOPMENT: A SIMPLE CASE STUDY  

104

APA

FF8

2:30pm – 3:00pm

HOT TOPIC: INTEGRATING HISTORIC PRESERVATION GUIDELINES AND FORM-BASED CODE: FORT WORTH, TX STOCKYARDS

104

APA

LOCATION

CREDIT

103/105 AIA

203

AIA

FD6

9:00am – 9:30am

HOT TOPIC: LINCOLN HILLS, FROM NECESSITY TO OPPORTUNITY

113

FD6

9:45am – 10:15am

HOT TOPIC: NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK HERITAGE AND HISTORY INITIATIVES IN COLORADO

113

FD7

9:00am – 10:15am

MAIN STREET AND CERTIFIED LOCAL GOVERNMENTS: NATURAL PARTNER

9:00am – 10:15am

TELLING HIDDEN STORIES: REIMAGINING PRESERVATION FOR THE COMMUNITY

FE4

LOCATION

WESTERN HERITAGE LUNCHEON 205/207

1:45pm – 3:00pm

IS IT WORKING? REVISITING ADOBE TREATMENTS IN THE FACE OF THE SSI

FINDING REFUGE ALONG THE STRANGER’S PATH: THE HIDDEN HISTORIES 10:30am – 11:45am AND GEOGRAPHIES OF LGBTQ SPACE

AIA HSW

FF6

9:00am – 10:15am

10:30am – 11:45am THE TURNABOUT OF TRINIDAD

104

AIA, APA

FD5

FE3

AIA

201

AIA

FE2

107/109

113

111

DOCUMENTATION AND PRESERVATION OF CULTURAL TRADITIONS OF THE 10:30am – 11:45am INDIO-HISPANO COMMUNITIES IN THE UPPER RÍO GRANDE REGION A MULTIMEDIA PROJECT

APA

LINEAR HISTORIC RESOURCES: UNIQUE CHALLENGES AND PRESERVATION TECHNIQUES FOR HISTORIC TRAILS

MISSIONS PRESERVATION IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

WORKSHOP: HISTORIC TAX CREDITS: KEYS TO REVITALIZATION SUCCESS

203

1:45pm – 3:00pm

9:00am – 10:15am

9:00am – 11:45am

113

FF5

102

FE1

CREDIT

CREDIT

PANNED IN COLORADO, WINDOW REHABILITATION, SCRAPE V. ANTISCRAPE AND THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR’S STANDARDS

FRIDAY MORNING | BLOCK e

LOCATION

LOCATION

FD4

FD8

10

CREDIT

10:30am – 1:30pm

FRIDAY MORNING | BLOCK d

FD3

THE RISING IMPORTANCE OF MID-CENTURY MODERN IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

FRIDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK f

FRIDAY TOURS

FT2

SUPPORT NETWORK FOR THE STEWARDSHIP OF THE STATE’S ARTIFACTS AND PALEONTOLOGICAL SPECIMEN

FE5

12:15pm – 1:30 pm

FT1

FRIDAY

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

107/109

FRIDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK G

APA

FG1

3:15pm – 4:30pm

STAR CU-DENVER PRESERVATION PROJECTS

203

FG2

3:15pm – 3:45pm

HOT TOPIC: A ROLLER COASTER HISTORY OF DENVER’S LAKESIDE AMUSEMENT PARK

104

FG2

4:00pm – 4:30pm

HOT TOPIC: DENVER’S STREETCAR LEGACY AND ITS ROLE IN NEIGHBORHOOD WALKABILITY

104

FG3

3:15pm – 4:30pm

SUPPORTING ARCHAEOLOGY IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT

102

FG4

3:15pm – 4:30pm

DENVER MOUNTAIN PARKS: THE POWER OF PLACE & PARTNERSHIP

FG5

3:15pm – 4:30pm

DIGITAL TOOLS FOR DESIGN REVIEW

FG6

3:15pm – 4:30pm

THE SAARINEN/SOLDNER LEGACIES: TWO STORIES OF PRESERVATION

FG7

3:15pm – 4:30pm

FG8 FG8

104

LOCATION

CREDIT

201

AIA, APA

102 103/105

APA

111

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

APA

103/105 111 107/109

APA

CERTIFIED LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT WORKSHOP

201

APA

3:15pm – 3:45pm

HOT TOPIC: THE BRIDGE IS FIGHTING BACK: SAVING THE DOLORES RIVER BRIDGE

113

4:00pm – 4:30pm

HOT TOPIC: PRESERVING THE ORDINARY: SECTION 106 IN PRACTICE

113

AIA

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SATURDAY SATURDAY

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

CREDIT

S1

9:00am – 12:00pm

LODO WALKING TOUR Meet at the Convention Center (Blue Bear)

APA

S2

9:00am – 4:00pm

CLG WORKSHOP: SECTION 106 - WHAT’S IN IT FOR YOUR COMMUNITY? History Colorado

APA

S3

3:00pm – 6:00pm

SATURDAY TEA AT THE LUMBER BARON INN Lumber Baron Inn

SATURDAY LODO WALKING TOUR

SATURDAY TEA AT THE LUMBER BARON INN

SILENT AUCTION SNEAK PEEK Beginning Wednesday morning, Conference attendees can “Buy it Now” and start bidding on a great collection of Silent Auction items. Interested in staying a night in a historic hotel? Or attending 2018 Comic Con? How about a private tour and tasting at Leopold Bros. Distillery? Then we recommend you visit Colorado’s Most Endangered Places Silent Auction! Join us at the Four Seasons Ballroom on Thursday, February 1 from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. for the close of the auction while enjoying the entertainment of the Preservation Marketplace. Expect live music, appetizers, drinks, and mingling! CPI friends and supporters have donated some terrific items for this year’s Silent Auction, which is a fundraiser for the Endangered Places Program… Now it’s up to you to BID, BID, BID!

Below are just a few highlights of the 180+ items that will be for sale at the Silent Auction! Check your tote bag for a more complete list of items for bid. • Two 3-day passes for the 2018 Denver Comic Con at the Colorado Convention Center. Experience the convention, the panel, and celebrity guests from features like Star Wars, Adventure Time, and Riverdale. • Be a fireman for a day with the South Park Rail! This is a unique opportunity to participate in the return of steam to Como, one of the quintessential Narrow Gauge locations in Colorado. • Private tour and tasting at the Leopold Bros. distillery for up to 20 people on a Sunday, when the distillery and taproom are closed, and one bottle of Leopold Bros. New York Apple Whiskey. • Two Saturday afternoon session tickets to the 2018 Great American Beer Festival. • Goodnight Barn Historic Preservation Committee Gift Basket that includes items unique to Pueblo as well as two passes to the Pueblo Heritage Museum, an overnight stay at the Rusted Poppy B&B, passes to the Sangre de Cristo Arts Center and Buell Children’s Museum, passes to the Steelworks Museum, and more! • Tour Denver on a Vespa! You’ll stop by Civic Center Park, the Colorado Capitol, the Molly Brown House, the Governor’s Mansion, and plenty more on this adventurous guided tour. Alternatively, you can opt for a three-hour Vespa ride around Red Rocks! • A spot in the John Fielder Spring Colors Photography Workshop.

Anderson H a l l a s Arch it e cts

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PARTNERS IN OUR COMMUNITIES

HISTORIC AND CONTEMPORARY DESIGN

w w w. a n d a r c h . c o m

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

13


WEDNESDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY ALL DAY

WEDNESDAY TOURS

■ W1 | 2018 DAY AT THE CAPITOL

■ WT1 | PRESERVING THE PLACES THAT MATTER:

8:00am – 3:00pm • Location: Capitol Building, Conference Room 603

A TOUR OF THE STAPLETON AIR CONTROL TOWER

Join us for a fun and informative day under the dome at Colorado’s Capitol where you will hone your legislative knowledge and lobby your legislator to support the 2018 reauthorization of the state historic preservation tax credit!

11:00am – 1:30pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center for bus transportation The historic Stapleton Airport closed its doors in 1995, and after 20 years of vacancy, its Air Traffic Control Tower is now home to a new Punch Bowl Social. Punch Bowl Social is an award-winning, Denver-based, “entertainment” business that combines “old school” gaming with culinary and craft beverage experiences.

The day will include an interactive session with government affairs professionals to ensure you have the tools to engage with your legislator. You will also hear from those who have utilized the tax credit to spur economic activity in their communities. Attendees will end their day meeting with elected officials and witnessing the political process in action. This session is open to all and your participation will aid in passing one of the preservation community’s top legislative priorities in 2018.

■ W2 | PROJECT ARCHAEOLOGY CURRICULUM WORKSHOP 9:00am – 4:00pm • Location: History Colorado - Martin Room

Colorado is home to over 100,000 documented archaeological sites, however, teaching archaeology is often easier said than done. Learn how to bring archaeology lesson plans to your community by joining us for a one-day workshop on Project Archaeology curriculum. Project Archaeology is a heritage education program useful for everyone interested in teaching archaeology, historic preservation, and our nation’s rich cultural legacy. The curriculum teaches scientific inquiry, citizenship, and cultural understanding through hands-on archaeology lesson plans. The curriculum was developed by professional archaeologists and teachers, and is jointly sponsored by Montana State University and the Bureau of Land Management. Education materials are aligned to both Common Core State Standards, Colorado Teacher Quality Standards, and Colorado Department of Education Standards. This session is free to attend and will be hosted at History Colorado in the Martin Room. Lunch will be provided. Speakers: Katie Arntzen (History Colorado State Historical Fund) Danielle Hoefer (WinterTree Consulting, LLC)

Speakers: Megan Freckelton (Punch Bowl Social) Frank Mataipule, (Punch Bowl Social)

■ WT3 | GOVERNOR’S RESIDENCE - PRESERVATION OF COLORADO’S HOME 1:30pm – 4:00pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center for bus transportation Join us for a behind the scenes tour of the stunning Residence, the Governor’s Gardens, Carriage House, restored green house and elegant Cabinet Room. Current and ongoing restoration projects will also be highlighted during the tour. Attendees will meet at the Colorado Convention Center for Conference check in, bus transportation will be provided. Speakers: Nicole Bopp (Governor’s Residence Preservation Fund)

■ WT4 | TOUR OF COLFAX AVENUE: THE LONGEST, WICKEDEST STREET IN AMERICA

APA

Join our friends at the Colfax Ave Business Improvement District for a tour of the “longest, wickedest street in America,” Colfax Avenue. Colfax has seen many evolutions, from being the main thoroughfare to the mountains during the Gold Rush, to the stomping grounds of Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady, to the eclectic main street that it is today. Learn about some iconic establishments on Colfax and how historic buildings can add value and also create challenges along the corridor. The Colfax Ave Business Improvement District (colfaxave.com) will share with attendees their vision of how they plan to improve Colfax while maintaining the character and grit that so many love.

■ WT6 | TOUR: THE MCNICHOLS CIVIC CENTER BUILDING

Speakers: Frank Locantore (Colfax Ave BID) Michelle Valeri (Colfax Ave BID) Annie Levinsky (Historic Denver, Inc.) Alison Salutz (Historic Denver, Inc.)

