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June 2020

Growing Great Families Since 1986

Retro Summer Fun

Camping adventures with Jeremy Padgett, of Mix100 Denver's Dom and Jeremy Morning Show, and his kids

Build a Backyard Play Zone

Family Camping What You Need to Know Before You Go

The Benefits of Boredom

GET GROWING

Expert Tips to Plant a Family Garden Cool & Fruity Frozen Treats 4 Metro Denver Family Hikes

PART OF THE

PUBLISHING FAMILY

ColoradoParent.com


2020

2020

Gardening: Getty Images.

2020

CONTENTS June 2020 features 35

Hop on the trend! Grow your own groceries in your backyard.

Plan an old-fashioned summer filled with messy crafts, exciting games, and more.

PLANT A STARTER GARDEN

departments

PARENTING 911

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GOOD STUFF

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LEARN & GROW

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

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YOUR TURN

Stories of Feelings and Emotions

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FAMILY FOOD

IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

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ROUNDUP

ON THE WEB

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FROM THE EDITORS

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What We Learned

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GOOD TO KNOW

Summer Business Advice for Young Entrepreneurs

LET’S GO

Hit the Local Trails

READ TO ME

New and Noteworthy for Denver-Area Families

on the cover

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OLD-FASHIONED SUMMER FUN

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The latest tips and tricks on ColoradoParent.com

advertising

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Education and Enrichment Guide Camp Guide

Mending a Playdate Gone Wrong

Just Add Water

Positively Bored

Look Before You Leap

The Wild Life

Frozen Fruit Pops

Together, Apart

12 Local Hikes for Denver Families | 18 The Benefits of Boredom 28 Frozen Fruit Pop Recipes | 30 How to Plant a Starter Garden 35 Plan a Summer Filled With Fun | 44 Tips for Colorado Camping

Colorado Parent | June 2020

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FAMILY CAMPING IN COLORADO What you need to know before you go.

Jeremy, Reid, and Lyla photographed by Eliza Donley Nolte, skippingrocksphotography.com


jeffcolibrary.org

EXPLORE SUMMER READING JUNE 1-JULY 31

Gear up for epic adventure as you pursue your goal and Explore Summer Reading! You’ll find dozens of activity suggestions and staff picks online. Start anytime after June 1! • Win prizes.

• Read and complete activities.

• Participate in virtual library programs.

• Support your school and Foothills Animal Shelter.

All ages are invited to have fun with Explore Summer Reading! Everyone benefits from keeping their minds active over the summer—babies, kids, teens and adults!

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN! Visit jeffcolibrary.org to start exploring and sign up for summer reading!


On the Web

Colorado Parent Online

Practical financial steps to take during COVID-19-related financial crises.

Virtual Summer Summer is going to look very different this year now that we’re practicing social distancing and safer-at-home measures, and the same goes for summer camps. We’re sharing virtual camps and classes to keep your kids entertained and learning at home over the next few months.

Farmers Markets Here’s what to expect during the 2020 farmers market season.

Celebrate Your Grad Is your child graduating this month? Honor your 2020 grad by sharing their photo and accomplishments in our Graduation Gallery. We’re accepting submissions for kindergarten graduates, middle school continuation, and senior classes. Upload your photo and share a personal, congratulatory message through June 30th.

Masks for Kids Where to find face masks for kids (that they’ll actually want to wear).

CONNECT WITH US

@coloradoparentmagazine

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

@coloradoparent

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Pinterest.com/ColoradoParent

Sign up for our E-NEWSLETTER at ColoradoParent.com

Virtual summer, budget: Getty Images. Farmers' Market: Metro Denver Farmers Market. Masks: Swaddle Designs.

Family Budget Tips


From the Editors

What We Learned…

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During the past couple of months, neighbors have rallied, signs of encouragement have filled windows, and local businesses have given back to front-line workers. On top of it all, you’ve bravely juggled the role of parent, teacher, friend, and coach. Although we wish we could be together, we couldn’t be more proud to call you our community.

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Things that inspired this issue, and what our editors discovered along the way.

EDITORIAL edit@coloradoparent.com Editor Deborah Mock Associate Editor Christina Cook Assistant Editor Kara Thompson Editorial Assistant Anna Sutterer Copy Editor Lydia Rueger ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Patrick Pacheco patrick@coloradoparent.com Senior Account Manager Brigette Swartz brigette@coloradoparent.com Account Manager Hilary Angel hilary@coloradoparent.com Client Services Coordinator Shundra Jackson

Colorado families showed gratitude, offered support, and shared moments of joy amidst stay-at-home orders. Page 48

PRODUCTION Art Director Heather Gott

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TRENDING Backyard Gardens Local experts offer their best tips for growing your own fruits and veggies.

Families are finally given a chance to get away from home as campgrounds across the state begin to open up. Page 44

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MARKETING Senior Marketing Director Carrie Horn Marketing & Events Coordiantor Piniel Simegn Marketing Coordinator Jess Mora Marketing Interns Niyat Ogbazghi, Pamela Amaya, Tiana Noble ADMINISTRATION Billing and Collections Manager Jessica McHeard

CAN’T WAIT To laugh, dance, and play in the warm summer sun. That’s why we’ve dedicated eight pages to inspire you and your kids to look for all of the fun that can be found in your own backyard. From crafty ways to spruce up bicycles to makeshift water parks at home, this summer is all about what you make it. page 35

DISTRIBUTION & CIRCULATION AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Audrey Congleton Audience Development Coordinator Caitlin Kittrell circulation@coloradoparent.com Printed by Publication Printers Please recycle this magazine. 5280 PUBLISHING, INC. 1675 Larimer Street Suite 675 Denver, CO 80202 P (303) 832-5280 | F (303) 832-0470 Visit us online at ColoradoParent.com

YOU SAID IT How kids learn to handle discomfort will carry them through their whole lives. —Marc Gallivan, staff member at Alpine Valley School, in “Positively Bored” on page 18. Share your feedback and ideas! Email us at edit@coloradoparent.com.

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CREATIVE SERVICES Creative Services Director Carly Lambert Lead Graphic Designer Chelsea Conrad Digital Advertising Manager Nick Stonecipher Graphic Designer Caitlin Brooks Production Coordinator D'mitrius Brewer Creative Services Intern Cole Navalta

Colorado Parent | June 2020

PRESIDENT & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daniel Brogan VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGY Andrea Bott VICE PRESIDENT, REVENUE Zach Wolfel Colorado Parent is published monthly by 5280 Publishing, Inc. Please note that the advertisements in this magazine are paid for by the advertisers, which allows this magazine to be free to the consumer. Limit of one free copy per reader. Additional copies can be purchased for $5.00 per issue. Call (303) 320-1000 to request additional copies. Unless specifically noted, no advertisers, products, or services are endorsed by the Publisher. Editorial submissions are welcome. Colorado Parent (ISSN 1937-1020) ©2020 5280 Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited.


Weekly Camps Starting in June

Choose from themed camps filled with aviation and space activities! Register online at WingsMuseum.org/Camps

Camp Hours 9am - 4pm Before & After Care 7am - 9am 4pm - 6pm Open to ages 8 - 13 only Starts at $299.00/wk per person

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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469.353.6634 Monday to Saturday 7:30 AM to 7:30 PM MST

There’s hope in Telehealth from The Behavior Exchange. Call our Telehealth ABA therapy hotline today. We can help! 469.353.6634 | Mon-Sat 7:30am-7:30pm MST (8:30am-8:30pm CST) Hello Front Range families! The Behavior Exchange is excited to bring you much-needed Telehealth ABA therapy during these trying times. As an accredited Behavioral Health Center of Excellence (BHCOE), we’ve been on a mission for 20 years to help children with autism and their families achieve meaningful change in their lives.

TBE TELEHEALTH

Our NEW hive serving the greater Boulder area will be opening as soon as we can ensure the health of our clients and staff. Until then, our Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) and Registered Behavior Therapists (RBTs) can provide you with critical continuity of care through Telehealth services, including One-on-One and group therapy for children and special training for parents.

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Telehealth Hotline

469.353.6634 Monday to Saturday 7:30 AM to 7:30 PM MST

Telehealth is also a great way to get a sneak peek of our fun, creative curriculum you won’t find anywhere else!

972.312.8733

intake@behaviorexchange.com

behaviorexchange.com

Boulder, CO | Plano & Frisco, TX

ENROLL NOW FOR 2020-21! Call to schedule a virtual meeting & tour of the 22-acre campus.

Serving students with dyslexia, ADD and diverse learners, grades 1 to 12. denveracademy.org • 303-777-5161

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Colorado Parent | June 2020


Good to Know HELPFUL NEWS, IDEAS, AND TIPS FOR COLORADO PARENTS

Photo: Getty Images.

Summer Business Advice for Young Entrepreneurs The lemonade stand, that staple of summer business ventures, has helped industrious kids learn financial and social skills for generations. Social distancing and lingering questions about public health, however, may thwart budding business owners’ plans this year. Anna Leer, vice president of YouthBiz, a hands-on business basics program at the Young Americans Center for Financial Education (YACFE), offers these timely tips to kids hoping to earn money with their own startup this summer. Try a business with social distance built-in. Lawn care, pet walking, grocery delivery, mask making, assembling to-go activity kits for

families, and filming how-to classes online are creative, yet socially-responsible, options. Adjust your current business practices. Accept PayPal or Venmo for products or services to reduce cash transactions. Deliver products to customers’ doorsteps to reduce in-person interaction. Market creatively. Create a social media page or website to show off your products and services. Stream events to stay connected with your customers and let them know what you are up to. Offer YouTube tutorials on how you make your product or perform your service. Gabe Nagel, 15-year-old owner of Gabe’s Bazaar,

an online store, and Light CO2, a nonprofit helping teens fight climate change, says the Young Americans Center helped him build community and improve his business ideas. “The only way you can get better at something is to practice,” he says. “Don't get discouraged by the bumps and ‘failures’ along the way. There are always lessons to be learned.” Enterprising Colorado kids can check out YACFE’s virtual programs, including the new YouthBiz Enterprise Society, a monthly subscription to interactive workshops and community with like-minded peers. yacenter.org —Anna Sutterer

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Good to Know

1. Newspapers give context to the time capsule by providing a date when it was put together and what was important in the world at the time. 2. Journal entries or other writings. Future historians (or you and your family!) will be interested to learn what you were thinking and feeling when you put your time capsule together. 3. Historical photographs are a window into the past. Snap photos of you and your family, your neighborhood, local businesses, anything that you feel captures the moment you're living in now. 4. Everyday items like coins or stamps are things we all use, and that future historians will recognize.

HERE’S AN IDEA!

Assemble a Family Time Capsule Not only is this year the beginning of a new decade, but it’s starting off with a major historical event. That makes it a great time to assemble a family time capsule. “I think creating a time capsule is a great way to see the relevance of history,” says Julie Peterson, public historian and exhibit developer with History Colorado. “What we do now can provide

insight for future generations about how we lived, what we thought about during this crisis, and how we might have hope for the future.” To get started, select a cardboard or plastic container to hold your items, says Kimberly Kronwall, the exhibits and loan registrar for History Colorado, or any material that doesn’t react when temperature or humidity changes.