10:30am – 12:30pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center - walking tour The McNichols Civic Center Building exemplifies the struggle many historic buildings experience. Opening in 1910 as an Andrew Carnegie funded Denver Public Library, the building was a symbol of knowledge available to all until the Library was transformed into municipal office space. During this process the massive grand staircase, which once led to the “piano noble,” was demolished and replaced with a lower level entry court. Much of the decorative ornamentation typical to a Carnegie was deemed to be excessive and either covered with plaster or unfortunately removed.

■ WT5 | FOUNDATIONS OF DENVER: TOUR WITH HISTORICITY 4:30pm – 6:00pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center Walk in the footsteps of Denver’s founding citizens and along its oldest streets to experience the storied and complex connection between the people who formed this city and the place they came to call home.

The municipal offices were subsequently relocated in the 1990s, and the former Carnegie jewel remained dark in Denver’s most important civic space, Civic Center Park. The building was reopened in 2010 for the Biennial of the Americas art exhibit, which clearly demonstrated the potential of the building, to be a unique event venue and gallery space. The building has since undergone a series of rehabilitation projects to replace the non-original aluminum windows, construct a new forecourt at the main entry, and insert a service elevator and new restrooms for both park visitors and event attendees. This tour will discuss the building’s history, its influence on the design of Civic Center Park, the struggles involved in the rehabilitation, and the final outcome.

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Join the team behind the new Punch Bowl location for a tour to see how the project honors the legacy of the airport tower while preserving the character of the neighborhood. The project is a great example of adaptive reuse and design, as many elements of the historic tower were saved and incorporated into the interior design theme highlighting a “golden age of flight.”

1:00pm – 4:00pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center for bus transportation

WEDNESDAY TOURS

14

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

Guided by two native Coloradans and natural storytellers, this tour will uncover the economic opportunities and social enticements of early Denver and explore how geography, family and politics served to polarize the city in its infancy. Together, we’ll confront the historical legacy that forms our diverse heritage as Coloradans. After 1 mile and 1.5 hours, you’ll walk away with a renewed sense of the importance of remembering the past in order to protect it moving forward.

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15


WEDNESDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY MORNING

■ WM1 | STATE HISTORICAL FUND GRANT WORKSHOP - BEGINNERS

9:00am – 12:00pm • Location: 113

Project funding is a critical component to any preservation project. Join State Historical Fund staff for a beginners training session that will provide guidance and tips for individuals new to obtaining and managing a State Historical Fund grant. The State Historical Fund grants funds throughout the year for preservation projects including restoration and rehabilitation, architectural assessments, archaeological excavations, designation and interpretation, preservation planning studies, and education and training programs. Speakers: Megan Eflin (History Colorado State Historical Fund)

■■ WM2 | STATE HISTORICAL FUND GRANT WORKSHOP - INTERMEDIATE / ADVANCED 9:00am – 12:00pm • Location: 111 This training session, presented by State Historical Fund staff, will provide guidance and tips for obtaining and managing a State Historical Fund grant to those already familiar with the process. The State Historical Fund grants funds throughout the year for preservation projects including restoration and rehabilitation, architectural assessments, archaeological excavations, designation and interpretation, preservation planning studies, and education and training programs. Speakers: Gheda Gayou (History Colorado State Historical Fund)

■ WM3 | PRESERVING PLACES THAT MATTER - BREATHING NEW LIFE INTO OLD BUILDINGS IN DENVER

9:00am – 10:15am • Location: 103/105 • Panel Discussion

APA

Across the U.S. during the 60’s and 70’s, buildings that were considered “old” were often bulldozed to make way for what was seen as the new, modern, steel-and-glass style of architecture. Today, buildings with historic character are finding new life by preserving the unique aspects of the building while adapting the building to suit a modern-day tenant. Join us for a panel discussion with Denver developers from Larimer Square, OZ Architecture, Urban Villages and Zeppelin Places. Projects to be discussed include: The Source, Larimer Square, Punch Bowl Social’s reuse of the Stapleton Airport’s air traffic control tower, Hotel Teatro, the Benjamin Moore Building, Gold Star Factory, the Sugar Building, and more. Speakers: Jon Buerge (Urban Villages), Jenna McKnight (Dezeen), Rebecca Stone (OZ Architecture), Kyle Zeppelin (Zeppelin Places), Jeff Hermanson (Larimer Associates)

HOW DENVER’S CITYWIDE BUILDING SURVEY IS OPENING DOORS TO THE PAST 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 102 APA Discover Denver is a citywide building survey focused on identifying the buildings and stories that matter to Denver’s history. Find out how you can implement a technology-driven, volunteer-based survey in your own community. And, learn about planned efforts to make the project’s software available for survey efforts throughout the state. Come learn Discover Denver’s methodology, technology, lessons learned, and surprising discoveries made thus far in surveyed neighborhoods. Speakers: Beth Glandon (Historic Denver, Inc.), Kara Hahn (City and County of Denver)

■ WM6 | WESTERN CENTER FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION:

IMPROVING STEWARDSHIP OF NPS HISTORIC PROPERTIES

10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 107/109

More than ten years ago, a visionary public-private partnership developed between the National Trust for Historic Preservation and National Park Service. In an effort to help the Park Service meet its mission to preserve the cultural resources in its care for future generations, the National Trust entered into an agreement with the agency to prevent the loss of 13 log buildings at White Grass Dude Ranch in Grand Teton National Park. These buildings were rehabilitated and became the preservation training facility for Park Service employees and volunteers. Named the Western Center for Historic Preservation, the site was completed in time for the Park Service’s 2016 centennial celebration. Learn how this public-private partnership was structured, and how the facility is now helping address the agency’s stewardship responsibilities including the enormous $12 billion backlog of deferred maintenance on cultural resources. Speakers: Barbara Pahl (National Trust for Historic Preservation), Jenny Buddenborg (National Trust for Historic Preservation), Katherine Wonson (Western Center for Historic Preservation, National Park Service)

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■ WM7 | HOT TOPIC: WHEN HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMES OF AGE:

CAN HISTORY BE FOUND IN A 1960’S RESORT COMMUNITY APA

10:30am – 11:00am • Location: 104

When should a town begin a historic preservation program? Is 40 – 50 years after its founding long enough? The “Snowmass-at-Aspen” Ski Resort first opened on December 15, 1967 with great fan-fare. It was conceived as a ski-in, ski-out resort complex, developed after its wildly successful sister city, Aspen. The area was incorporated as Snowmass Village in 1977. Join representatives from Snowmass for a presentation on the steps being taken to create a preservation program that will further strengthen Snowmass Village’s tourism economy and build a stronger year-round community. Speakers: Britta Anne Gustafson (The Story of Snowmass, Snowmass Sun) Julie Ann Woods (Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado)

■ WM7 | HOT TOPIC: PUBLIC HISTORY AND HOMESTEADS:

A CASE STUDY OF BRIGHTON’S HISTORIC FARMSTEAD INVENTORY APA

11:15am – 11:45am • Location: 104

This session will present the results and lessons learned from a 2015-2016 survey of historic farmsteads located in Adams and Weld Counties. This session will examine ideal survey strategies for performing intensive and reconnaissance-level surveys for farmsteads in rural Colorado, as well as the importance of using rural historic landscape surveys as an alternative approach to traditional survey methods. Since many historic agricultural properties in Colorado face the threat of future development, the session will recommend methodologies to follow in order to capture critical information related to agricultural development, to preserve northern Colorado’s agricultural history. This session will also cover potential applications of historic interpretation, education programs, and future surveys which may be beneficial to preserving these significant rural historic resources. This course will be very useful for municipal preservation planners, consultants, and historic preservationists of all levels. Speakers: Erin Drake (Spirit Environmental) Margaret M. Tillman (Spirit Environmental)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

■ WA1 | PRESERVATION 101

■ WM5 | UNLOCKING THE CITY’S SECRETS:

16

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

1:30pm – 4:30pm • Location: 111 Historic preservation can be confusing. What is the difference in the many preservation organizations? What programs are available for assistance, training, and/or funding? Join leaders from a diverse group of national, state, and local organizations to learn how they can help you achieve your project goals. Participants include the National Park Service, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, History Colorado, Colorado Preservation, Inc., Colorado Archaeological Society, Colorado Historical Foundation, and Colorado’s Main Street Program - DOLA. Come armed with questions! Speakers:

Ed Jakaitis (History Colorado), Erika Warzel (History Colorado), Mark Rodman (History Colorado), Amy Cole (National Park Service), Ann Pritzlaff (Past Member - Advisory Council on Historic Preservation), Jennifer Buddenborg (National Trust for Historic Preservation), Steve Turner (History Colorado), Gayle Langley (Colorado Main Street), Jennifer Orrigo Charles (Colorado Preservation, Inc.)

■ WA2 | COLORADO MAIN STREET WORKSHOP 1:30pm – 4:30pm • Location: 113

APA

This workshop explains the broad overview of the National Main Street Program and explores the long-term benefits for communities involved with the Colorado Main Street Program. Main Street staff will discuss the methods, resources and partnerships used by the program to help Colorado communities statewide! Learn how your community can benefit from this important program and leave with new tools and upcoming opportunities to bring back to your own communities. Speakers:

Kathy LaPlante (National Main Street Center), Gayle Langley (Colorado Department of Local Affairs), Becky Frank (City of Victor), Johanna Jamison (Colorado Department of Local Affairs), Tom Gougeon (Gates Family Foundation), Alan Matlosz (Colorado Public Finance Group of George K. Baum & Company), Lisa Popvich (Main Street Steamboat), Tim Stroh (History Colorado)

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17


WEDNESDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

■ WA3 | HOT TOPIC: GRAND JUNCTION ATOMIC LEGACY LEARNING CENTER 1:30pm – 2:00pm • Location: 104

During the Cold War, the Grand Junction Department of Energy (DOE) Office was at the center of the nation’s domestic uranium exploration and procurement efforts, known as the Manhattan Project. The Manhattan Project was a research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons. In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy transferred 46 acres of the original 55.71-acre site to Riverview Technology Corporation (RTC), a business development nonprofit sponsored by Mesa County and the City of Grand Junction. The complex has since been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. Currently, the DOE Grand Junction Office is working to turn a Manhattan Project-era log cabin at the site into a learning center to engage the public. Come learn about the history of the Manhattan Project in Colorado and the work being done to turn the historic complex into a learning center for the public. Speakers: Padraic Benson (US Department of Energy), Laurena Davis (Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.)

■ WA3 | HOT TOPIC: NEW LIFE FOR A REGIONAL LEGACY - THE HIGH LINE CANAL 2:15pm – 2:45pm • Location: 104

More than 130 years ago, enterprising English businessmen commissioned the construction of a 71-mile canal to irrigate the dry plains of the Denver Basin. Known as the High Line Canal, this engineering feat of its time never reached its full potential as an irrigation channel due to severe water seepage and a weak water right. Today, the Canal is owned and operated by Denver Water and still serves over 60 water customers. Its adjacent service road has become a beloved path and slice of nature for 500,000 people annually - hikers, joggers, cyclists, equestrians, bird watchers and others.

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

The Colorado Byways carefully manages the protection of significant resources in tandem with the sharing of their local heritage with visitors. This panel of Byway executive directors will share with attendees how preservation has supported and continued the unique story along their byway. Speakers: Scott Bruntjen (Peak to Peak’s Tourism and Recreation Program), Tim Sandsmark (Jefferson County Open Space), Anna Scott (Ernest and Lillian E. Campbell Foundation), Lenore Bates (Colorado Department of Transportation)

■■ WA6 | FRUITDALE SCHOOL: A TEN-YEAR TALE OF PERSISTENCE AND PARTNERSHIP 3:00pm – 4:15pm • Location: 104

APA

Located in the heart of Wheat Ridge, the Fruitdale School was constructed in the 1920’s by noted Denver architect and developer Temple Buell. The site served as a public school for nearly 125 years, until it was decommissioned in 2007. The future of the property remained uncertain and the building faced threat of demolition until the site was purchased by Hartman Ely Investments in 2015. Today the school is an example of a successful preservation project developed with the use of historic tax credits. The Fruitdale school recently celebrated its 90th birthday with the grand opening of the Fruitdale School Lofts—a 16-unit mixed income apartment community made possible through patience, persistence, partnership, and a creative stack of various funding sources. Join representatives from the city and the project to learn how historic tax credits and other funding sources can be used to fill the funding gap with your historic adaptive reuse projects. Speakers: Jim Hartman (Hartman Ely Investments - HEI) Lauren Mikulak (City of Wheat Ridge Development Department)

■ WA7 | BRINGING HISTORIC CEMETERIES BACK TO LIFE 3:00pm – 4:15pm • Location: 103/105

Recently, historic features of the canal were documented in an official survey conducted to help advise long-term planning of the canal. Join the High Line Canal Conservancy in a session where they will share a case study of their ongoing efforts to proactively plan for (and implement) long-term protections and enhancements for this beloved corridor.

This session presents historic cemeteries as destinations that celebrate a town’s heritage and blend the contemporary with the past. Join this panel of experts for an exploration of the ways that cemeteries can be used creatively to highlight a town’s history and unique story, using art and creative events to preserve the sites and engage visitors.

Join to learn about this inspiring project, including the High Line Canal’s rich history, today’s challenges, and the Conservancy’s collaborative efforts.

Panelists will discuss the art and history exhibitions found in cemeteries, the research done on Hispano cemeteries, and how to establish community development around historic cemeteries.

Speakers: Harriet Crittenden LaMair (High Line Canal Conservancy), Barbara Stocklin-Steely (Square Moon Consultants, LLC)

Moderated by Estella Cole, panelists will answer questions and attendees will be encouraged to take part in the discussion.

■ WA4 | ALCATRAZ - PRISON TO PARK: HISTORIC STRUCTURE REPORTS AND NEW TECHNOLOGY

1:30pm – 2:45pm • Location: 107/109

AIA

An ongoing challenge when documenting historic buildings is integrating information from previous reports and new technologies into one cohesive document. Using the Main Prison on Alcatraz Island as a case study, speakers will present how traditional documentation techniques (including historic accounts, photos, reports, and drawings) were used to retain existing knowledge and integrate new findings in the new report. Speakers will discuss the use and evolution of technology, including 360 cameras and 3D modeling, and their role in improving documentation of existing conditions. Alcatraz provides the perfect example for this discussion as it has seen many uses in its history, including: military barracks, military prison, federal penitentiary, Native American occupation site, and national park. Speakers: Kristen Craig (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC) Rachel Koleski (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC)

■ WA5 | PUTTING THE “HISTORIC” IN THE COLORADO SCENIC & HISTORIC BYWAYS

1:30pm – 2:45pm • Location: 102

The Colorado Scenic and Historic Byways program isn’t just a list of roads connecting one place to another. Colorado’s 26 Byways have been carefully selected to awe, instruct, delight, inform, physically challenge, soothe, and bolster the physical and spiritual health of the thousands of travelers who traverse Colorado’s chosen trails. There isn’t one formula that defines a Colorado Byway, but when you are driving, cycling, or walking on one of these routes you feel a “wow” factor that can’t be denied. Whether you are an outdoor recreationist, history buff, nature lover, tourist, or conservationist, you will recognize the work of devoted locals who share their bounty with you through resource stewardship. And that devotion is paid back to the local businesses, non-profits, and local citizens through renewed pride in their resources, community coalescence, and economic development.

18

WEDNESDAY

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From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

Speakers: Patricia Carmody (Patricia Carmody Consulting), Estella Cole (Colorado Historic Cemetary Association - CHCA) Ruth E. Lambert (San Juan Mountains Association), Annette Stott (University of Denver School of Art and Art History)

■ WA8 | NATIONAL HERITAGE AREAS: AMERICA’S OTHER BEST IDEA

3:00pm – 4:15pm • Location: 107/109

National Heritage Areas (NHAs) are places designated by Congress, where cultural, ecological, and historical resources combine to form a nationally important landscape. NHAs are lived-in communities that connect, foster, and promote pride, stewardship, preservation, conservation and economic development for the people who live and work there. Today, there are 49 National Heritage Areas throughout the country. Over 87 million people have visited them, creating revenue for their regions. Come and see what Colorado’s 3 NHAs are doing and can do for you. Speakers: Kathleen Benedict (Poudre Heritage Alliance), Victoria Martinez (Sangre De Cristo National Heritage Area), Andrew Spencer (South Park National Heritage Area)

WEDNESDAY EVENING

STEPHEN HART AWARDS

5:30pm – 8:00pm • Location: History Colorado, 1200 Broadway History Colorado invites you to attend their free annual celebration recognizing outstanding projects and individual achievements in archaeology and historic preservation throughout Colorado.

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19


THURSDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

THURSDAY MORNING

PLENARY PRESENTATION AND WELCOME TO THE CONFERENCE

8:30am – 10:15am • Location: Four Seasons Ballroom

Join us Thursday, Feb. 1 at 8:30 a.m. for the official kickoff to Colorado Preservation, Inc’s Saving Places Conference. Governor John Hickenlooper will start our plenary presentation with remarks on his view of the importance of preservation in Colorado, followed by questions from the audience. CPI’s keynote presentation will be given by Kevin Jennings, the new president of the Tenement Museum in New York City. The Tenement Museum preserves and interprets the history of immigration through the personal experiences of the generations of newcomers who settled in and built lives on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, America’s iconic immigrant neighborhood. Kevin’s talk will draw on his years of activism and his time at the Tenement Museum to discuss the importance of preserving things that at one time were considered by some to be unimportant and without value. A light breakfast will be served.

THURSDAY MORNING | BLOCK A

■■ THA1 | COLORADO’S HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMERCIAL TAX CREDITS:

WHY TAX CREDITS ARE IMPORTANT AND HOW THEY CAN BE USED TO WORK FOR YOUR PROJECT

10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 102

In 2015, Colorado improved and enhanced its Historic Preservation Tax Credit to allow larger projects and non-profits to benefit from restoring historic commercial buildings, but high-profile properties are not the only ones that qualify! This session will cover the application process, the status of the current tax credit cap, and the type of improvements that are included. Come learn from a panel of experts whether your project will qualify, and how your bottom line can be uplifted through the use of Colorado’s Historic Preservation tax credit program. Speakers: Drew Notestine (Thomas and Tyler, LLC), Joe Saldibar (History Colorado), Ariel Steele (Tax Credit Connection)

THURSDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ THA4 | DOCUMENTATION AND PRESERVATION: TECHNOLOGY OF RECORDING THE PAST 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 104

AIA HSW

Documentation data forms the foundation for condition assessments and analysis, the understanding of structural systems, recording deformations, calculating in-situ hygrothermal and pressure data across building assemblies, and conditions of concealed elements these are what the tools of MBS (Measured Building Survey), digital field survey documentation, and NDE (Non Destructive Testing) can assess for the evaluation and development of existing buildings; invaluable tools for Preservation Project planning. Speakers: Natalie Feinberg Lopez (Built Environment Evolution), Brandon C. Fiske (Quinn Evans Architects), Donald Harvey (Atkinson-Noland & Associates)

■ THA5 | DEFEND THE SACRED

10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 111 To Indigenous Peoples, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s confrontation about the placement of the Dakota Access Pipeline on sacred ground is a spiritual battle. To understand why the Sacred is being defended we must understand what is sacred, why it is sacred, and why defending it matters. This panel will use the Standing Rock protest to begin the discussion about why sacred beliefs and culture should be considered, understood and not dismissed about Standing Rock and beyond. Speakers: John Gritts (U.S. Department of Education), Brett Shelton (Native American Rights Fund), Kimberly Varilek (Regional Federal Agency), Richard Williams (American Indian College Fund)

■ THA6 | DEVELOPING SENSITIVE INFILL: CASE STUDIES IN DENVER’S HISTORIC DISTRICTS

10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 103/105

AIA HSW APA

Infill is a common issue facing most historic districts and creating sensitive infill can be a challenging and rigorous process. Join Denver’s Landmark Preservation staff as they discuss their design review process and how it works in a quickly growing and developing city. The session will highlight infill aesthetics from traditional to modern and present case studies showing the do’s and don’ts of sensitive infill. Speakers: Brittany Bryant (City and County of Denver), Krystal Marquez (City and County of Denver), Jessica White (City and County of Denver)

■ THA2 | GIVING YOUR VOICE TO HISTORY 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 113

COLORADO’S MOST ENDANGERED PLACES ANNOUNCEMENT LUNCHEON

“Gaman” means to silently endure the unbearable with patience and dignity. So it was that 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans, forcibly removed from the west coast during World War II for reasons of “national security,” endured incarceration. Allowed to take only what could be carried by hand and with just 48 hours’ notice, anyone with as little as 1/16 Japanese blood was removed first to horse stalls at temporary assembly centers then to prison camps surrounded by barbed wire. When the war ended, inmates were faced with relocation – again. Almost as quickly as they lost their original homes and businesses, they were faced with sorting belongings that accumulated during their incarceration. Much was simply taken to the local dump. These objects remained mostly untouched for decades until they were excavated during an archaeological dig. The significance of their discovery is the representation of previously unknown stories. Most of the inmates never spoke of their experience in these prisons, but each broken plate or teacup, long-lost marble, and empty bottle tells a story. Through these objects, the stories that inmates could never verbalize are finally being told.

12:00pm – 1:30pm • Location: Four Seasons Ballroom

Included in your registration, Thursday’s Endangered Places Luncheon will highlight Colorado’s threatened historic resources and the groups that are working to save them. 2018 will be mark the 21st year that CPI has announced Colorado’s Most Endangered Places at the Conference. Throughout the years the luncheon has highlighted over 100 historic sites. Over 40 of these sites have since been designated as Saved and only six have been lost. Join us for the announcement of the 2018 Endangered Places and a presentation by Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk, a member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of Towaoc, Colorado and current Education Director at the Ute Indian Museum in Montrose, Colorado.