Q: How do I find kids sunscreen that is effective and free of harsh chemicals?

Singable Summer Playlist Searching for a new summer sound around your house? Sing along with The Okee Dokee Brothers’ new 2-CD album, Songs for Singin’ loaded with 27 original songs inspired by American folk music. “Hope Machine” is the song we all need right now. okeedokee.org

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Slathering kids with sunscreen is a must for sunny day play. Knowing exactly what you are slathering them with, and if it’s actually working, now that’s the dilemma. Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) evaluates hundreds of beach and sport sunscreens for not only efficacy, but also safety of ingredients. Of the 180 sunscreens receiving a green rating (their top honor) in 2020, 16 sunscreens marketed for use on kids and babies shined through, including Adorable Baby Sunscreen Lotion, SPF 30+ and TruKid Sunny Day Sport Mineral Sunscreen Lotion, SPF 30+. ewg.org

5. Be creative! Your time capsule is all about what you want to preserve and remember. Include anything you like, but avoid messy things like liquids, or things that might degrade over time like food or organic material. Ask each family member to contribute a couple of items. “Include a list of all of the objects you’ve put in the time capsule, with a description of what they are and why you chose to include them,” says Peterson. “This will help future historians understand why the items included were important, … and if you're the one to open the time capsule, you'll have something to jog your memory.”

Time capsule, sunscreen: Getty Images. Songs for Singin': The Okee Dokee Brothers.

Plan to store your time capsule in a cool, dry place; a crawl space or linen closet is best. Peterson suggests adding these items to your time capsule to help future historians understand what life was like during 2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic:


Family in park: Getty Images.

Good to Know | Tech Dad

The Family Drone With many of us at home and looking for things to do with the kids, now might be the perfect time to consider buying a drone. It’s something most people can fly in their backyard, and there is much that kids can learn from it, such as aerodynamics, cognitive reasoning, and eye-hand coordination. Here’s my pick for the best family drone under $500. There was a day when a good drone easily cost $1,000 or more. That is not the case anymore. The newest, more affordable drone from DJI is the Mavic Mini at $400. It folds up into a compact pouch that you can easily take to your local park. Unfold the arms and it’s ready to fly. What I love about the Mavic Mini is that it’s simple to use. The DJI Fly app walks you through the entire process. There are a few different modes that make it easier or more difficult to control based on your, or your child’s, skill level. The drone does most of the hard work if you don’t want to spend too much time figuring out how to be a drone master. The best part is that if you take your hands off the drone at any time it will simply hover in place. If you’re careful, it really is hard to crash this thing. The Mavic Mini also takes 12-megapixel pictures, and video is 1080p—technically it can

record video up to 2.7K. If these numbers are gobbledygook to you, just know that it's not the best quality, but it’s good enough for most of us and the results look amazing. The battery will last up to 30 minutes per flight and DJI claims you can fly the drone more than two miles away with the included remote. It’ll even land itself back where it started with the push of a button. I found the Mavic Mini easy to set-up, easy to fly, and durable enough for most families. Kirk Yuhnke is a father of three, self-admitted tech junkie, and the morning news anchor on the Fox31 Morning News.

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Good to Know | Let’s Go

Hike photos Jamie Siebrase. Sanitizer and water bottle: Getty Images.

LET’S GO

Hit the Local Trail Best neighborhood hikes for families in metro Denver. By Jamie Siebrase VIBE: Convenient Adventure DRIVE TIME: Consistent with Safer-at-Home guidelines, these hikes are within the metro area. TIP: Begin your hike before 10 a.m. In addition to facilitating social distancing, you’ll up your odds of spotting wildlife if you head out early. My family will be staying closer to home this summer, but we don’t plan on sacrificing wildlife viewing, exercise, or outdoor adventures. Luckily, metro Denver has lots of great neighborhood hikes. Suddenly, staying local is looking pretty good. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ARSENAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, COMMERCE CITY Commerce City claims one of the nation’s largest urban wildlife refuges. Your kids are pretty much guaranteed to spot wildlife on the peaceful stroll from the Visitor Center to Lake Mary, a 3.4-mile route passing a black-footed ferret exhibit, buffalo enclosure, and thriving prairie dog community. Catch-and-release fishing is permitted on the lake with a license. MARJORIE PERRY NATURE PRESERVE, GREENWOOD VILLAGE At 71 miles, the High Line Canal is one of the country’s longest continuous urban trails. For a pretty, 4-mile hike, access the High Line at its Dahlia Trailhead (there’s parking past Arapahoe Tennis Club), and turn left onto the trail. At mile 33, use the underpass to cross East Belleview Avenue then follow the dirt path to a secluded nature preserve with two idyllic ponds.

North Table Mountain Park offers short and long trails for any age.

Remember water bottles, even on short hikes!

BLUFFS REGIONAL PARK, LONE TREE Despite its proximity to a hospital mega-complex, the 2.7-mile natural surface trail circumventing Bluffs Regional Park feels surprisingly secluded as it winds around a grassland ecosystem, opening to pleasing views of the Front Range mountains and Denver metro skyline. The trail is a lollipop, so go either way at the fork that’s just past the trailhead. NORTH TABLE MOUNTAIN PARK, GOLDEN Start your adventure at this 15-mile trail network from the West Trailhead. The first segment of the hike is a glute-burning, half-mile climb up a wide dirt and asphalt road. From here, ambitious families can complete a 7-mile route by following North Table Loop. Shorten the adventure by taking North Table Loop to Lichen Peak; then retrace your steps to the trailhead. Whatever your preference, you’ll pass two noteworthy landmarks: an old rock quarry and Lichen Peak.

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

As if you need another reminder, don’t forget to pack hand sanitizer. serve rjorie Perry Nature Pre nty to explore at Ma Curious kids have ple nal. on the High Line Ca


Three Grumpy Trucks: Little, Brown and Company. Glad, Glad Bear! and Fred’s Big Feelings: Simon & Schuster. The Happy Book: Penguin Random House. The Worry Box: Tiger Tales. I’m Happy-Sad Today: Free Spirit Publishing. Allie All Along: Sterling Publishing.

Good to Know | Read to Me

Three Grumpy Trucks

by Todd Tarpley; illustrated by Guy Parker-Rees (Little, Brown and Company, 2018)

Three toy trucks love digging and lifting at the playground. When their owners tell them that their engines are overheating and it’s time to go, the trucks keep asking for more time, until “they honked, they bonked, they threw a fit.” Young readers and parents will see the parallel to times when children don’t notice their elevated emotions until they reach a breaking point, through a humorous story written in verse.

Allie All Along

by Sarah Lynne Reul (Sterling Children’s Books, 2018)

When Allie breaks a crayon, she turns into a monster—literally. Page by page, her patient older brother prompts her to stomp her feet, punch a pillow, and more until she becomes Allie again. The story will give young readers a concrete way to visualize their angry feelings.

Glad, Glad Bear! by Kimberly Gee (Beach Lane Books, 2020)

A companion book to Mad, Mad Bear!, this story for young children shows how Bear feels very glad on the way to his first ballet class as he puts on his leggings, slippers, and tutu. But his feelings change to shy, unsure, and afraid when he arrives at the class. In the end, it’s dancing that makes Bear feel better.

READ TO ME

Stories of Feelings and Emotions By Lydia Rueger It’s been a spring filled with emotions, both for our kids and ourselves. As we begin to explore the changes summer will bring, check out these great picture books that help kids identify different emotions and understand what they are feeling inside.

The Happy Book

by Andy Rash (Viking Books for Young Readers, 2019)

This story begins with one happy camper and one happy clam in a sunny yellow world. But when they go through a “door” on the page, the book turns blue and sad, then red and angry, then green and scared, and the boy and the clam have a hard time finding their way back to happiness. In the end, the friends wind up in a place where all the emotions coexist together.

Fred’s Big Feelings

by Laura Renauld; illustrated by Brigette Barrager (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2020)

I’m Happy-Sad Today

by Lory Britain; illustrated by Matthew Rivera (Free Spirit Publishing, 2019)

Inspired by a conversation with her granddaughter, early childhood education expert Lory Britain wanted to write a book that validated kids’ mixed-together feelings, such as happy and sad, scared and brave, nervous and excited. The book gives kids researched-based strategies to help them cope with their challenging emotions, like talking to a grown-up or playing pretend with stuffed animals.

Find more books about feelings and emotions at ColoradoParent.com

The Worry Box

by Suzanne Chiew; illustrated by Sean Julian (Tiger Tales, 2018)

Murray Bear is worried about visiting the waterfall with his sister Molly. “What if it’s too loud?” and “What if I get swept away?” he wonders. Molly tells Murray about her worry box: When she is worried, she writes down her concerns and places them inside the box. She helps Murray make his own box to take on his journey.

Through the life story of children’s television host, Fred Rogers, the author shows how feelings—and the ability to identify and express them—can impact others and change lives. It was Fred’s big feelings as a boy that spurred him to teach children about feelings through his show, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, which aired from 1968 to 2001.

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Good to Know | In the Neighborhood

In the Neighborhood » New and noteworthy for Denver-area families. LOVELAND Vegetables for Families in Need The High Plains Environmental Center, an urban environmental park that provides education on natural resource conservation and sustainable living, is growing vegetables to assist families who have lost income due to COVID-19. This summer, the center will use its 2,000 square feet of greenhouse space to grow cucumbers and tomatoes, which will be donated to the Larimer County Food Bank and Loveland House of Neighborly Service. suburbitat.org

THE HIGHLANDS New Wellness Marketplace Opening in Phases Nurture, a new well-care marketplace located in the Highlands, is beginning to open its businesses in phases. The on-site café/bar, Nest, is open for preorders, carry-out, and walk-ins. Nest serves coffee, wine, baked goods, and smoothies. Other wellness providers in the marketplace are currently open by appointment. visitnurture.com

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

METRO DENVER Virtual Musical Birthday Parties Rocky Mountain Aardvarks, an organization known for its original kids’ music classes, started hosting virtual birthday parties during Colorado’s stay-at-home phase, and will continue the offering as long as there are social distancing requirements and beyond. Parties are held through Zoom, with friends and family receiving a link to join in, even if they are states away. During each party, an instructor leads a 30- to 45-minute routine of songs and movement, finishing with Happy Birthday. After the class, guests can continue to visit with one another. rockymtnaardvarks.com DOUGLAS COUNTY Highway Renamed to Remember Student A portion of Colorado state highway C-470, from University Boulevard to Santa Fe Drive, was recently renamed Kendrick Castillo Memorial Highway, in honor of the student who died during the STEM School Highlands Ranch shooting last year. Castillo, the only child of John and Maria Castillo, died May 7, 2019, when he lunged at an armed classmate inside the school. Castillo’s brave action is believed to have prevented other casualties. leg.colorado.gov

Building exterior: Firefly Autism. Drum: Rocky Mountain Aardvarks. Wellness marketplace: Nurture.