THURSDAY TOURS

■■ THT1 | OLD MEETS NEW: TOUR OF FRUITDALE SCHOOL LOFTS

Speakers: Bonnie Clark (University of Denver), Mitch Homma, Marge Taniwaki

■ THA3 | MID-CENTURY MODERN ARCHITECTURE FROM THE MOUNTAINS TO THE PLAINS 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 107/109

This session will explore the cultural, economic, and architectural development that occurred in Colorado during the post-War years. Speakers will explore how the unique environments and cultures found throughout Colorado influenced the overarching mid-century modern movement. The session will examine outside influences such as Frank Lloyd Wright and Joseph Eichler, and trace how these inspirations were modified by the unique conditions in Colorado. Speakers will present on Eugene Sternberg’s Mountain Usonian style buildings, Denver’s Krisana Park, and mid-century modernization on the plains. Attendees will learn how to understand and identify the characteristics that make the mid-century modern movement in Colorado unique. Speakers: Abigail Christman (City and County of Denver), Melanie Short (Robson Forensic), Arianthé C. Stettner

2:00pm – 4:45pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center for bus transportation Fruitdale School was originally designed by Denver architect and developer Temple Buell in 1927, and it served as a public school until 2007. The property has since been transformed into 16 apartments which opened to tenants in October 2017.

The property is in the National Register of Historic Places and utilized state and federal historic preservation tax credits as part of its complex financing. Each unit is unique, featuring original wall materials, reconstructed original chalkboards in some units, original windows with storm windows, historically compatible new windows in some areas, and even basketball backboards in the converted gymnasium. Sustainability features include xeric and edible landscaping, electric vehicle charging stations, high-efficiency lighting/HVAC systems, super-insulation and ground/roof-mounted solar panels. Join the property owner and developer, Hartman Ely Investments and the City of Wheat Ridge, for an inside look at the Fruitdale School Lofts. Speakers: Lauren Mikulak (City of Wheat Ridge/Wheat Ridge Housing Authority), Jim Hartman (Hartman Ely Investments)

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From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

■ Beginner ■ intermediate ■ advanced

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THURSDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

THURSDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK B

■ THB1 | RAISING MATCH: A ROUNDTABLE ON CLOSING THE FUNDING GAP 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 113

This round table discussion will cover challenges and successes in fundraising to raise match for historic preservation projects, many of which are funded by the State Historical Fund. Sometimes this can be a daunting task and grantees will bring stories of success, heartbreak, and astounding creativity in raising the required match. This session will require attendee participation and courage. Surrounded by empathetic listeners, each participant should plan to share one-two examples of strategies that have worked for them and what they learned from the process. Speakers: Cindy Nasky (Colorado Preservation, Inc.) Ronda Dorchester (Historic Fraser, Inc.)

■ THB2 | LIGHTNING TALK: FOUR FACETS OF PRESERVATION IN COLORADO 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 102

AIA

This session includes four dynamic presentations covering Colorado preservation projects and topics. Each presenter will talk for 15 minutes with slides changing every 30 seconds. This fast-paced format will provide a quick and highly informative overview of topics including, the “6 Degrees of Preservation,” “Civil Defense Bunker – The Mothballing of a Temporary Structure,” “History and Downfall of Sarabond Mortar Additive,” and “Preservation: It Takes a Village.” Speakers: Nan Anderson (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC), Lawrence Graham (JVA,Inc.), Nicole Lane (Martin/Martin, Inc.), Natalie Lord (Form+Works Design Group, LLC), Kristin Craig (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC)

■ THB3 | WHERE WAS THAT? PRESERVING AND UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY HISTORY WITH GIS TOOLS 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 111

The Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, along with its partners at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and Tierra Plan, have developed a unique, innovative digital tool called the Story of Us. This online platform and interactive exhibit is a new, engaging way for the museum to tell stories and preserve the heritage of the Pikes Peak region. The platform highlights the museum’s rich historic collections and integrates them with modern GIS mapping technology. It helps visitors envision how the community has changed over time and encourages a street-by-street exploration of the city. It answers the most common question our visitors ask, “where was that?” Additionally, community members can become part of the Story of Us by submitting their own content into the online mapping portal; including photographs, videos, documents, and personal accounts. The project will continue to collect and preserve the history and geography of our community for decades to come – serving as a powerful connection between people and place. This session discusses how the project drew on local resources to create a vital and unique resource that can serve as a model for other communities. Speakers: Leah Davis Witherow (Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum), John Harner (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs), Kevin Knapp (Tierra Plan), Matt Mayberry (Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum)

■ THB4 | HOW TO UPDATE YOUR MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEM AND NOT

WRECK YOUR HISTORICAL BUILDING 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 103/105 AIA

The majority of existing historical buildings also have historical heating, cooling and lighting systems. Due to age and wear and tear, these systems often do not provide the best environment for users. They rarely meet current energy codes and are not optimized to reduce energy usage bills. Bringing these systems into the 21st century provides significant financial and environmental benefit to the facility. With proper planning these upgrades can reduce existing mechanical and electrical equipment eye sores, improve overall aesthetics, and preserve the historical integrity of the structure with the implementation of creative solutions. Participants will learn about the common concerns with upgrading MEP (mechanical, electrical and plumbing) systems within a historical building, how to evaluate potential options, and how building codes uniquely affect historic projects.

THURSDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ THB5 | RESTORATION OF THE SOCIEDAD PROTECCIÓN MUTUA DE TRABAJADORES UNIDOS’

(SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF UNITED WORKERS-SPMDTU) BUILDING IN ANTONITO 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 104 The SPMDTU was founded on November 26, 1900 by Celedonio Mondragón, and a core group of supporters in Antonito, a small town in the southern part of the San Luis Valley of Southern Colorado. The SPMDTU began as an organization that sought, through nonviolent actions, to combat the exploitation of Hispanic workers by land barons, mine owners, and the railroads. It is the oldest surviving Hispanic organization in the United States and its meeting hall is listed in the National Register of Historic Places for its connection to Ethnic Heritage and Social History. This session will provide a history of the SPMDTU and the status of the restoration of its historic building in Antonito, Colorado. Speakers: Antonio Esquibel (Concilio Superior of the Sociedad Proteccion Mutua de Trabajadores Unidos - SPMDTU), Ralph Maestas (Concilio Superior of the Sociedad Proteccion Mutua de Trabajadores Unidos - SPMDTU) Eppie Perea (Concilio No. 7 of the Sociedad Proteccion Mutua de Trabajadores Unidos - SPMDTU)

■ THB6 | THE NEW NORMAL: GRAPPLING WITH REHAB OF MID-20TH CENTURY BUILDINGS

1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 107/109

As we progress into the 21st century, buildings from the late 1960s and the 1970s are becoming eligible for National Register listing. The design and materials of many of these buildings present unique challenges to rehabilitation and reuse. This session will explore some of the issues that make mid-century and Modern Movement buildings challenging to preserve, rehabilitate, and adaptively reuse. The discussion will first cover the complexities that often arise when listing Modern resources in the National Register, including establishing significance and integrity issues. Next it will explore the unique architectural characteristics of Modern buildings, and the restoration and replacement dilemmas Modern materials can pose. Finally, it will showcase several Mid-century Modern buildings that have utilized historic tax credits. Speakers: Kristen McSparren (Rosin Preservation), Elizabeth Rosin (Rosin Preservation)

THURSDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK C

■ THC1 | ONE OF THESE THINGS IS NOT LIKE THE OTHER: ARCHITECTURE TRIVIA

3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 111

It’s time for another session of architectural trivia! Oddball or original? Interesting or incompatible? Avant-garde or antagonistic? This year’s theme is buildings that stand out. This interactive session invites audience members to test their architectural knowledge through trivia. Join a team or challenge yourself. The three rounds of trivia will focus on infill, innovations, and icons. There will be prizes! Speakers: Abigail Christman (City and County of Denver), Kathleen Corbett (Corbett AHS, Inc) James Wright Steely

■ THC2 | PARTNERS IN PREPAREDNESS: HOW TO PREPARE YOUR SITE FOR DISASTER AND

GET HELP IF ONE OCCURS APA

3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 102

Fires, floods, storms, and tornadoes are very real threats to historic places across Colorado. Are you prepared should disaster strike? Planning for your cultural and heritage resources is essential to ensure not only that they are protected during the initial disaster, but also throughout the emergency response. National and State experts offer tips and guidance for both those new to the process and those looking to augment current disaster plans. Learn how to leverage the Colorado Cultural & Historic Resources Task Force resources and assistance in the event of a disaster. Speakers:

Scott Baldwin (Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, DHSEM) Megan Brown (National Park Service), Rebecca Hunt (University of Colorado Denver), Jaime Loichinger (Advisory Council on Historic Preservation), Todd McMahon (History Colorado), Amy Zimmer (Colorado State Publications Library)

Speakers: Jon Brooks (AE Design), Denise Dihle (360 Engineering), Anna Martinovich (AE Design)

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THURSDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ THC3 | FAÇADE RESTORATION & CLEANING: A MULTIFACETED APPROACH 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 103/105

AIA

Successful façade restoration requires constant collaboration from all professionals involved—each bringing their own perspective to the project. As preservation professionals, we are challenged with balancing the needs of the project, schedules, knowledge, and skillsets to plan and implement a façade restoration project. In this ever-changing industry, we benefit from previous knowledge and from continued discussion on the principles, technologies, and protocols of cleaning historic masonry facades. In this panel discussion, practicing professionals will discuss the challenges of façade restoration and cleaning and examine how collaboration between disciplines is an essential component to project planning and implementation. Attendees will hear perspectives from industry experts in architecture, engineering, contracting, and materials conservation. The panel will explore best practices in façade restoration and cleaning, provide examples from recent projects, and engage with the audience during a question & answer session. Speakers: Nan Anderson (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC), Sarah Holder (PROSOCO, Inc), Jacob Holland (Summit Sealants and Restoration), David Woodham (Atkinson-Noland & Associates)

■ THC4 | ASPEN: CHALLENGES AND REWARDS OF ADHERING TO BEST PRACTICES IN CONSERVATION 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 104

APA

The small town of Aspen is always on the forefront of conservation of the city’s rich mining history combined with the need to balance the pressure of development with some of the highest property values in the US. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the challenges and the rewards of conservation, followed by a discussion of the benefits of preservation both to the local community, as well as the larger community beyond the Roaring Fork Valley. Speakers: Natalie Feinberg Lopez (Built Environment Evolution), Lisa Hancock (Aspen Historical Society), Amy Simon (City of Aspen)

■ THC5 | REFLECTED IMAGES: DOCUMENTING LANDSCAPES AND SITES THROUGH IMAGES 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 107/109

The experience of place is holistic; drawing from a combination of the natural environment, material culture, as well as designed and natural features. Landscape features contribute greatly to the feeling and character of place, and often form (or shape) our entire experience of sites. These settings respond to human and natural forces that change them over time. How one evaluates this change is a challenge faced by historic preservation professionals. The landscape is critical when documenting or determining concepts of historic integrity. When we overlook the landscape, buildings and structures are stripped of their contextual meaning. This session will use case studies to explore the practice of documenting historic landscapes through photographs.

THURSDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

The project was cited as an outstanding example of research that combines archaeology, ethnography, history, and technological innovation. The organization is currently working in collaboration with History Colorado and the Ute Tribes in a National Science Foundation STEM project, and is developing collaborative partnerships in northwestern Colorado with local and regional stakeholders in support of cultural resource research and preservation, heritage tourism, and public education. Attend this session to learn how collaboration with diverse stakeholders is critical in leveraging small projects to achieve larger goals. Speaker: Richard W. Ott (Dominquez Archaeological Research Group - DARG)

THURSDAY EVENING

THN1 | PRESERVATION MARKETPLACE

5:00pm – 7:00pm • Location: Four Seasons Ballroom

Enjoy live music, drinks, and appetizers Thursday evening during CPI’s Preservation Marketplace! Visit with our exhibitors to learn about their work and how they can help your project, while shopping the Endangered Places Silent Auction and networking with other attendees during this lively event.

THN2 | Young Preservationists Gathering 7:00pm – 10:00pm • Location: Stout Street Social (across the street from the Convention Center)

Immediately following the Preservation Marketplace Reception, keep the networking going at the Young Preservationists Gathering. Connect with young professionals (and the young at heart) during this fun event concluding Thursday of the conference.

THN3 | SKI TOWN FORUM DINNER

7:30pm – 9:00pm • Location: The Irish Rover Pub Colorado’s Ski Towns and friends are invited to The Irish Rover Pub for a dutch treat dinner. Protecting the historic environment and promoting heritage tourism, while also supporting infrastructure for residents and the large numbers of visitors, pose unique opportunities and challenges for these communities. Successes and concerns from 2017 and plans for 2018 will be presented and discussed. Speakers: Mark Rodman (History Colorado), Jennifer Deichman (History Colorado), Amy Unger (History Colorado), Erika Warzel (History Colorado)

Speakers: Ashley L. Bushey (Pinyon Environmental), Thomas Carr (Colorado Cultural Research Associates, LLC), Ann E. Komara (University of Colorado Denver)

■ THC6 | HOT TOPIC: CPI AT THE CAPITOL: AN OVERVIEW AND UPDATE ON CPI’S EFFORTS TO REAUTHORIZE THE JOB CREATION AND MAIN STREET REVITALIZATION ACT 3:15pm – 3:45pm • Location: 113 Colorado Preservation, Inc. and its partners have been working to reauthorize Colorado’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit. With the 2018 Legislative Session now underway, receive an update from CPI’s lobby team on efforts to reauthorize the credit and learn how CPI needs you to advocate in support of this key preservation and economic development tool. Speakers: Jeannie Vanderburg (Capstone Group)

■ THC6 | HOT TOPIC: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND LANDSCAPE SCALE HISTORIC PRESERVATION 4:00pm – 4:30pm • Location: 113

Since its founding in 2003, Dominquez Archaeological Research Group (DARG) has organized and conducted on-going programs for archaeological and ethnohistorical research throughout western Colorado in collaboration with the Ute Tribes, public land agencies, and industry and community partners. The organization’s Colorado Wickiup Project, inspired by CPI’s Most Endangered Places List in 2003, shared the 2014 Annual Governor’s Award for Historic Preservation with tribal and management agency partners.

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a story collecting project looking at connections between people and place Voices of the Plains is attending the Saving Places Conference, collecting typewritten and audio recordings of stories about place. We invite everyone to participate with this free interactive experience. Stop by the recording van on Thursday evening at the Preservation Marketplace, or all day Friday in the lobby of the Convention Center! www.voicesoftheplains.com

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

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FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

FRIDAY TOURS

■ FT1 | TOUR OF THE STANLEY MARKETPLACE

A small team of first-time developers have turned a 1950s aviation manufacturing facility into Stanley Marketplace, a food hall and urban marketplace with more than 50 independent Colorado businesses under one spectacular roof. Guided by their Stanifesto, Stanley aims to be a community and cultural hub as much as a place to eat and drink and shop. Tour the marketplace and learn about its unconventional development, its use of historic tax credits, and the ups and downs during its first full year of business. Speaker: Mark Shaker (Stanley Marketplace)

■ FT2 | TRIUMPH OF VISION - UNION STATION TRANSFORMATION AND ACTIVATION 1:30pm – 4:00pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center - Walk to Union Station

Denver’s Union Station is a renowned 100-year-old historic landmark recently converted to a vibrant gathering place for locals and visitors alike. The preservation of the station was led by community organizations and passionate professionals devoted to conserving the building and the history it represents. Join a customized one-hour tour, showcasing Denver Union Station’s history, art, transportation, restaurants, retail space and the Crawford Hotel’s luxury guest rooms. The tour will be followed by a short film capturing the story of its recent renovation, by local filmmaker HaveyPro Cinema and a discussion with members of the renovation team and community organizations dedicated to activating the station today. The tour will focus on the role Union Station plays in the LoDo community as a gathering space and how ‘placemaking’ has connected the station with the people who visit it. The tour will leave from the Convention Center at 1:30pm. – it will end at 4:00pm at which point attendees are encouraged to enjoy happy hour on their own at Union Station. There will not be transportation provided back to the Convention Center (it is just one mile away). Speaker: Blair Miller (Urban Neighborhoods), Joe Vostrejs (Larimer Associates), Dana Crawford (Urban Neighborhoods, Inc.)

FRIDAY MORNING | BLOCK D

■ FD1 | WORKSHOP: HISTORIC TAX CREDITS: KEYS TO REVITALIZATION SUCCESS APA AIA

Historic tax credits have been critically important to Colorado’s revitalization efforts. Hear experts explain how the process works and offer tips on how to successfully complete a historic tax credit project. You will also learn how you can help encourage the use of these impactful incentives in your community and how you can help ensure these credits remain. Attendees will leave better informed about Federal Preservation Tax credits and how to use them, equipped to be a successful preservation advocate, and prepared to make a difference in the statewide and federal advocacy campaigns. Speakers: Renee Kuhlman (National Trust for Historic Preservation), Elizabeth Rosin (Rosin Preservation), Mark Shaker (Stanley Marketplace)

■ FD2 | ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL INVESTIGATIONS ALONG THE OLD

SPANISH TRAIL IN COLORADO

9:00am – 10:15am • Location: 103/105

The Old Spanish Trail was a commercial route used by traders in New Mexico from 1829-1848 to reach markets in California and beyond. Designated a National Historic Trail in 2002, the North Branch has the greatest reach in Colorado as it passes through the San Luis Valley and over Cochetopa Pass to the Uncompahgre, Gunnison, and Colorado river valleys on its way westward. This session brings together the foremost researchers of the Old Spanish Trail in Colorado for an overview of the intensive fieldwork that has been done along the route in Colorado. Attendees will leave with an increased appreciation of the historical importance of the trail. Speakers: Jonathon C. Horn (Alpine Archaeological Consultants), Marilyn A. Martorano (Martorano Consultants, LLC) Mark Mitchell (Paleocultural Research Group), Michael Prouty (Alpine Archaeological Consultants)

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SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FD3 | PANNED IN COLORADO, WINDOW REHABILITATION, SCRAPE V. ANTISCRAPE

AND THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR’S STANDARDS AIA

9:00am – 10:15am • Location: 102

10:30am – 1:30pm • Location: Meet at Convention Center for Bus Transportation

9:00am – 11:45am • Location: 201

FRIDAY

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

This session will debate various historic wood window rehabilitation projects and the methodologies used in their repair. Discussion will include the challenges of retaining original fabric, the pros and cons of reversible versus irreversible repairs, the use of epoxy, and compliance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards. Speakers: Tom Keohan (National Park Service), Phil Barlow (Historic Preservation Specialist), Gheda Gayou (History Colorado State Historical Fund), Gary Petri

■ FD4 | MISSIONS PRESERVATION IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 9:00am – 10:15am • Location: 111

AIA

This session will explore the unique challenges of preserving Spanish Mission sites within the National Park System. These sites were founded by Catholic missionaries of the Spanish Empire between the 16th and 19th Centuries with the express purpose of indoctrinating Native American peoples in Hispanic religious and cultural beliefs. Most of these sites were built where pre-Hispanic communities already existed, substantially broadening their period of significance. Specific conservation issues and techniques will be discussed as well as experiences in dealing with community members, stakeholders, and the visiting public. Examples come from the San Antonio Missions, Tumacacori National Historical Park, Salinas Pueblo Missions and Pecos National Historical Park. These sites are unique in their religious and historical significance, and also in the range of materials and conservation challenges they represent. Speakers: Rachel Adler (National Park Service), David Vekasy (San Antonio Missions National Historical Park), Ron Anthony (Anthony & Associates, Inc.), Francisco Uviña-Contreras (University of New Mexico)

■ FD5 | IS IT WORKING? REVISITING ADOBE TREATMENTS IN THE FACE OF THE SSI 9:00am – 10:15am • Location: 203

AIA

This session will feature a panel discussion of adobe/stucco preservation, stabilization, and the current accepted best practices/restoration techniques as interpreted through the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Preservation Brief #5. Case studies will be presented by Scheuber + Darden Architects and Jedidiah Williamson from Martin Martin Consulting Engineers. Join session speakers to explore what works and what doesn’t for adobe treatments, as well as current technical materials research and evolving theories on adobe/stucco preservation. Speakers: Barbara Darden (Scheuber + Darden Architects), Rick Scheuber (Scheuber + Darden Architects), Jedidiah Williamson (Martin Martin Consulting Engineers)

■ FD6 | HOT TOPIC: LINCOLN HILLS, FROM NECESSITY TO OPPORTUNITY 9:00am – 9:30am • Location: 113

Wink’s Lodge, also known as the Winks Panorama, is a nationally significant site unique to Colorado’s history. The Lodge represents Black Social History and exemplifies efforts of Colorado’s African American community to create their own opportunities for vacationing, recreation and leisure in response to their exclusion from white-dominated venues under segregation. Winks is also significant for its Craftsman Style architecture, the sand-shifting influence of the Civil Rights Movement on the property, and in the area of Non-Aboriginal Historic Archaeology. Join J. R. Lapierre of Lincoln Hills Cares and Gary Jackson as they share past stories and future plans for Winks. Speakers: Gary Jackson (Denver County Court), J. R. Lapierre (Lincoln Hills Cares)

■ FD6 | HOT TOPIC: NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK HERITAGE AND HISTORY INITIATIVES IN COLORADO 9:45am – 10:15am • Location: 113

The National Park Service’s National Historic Landmarks Program celebrates historic properties that exhibit strong integrity and national significance. Towards that end, the program has developed numerous theme studies since 1958 that include American Latino, Asian American and Pacific Islander, Women’s History, and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Heritage Initiatives since 2011. Come learn more about the National Historic Landmark program, its process, and examples of themed Colorado sites. Speakers: Astrid Liverman (Metcalf Archaeology), Christy Dickinson (Historian)

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FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FD7 | MAIN STREET AND CERTIFIED LOCAL GOVERNMENTS: NATURAL PARTNER 9:00am – 10:15am • Location: 107/109

APA

Does your community have a preservation commission? If so, why? If not, should you? Discover how Certified Local Governments (CLGs) and your Main Street Program work together to provide a positive environment for historic preservation and economic development.

FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FE3 | THE TURNABOUT OF TRINIDAD 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 103/105

APA

Learn how communities across Colorado and throughout the U.S. pool historic preservation resources to successfully revitalize their downtowns and commercial districts

The City of Trinidad is in the midst of significant revitalization efforts seeking to capitalize on its rich history while simultaneously looking to create an economically viable future. Trinidad’s historic downtown includes an amazing inventory of architecturally significant buildings that are being brought back to life by artists and entrepreneurs alike. Public and private efforts are coming together on projects such as Space to Create, a state-driven initiative providing affordable housing options for creatives. Come learn how Space to Create can be a tool for your community, and other efforts underway in Colorado’s hidden jewel, Trinidad!