JEFFERSON COUNTY Jeffco Students Win National Awards Three Jefferson County students advanced to the national level of the PTA Reflections competition, in which students enter their work in categories related to the arts. Madhvi Chittoor of Hackberry Hill Elementary received an Award of Excellence for music composition; Kinley McDonald of West Woods Elementary received an Award of Merit for music composition; Val Heidarsson of Evergreen Middle School received an Award of Merit for literature. Excellence winners receive a $200 Young Artist Scholarship, silver medal, and certificate; Merit winners receive a bronze medal and a certificate. All winning work will be featured in a traveling exhibition sponsored by National PTA. pta.org/home/programs/reflections

LAKEWOOD Autism Center Expands Programming Firefly Autism will have a new home at the beginning of June, designed to serve even more individuals with autism. The larger building, located in Lakewood, allows them to admit children currently on their waiting list and expand programming. The location will offer daycare for neurotypical children, autism diagnosis, and parent training and support groups. In the evenings, Firefly Autism will work with adults who were previously misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. fireflyautism.org


Good to Know | Parenting 911

Young Voices of Colorado

Be a part of something

Illustration: Lauren Rebbeck.

AMAZING!

PARENTING 911

Mending a Playdate Gone Wrong THE PROBLEM: On a recent playdate, my son and his friend got into a real tussle and the other boy got hurt. My son apologized and I apologized to the other mother, but the boys haven’t had a playdate since. How can I make peace with the child (and parent) and repair the relationship? THE EXPERT: Eli Harwood, mother and psychotherapist at PASS Center. THE SOLUTION: Conflict is a part of every healthy relationship—even for our kids. We are so often focused on getting our children to behave properly that we forget how messy emotions and needs can be with all of our loved ones, including our friends. Making a repair in a relationship generally has three prongs:   1. Owning missteps and apologizing (which you both did). 2. Understanding the impact our child’s actions had on the other person’s child. 3. Re-establishing new standards of relating. Many people never even get to step one, so be proud of yourself that you and your son have the capacity for remorse. The next best move? I would reach out to the other parent and check in. Ask her if she’s still been thinking about the incident and if it has had a larger impact on

her or her child, beyond the day it occurred. For some people, these events can trigger their own past experiences, or even their general fears as a parent. Once she has shared with you, ask if there’s anything you can do to help make it better the next time you are together. Most people will feel better at just the suggestion, but others may have an idea of what they or their child need to re-establish the connection.  The caveat here is that it takes two to tango. If you ask her to dance and she keeps telling you her dance card is full, then perhaps it’s time to look for a better date. Playdates, like anything else, are best done with people who value us as much as we value them.  The good news is that the average parent has reasonable expectations for other children as well as their own. I know that all of my son’s friends have at some point engaged in rough behavior towards him. They have bitten him, stolen from him, called off the friendship temporarily, and been downright rude. And you know what? My son has done the same. And he isn’t even five years old yet.  The golden rule here is this: Do your best to own your mistakes, listen, and change. If that’s not enough for the other person, it’s likely triggering something far greater than the tussle they got into.

Accepting new singers for Fall 2020 Call or go online for information

No audition for K-1st Graders - just sign up! Auditions for 2nd-9th Graders

Be AMAZING

Join Young Voices www.youngvoices.org/join 303.797.7464

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June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Good to Know | Good Stuff

Just Add Water Who needs a neighborhood pool when there’s plenty of water fun to be had in your own backyard? These toys and inflatables will keep your family cool all summer long—no social distancing required. By Christina Cook

Fill the Zoom Ball Hydro with water balloons and get ready for an unexpected splash—the balloons will randomly pop as you send it zooming back and forth between two people. Ages eight and up. $18, amazon.com

Fill, pump, and experience the nostalgia of ‘90s water-drenching fun with the new Nerf Super Soaker XP100 water blaster. $15, target.com

Connect the giant Funboy Backyard Rocketship Sprinkler to your garden hose and splash around in 360 degrees of water from four sprayers. $69, funboy.com

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Background: Getty Images.

When the weather heats up, cool off in a Minnidip Minni-Minni inflatable kids pool. With cute smiley face bottoms and easy setup, these pools create a little oasis in your backyard. Ages three and up. $33, minnidip.com

Slip and slide down Sun Squad’s 18-foot long Watermelon Double Water Slide, which features water sprayers throughout and a splash pool at the end. Ages five to 12. $15, target.com


Celebrate your Grad! presented by

Honor your 2020 grad by sharing their photo and accomplishments. Now accepting submissions for Kindergarten, Continuation, and Senior classes.

Share on Social: @ColoradoParent | #CPCelebrateYourGrad Submissions are accepted now through June 30, 2020

Graduating students may have missed out on many traditions this year, but there is still a way to recognize their achievements. Join Colorado Parent in honoring the class of 2020 in three different categories: Kindergarten, Continuation and High School.

Submit your grad’s photo and tell us a little about them at

coloradoparent.com


Learn & Grow

Boy seated: Getty Images.

Positively Bored Are there really benefits to boredom? Learn how you can help foster positive outcomes from less-than-thrilling times. By Lydia Rueger

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’ve read numerous blogs that say things like “my kids’ boredom is not my problem.” The authors make some good points, and experts agree that if parents try to fix their kids’ bored feelings, it just won’t work. But given our kids’ more limited options this summer, paired with parents experiencing reduced incomes, the notion expressed in those blogs sounds a little too simple to me. Boredom is, in fact, our problem if our kids aren’t sure what to do with the feeling. Research shows that people prone to boredom have higher rates of depression, hostility, and sexual promiscuity, and engage in riskier behaviors, says James Danckert, cognitive neuroscientist and coauthor of the book, Out of My Skull (scheduled for release on June 9). On the positive side, “My research has shown that we get much more creative when we are bored,” says Sandi Mann, senior psychology lecturer and author of The Science of Boredom. More creative, that is, if parents consider the following: Allow unstructured time. It may seem a counterintuitive solution to give bored kids more free time, but it can actually inspire ideas. “The problem with kids growing up now is that they are

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

not used to any downtime. Everything is structured and what I call ‘whizzy whizzy bang bang’— fast moving, fast paced, lots of novelty—and that lowers their threshold to boredom,” says Mann. “So the best thing you can do for your kids is give them plenty of free time.” Arvada mom of four Susie Rodgers has seen the results of unstructured time at home. In her newly blended family, her four children spanning a wide age range don’t often agree on what to do. One evening, when Rodgers and her husband decided to watch a show by themselves, the four kids started a game of capture the flag outside. “They used a shoe as the flag; they set up their own boundaries. It has amazed me what kids will come up with if we step back a bit,” Rodgers says. The concept of abundant unstructured time has also been integrated into some education settings, such as the Sudbury model, for decades. It’s part of the philosophy of Alpine Valley School (AVS) in Wheat Ridge, an independent school where students pursue only activities that interest them. Marc Gallivan, graduate of the school and current staff member, has seen the results, both as a student and an adult community member at the school. At age 14 when Gallivan first enrolled in

AVS, he was often bored, as he tried to figure out how this new school worked. “One of my favorite things to do when I was bored was to go see what my good friend was doing. She was usually writing. Sometimes she’d read what she wrote, and sometimes we would collaborate on a story together.” From there, Gallivan and his friend formed a writing group at AVS, which met consistently through his high school years and wrote a screenplay that was performed for their school community. The group continued meeting for six years after graduation, and lifelong friendships developed. “Boredom can be an invitation, if we listen to it,” Gallivan says. Help kids build on the skills they have. “If you foster creative outlets, then when [your kids] get bored, [they] can turn to them,” Danckert says. A seasoned piano player might try writing a song; a young soccer player might work on an advanced move; a child taught to hammer a nail might be ready to build something. “Vary the level of oversight as [they] gain more skills,” advises Danckert. Make a variety of supplies and materials available. “Give them the tools to be creative … craft materials or material to build dens [blanket


Learn & Grow

forts] … natural things that are lying around your house … they don’t have to be expensive,” Mann says. Arvada mom of two Lacey Meyerhoff started doing this for her two-year-old daughter Alanna, after she researched Montessori philosophy, which is designed to engage children’s natural desire to learn, by allowing them to learn at their own pace. She used to have toys stashed away in bins and totes, but she now sets out a variety of different materials at eye-level for Alanna to access on her own. “I get to see more of her sense of curiosity, and see what grabs her attention,” Meyerhoff says. She hopes that by doing this, Alanna will start to develop more independence to play on her own, as is evident in Montessori classrooms. Ask questions. Rather than trying to solve a child’s boredom, ask, “Why do you think you are bored right now? What are you missing? What would you want to be doing right now?” suggests Danckert. Note that these questions can be harder for some younger children to answer; you know your child best. Think about questions that would be most appropriate for them. When AVS students complain to Gallivan of boredom, he says, “On the inside, I’m [thinking], ‘Great! It’s working!’ What I tend to say is, ‘Do you want to see what I’m doing? Do you want to talk? Do you want to go outside?’”

KIDS ARE MORE PRONE TO BOREDOM IF… Clinical psychologist and co-author of Out of My Skull, John Eastwood, cites the following factors that contribute to boredom proneness in adults, some of which could be helpful when considering why a child is often bored.

…They are not good at labeling their emotions. Parents can ask, “What is going on, in your thoughts or in your body?” Help label the emotion for them. …They have trouble with focus and attention. Pull a puzzle off the shelf, and get them engaged with your support. As they become engrossed, you can pull back. You’ve helped scaffold their need for attention. …They are highly motivated to maximize pleasure or minimize pain. People who are high on either end are more prone to boredom—either the world seems not pleasurable enough, or they “turtle in” to avoid risks. …They struggle to self-regulate. Kids with more self-control are less likely to be bored. …Biologically, they have chronically lower levels of arousal. If this is the case, it’s harder to concentrate because they are constantly seeking to be energized. Take longer breaks from technology. “If kids are constantly swiping and scrolling their boredom away, they are not learning to un-bore themselves, and they are not going to get their creative juices flowing,” says Mann. Danckert says it’s important to make the distinction between active and passive engagement with technology. Just scrolling through social media will occupy time, but won’t be very mentally satisfying. Using technology to make videos or as a way to connect with friends would be an active

STA RT YOU R

SEARCH TODAY

TO ENROLL YOUR 4-YEAR-OLD IN PRESCHOOL

way to use it, rather than using it to just pacify boredom, Danckert adds. Remember that boredom is normal. Everyone experiences it, and Gallivan believes boredom is essential to learning. “It’s uncomfortable, like all lessons that are essential,” he says. “How kids learn to handle the discomfort will carry them through their whole lives.” Lydia Rueger is an Arvada-based writer and mother of two.

The Denver Preschool Program offers tools to help families find a quality preschool that best meets their needs and tuition support to help lower their child’s monthly enrollment costs.

Get started today at

DENVERPRESCHOOL.COM June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

19


EDUCATION & ENRICHMENT

EDUCATION AURORA CedarWood Christian Academy 11430 E. 19th Avenue, Aurora 303-361-6456 roborny@cedarwoodchristian.org cedarwoodchristian.org

Our mission is to teach and train young people to know and serve God by building a relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ, nurturing godly character and developing the mind with excellent academics. K-12. Founded in 1983. Fully accredited.