Speakers: Megan Brown (National Park Service), Tim Stroh (History Colorado State Historical Fund), Mark Rodman (History Colorado)

Speakers: Dana Crawford (Urban Neighborhoods, Inc.), Margaret Hunt (Colorado Creative Industries), Tara Marshall (City of Trinidad)

■ FD8 | TELLING HIDDEN STORIES: REIMAGINING PRESERVATION FOR THE COMMUNITY 9:00am – 10:15am • Location: 104

Colorado’s Main Streets are a reflection of America’s history. The stories of immigration, culture, and communication are captured in every community throughout the west. This session will focus on reimagining how to convey preservation to the general community through the use of the stories that reside within the structures in our towns. Buildings and stories will be examined through social, societal, and structural lenses. Speakers: Paul S. Chinowsky (University of Colorado)

FRIDAY MORNING | BLOCK E

■ FE1 | WORKSHOP: HISTORIC TAX CREDITS: KEYS TO REVITALIZATION SUCCESS 9:00am – 11:45am • Location: 201

AIA APA

Historic tax credits have been critically important to Colorado’s revitalization efforts. Hear experts explain how the process works and offer tips on how to successfully complete a historic tax credit project. You will also learn how you can help encourage the use of these impactful incentives in your community and how you can help ensure these credits remain. Attendees will leave better informed about Federal Preservation Tax credits and how to use them, equipped to be a successful preservation advocate, and prepared to make a difference in the statewide and federal advocacy campaigns. Speakers: Renee Kuhlman (National Trust for Historic Preservation), Elizabeth Rosin (Rosin Preservation) Mark Shaker (Stanley Marketplace)

■ FE2 | DOCUMENTATION AND PRESERVATION OF CULTURAL TRADITIONS OF THE

INDIO-HISPANO COMMUNITIES IN THE UPPER RÍO GRANDE REGION A MULTIMEDIA PROJECT 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 102

Founded in 2000, Hilos Culturales focuses on preserving the cultural traditions of Indio-Hispano communities of the upper Río Grande region of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. Through publications and film, a 500-year history is made available to educators, historians and folklore enthusiasts, on a variety of topics including Anthropology, Ethnomusicology, Literature, Music and Storytelling. Attendees will learn about the value of documenting and preserving traditions through digital multi-media publications. Multimedia projects discussed during this session will include: a published book (¡Viva La Tradición!) - a twelve year history of local Traditional Artists in music and dance; Cultural Threads - an award winning documentary film portraying the Río Grande region’s lifeways, filmed in San Luis, the oldest town in Colorado; a fourteen part educational film module series available on-line, on demand or on DVD (authored and layered sets); on-line quarterly eMagazine, El Alba, highlighting the Río Grande region’s IndioHispano cultural mosaic through a multimedia format.

■ FE4 | FINDING REFUGE ALONG THE STRANGER’S PATH: THE HIDDEN HISTORIES AND GEOGRAPHIES OF LGBTQ SPACE 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 111

In the decades since the beginning of the Gay Liberation Movement to today’s push for LGBTQ equality, gains in civil rights and increasing societal acceptance have transformed the places and spaces LGBTQ people have connected with one another. Historically the taverns, nightclubs, and other establishments owned and/or frequented by LGBTQ people were well hidden— often in plain sight in the city corridors that cultural geographer J. B. Jackson called “the Stranger’s Path.” This session examines ways that spaces associated with the LGBTQ communities have changed with wider acceptance, the place these spaces have held in the framework of this particular social history, and the unexpected ways the geographies of these communities have been written on the urban landscape. Speakers: Kathleen Corbett (Corbett AHS, Inc.), Becca Dierschow (City and County of Denver), Andy Duckett-Emke (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC), Kara Hahn (City and County of Denver)

■ FE5 | SUPPORT NETWORK FOR THE STEWARDSHIP OF THE STATE’S ARTIFACTS AND PALEONTOLOGICAL SPECIMEN 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 113

This session focuses on the progress and challenges organizations with held-in-trust artifacts and specimens stored in museums and repositories throughout the State face. Over the past few years, the Office of the State Archaeologist has increased accountability standards for State collections care while broadening the State’s level of support for their care. Collections care is an issue related to the broader goals of historic preservatio; artifacts found onsite provide a comprehensive historical record. Speakers will highlight success stories concerning the preservation and care of artifacts. Speakers: Linda Baker (Member of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe), Todd McMahon (History Colorado), Jim Snyder (Savory Institute), Andrew Spencer (South Park National Heritage Area), Gene Wheaton (Community College of Denver)

■ FE6 | HOW TOURISM CAN SUPPORT AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 203

APA

Many communities throughout Colorado have established tourism industries that are integral to their economic welfare and quality of life. Others would like to establish a foothold into the industry to build greater economic diversity. Learn how every municipality in Colorado can benefit from the state’s tourism economy while staying true to its own long-term goals, values, and culture. Core principles that are key to building an effective local tourism industry will be outlined and current resources available to help municipalities achieve their tourism goals will be provided. In addition, hear about Colorado communities that have been able to reach into their untapped tourism potential through creative marketing, branding, and resourcefulness. Speakers: Donielle Gonzales (Visit Pueblo), Rob Joseph (Montrose), Cathy Ritter (Colorado Tourism Office), Michael Varnum (SteamPlant Event Center and Salida Creative District), Michael Bennett (City of Fruita)

Speakers: Herman A. Martinez (Hilos Culturales, Inc.), Ellen Alires-Trujillo (Hilos Culturales, Inc.), Patricia Valdez Martínez (Hilos Culturales, Inc.), Lorenzo A. Trujillo (Hilos Culturales, Inc.), Edward Griego (Ed Griego Productions)

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FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FE7 | THE RISING IMPORTANCE OF MID-CENTURY MODERN IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 107/109

AIA

With a thirst for family adventure and a booming population, America took to the roads post-WWII and headed to our national parks. In this same moment, the National Park Service was planning its 50th Anniversary and exploring new ways to engage a broader class of visitor. Enter “Mission 66,” the NPS initiative to celebrate, expand park offerings and services and bring midcentury modern concepts to parks and park planning. This session will provide a brief history of the movement and its principles and reveal how it built on the NPS rustic aesthetic, to bring us new and overlaid cultural landscapes, iconic buildings, new building typologies, and specific challenges. We’ll examine Mission 66 site designs, look at Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence through his protégés’ designs, and will close with a “you make the choice” design competition that invites attendees to be the judge. Speakers: Nan Anderson (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC), Tina Bishop (Mundus Bishop Design), Andy Duckett-Emke (Anderson Hallas Architects, PC)

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FF2 | THE POWER OF PLACE IN THE SAN LUIS VALLEY 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 103/105

This session will examine how researchers, educators, and public land managers are using rural, cultural landscapes and historic buildings in the San Luis Valley to promote historic preservation and a deeper appreciation of the community’s culture and history. These powerful places reveal unique stories, nurture public memory, and promote further understanding of cultural landscapes changing over time. Speakers will highlight techniques used to connect the local community to their past and preserve the places that matter. Attendees will learn how place based learning and field methods connect local middle and high school students to the field of archaeology and create a deeper understanding of how and why to preserve historic and archaeological sites. Speakers will also share how oral histories from community members and preservation projects are bringing these sites to life and encouraging visitors to explore and learn more about this area’s rich culture. Attendees will hear how place-based curriculum for educators can be used as a means for connecting students to these historic sites and the meanings behind these sites: settlement, politics, and cultural landscapes. Finally, an overview of how the Trujillo Homestead National Historic Landmark within the SdCNHA is creating a sense of reunion for family members whose relatives settled the area, will be shared with attendees. Speakers: Tori Martinez (Sangre De Cristo National Heritage Area), Marilyn A. Martorano (Martorano Consultants LLC), Charles Nicholas Saenz (Adams State University), Nicholas Scarborough (Great Sand Dunes National Park), Katherine B. Faz (Great Sand Dunes National Park)

■ FE8 | GLASS AND WINDOW BASICS - PAST TO FUTURE 10:30am – 11:45am • Location: 104

FRIDAY

AIA HSW

Glass and window details are often defining characteristics to a historic building. However, the sub-components and driving forces for the progression of window design are often misunderstood. By deconstructing the basic components of windows (glass, coatings, and design), it is possible to better analyze and understand a clear path forward for repair or restoration.

■ FF3 | HOT TOPIC: ALTERNATIVE ROOFING MATERIALS 1:45pm – 2:15pm • Location: 107/109

AIA

This session will provide a high-level overview of the history of these window components. Attendees will explore the history of glass-making methods, glass-coating processes, and insulated glass (IG) construction. The session will also explore potential developments in the window and glass technology realm, such as vacuum insulated glazing (VIG), and examine the ways in which this can also be used to enable historic restoration.

Roofing can define a building’s character, profile, and architectural style, with each roofing material providing a distinctive color, texture, and pattern to a roof surface. A wide variety of substitute roofing materials simulating historical materials such as tile, slate, and shake have been introduced in recent years. How do these alternative roofing materials compare to the original materials they are replacing? Are these acceptable alternatives when original materials are hard to obtain or too costly? Do they meet the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation?

Attendees will leave with an understanding of the factors that should be considered when managing the aesthetic and performance components of a project – and the realization that these two things are not diametrically opposed.

Preservation commissions and architects are currently struggling with these questions. And with new materials and changing technology a constant, no design guidelines can provide a definitive list of acceptable choices. The compatibility of alternative roofing materials varies, with some much more successful than others. This session will provide tools for evaluating the compatibility of alternative roofing materials on a case by case basis. Attendees will have a chance to debate the appropriateness of materials by evaluating before and after photos of Denver case studies where alternative roofing materials have been installed. Samples of alternative roofing materials will also be available for attendees to examine.

Speakers: Kyle Sword (Pilkington North America)

WESTERN HERITAGE LUNCHEON

12:00pm – 1:30pm • Location: 205/207 This annual luncheon reflects on the state of preservation in Colorado, acknowledges the progress made, and looks to the future. This year’s celebration will feature a presentation by Steve Turner, Executive Director of History Colorado, and Dr. Jim Potter, Principal Archaeologist with PaleoWest Archaeology. Dr. Potter has worked collaboratively with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe since 2002, when he began directing the Animas La Plata project near Durango, Colorado. This project was the largest archaeological project in the country at the time and is still the largest tribally administered cultural resources project ever. Dr. Potter will speak to attendees at the Western Heritage Luncheon about the current preservation efforts in the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Park. Longtime Colorado preservationist Ann Pritzlaff will then conclude the luncheon with the presentation of the Ann Alexander Pritzlaff Leadership Award to an esteemed member of our community.