Montessori del Mundo

15503 E. Mississippi Ave. 720-863-8629 info@montessoridelmundo.org montessoridelmundo.org We are a public, dual language charter school serving diverse students from age three to sixth grade. Our model provides a respectful, developmentally appropriate, and rigorous whole child education for both Spanish and English dominant speaking children.

DENVER Children’s Garden Montessori School 444 Detroit St. 303-322-0972 jboes@cgmontessori.com cgmontessori.com

Using Montessori philosophy as a foundation and Reggio Emilia philosophy as inspiration, we serve children ages 18 months to six years in a communityfocused environment.

International School of Denver 7701 E. First Pl., Unit C 303-340-3647 info@isdenver.org isdenver.org

Multicultural, multilingual immersion school serving students age three to grade eight through accredited, authentic French, Spanish, and Chinese curricula. We offer a capstone International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme for grades six through eight.

Montessori Children’s House of Denver Mayfair, Stapleton, and Park Hill campuses 303-322-8324 directorofadmissions@mchdenver.org mchdenver.org

MCHD is a private Montessori school for preschool

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

through middle school students. We help children develop a strong academic foundation, self and community awareness, and a love of learning. MCHD is not just a school, it’s an investment in your child’s future.

Ricks Center for Gifted Children 2040 S. York St. 303-871-3715 ricksctr@du.edu du.edu/ricks

Located on the University of Denver campus, Ricks Center is a school, preschool to eighth grade, dedicated to gifted learners. Flexible, differentiated curriculum designed around the whole child. Teachers who know, understand, and care deeply about gifted education and each individual student. Low student to teacher ratio.

ENGLEWOOD First Plymouth Learning Center 3501 S. Colorado Blvd., Englewood 303-762-9355 fplcdirector@firstplymouthchurch.org fplc.org

We proudly serve children 15 months to five years of age. We have many schedule options for the school year. Small class sizes create a strong community at FPLC. We offer several summer sessions. We look forward to meeting you!

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS New Horizon Academy

Preschool and Early Education Multiple Denver area locations newhorizonacademy.net New Horizon Academy provides high-quality care and education to young children. While focusing on developing a healthy sense of self in each child, we strive to provide your child with the necessary skills to succeed not only in school but also in life.

Rocky Mountain Prep

Denver (NW, SW, SE) and Aurora locations 720-464-3530 enroll@rockymountainprep.org rockymountainprep.org Rocky Mountain Prep (RMP) is a network of free, topperforming public elementary schools. RMP is now enrolling for pre-K through fifth grade at our Denver and Aurora schools.

ENRICHMENT ART artSPARK Creative Studio

2630 W. Belleview Avenue, Suite 160 303-795-7897 info@artsparkcreative.com artsparkcreative.com

A unique art making and sewing space for ages one to adult. artSPARK teaches you to think and work like artists through techniques, concepts, process, and play, using your own ideas. Purchase art kits and alternative summer options during COVID-19.

MARTIAL ARTS ATAFMA (Family Martial Arts) 4510 S. Reservoir Rd, #A, Aurora 303-690-0560 info@atafma.com atafma.com

Traditional Martial Arts classes for ages four and up. We focus on teaching discipline and respect in a fun, active environment. ATAFMA has been serving the Aurora/Centennial area for 25 years.

Tiger Kim’s Academy Taekwondo & Tang Soo Do 1480 Steele St., Denver 303-388-1408 tigerkim.com

Our mission is to inspire each member to strengthen their mind and body through taekwondo, tang soo do, and hapkido, striving for excellence. We provide individualized attention through understanding student needs and encouraging them to attain their best.

MUSIC Young Voices of Colorado

99 Inverness Dr E., Ste. 150, Englewood 303-797-7464 margie@youngvoices.org youngvoices.org Want to be a part of something AMAZING? YVC offers age appropriate choirs where children sing and learn with peers in a meaningful way. Each group provides skill development in vocal technique, music theory, and choral artistry. Be AMAZING: Join YVC!

Tell Colorado Parent readers about your school or classes! For more information, contact sales@coloradoparent.com.


First Plymouth Learning Center… Where your child is seen, heard, known, and loved— just the way they are!

Now enrolling ages 15mo. - 5 years. Flexible options available. Want to learn more about us? Check out our website fplc.org and then give us a call for a tour where you will learn more about our wonderful community. Please call Noanie Geistert, FPLC Director, at 303-762-9355. Everybody, welcome. Seriously. Everybody.

FIND A SCHOOL 24/7 Search Colorado Parent’s exclusive list of Denver-Metro schools anytime online. With an updated look and streamlined platform, our website is now faster, more engaging, and responsive on any device.

.COM

SATURDAY AUGUST 15, 2020 Experience the LoHi neighborhood at the first installment of our Block Party Series! This FUN-FILLED Saturday afternoon will feature FOOD TRUCKS, MARKETPLACE, KID ZONE, + MORE!

FRE E EVEN T !

Breastival 2020 at Central Park in Stapleton Saturday, August 8th, 2020 10am - 2pm Over 50 family friendly vendors • Mommy & me yoga • Facepainting • and more!

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June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

21


Health & Wellness

Girl on trampoline: Getty Images.

Summer Safety Series

Look Before You Leap

As trampoline parks surge in popularity, tiny jumpers are most at risk. By Sarah Protzman Howlett

C

helsea Carlton had to think fast. It was the start of the 2019 holiday season, but a Christmas light event she and her daughter Nell, then two, were planning to attend had been abruptly canceled. Hoping to skirt Nell’s disappointment, Carlton thought of a trampoline park nearby she’d passed many times. She pulled up its website on her phone: It was open, had a toddler area, and it wasn’t typically too busy on a Friday evening. This would do. Nell’s father, Sean, met Chelsea and Nell shortly after they arrived. Nell was having a ball, plenty of space to herself, when out of nowhere, her knees buckled upon descending back on the trampoline, landing her in a seated position. She cried a little but it didn’t look like anything too bad. Then she put weight on her legs and cried louder. Her parents wondered if maybe she was tired and ready for bed, or maybe pulled a muscle. The family headed home and called Children’s Hospital Colorado, who recommended urgent care if they saw Nell’s leg swelling. They gave her Tylenol, no swelling in sight, but she was definitely

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

uncomfortable and still crying. Nell fell asleep in her parents’ bed that night. By 2 a.m., the swelling was so severe, Chelsea saw it while Nell was still covered with a blanket.

A LESSER-KNOWN WARNING

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons recommends that no children under six jump on a trampoline, though statistics suggest low awareness of this recommendation. According to data from 50 trampoline parks taken from April to June 2019, 13 percent of all jumping was done by children ages one to five years old, reports Roller, a company that makes software for leisure businesses. While disappointing for parents to hear, says Dr. Gaia Georgopoulos, an orthopedic surgeon at Children’s Colorado, many parents get a false sense of security when trampoline parks have a toddler area. It’s a good idea in practice to separate toddlers from older kids who are jumping, however the majority of trampoline injuries she’s seen in the under-five group have occurred on the trampoline itself—not from falling off. “Bones at the toddler age

are more like plastic,” says Georgopoulos, and the impact of jumping alone is sometimes too much.

INCREASE IN INJURIES

In November 2019, Georgopoulos and a team of researchers released their findings from a study on pediatric trampoline-related fractures, which trended up from 35.3 per 100,000 people in 2008 to 53 people per 100,000 in 2017. By age group, age zero to four accounted for 25.5% of all trampoline fractures across the study period, 41.9% were ages five to nine, 28.3% were 10 to 14, and 4.2% 15 to 17, according to data the Children’s Colorado team pulled from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. The uptick in injuries correlates with the surge in popularity in recreational trampoline parks nationwide: The first trampoline park opened in the United States in 2004, and today there are more than 800, according to the International Association of Trampoline Parks (IATP). Colorado has more than a dozen trampoline parks, most of which note specified areas for children under seven or five on


Health & Wellness

their websites. Georgopoulos hopes pediatricians are talking to parents about the risks trampolines pose, especially for the younger set. “Nell’s mom had no idea it wasn’t safe for her toddler to jump on a trampoline,” she says. When a child jumps and the trampoline bounces back to meet the child’s legs, bones can break. Lower extremity fractures are common in younger age groups; in fact, many patients visit Children’s Colorado with tibia fractures from jumping on the trampoline. It happened to Nell.

A BAD BREAK

It turned out that Nell had broken her femur. They’d arrived at Children’s Colorado after 2 a.m., and Nell went into a four-hour surgery with Georgopoulos at 6:30 the next morning. Two small plates and six small screws were fabricated especially for Nell, then she was placed in a spica cast that immobilizes one or both legs as well as the waist. In the weeks following the surgery, Nell’s “personality shriveled away to nothing,” Chelsea says. Nell took to wearing aviator sunglasses all day, every day. The formerly social little girl—who’d never met a stranger she didn’t like—became afraid of others and did not want

to be touched. Because Nell was normally in daycare, Chelsea started working from home, rising at 2 a.m. to do her job until Nell woke up at 7 a.m., and thus began the full day of constant Nell care. She developed hacks—like carting Nell in a wagon and lining her diaper with maxi pads so urine wouldn’t trickle into her cast.

BEFORE YOU LEAP

Nell had the cast removed right before Christmas 2019. She developed a bad limp that eventually resolved—but not before another child called her “weird” during a bookstore outing. Though Nell went back to daycare, socializing normally, and is healing well, her journey is not quite over: In late June, Nell will have another surgery to remove the pins and plates. While Chelsea is proud of her own resilience and grateful for the help they received from loved ones, the lasting emotional implications and ongoing pangs of guilt have made her a more nervous parent. “A break like this is so much more than just a cast,” she says. “If something feels like it’s worth a Google search to assess safety, Google it three times.” Sarah Protzman Howlett is a Boulderbased journalist and editor whose work has appeared in national, local, and trade magazines.

DR. G’S THREE SIMPLE RULES

PARENT LIKE A PRO with our video series #COPARENTSENCOURAGE! Learn tips and tricks from local parents. Get new ideas on homeschooling, learning resources and avoiding boredom! CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE SERIES

Regardless of whether the trampoline is in your backyard or at a recreational facility, this shortlist will ensure the best protection against injury. Georgopoulos notes that the percentage of injuries related to home trampolines is slightly less given the rise of trampoline parks, yet the overall number of injuries has increased. • Jumpers are most often injured when they’re on the trampoline with someone else, Georgopoulos says. One jumper at a time is the best way to prevent injury. The IATP also advocates this safety guideline, says Bethany Evans, executive vice president of IATP. • Trampolines should always be set up on a soft surface like grass or sand, never on a hard surface like a patio or a concrete driveway. • Adults should always supervise kids while they’re on a trampoline. Georgopoulos says many parents send their kids out back to jump on the trampoline and that’s that, but trampoline use needs to be monitored. Also, children under age six should not be jumping on trampolines.

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CAMP GUIDE ACADEMIC/STEM Code Ninjas Arvada, Broomfield, Denver, Highlands Ranch, Louisville, and Parker codeninjas.com Code Ninjas teaches kids ages seven to 14 to code by building video games and robotics. Students advance from white to black on the path to coding enlightenment. Programs include year-round drop-ins, weeklong camps, birthdays, parents’ night out, and more.

CU Science Discovery 4001 Discovery Dr., Boulder 303-492-7188 scidisc@colorado.edu colorado.edu/sciencediscovery K-12 programs covering a wide range of STEM disciplines. Full-day programs at CU Boulder and CU Anschutz provide a mix of engaging, experiential learning activities that explore CU science using university equipment, laboratories and resources.

eXL Learning Lowry Town Center, 200 Quebec St., Denver 303-364-9581 info@exllearning.com exllearning.com We know what it takes to help your child succeed. We have the right tutor and supplemental educational programming to make a difference. Tutoring, Academic Coaching, Executive Functioning Skills, Social Emotional Academic Learning, Educational Evaluations, Summer Camps.

Gold Crown STEAM Camps 150 S. Harlan St., Lakewood 303-233-6776 camps@goldcrownfoundation.com goldcrownfoundation.com/enrichment Explore, create, and discover new interests at the Summer STEAM Camp Series. Three camps are offered ranging from building drones to designing murals to creating your own social media content. Camps are offered to boys and girls ages 10 to 18.

HRCA Art and Education Camps 9568 S. University Blvd., Highlands Ranch 303-471-8928 angela.munger@hrcaonline.org hrcaonline.org/camps Get creative with more than 50 art and educational camps from science, technology and robotics, to jewelry making, cooking, drama, and tumbling. Full and half day options at four recreation centers for ages three to 12.

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Pop Culture Classroom Summer Camps 2760 W. Fifth Ave., Denver 303-325-1236 education@popcultureclassroom.org popcultureclassroom.org/camps

Uncorked Kitchen 8171 S. Chester St. Ste. A 720-907-3838 info@uncorkedkitchen.com uncorkedkitchen.com

Pop Culture Classroom offers camps that ignite your child’s interest in comics, movies, television, board and video games, and other pop culture topics to create one-of-a-kind learning experiences. Camps are taught by experienced educators and artists.

We will be offering our week long summer camps! We are limiting our group size to 10 to ensure social distancing during the cooking process and each week is a different theme with all Junior Chefs bringing home dinner for a family of 3 to 4.

Silicon STEM Academy 4201 E. Yale Ave. 303-800-0011 info@siliconstemacademy.com siliconstemacademy.com Our Summer STEM Camps are #1! Engaging camps like: Minecraft Modding, 3D Printing, Coding 101, YouTube Video Production, Stop-Motion Animation! Look for our new ONLINE Summer Camp options & check out our Coding Bootcamps for Teens!

DAY CAMPS Camp Backcountry 6005 Ron King Trail, Littleton 303-471-7052 campbackcountry@hrcaonline.org campbackcountry.org

ART

Expand your horizons and test your limits in the Backcountry Wilderness Area. Together we will explore, hike, climb, paddle, create, lead, campout, ride horses, connect, raft, and learn to love the wild around us.

Art Garage 6100 E. 23rd Ave., Denver 303-377-2353 katie@artgaragedenver.com artgaragedenver.com

Camp HRCA 9568 S. University Blvd., Highlands Ranch 303-471-8928 angela.munger@hrcaonline.org hrcaonline.org/camphrca

The Art Garage is a non-profit that offers toddler and me classes, summer/school day out camps, after school classes and birthday parties. Ceramics, drawing, painting, illustration, and more! Check out our adult classes too!

Enjoy a summer of fun with field trips and projects based on a new theme each week. Swimming, batting cages, rock climbing, cooking, pottery, art and more are part of daily activities based on location.

Studio Arts Boulder 1010 Aurora Ave. | 720.379.6033 contact@studioartsboulder.org studioartsboulder.org Visit our website for updated summer camp info!

COOKING Flour Power Kids Cooking Studios 2030 E. County Line Rd., Unit E, Highlands Ranch 720-656-9405 highlandsranch@flourpowerstudios.com flourpowerstudios.com/highlandsranch Each day we will create a morning snack, lunch, and afternoon snack. We will supply everything needed for an amazing week filled with newly developed lifelong skills including math, science, reading, and chemistry! Camps offered Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Growing Gardens 1630 Hawthorn Ave. | 303-443-9952 carly@growinggardens.org growinggardens.org/peacegarden Our virtual summer camps are open for registration! From June to August, we have a variety of themes with technology and technology free adaptations. We’ll engage our senses through cooking, art, and science. Visit our website for current information.

International School of Denver Summer Camps 7701 E. First Pl., Unit C, Denver 303-340-3647 summercamps@isdenver.org isdenver.org/camps Explore a new world every week at ISDenver Summer Camps! Your child will thrive while building sports skills; learning about a new subject in French, Spanish, or Chinese; or designing an innovative STEAM project. Ages three to 14.


CAMP GUIDE Montessori Children’s House of Denver 1467 Birch Street, Denver 303-322-8324 directorofadmissions@mchdenver.org mchdenver.org We offer learning centered, fun, theme-based camps at our Mayfair, Park Hill & Stapleton campuses. Built around outdoor play and handson experiences, camps include gardening, sports, arts & crafts, and more. Camps meet COVID19 safety requirements.

New Horizon Academy Broomfield and Denver 720-419-3353 inquiries@nhacademy.net newhorizonacademy.net Our summer child care program, Camp Discovery, is your child’s passport to a summer of fun, hands-on experiences, and so much more. Summer at New Horizon Academy provides your child a safe environment to learn, play, and explore during those happy summer days. Enroll today!

Outta Bounds Day Camp by Camp Timberline 970-484-8462 office@camptimberline.com camptimberline.com A Christian sports and adventure day camp unlike any other! Featuring incredible staff, sports instruction, a portable high ropes course, climbing wall, giant inflatables, theme parties, bible studies, and more! Please check our website for updates.

Parker Arts 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., Parker 303-805-6800 paceedu@parkeronline.org parkerarts.org Parker Arts camps make it fun for kids to explore their interests and try new things. We have a wide variety of camps featuring everything from theater, arts, science, dance, music, robotics, and more!

Renaissance Adventures Denver Metro & Boulder County 303-786-9216 info@renaissanceadventures.com renaissanceadventures.com Adventure abounds at our awardwinning, outdoor summer camps! Through live-action role play, girls & boys ages six to 17 work together to solve mysteries, outwit monsters, battle foes and save the kingdom of a mythical land. Every child gets to be a hero!

Summer at Ricks 2040 S. York St., Denver 303-871-4839 ricksctr@du.edu du.edu/ricks Summer at Ricks blends fun summer activities with rich learning experiences. Campers entering preschool to sixth grade will enjoy weekly themes and specialty camps ranging from Life Sized Games, Tiny Chef, Wild Wild West, Rocket Science, and more.

GET TIPS TO FINISH YOUR PERFECT PA T I O

Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum Summer Camps 7711 E. Academy Blvd., Denver 303-360-5360 ckepner@wingsmuseum.org wingsmuseum.org/camps Your child will explore, learn, and get hands-on in our weekly themed camps about aviation, robotics, and space. Scholarships and before/after care are available! Ages seven to 18. Contact for pricing.

YMCA of Northern Colorado Day Camps Locations in Boulder, Larimer & Weld Counties 303-443-4474 afterschool@ymcanoco.org ymcanoco.org YMCA Day Camps will offer opportunities for kids to connect with a community of campers in a safe environment. The Y will take many safety precautions: small groups, social distancing and guidance from the CDC and health agencies. Space is limited.

CAMP GUIDE continued on page 27

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June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

25


Your Turn

Bear: Getty Images.

The Wild Life

Christening the camper brings unexpected adventure to this family’s doorstep. By Jeremy Padgett

I

t was 1 a.m. at about 10,000 feet and my wife Nicole awoke to frightening sounds outside our camper. We were deep in the woods, tucked away in a secluded part of Jefferson, Colorado. It’s a beautiful location just up and over Kenosha Pass on Highway 285, with some of the most breathtaking views in the state—a favorite location of mine ever since high school. Nicole was surprised to hear the ruckus outside our door at that time of the night, knowing that not another soul was within miles of our remote compound. The shuffling, clunking, thump, and bumping of a rather clumsy intruder continued for a few minutes before she decided to wake me from my deep dormancy. Startled by the unease in her voice, I hopped out of bed to join her and our two wide-eyed kiddos who had also been jolted awake from the commotion. We all stood silent, waiting for our unwelcome guest to make another move. Then, quietly, we tip-toed over to the side window of our camper and gently tipped up the blinds to see who was rummaging through our coolers full of Capri Sun and low-carb adult beverages.

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

The campsite was awash with the light of the moon, but it was still not bright enough to see what was going on out in the wilderness. Needing a little more illumination on the situation, I reached for the light switch to flick on the exterior porch light. Just in that instant, two large black paws flopped up on the window, and a bright pink tongue started slurping up the mosquitoes and moths attracted to the light. We were face-to-face with a black bear. Our visitor was just as curious about our startled little family, huddled in the camper, as we were with the racket that he and his three bear buddies were causing outside. We gazed at that big wet nose and those sharp teeth for a couple of minutes before he let out a big bear yawn. Dropping back down from the window, he gave us a quick glance back, seemingly annoyed that we humans had interrupted his bug appetizers. The bears foraged through our stuff, then became bored by the lack of treats and gradually lumbered off into the darkness. Filled to our ears with adrenaline, we didn’t sleep a wink the rest of that night. We were all pretty pumped about what had just happened—we had

been face-to-face with a bear, with only a thin layer of glass between us! What at first was fear had now turned into the four of us laughing about the experience. My kids couldn’t wait to get back and tell their “city friends” about the excitement of the evening. That was the maiden voyage in our family camper, and we now had an awesome story to regale our friends and families with for years to come. We’ve been adventuring in our camper for two years now. Purchasing it was one of the best decisions my wife and I have ever made. Growing up, I went on countless trips with my parents and we created magical memories. I wanted to pass that magic on to my children, as well. The adventures we’ve created thus far in our home-on-wheels have proven to be a priceless investment in our family’s history—complete with bear prints and a couple slobbery coolers. Jeremy Padgett is a morning radio host and executive producer for the Dom and Jeremy Show on Denver’s Mix100.3, and a father of two.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CAMP GUIDE EQUESTRIAN Horse Camp Chatfield Stables Chatfield State Park, Littleton 303-933-3636 chatfieldstables.com Longest running Horse Camp in Colorado and voted one of the best Colorado Parent Family Favorites 2019. Campers ages seven and older work with horses extensively: riding lessons, horse safety, grooming, saddling and care. Kids ride many hours inside Chatfield State Park. Mention ad for discount.

MUSIC Queen Bee Music Association Crested Butte, CO & Santa Fe, NM lindsay@queenbeemusicassociation.org queenbeemusicassociation.org Queen Bee’s Kids Bluegrass Camps in Crested Butte (July 6-10) and Santa Fe (July 13-17) provide beginning and intermediate players (ages seven to 14) with an unforgettable experience learning to play an instrument in a bluegrass band and writing songs!