■ FF3 | HOT TOPIC: RESTORATION OF THE SPIRES AND TOWERS OF DENVER’S BASILICA

2:30pm – 3:00pm • Location: 107/109

Denver’s Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception was completed in 1911 in the French Gothic style with extensive carved architectural details on the Indiana Limestone façade. During a Sunday mass in April of 2016, a softball-sized stone fragment fell from one of the two towers and landed near the main entry on Colfax Ave. Fortunately, no one was hurt. However, the resulting façade investigation discovered numerous fractured and deteriorated carved limestone elements – several at the tops of the 210 ft. tall spires. It became apparent that extensive repairs to the spires and towers would be required to protect public safety and restore the stone masonry façade. This presentation will provide details of the year-long masonry restoration – both the challenges encountered and the developed solutions. While 21st century technology could be employed in some aspects of the repairs, many of the stone repairs required the same techniques as those used in the original construction. Speakers: Jacob Holland (Summit Sealants and Restoration), David Woodham (Atkinson-Noland)

FRIDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK F

■ FF1 | PRESERVATION: AN EXERCISE IN PERSEVERANCE AND PATIENCE 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 102

This session will visit three significant, but vastly different, historic preservation projects: The Goodnight Barn in Pueblo, the Tabor Opera House in Leadville, and the World’s Wonder View Tower in Genoa. In different phases each, these case studies demonstrate various degrees of community engagement, preservation planning, momentum building and fundraising strategies. The project owners will share histories of their sites, project successes, and road blocks with information to inspire and inform project managers statewide. Speakers: Laurel Campbell (Goodnight Barn Preservation, Inc.), Linda Crawford (Goodnight Barn Preservation, Inc.) Sarah Dae Dallas (City of Leadville), Chandler Romero

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Speakers: Abigail Christman (City and County of Denver)

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

■ FF4 | GETTING CREATIVE WITH SECTION 106: EXPLORING ALTERNATIVE MITIGATION 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 111

APA

Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act requires that federal agencies consider the effects of their undertakings on historic properties; when consultation fails to identify suitable alternatives, mitigation is used to resolve adverse effects. Generally, mitigation focuses directly on the significance associated with the affected property, but sometimes more creative solutions better serve the public interest. Explore innovative strategies from Colorado and across the Nation in this interesting session with experts on Section 106 from Colorado Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. Speakers: Jennifer Bryant (Colorado State Historic Preservation Office), Jaime Loichinger (Advisory Council on Historic Preservation), Blythe Semmer (Advisory Council on Historic Preservation), Mark Tobias (Colorado State Historic Preservation Office)

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FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FF5 | LINEAR HISTORIC RESOURCES: UNIQUE CHALLENGES AND PRESERVATION

TECHNIQUES FOR HISTORIC TRAILS

1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 113

Linear cultural resources present unique preservation challenges, and historic trails are no exception. Often covering many miles, and crossing both public and private lands, historic trails require preservationists to not only look downward, but in all directions including the sky. The passage of Colorado HB 16-1106 – the designation of Pioneer Trails by County Commissioners offers communities an avenue for recognizing historic trails on a local basis. Learn how this legislation and old and new tools from the NPS National Trails Office, Santa Fe Trail Association and others can help preservationists protect the historic trails in their own backyards. Topics discussed will include cultural landscapes, viewshed analyses, the concepts of “night sky”, historic contexts, MPDF’s, public awareness, and the use of modern technology to educate and engage youth. Speakers: Rebecca Goodwin (Otero County), Kevin Lindahl (Bent’s Fort Chapter for the Santa Fe Trail Association), Astrid Liverman (Metcalf Archaeology), Michael Romero Taylor (National Park Service)

■ FF6 | COLORADO ASIANS: A HISTORY OF ADVERSITY AND RESILIENCE 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 201

Asians in Colorado have endured a long legacy of exclusion and inequity. Despite historical, linguistic differences, and distinct Asian cultures, they’ve been generalized and treated similarly by the community at large. Yet, notwithstanding these adversities, Colorado Asians have and continue to transform and enrich the state’s landscape through their unique cultural contributions and permanent landmarks. The best way to know and appreciate our Asian neighbors today is to learn about their historic links from the past to the present. This session will provide a historical overview of some of the largest Asian populations that have arrived in Colorado including: Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese. Speakers: Nga Vuong-Sandoval (Denver Mayor’s Asian-American Pacific Islander Commission)

■ FF7 | GENTRIFICATION: COMING SOON TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU? 1:45pm – 3:00pm • Location: 203

Denver is experiencing an unprecedented amount of growth and development – and with growth often comes gentrification. How are Denver neighborhoods changing? How are long-time residents being affected? What can communities learn from Denver’s experience? What role can historic preservation play in this issue? This panel includes neighborhood activists and residents of so-called ‘gentrified’ neighborhoods. We will discuss what can be learned from what’s occurring in Denver, and explore some ways in which historic preservation can help keep neighborhoods and their cultures intact. Speakers: Julie Johnson (City of Boulder), John Hayden (Curtis Park Neighbors), Shontel Lewis Candi CdeBaca (Project V.O.Y.C.E. - Voices of Youth Changing Education)

■ FF8 | HOT TOPIC: COMBINING PRESERVATION AND INFILL DEVELOPMENT: A SIMPLE CASE STUDY 1:45pm – 2:15pm • Location: 104

APA

Historic preservation and infill development are sometimes at odds. This session will discuss a small but informative case in Boulder that brought the two together. It will also examine the controversy and the lessons for municipalities. Speakers: Kurt Nordback (747 Twelfth Street LLC)

■ FF8 | HOT TOPIC: INTEGRATING HISTORIC PRESERVATION GUIDELINES AND FORM-BASED CODE: FORT WORTH, TX STOCKYARDS 2:30pm – 3:00pm • Location: 104 APA Fort Worth, TX recently adopted a new form-based code for its historic stockyards and surrounding area. The code incorporates design guidelines along with prescriptive standards that are seamlessly integrated. In this approach, zone district boundaries are drawn to coincide with a historic district and a buffering conservation area. Design Guidelines address finer-grained topics that the zoning standards do not cover. This may be the first code in the country to take a completely integrated approach to the preservation and zoning system, which uses a bull’s eye concept for varying degrees of historical influence on new construction, and includes design review by a preservation commission. This approach can be applied to many situations, but may have special interest to communities that seek to redevelop areas that were historically related to farming and ranching, but now are sites for potential new uses.

FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

FRIDAY AFTERNOON | BLOCK G

■ FG1 | STAR CU-DENVER PRESERVATION PROJECTS 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 203

CU-Denver graduate students receiving degrees in architecture, history or preservation will present their research during this session. An annual tradition at the Saving Places Conference, this informative and interactive session will provide attendees with a wide variety of stories from throughout history and gives attendees a chance to engage with students on the verge of beginning their preservation careers. Speakers:

Tom Noel (Professor of History and Director of Public History and Preservation, CU Denver), Shelby Carr (Restoring the Colorado Capitol Building), Hannah Clark (Reviving Buffalo Creek’s Blue Jay Inn), Lindsey Flewellyn (Preserving Ethnic Heritage in a Colorado Mining Town), Thomas “T.J.” Trump (Preservation & the NPS), Mary O’Neill (Saving the Sisters of Loretto Heights: Can they Rest in Peace?), Lindsay LaBelle (Why Robert E. Lee Had to Go)

■ FG2 | HOT TOPIC: A ROLLER COASTER HISTORY OF DENVER’S LAKESIDE AMUSEMENT PARK 3:15pm – 3:45pm • Location: 104

For more than a century the iconic Lakeside Amusement Park has been entertaining residents of and visitors to Denver. Initially promoted as a welcome addition to Denver’s City Beautiful movement, Lakeside has both reflected and survived a changing Denver, and become a beloved part of the city. One of only a handful of amusement parks in the United States to reach its centennial, Lakeside Amusement Park is a survivor that embraces its past while looking to the future. Attendees will leave with a new appreciation for the Lakeside Amusement Park. Speakers: David Forsyth (Denver’s Lakeside Amusement Park)

■ FG2 | HOT TOPIC: DENVER’S STREETCAR LEGACY AND ITS ROLE IN NEIGHBORHOOD WALKABILITY 4:00pm – 4:30pm • Location: 104 APA

Long before light rails there were streetcars in Denver. This presentation examines the year-by-year history of Denver’s streetcars from the system’s start in 1872 to its end in 1950. University of Denver graduate student, Ryan Keeney, has documented and digitized every streetcar line that ever existed in Denver. This session, led by Ryan, will discuss the system’s impact on Denver’s land use in the form of historic neighborhood commercial districts such as South Pearl Street and Tennyson and analyze how this legacy enhances the walkability of the city by virtue of their close proximity to residential areas. Ryan’s Story Map can be viewed online at: bit.ly/DenverStreetcarLegacy Speakers: Ryan Keeney (Digital Data Services)

■ FG3 | SUPPORTING ARCHAEOLOGY IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 102

Nearly all local governments own or manage archaeological resources and an archaeological heritage worthy of protection. The fate of archaeological resources in cities, towns, and county jurisdictions are deeply affected by the decisions of local governments and planning departments, which often operate with little formal guidance regarding archaeological site stewardship. Preservation and stewardship of archaeological resources by local governments is most successful when local governments pass ordinances that protect archaeological resources, employ archaeologists and cultural resource professionals, recognize special archaeological districts in zoning overlays and development guidelines, and maintain diverse partnerships. The panel/speakers will discuss select examples of local governments and partners in Colorado making such efforts, state and municipal codes related to archaeological resources, and emerging stewardship opportunities. Speakers:

Katy Waechter (City of Boulder’s Open Space and Mountain Parks Department), Matthew Mayberry (City of Colorado Springs Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Services Department), Anna Cordova (City of Colorado Springs Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Services Department), Julie Johnson (City of Boulder Open Space & Mountain Parks Department), Christian Driver (City of Boulder Open Space & Mountain Parks Department)

Speakers: Lee Einsweiler (Code Studio), Noré Winter (Winter & Company)

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FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FG4 | DENVER MOUNTAIN PARKS: THE POWER OF PLACE & PARTNERSHIP 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 103/105

FRIDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

■ FG7 | CERTIFIED LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT WORKSHOP 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 201

APA

The creation of the Denver Mountain Parks system in the early twentieth century was an expression of remarkable vision and aspiration. The junior Olmsted’s “Mountain Park Preliminary Plan” of 1914, and the “Park and Boulevard System of Denver” that preceded it, were remarkably farsighted documents — sharing many of the ideas that fed into Roosevelt’s vision for the National Park system. Together they offered a blueprint for a shining city, guided by concerns that were at once aesthetic, idealistic, and commercial. “The Queen City of the Plains” knew the power of its place: how to capitalize on the amenity of the mountains for the benefit of the fledgling metropolis.

Colorado is required to give at least 10% of its Federal Historic Preservation funding to Certified Local Governments (CLG) as subgrants to support their local preservation activities. These grants require no matching funds and can be used to fund a variety of projects including surveys, National, State and Local Register nominations, preservation plans, design guidelines, interpretative materials, as well as educational programs and training. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of Colorado’s CLG grant program, guidance in developing a project and preparing a successful grant application, as well as information on the requirements specific to CLG grants.

A hundred years later, as Denver is again poised for growth, boosted by the recently passed “billion-dollar bond”, we revisit the legacy of Denver Mountain Parks. How will the bond dollars contribute to the achievement of the original vision? What role can partnerships, “stewardship,” and historic preservation play in a rapidly growing city seeking to be green and sustainable?