Urban Arts Music 635 N. Williams St., Denver 303-818-8386 zeldazelda@aol.com urbanartsmusic.com No matter what your level or style, we help musicians learn to enjoy the possibilities of music making in so many creative ways. From beginners who want a musical introduction, to seasoned aspiring professionals, our offerings are diverse and unique.

Swallow Hill Music 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver 303-777-1003 info@swallowhillmusic.org swallowhillmusic.org/camps Swallow Hill’s Summer Music Camps will look different this year, but we’ll still have your child playing, rocking, dancing, and strumming all summer long. For kids ages six to 18.

ONLINE CAMPS

for ages 6-17. Kids work together to solve riddles and mysteries, and outwit monsters to save the kingdom. Be the hero of a mythic quest in this non competitive and socially engaging environment!

confidence, and stay active at the Denver Nuggets Hanzlik Hoop Camp or Summer Volleyball Camp.

OVERNIGHT CAMPS

HRCA Sports Camps 9568 University Blvd., Highlands Ranch 303-471-8856 lisa.sheley@hrcaonline.org hrcaonline.org/sportscamps

YMCA Camp Santa Maria 51321 US Highway 285, Grant 303-443-4474 santamaria@ymcanoco.org ymcacampsantamaria.org Following safety measures, YMCA Camp Santa Maria will offer traditional overnight camp this summer. Children ages six to 17 will have the opportunity to disconnect from technology and enjoy adventure, nature and a welcoming community. Space is limited.

SPECIAL NEEDS Adam’s Camp 6767 S. Spruce St. 303-563-8290 Lesley@adamscamp.org adamscampcolorado.org Therapy and adventure programs for individuals with special needs and their families. Due to Covid-19 we have canceled summer camp in Granby for 2020.

TACT (Teaching the Autism Community Trades) 2733 W. 8th Ave. | 303-295-0163 becky@buildwithtact.org buildwithtact.org TACT is offering individual lessons in lieu of summer camps for 2020 due to COVID-19. Lessons in carpentry, welding, auto mechanics, STEM, & sewing are available! Sign up here: https://www. signupgenius.com/go/60B084EACA728ABFB6-tact1. Ages five to 30!

SPORTS

Renaissance Adventures Denver, Boulder & USA 303-786-9216 info@renaissanceadventures.com renaissanceadventures.com

Gold Crown Sports Camps 150 S. Harlan St., Lakewood 303-233-6776 camps@goldcrownfoundation.com goldcrownfoundation.com

Online adventure role playing (RPG) summer camps

Let your child improve their skill set, build their

With a 1:8 coach to camper ratio and 45,000 square feet of hardwood, camp is sure to be a great time!

Stay active all summer with HRCA Sports Camps! From beginners looking to try something new, to more advanced players looking to refine their skills in tennis, fencing, golf, basketball or volleyball - we’ve got you covered!

Ocean First Swim School 3015 Bluff St. 303-444-7234 swim@oceanfirst.blue oceanfirst.blue Offering a variety of virtual materials for you and your child including marine science lessons, dry-land swim practices, and more! Created and filmed by our knowledgeable staff, your family can complete these interactive courses from your home.

The First Tee of Denver 3181 E. 23rd Ave., Denver 720-865-3415 info@thefirstteedenver.org firstteedenver.org The First Tee of Denver offers Golf Camps and Clinics for kids of all ages and abilities at locations throughout Colorado. Every class includes our 9 Core Values and Life Skill instruction.

Tell Colorado Parent readers about your summer camps! For more information, contact sales@coloradoparent.com.

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Family Food

Frozen Fruit Pops Add a bit of sweetness to your summer with these three-ingredient treats. By Kara Thompson

I

ce pops are often loaded with added sugar and artificial colors and flavors. Cut out some of the bad and squeeze in a bit of nutrition by making your own. Using fruit and 100% juice is an easy way to make a healthier dessert, just be sure to avoid juice that lists added sugar on the nutrition label. Choosing better-for-you ingredients will give you peace of mind while you and your kids enjoy these refreshing sweets. Making these pops is simple. Pick a favorite fruit and juice combo. Slice or chop fruit and arrange it in each of the ice pop molds (we used Zoku Classic Pop Molds). Pour the juice to the top of each mold’s fill line, then insert ice pop sticks and freeze until solid, about eight hours.

KIWI STRAWBERRY COOLERS

Enjoy a classic summer combo with kiwi and in-season berries.

1 package of strawberries 4 kiwifruit, sliced 18 ounces of Minute Maid Zero Sugar Lemonade

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Zoku Classic Pop Molds have drip guards to limit sticky messes.


Family Food

TROPICAL MANGO PINEAPPLE

Take your taste buds on a virtual beach vacation.

2 mangoes, sliced 1 pineapple, chopped 18 ounces of Dole Pineapple Juice

Amped-Up Ice Cubes Just a few supplies and a touch of water can turn average ice cubes into dazzling additions to pitchers and punch bowls. Pick one combo from below, place the ingredients into a square ice cube tray, add water, and freeze for eight hours.

FLORAL FRENZY

WATERMELON REFRESH 1 small watermelon, balled 4 limes, sliced

LEMON SPRITZERS 3 lemons, sliced

1 package of Gourmet Sweet Botanicals edible flowers (mini orchids, begonias, and violas work best!) June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Plant a Starter Garden It’s not too late! Early summer is the perfect time to plant a variety of fruits and veggies.

By Kara Thompson

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Colorado Parent | June 2020


G

rowing your own veggies might seem like a daunting task, but from the first sprout all the way to harvest, cultivating a garden can teach kids the importance of patience and hard work. It’s also a great way for them to learn more about where their food comes from in a world that’s longing for more sustainability. Since Colorado’s final spring frost isn’t usually until mid-May, it’s not too late to plant small amounts of produce in June. “People rush to put warm season crops out because they want to have the first ripe tomato, but because overnight temperatures are too cool, it stunts the growth of plants,” says Linda Langelo, a horticulture agent at Colorado State University Extension. Plants that don’t mind a June seed start include spinach, cilantro, parsley, seed potatoes, leaf lettuce, radishes, peas, green onions, carrots, summer squash, pumpkin, cucumber, and basil. You can also plant tomato, eggplant, and pepper transplants or starts in June. Before you dig in, follow along with these steps to make the most of your crop.

Plan Your Plot

Where you locate your garden matters. Find a sunny spot in the yard, someplace that ideally gets a maximum of eight hours of direct sunlight each day. Since you don’t want feet or paws stepping on and compacting your soil, it’s best to designate specific areas where it’s OK to walk and work. Whether you make a raised garden bed or in-ground rows, make a path of bricks or line a walking area with mulch. This will help kids see where their feet can and cannot be.

Opener, photo, background, doodles: Getty Images.

Prepare Your Soil

Once you have your area chosen, prepare your soil. Colorado is known to have clay-like soil that can be difficult to work with, so Judy Elliott, senior education specialist at Denver Urban Gardens, encourages gardeners to enlist the help of their kids to check the soil moisture. Start by digging about four inches into your soil with a shovel, grab a little handful of dirt, and mold it into a ball. Next, ask your child to hold the ball of soil about one foot above the ground and drop it. If the ball shatters and breaks apart, that’s a sign that you’re ready to dig and plant, but if it stays in a ball, then wait until the soil dries out a bit and add compost. “Avoid using manure-based compost in your garden because those contain a lot of salt, which our Colorado soil is already high in,” says Elliott. It’s best to use a landscape-based compost that’s made of remains of shrubs, vegetables, and other garden remnants instead. Elliott recommends EcoGro Compost, which is made from the food scraps and yard debris that’s collected in Denver Composts’ green compost collection carts. Add

an inch and a half of compost to your soil, digging down about six inches. When you’re finished, you’ll be ready to plant.

Plant The Seeds

Planting seeds and anticipating the appearance of little green sprouts is exciting—especially for kids. Before you start planting, read the back of your seed packets to learn how deep and how far apart the seeds need to be planted. “If you don’t give your plants enough room underneath the soil, they won’t grow,” says Elliott. Tiny seeds can easily spill out of the packet and be hard to handle. Here's a tip for little gardeners: Prep the area where you want to plant, then fold an index card in half the long way and place a small handful of seeds inside. Children can use a toothpick or a pencil tip to push two seeds at a time off of the card and into the planting area. Cover the seeds with soil, and then water. If you’re planting a few different crops, label the seeded areas with the name of each plant. Kids can make simple labels at home using popsicle sticks, painted rocks, or brick. A common mistake many beginning gardeners make is planting too much. “One package of lettuce seeds can have enough in it to yield 500 plants, so you certainly don’t want to just dump the package into your soil,” Elliott explains. Plant a few seeds to avoid waste and hone your gardening skills. With a good gardening season under your belt, you can plant more next year. To jumpstart the garden, mix in a few plant starts from the garden center. These small plants have a healthy head start on the growing season. Starts are more expensive than seeds, but kids will enjoy the process of shopping for little plants and get inspired by the many different veggies they can see and grow. You will also see results sooner.

Gardening Support & Resources COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION If you get stuck during your gardening journey, CSU Extension has more than 1400 Master Gardener volunteers who can answer your questions. coloradomastergardener.org DENVER URBAN GARDENS Don’t have an outdoor space at home? There are still plenty of ways to get involved. Visit the DUG website to find a list of more than 180 community gardens that are located around the Denver area. dug.org GROW AND GIVE For the 2020 growing season, CSU Extension encourages gardeners to grow a little extra and share the surplus with neighbors in need. Register your garden to learn more about growing and donating. cmg.extension.colostate.edu/grow-give/

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Children in garden,doodles, terra cotta pot: Getty Images.

Bring Your Garden Inside If you don’t have a yard, you can still reap the benefits of gardening with these trendy products.

Modern Sprout delivers garden kits with all the necessary supplies, like seeds and soil, straight to your front door. Choose from plants like poppies, lavender, basil, and mint, which come in reusable vases that add a sweet touch to windowsills, kitchen countertops, and nightstands. $13 and up, modsprout.com

The Click & Grow Smart Garden 3 takes care of itself after you plug it in, insert plant pods, and add water. An LED lamp spurs growth and a 40-ounce tank holds enough water to last up to three weeks—talk about simple gardening! $100, clickandgrow.com

Get back to the basics by planting fruits and veggies in small terracotta pots. Add a personal touch by having your kids use washi tape or paint to decorate the outside of their pots. They can even write their names or draw a picture of themselves so they remember whose is whose.

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Stay on Top of Care

To grow strong plants in your garden, you need the right amount of water and healthy, loose soil. Colorado’s arid summer heat means gardens can dry out quickly. Give your child a daily task of checking to see if any plants need to be watered. Carefully place a wooden skewer or gardening stick into the soil, and slowly pull it out. If there’s moist soil stuck to the stick, then you don’t need to add any water, but if it’s dry, then it’s time to give your plants a refresh. Because diseases can be spread on some plants with overhead watering, and you want to soak the soil rather than just the leaves, it’s best to water at ground level. As watering becomes a part of your routine, your soil can also become hard, making it difficult for roots to penetrate. To keep this from happening, ask your child to lightly cultivate the garden once a week before watering. They can do this by using a stick or branch to carefully scratch around the plants, which keeps the soil loose. “Cultivating will also help them develop a relationship with the plants because they’ll be more likely to pay attention to what else is going on in the garden,” says Elliott. “When they spend time outside by the garden, they might turn over a leaf and discover insect eggs, or find a new type of bug they want to learn more about.” To protect your garden as the weather gets warmer, add mulch. This will keep the weeds down and help reduce moisture loss and drastic temperature fluctuations in the soil. Straw, dry

grass clippings with no pesticides, and leaves are good choices for fruit and vegetable gardens.

Keep Your Kids Interested

There are countless ways to involve your kids in the process. “Gardening teaches a lot of life lessons. It’s a really good way to connect with your kids and get them outside,” says Langelo. Start incorporating little lessons from the beginning by using seed packets to teach your child about different fruits and veggies. Make it fun by creating a chart to track which plant sprouts, blossoms, and harvests first. You can also help kids learn more about each plant by researching their different nutritional benefits and finding healthy recipes to prepare from your garden. If you involve your kids in the process from the start, they’ll be excited to watch each plant grow, and they'll beam when it's time to harvest.

Keep the Bugs Out

Avoid unwanted guests by adding these plants to your garden. • Zinnias • Marigolds • Chives • Cilantro • Onion • Garlic


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June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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i o h n s e a F d d l O Summer Fun

By Anna Sutterer

Opener: Getty Images.

T

his summer likely won’t include adventurous days at summer camp, swimming pools full of splashing kids, or families flooding festival grounds, but it can still be packed with fun. Remember your own childhood summer days, where your bicycle got you anywhere in the neighborhood and the evenings were filled with rowdy games of flashlight tag? Show your kids how to have fun by throwing it back to simpler times. If you’re wary of jumping into the usual public entertainment spaces, or just looking for inexpensive and creative ways to spend the long days, check out our guide to old-fashioned summer fun.

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Long days spent at crowded parks and swimming pools may not be in the public health recommendations or the budget this year. However, with a little planning and items you may already have around the house, you can transform your backyard into a fun zone filled with exciting activities.

Sandboxes have served kids’ desires to dig, pour, and build for over a century. Craft a sandbox by assembling a simple raised bed with cedar boards, or even easier, setting an old tire in the shade and filling it with sand from the garden center.

Round up four pool noodles and poke holes in one side of each. Duct tape them together, then carve a snug spot to insert the nozzle of a hose. Tape around the hose to hold it in place. Hang the noodle contraption from a tree, set up a baby pool nearby, and voilà—you’ve got a sprinkler splash zone. Find more inspiration from ziggityzoom.com.

Play up summer festivities by stringing large water balloons from a tree branch for a wet and wild piñata party. Visit milkallergymom.com for more.

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Colorado Parent | June 2020


The classic tree swing is not out of reach, if you have a mature tree in your yard. With just a few pieces of sturdy wood, sandpaper, screws, and glue, you can build the perfect high-flying seat. Lowe's or sawdustsisters.com both have simple do-it-yourself instructions.

Create a bowling setup with a long patch of lawn, deck, or sidewalk, and pins made out of 2-liter soda bottles, each filled with ½ to 1 cup of pebbles. Then, grab a playground or soccer ball and get rolling!

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Pedal Power There’s more to bikes than just cycling from point A to point B. Try coordinating games and learning opportunities with your two-, three- or even one-wheeled wonders. These activities will surely deepen your family’s appreciation of their bikes.

"Car" Wash Kids will love sliding through sprinklers and playing with sponges filled with suds. Set up a hose with a sprinkler attachment and buckets with dish soap. Little riders pedal through while you scrub and the water washes them down. Level up the experience by building a PVC pipe structure as seen on designmom.com.

Parade Search your craft and party boxes to find colorful wheel spoke, handlebar, and bike frame decorations. Plan a promenade down your street (with chaperones for safety) to show off the kids’ creations.

sponges

Streamers

spinners

buckets

pipe cleaners

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Photos: Getty Images.

sprinklers


Bike Shop Rodeo Imagine the bike is a bronc, then take it for a barrel race through an obstacle course and tracks drawn in chalk. Give each rider a cowboy hat (or any kind of hat) to toss into laundry baskets as they zip past.

Break out the dungarees and work shirts, wrenches, tire pumps, and chain lubricant; it’s time to learn bike mechanics. Gain the lifelong skill of bike repair and maintenance alongside your young one for cooperative and intentional time together.

tire pump

laundry basket

wrench

pool noodle

obstacle cone mechanic’s shirt

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Operation Make-a-Mess

Spread out the game’s plastic sheet and pour globs of red, blue, yellow, and green washable paint on the corresponding dots. Start playing Twister and watch the kids slip around, getting more colorful with each move of right hand on red or left foot on green.

Ice Painting Fill each spot in an ice tray ¾ full with water blended with food coloring. Put in the freezer. Once partially frozen, place corresponding colors of giant plastic building blocks on top and return to the freezer. Once they’re fully solidified, bring them outside to a large sheet of paper and hand the cool, melty crayons to your kids. Find more at twinmomrefreshed.com.

Sensory Jell-O Foam Whip up some sweet-smelling play foam using ¼ cup water, 3 tablespoons Jell-O powder, and 4 tablespoons dish soap, adding food coloring for deeper hues. Whisk or beat with an electric mixer at high speed until thickened. Find more at fun-a-day.com.

Bubble Snake Blower Upcycle a plastic bottle and old sock to create a cute and easyto-use bubble blowing machine. Cut the bottom off the bottle, pull a sock over it and secure with an elastic band, dip the bottom into a mixture of dish soap and water, then blow through the mouth opening. Keep an eye on younger kids to make sure they don’t accidentally inhale the bubble mixture. See messylittlemonster.com for more.

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Bubble Juice

Level up the soap + water combination with this recipe for stronger, bigger bubbles. Pour 6 cups of water (tap is okay, distilled works best) into a large container, then add 1 cup of dish soap (avoid “Ultra” varieties), stirring slowly until mixed. Add 1 tablespoon of glycerin or ¼ cup of corn syrup and stir. Let sit overnight for the best result. homesciencetools.com

Cornstarch Finger Paint Use common pantry items to create finger paints or mud for all kinds of kid entertainment. Combine 3 tablespoons of cornstarch with ¼ cup cold water and food coloring (or cocoa powder to make “mud”). Mix until smooth. Add 1 cup boiling water and stir until thickened. Recipe courtesy of mysmallpotatoes.com.

Paint: Getty Images.

Let loose a little; see the fun you can have while creating mayhem. Try some of these silly, slippery, and soapy activities, then simply hose off the kids! Move the party outside and consider laying down tarps and wearing play clothes for worry-free fun.

Paint Twister


Grill out ww way aa nneew Keep things cool and simple in the kitchen with this build-your-own classic dinner for the grill. Use up bits of veggies cluttering the fridge and stockpiled meat from the freezer to concoct a variety of kabobs. Try these classic combos or dream up your own.

Souvlaki marinated chicken + zucchini + grape tomatoes + tzatziki on the side =

Chicken Styx

Teriyaki chicken + pineapple + onion + bell pepper + Hawaiian rolls on the side =

Kebabs: Anna Sutterer

The Luau Skew

Marinated steak + red onion + Yukon Gold potato + mushrooms =

Steak on a Stake

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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soda Shoppe Swap Shake up your usual root beer and vanilla ice cream combo with these inventive floats. Order favorite ice cream flavors from one of Denver’s independent creameries, like Little Man Ice Cream, Inside Scoop Creamery, or Sweet Cow, to experiment with creative combos. Add a classic soda fountain glass, long spoon and reusable straw, and whipped cream to complete the look.

Rocky Mountain Soda Co. Breckenridge Blackberry + Sweet Cow Oatmeal Cookie ice cream =

Homegrown Blackberry Pie

Orange soda + Vanilla bean ice cream + sliced bananas =

Orange You Glad?

Sippable PB&J

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

Floats: Allie Sutterer

Vanilla cream soda + peanut butter ice cream + berries =


Night Games Nothing feels quite like being a kid out past dusk, running around and soaking up every bit of freedom baked into summer days. These classic night games are playful, active, and simple ways to get the rascally energy out of children before bedtime.

Ghost in the Graveyard

Flashlight Fugitive

Firefly Hide and Seek

Need: four or more players, one flashlight

Need: small pocket flashlights

How To Play: One person with the flashlight stands at the end of the cul-de-sac, lawn, or field. The other players (fugitives) begin at the other end. The person with the flashlight turns around and counts to 10, while the fugitives run toward a safe point near the counter. After 10, the counter turns around and tries to catch a fugitive in the flashlight beams. If the counter can identify the name of a fugitive and where that person is hiding, that fugitive is out. The last fugitive caught or the first to the safe point gets the flashlight for the next round.

How To Play: One person is a firefly and hides while the others seek. The firefly shines the light quickly on and off again every minute, while changing hiding places. When someone catches the firefly, they become one, too, and do the same until everyone is a firefly.

Girl at dusk: Getty Images.

Need: three or more players How To Play: One player is the ghost, and hides while the others stand at a base to count the hours of the day. Once they hit midnight, they go search for the ghost. If someone sees the ghost, they yell, “Ghost in the graveyard!” and all go running back to base. If one player (or more) is tagged, they become a ghost as well. Play until all are ghosts.

Fallen Star Hunt Need: mini glow sticks, plastic Easter eggs or other translucent containers How To Play: Fill plastic Easter eggs with mini glow sticks (and bonus treats if you like) and scatter them around the yard. Send your kid on a hunt for the luminous treasures.

Niteball

Need: glow sticks and bracelets, ball, bucket or laundry basket for goals How To Play: Place “goals” lit with glow sticks at either end of the play area. Players are divided into two teams, each with their own color of glow bracelets. Following netball rules, players pass the ball between teammates to reach the end of the “court” and try to shoot it into the goal. No running, only pivoting, with the ball in hand. Players only have three seconds to hold the ball before a pass. No hand-offs. No contact, but opposing players can block shots and passes, and retrieve loose balls.

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Family Camping Staycation in Colorado

Experience the great outdoors across the state with these family-friendly camping tips. By Lindsay DeFrates, Kara Thompson, and Debbie Mock 44

Colorado Parent | June 2020


P

lanning summer vacation during the safer-at-home phase of the COVID-19 pandemic has many families revisiting the idea of staycation. Popular during the Great Recession of the early 2010’s for its budget-friendly nature, vacationing close to home may also be one of the most responsible vacation options this year. A staycation in Colorado is no sacrifice. Remember, our state is filled with stunning natural wonders and abundant hiking and biking trails, no matter what area you call home. With the gradual reopening of campgrounds, families have an added option to explore. Here’s a roundup of what you need to know to camp this summer, and some of the great places for families to park the RV or pitch a tent in Colorado. Some campgrounds have limited services and added restrictions this year to enforce social distancing. Be sure to follow the guidelines for not only the state, but also the county in which you will be camping. The information within this article was verified as of press time in mid-May, but with guidelines frequently changing, be sure to check directly with each location before you head out for your camping adventure.