Speakers: Jennifer Deichman (History Colorado State Historical Fund), Amy Unger (History Colorado State Historical Fund)

■ FG8 | HOT TOPIC: THE BRIDGE IS FIGHTING BACK: SAVING THE DOLORES RIVER BRIDGE

Speakers: Tina Bishop (Mundus Bishop Design), Townsend Anderson (HistoriCorps), Jonas Landes (HistoriCorps), Shannon Dennison (City and County of Denver), W. Bart Berger (Denver Mountain Parks Foundation)

3:15pm – 3:45pm • Location: 113

■ FG5 | DIGITAL TOOLS FOR DESIGN REVIEW 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 111

The time, cost, and complexity of historic design review is growing in many communities, frequently in places with limited staff and funding, and often with limited board or staff time. This session examines digital tools that can help address these constraints, including tools that are comparatively low-cost or relatively easy to learn. Major tools reviewed include Acrobat©, Access©, ArcMap© GIS, Dropbox©, Google Earth©, OneDrive©, Photoshop©, Sketchup©, and Street View©. The presentation reviews and demonstrates what these digital tools can do, and it includes information on where to find online step-by-step instructions or training videos, as well as already created data and digital content to use with the tools. The tools are presented in the context of a design review process that begins prior to application and extends to post-construction, with information on connecting the review steps and the tools in a workflow process. Speakers: Michael Davenport (Community Design)

■ FG6 | THE SAARINEN/SOLDNER LEGACIES: 3:15pm – 4:30pm • Location: 107/109

APA

TWO STORIES OF PRESERVATION

This presentation will discuss the challenges and choices that come with inheriting the responsibility of preserving the legacy of ‘place’ as related to a famous parent. This task can come in many forms, from estates and furniture patents to reputation and what stories to tell. This session will explore the unfolding stories of two families, Saarinan and Soldner. Susan Saarinen, daughter and granddaughter of renowned architects Eero and Eliel Saarinan, will share her personal story of managing the estate, responsibility, and fame of her forefathers. Eero Saarinan is known for many leading-edge buildings and structures, including the St. Louis Gateway Arch and the TWA Flight Center at JFK International Airport. He also designed longloved furniture designs such as the Womb Chair. Susan will be joined by NPS architect, name, who is leading the restoration efforts on the Gateway Arch, designed in 1947 and constructed in 1965 along the west bank of the Mississippi River. Stephanie Soldner, daughter of Paul Soldner, American ceramic artist, will share her story preserving her father’s legacy. Paul Soldner was an artist and innovator, noted for his experimentation with traditional 16th century Japanese Raku, creating a new method of firing, which became well known as American Raku. He was also known for designing and manufacturing Soldner Pottery Equipment and as a passionate and skilled teacher. In the 1960s he founded Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass, Colorado. His wife, Ginny Soldner, was a respected painter who worked on large-scale canvases. Beginning in the 1950’s, Paul designed and with Ginny, hand-built their remarkable home and studio outside Aspen, Colorado. With his recent death in 2011, Stephanie is faced with many choices on how to preserve and honor the family home and Soldner studio, as well as provide for her own stable future in the valley. This session will conclude with a question and answer period.

The session will explore the general challenges of trying to preserve historic bridges in place or find local or private adoption opportunities for bridges that no longer meet current transportation standards in Colorado. The session will share the technology used to document the Dolores Bridge and CDOT’s commitment to store the bridge truss for a future use in a new location. Session attendees will gain a better understanding of CDOT’s Section 106 compliance process for historic bridge replacement projects through this unique effort to save the Dolores River Bridge. Speakers: Lisa Schoch (Colorado Department of Transportation)

■ FG8 | HOT TOPIC:

PRESERVING THE ORDINARY: SECTION 106 IN PRACTICE 4:00pm – 4:30pm • Location: 113 AIA Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act plays a vital role in documenting historic resources that have shaped Colorado, often those that would not otherwise be recorded, such as culverts, roads, irrigation features, and transmission lines. This interactive presentation will give life to Section 106 — a regulation that charges federal agencies to consider the effects of projects on historic resources. The session will outline fundamentals, discuss the consultation process, explore how to be an effective consulting party, and show how regulations have shaped projects to preserve historic resources. Learn how Section 106 compliance aids in the documentation of all types of resources, from mid-century commercial buildings to ranch complexes, and much more. Whether you want to learn about preservation regulations, are a member of a board or commission who participates in Section 106 consultations, or are interested in learning more about documentation of ordinary historic resources, this session is for you! Speakers: Hannah Braun (Colorado Department of Transportation), Lauren Cooper (Colorado Department of Transportation), Jason O’Brien (Park County), Lisa Schoch (Colorado Department of Transportation)

FRIDAY EVENING

HAPPY HOUR HOSTED BY THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN CHAPTER OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY

5:00pm – 7:00pm • Wynkoop Brewing Company (1634 18th St.)

Speakers: Cindy Nasky (Colorado Preservation, Inc.), Susan Saarinen Emmeline Morris (National Park Service), Stephanie Soldner

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Steel through truss bridges are increasingly rare on Colorado’s state highway system and on local roadways. Many of these bridge types were built in the early part of the twentieth century and have slowly been replaced over the years with utilitarian bridges that meet current standards for safety and transportation. This hot topic session will focus on efforts by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) to evaluate options to preserve in place, and ultimately remove and store for future use, the National Register of Historic Places-Listed Dolores River Bridge. This steel rigid-connected Pennsylvania through truss bridge carried a lonely stretch of State Highway 90 over the Dolores River near the community of Bedrock in Montrose County.

Join the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the Association for Preservation Technology for their happy hour on Friday evening! Current members and anyone interested in joining are invited to attend. Eat, drink and socialize after a day of learning at the conference!

From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

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SATURDAY

SAVING PLACES® 2018 SCHEDULE

SATURDAY

■ S1 | LODO WALKING TOUR

9:00am – 12:00pm • Location: Meet at the Convention Center (Blue Bear)

APA

Dana Crawford and State Honor Awards

Join Dr. Tom Noel and friends for a walking tour of the historic Lower Downtown neighborhood of Denver! This tour, a Conference tradition, meets at the Blue Bear outside of the Convention Center at 9:00a.m. Conclude the Conference by exploring historic streets of Denver! The tour ends at the Wynkoop Brewery. Speaker: Tom Noel (University of Colorado Denver), Dennis Gallagher, Savannah Jameson

Please join Colorado Preservation, Inc. for the 28th annual Dana Crawford and State Honor Awards. We are pleased to announce that the 2018 Dana Crawford recipient is:

■ S2 | CLG WORKSHOP: SECTION 106 - WHAT’S IN IT FOR YOUR COMMUNITY? 9:00am – 4:00pm • Location: History Colorado

APA

Rebecca Goodwin

Does your Certified Local Government (CLG) participate in Section 106 review? Whether yes or no, come learn how your community can get the most out of this important consultation process. Section 106 exists to provide local communities a voice in how projects by the Federal Government or funded or permitted by the Federal Government affect your historic places. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear and interact with the Federal Agency experts that ensure this process provides your community with that crucial local representation.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

This session will be hosted at History Colorado (1200 N Broadway, Denver) in the MDC/Richmond Terrace Room. Speakers: Blythe Semmer (Advisory Council on Historic Preservation), Megan Brown (National Park Service), Jaime Loichinger (Advisory Council on Historic Preservation)

Seawall Grand Ballroom Rebecca Goodwin

Invitation to follow. Questions? Contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles (Executive Director) jorrigocharles@coloradopreservation.org • 303-893-4260 ext. 237

■ S3 | SATURDAY TEA AT THE LUMBER BARON INN 3:00pm – 6:00pm • Location: Lumber Baron Inn

Before you leave town on Saturday, make a visit to the Lumber Baron Inn for afternoon tea! Located in the historic neighborhood of the Potter Highlands, the Lumber Baron Inn was built in 1890 by John Mouat for his wife and their five children. The mansion has been beautifully restored to its original floor plan and today it is a charming bed and breakfast.

SAVE THE DATE

The Lumber Baron Inn offered a discount to attendees of the Saving Places Conference! You cannot attend this event unless you registered in advance online.

Thank You! Don’t miss our Denver walking tour on Wednesday: FOUNDATIONS OF DENVER 4:30pm – 6:00pm Meet at Convention Center

See page 15 for more details.

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From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

Together, our work in historic preservation has helped provide a catalyst for positive change in communities statewide, improving our quality of life and stimulating local economies. As your grassroots nonprofit preservation organization, we depend on your continued support to help us save the historic places that matter now and for future generations. www.ColoradoPreservation.org

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Thank you to the 2018 Conference Content Advisory Committee for their time and assistance in developing this year’s session schedule. The Saving Places Conference would not be possible without their support and guidance.

Heather Bailey *Committee Chair City of Durango

Jonathan Raab History Colorado State Historical Fund

Abbey Christman Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver

Andre Redstone Redstones Timber Frames, Inc.

Stan Clauson APA Representative – Stan Clauson Associates, Inc.

Mark Rodman History Colorado Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation

Rebecca Goodwin Historic Preservation Officer, Otero County

Jamie Shapiro Downtown Colorado, Inc.

John Gritts US Department of Education

Michelle Slaughter Historical Archaeologist/Principal

Elizabeth Hallas Anderson Hallas Architects Colorado Preservation, Inc. Board Member

Angela Smelker Center of Preservation Research, University of Colorado Denver

Karl Kumli Diezte and Davis, P.C. Colorado Preservation, Inc. Board Member

Tim Stroh History Colorado State Historical Fund

Astrid Liverman Metcalf Archaeology

Amy Unger History Colorado State Historical Fund

bingo sheet AIA Colorado

Anderson hallas architects

apa colorado

atkinson-noland & associates

Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety

Discover Denver

HistoriCorps

jva, inc.

Martin/Martin Consulting Engineers

Metcalf Archaeology

Pilkington North America, Inc.

pinyon environmental, inc.

secureview clearboarding

summit sealants & restoration, inc.

wattle & Daub contractors

Kat Vlahos Center of Preservation Research, University of Colorado Denver

Tori Martinez Sangre de Cristo National Heritage Area

Jane Watkins Watkin Stained Glass Colorado Preservation, Inc. Board Member

Cynthia Nieb City of La Junta

William Wei University of Colorado Boulder

Breanne Nugent History Colorado State Historical Fund

Amy Zimmer CHR Task Force

Your Name:

Gary Petri Architect

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Take this page with you to the Preservation Marketplace (Thursday, Feb. 1 at 5:00 p.m. in the Four Seasons Ballroom) and each time you speak with an exhibitor, get them to sign their square in the Bingo sheet below! Visit every exhibitor to complete your Bingo sheet and then drop it off in the basket at the front of the stage in the ballroom or with a CPI staff member by 6:30 p.m. on Thursday to be entered to win a FREE registration to the 2019 Saving Places Conference!

Committee Members

Julie Johnson City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Colorado Preservation, Inc. Board Chair

PRESERVATION MARKETPLACE - EXHIBITOR BINGO

Your Email: From the Mountains to the Plains | Saving Places® 2018

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