Need to Know!

Opener, swirls: Oksana Ashurova/Getty Images. Doodles: Tom Iurchenko/Getty Images.

Getting There In a May 11 press conference, Governor Polis shared that while camping itself is a safe activity—with appropriate social distancing—Coloradans should approach travel to and from the campgrounds with caution and respect for the residents of their destination. Gas up before you leave home, bring all of your food and supplies, and refrain from making stops along the way. Drive—recreate—return home.

Tasty Twists on Classic S’mores

Forget the traditional way of making the campfire treat and opt for something that’s even more delectable.   • Use white chocolate and add rainbow sprinkles to the top of your marshmallows.  • Spread peanut or cookie butter on your graham crackers before you put together your s’more. • Sub your favorite cookies in place of graham crackers. • Top your roasted marshmallows with gummy bears or chocolate chips. • Put whipped cream on top of your graham crackers before you take a bite. 

Reserve Ahead Campground occupancy rates may be cut in some areas to meet current guidelines, so availability may be limited. Make, and confirm, any campground reservations before you leave home. This is not the summer to be spontaneous in your search for accommodations. Be aware that state park campgrounds require families to have set reservations for any of their open campgrounds. Expect Changes If you regularly camp, arrive with the expectation that your favorite campgrounds may look different for at least part of the summer. Amenities, such as playgrounds and common spaces, on-site events, and even some basics like public toilets, may be temporarily closed. Do your research and plan accordingly. And do your part by abiding by posted social distancing and face-covering guidelines, which may be different at each campground. Be Prepared Many campgrounds are heightening their cleaning and disinfecting, and some are providing additional hand sanitizer stations. Camp stores will likely have limited hours, so in addition to your regular camping gear, bring all of your own supplies, including hand sanitizer and masks, and games or activities. Pack It Out All good stewards of nature know the mantra, leave no trace, that is, if you pack it in, you need to pack it out. This is especially important now as many campgrounds may be functioning on a reduced maintenance staff. Plan to remove all trash or waste of any kind that you generate while camping.

Camp at Home!

You don’t have to go far to enjoy the traditions that make camping so much fun.

1. Set the Scene.

To host a successful at-home camping trip, start by re-creating the environment that you would’ve had if you had ventured to the forest or mountains. Pick a spot to pitch a tent or two, whether it’s your living room or backyard, then make the space feel extra-cozy by rolling out sleeping bags, adding throw blankets, and lighting the space with lanterns or flashlights. Take the vibe to another level by setting up your tents near your fireplace or a fire pit that's outside. If you don't have either, the Plush Campfire Set ($69, crateandbarrel.com), which features rocks, logs, flames, and skewers, is the ideal toy for pretending to make s'mores.

2. Plan Your Meals.

Before you venture off to your at-home campsite, consider packing an ice chest with all of the food and supplies you’ll need. By not going back and forth to your kitchen, it will feel more like an actual camping trip, and you’ll get a muchneeded break from cooking anything elaborate. You can also keep meals simple by making your kids’ favorite sandwiches and snacks, and bringing along some breakfast cereals.

3. Make an Effort to Disconnect.

Camping is the perfect time to get away from work and technology. Try to be mindful of taking this at-home adventure just as seriously as you would take an actual camping trip. Leave your phone or laptop outside of your tent and take some time to focus on just being present. Play board games, put together a puzzle, color in coloring books, or tell spooky stories rather than watching a movie.

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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7 Great Family Campgrounds JAMES M. ROBB COLORADO RIVER STATE PARK, FRUITA SECTION Basecamp for the Grand Valley region Find It: Fruita The Fruita Section of James M. Robb’s network of state parks is tucked right up against the town of Fruita, the Colorado River, and Colorado National Monument. This unique campground offers simple camping choices for families with RV sites and walk-in tent sites. Activities: Biking, wildlife viewing, fishing, hiking, boating Reopened May 12 Online Moderate

KEY

46

Campground Open

Colorado Parent | June 2020

LONE DUCK CAMPGROUND A mountain-feel without mountain driving Find It: Cascade At the base of Pikes Peak, and just 12 miles from I-25, Lone Duck is a fun way to enjoy the mountain scenery without a drive into the mountains. The tent sites are shaded, and the cabins can accommodate up to five people. Pike National Forest is just a short drive away. Lone Duck’s playground, pool area, and pancake breakfast remain closed until further notice. Activities: Fishing on-site, hiking and biking in nearby Garden of the Gods Open through end of September Online All Reservations

Camping Experience Level

DOLORES RIVER CAMPGROUND Southwestern Colorado from a different perspective Find It: Dolores If you and the family don’t have a go-everywhere camping vehicle or tent (and even if you do), Dolores River Campground has several unique lodging options to keep you and the kids cozy. The choices run from basic to glamping, as well as tent and RV sites for the traditionalists. While traditional campground events are on hold and the playground and recreation hall are currently closed, check back when you make reservations. Activities: Fishing, boating, hiking Open through October 26, 2020 Online or phone All

Clark Wagon: Delores River. Ridgway State Park: Colorado Parks and WIldlife.

No tent? No problem. Some campgrounds will have cabins or glamping accomodations, like the Conestoga Wagons at Delores River Campground, shown, available this summer.


CARBONDALE/CRYSTAL RIVER KOA Aspen and Glenwood Springs are just down the road. Find It: Carbondale Just 10 minutes outside of Carbondale, the Crystal River KOA has a beautiful setting along its namesake river and lots of shade. This campground is perfect for families planning to trek to the Crystal Mill in Marble. Lodging options at the campground upon reopening will include RV sites and deluxe cabins, however tent sites and on-site airstream remain closed until further notice. Activities: Hiking, fishing, biking Scheduled opening: May 27 (dependent on Pitkin County regulations) Online or phone All

RIDGWAY STATE PARK On-water fun and access to Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park Find It: Ridgway The 1,000-acre reservoir at Ridgway State Park provides fishing and boating opportunities in the summer months, and campers also enjoy hiking and biking with a backdrop of mountain scenery. Showers, playgrounds, yurts, and park visitor centers are currently closed. Activities: Water recreation, hiking, wildlife viewing Reopened May 15 Online Moderate

ARROWHEAD POINT CAMPGROUND Perfect home base for adventure in the Arkansas River Headwaters area Find It: Buena Vista In a typical season, this campground has yurts, cabins, and tent and RV sites, as well as a number of on-site amenities, but it’s all about location, location, location. Water activities on the Arkansas River is one of the biggest draws to the valley. Check in with the campground for an update on access to outfitters who may offer activities this summer. Activities: Water sports, hiking, biking Opening in phases leading up to June 1. Yurts and cabins available, awaiting approval to open tent and RV sites as of press time. Online or phone All

Ridgway State Park offers tent sites and plenty of hiking and biking against beautiful mountain scenery.

STATE FOREST STATE PARK Year-round camping and outdoor adventures Find It: Never Summer Range, in North Park With 71,000 acres, this state park is the largest in Colorado, and it’s full of high alpine lakes, jagged ridgelines, deep forests, and moose. Campgrounds and dispersed camping are spread throughout the park for tents and RVs. Around North Michigan Reservoir, there is a mix of tent sites.

Activities: Hiking, biking, fishing, all-terrain vehicle riding, and moose-viewing Reopened May 22 Online Moderate

Lindsay DeFrates is a freelance writer who has lived and played in the Roaring Fork Valley for more than a decade.

Gear That Makes Camping More Fun

Pack these clever items before you head out on your next camping trip. Keep your little camper entertained with the Craft + Boogie Camping Busy Box, which comes complete with nature-inspired crafts, games, and activities. Supplies needed to make a paper bag kite, painted leaf mobile, and picture frame are all included. Plus, kids will love the thrilling bug hunt game, campfire recipes, coloring pages, and more. $33, etsy.com Budding wilderness explorers can easily spot birds, bugs, and stars with the kid-sized Educational Insights GeoSafari Jr. Kidnoculars. The focus-free binoculars feature comfy eyepieces and are made to withhold even the toughest of terrains. $14, amazon.com Take your camping food up a notch with the Rome Square Pie Iron. The cast-iron gadget quickly cooks everything from breakfast sandwiches to folded pizzas as you hold and rotate it over a fire. Simply butter up the sides of your base, add toppings, heat, then eat! $20, rei.com

June 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Roundup

Merage volunteers: Armand Piecuch, GroundFloor Media/CenterTable Family on porch: Lucy Beaugard. Window signs: Anna Sutterer

sfdg

Together, Apart Five ways Colorado families came together during quarantine. By Anna Sutterer

P

hysical distancing during the stay-at-home and safer-at-home phases of the COVID-19 quarantine didn’t mean complete isolation. Coloradans showed up to support each other in vital and beautiful ways. Just to name a few... 1. DOCUMENTING THE MOMENT Artist, writer, and photographer Lucy Beaugard gathered Denver families on their porches to create (from a safe distance) portraits of what quarantine life has been like. Parents, kids, and pets joined this record of history, expressing the silly and emotional parts of getting through

shelter-in-place. Beaugard hopes to bring all the subjects together for a group session once it’s safe to gather again. #thedenverporchproject 2. SHOWING GRATITUDE On April 30, The David & Laura Merage Foundation distributed 500 boxes filled with toys from Timbuk

Toys to the young children of parents working on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. “Our intention is to spark a bit of joy with these toys, and quite simply show these little ones how grateful we are that they are sharing their families with Coloradans in need,” says Sue Renner, vice president of philanthropy at Merage Foundations. 3. SUPPORTING HARDEST HIT COMMUNITIES On April 16, Soul2Soul Sisters, an organization that supports black women with programs relating to health and motherhood, launched a “Support Black Womxn-Owned Businesses” campaign to address disproportionate impacts COVID-19 has had on African Americans. Through emails, social media, and personal networks they raised thousands of dollars each week, with donations going to photographers, skin-care developers, and wellness providers, among others.

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Colorado Parent | June 2020

4. INSPIRING STUDENTS When Daniel Bettinger, owner of Bettinger Photography, heard there was a need for consistent creative activities for kids during quarantine, he started a student photo contest. In partnership with Reed Art & Imaging and The Greenway Foundation, the contest presented new photography themes every Tuesday and Thursday, for which elementary, middle, and high school students could submit their works to win a professional print of their snapshots and the chance for a Visa gift card. 5. CREATING MOMENTS OF DELIGHT From drive-by parades and rainbow window-decor to front-porch howls and teddy-bear hunts, neighborhoods worked together (but apart) to entertain, celebrate, and support each other. Sidewalk chalk gave kids a way to connect with their friends as they walked by. Elaborate chalk obstacle courses had kids (and grown-ups!) hopscotching, crab walking, and jumping through daily strolls.


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Colorado Parent June 2020  

Create retro summer fun by building your own backyard play zone, see what you need to know before going camping with the family, learn the b...

Colorado Parent June 2020  

Create retro summer fun by building your own backyard play zone, see what you need to know before going camping with the family, learn the b...

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