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July 2020

Growing Great Families Since 1986

Birthday Party Issue!

Host an Adorable Sleep-Under at Home

3 Star-Spangled No-Bake Treats EXPERT TIPS Talk to Your Kids About Racism How to Raise a Brave Child

Ideas for Family Fun

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Illustration: Getty Images. Calendar: Nathan Sawaya.

CONTENTS July 2020 features

HOST A NO-SLUMBER SLEEP-UNDER PARTY

TALKING TO KIDS ABOUT RACISM

Eight practical tips for initiating racerelated talks with your child.

departments 6

ON THE WEB

8

FROM THE EDITORS

The latest tips and tricks on ColoradoParent.com

11

What We Learned

GOOD TO KNOW

3D Printing Reduces Cast Limitations

14

READ TO ME

16

IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

17

Books That Feed Kids' Imaginations

Our dreamy guide will help you pull off your child’s best birthday party yet.

18

GOOD STUFF

20

HEALTH & WELLNESS

22

LEARN & GROW

24

FAMILY FOOD

54

ROUNDUP

Education and Enrichment Guide Kids Love Museums Birthday Party Guide

What to Expect at Medical Visits

Raising Brave Kids

Festive No-Bake Treats

Mountain Biking Hot Spots

PARENTING 911

Holiday Birthday Dilemma

22 How to Raise a Brave Child | 24 No-Bake, Star-Spangled Treats 28 Talk to Kids About Racism | 39 Host a Sleep-Under at Home 49 Ideas for Family Fun

Colorado Parent | July 2020

26 32 47

Sun-Safe Swimwear

Mobile Pantry and New Errand Service

on the cover

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advertising

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28

49

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Our monthly roundup of local events returns with a guide to what's open now around town.

Hadley photographed by Lucy Beaugard lucybeaugard.com


jeffcolibrary.org

EXPLORE SUMMER READING JUNE 1-JULY 31

Gear up for epic adventure as you pursue your goal and Explore Summer Reading! You’ll find dozens of activity suggestions and staff picks online. Start anytime after June 1! • Win prizes.

• Read and complete activities.

• Participate in virtual library programs.

• Support your school and Foothills Animal Shelter.

All ages are invited to have fun with Explore Summer Reading! Everyone benefits from keeping their minds active over the summer—babies, kids, teens and adults!

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN! Visit jeffcolibrary.org to start exploring and sign up for summer reading!


On the Web

Colorado Parent Online Books: Lydia Rueger. Staycation, summer, speech bubble, Fourth of July: Getty Images.

Summer Staycations Traveling may look a little bit different this summer. Here’s what you need to know about hotel visits and house rentals throughout the state.

Share Your Story Do you have a parenting story to tell? Our editors are always looking for Colorado-based parents and kids to talk to for upcoming stories. Check out our new Share Your Story page at ColoradoParent.com for the latest.

Read Together, Learn Together We found 15 age-appropriate books to help you start a conversation about racism and tolerance with your family.

Red, White, and Blue Backyard Fun With many fireworks shows canceled across Colorado, we’re sharing a handful of festive ideas to help you celebrate the Fourth of July. We want to see what you’re doing to celebrate! Tag your Fourth of July photos with our community hashtag #ShareColoradoParent on social media.

CONNECT WITH US

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

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July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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From the Editors

What We Learned…

IT

LO V

Try as we might, we can’t shield children from what is happening in the world around them. Recent events, and widespread access to the internet, have shown us that we need to be prepared to talk about the uncomfortable and even tragic. Page 28.

E

Things that inspired this issue, and what our editors discovered along the way.

EDITORIAL edit@coloradoparent.com Editor Deborah Mock Associate Editor Christina Cook Assistant Editor Kara Thompson Editorial Assistant Anna Sutterer Copy Editor Lydia Rueger ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Patrick Pacheco patrick@coloradoparent.com Senior Account Manager Brigette Swartz brigette@coloradoparent.com Account Manager Hilary Angel hilary@coloradoparent.com Client Services Coordinator Shundra Jackson

Add another layer of sun protection when the kids go out to play. Check out the cute UV-blocking swimwear on page 18.

PRODUCTION Art Director Heather Gott

L

VE EA

TRENDING

IT

No-bake treats. When it’s this hot outside, who wants to turn on the oven? Try the festive Fourth of July treats on page 24.

Put the paved roads behind you and give mountain biking a try. We’ve got a couple trails for all ages. Page 54.

CAN’T WAIT Sharing a calendar of fun family events is a favorite part of what we typically do here at Colorado Parent. With just about everything closed for months, we’ve been missing the exciting activities at our favorite spots. Well, museums around Colorado are reopening. We’re excited to visit old friends and show them some love (and our fun new masks!). Find out who is open on page 52.

MARKETING Senior Marketing Director Carrie Horn Marketing & Events Coordiantor Piniel Simegn Marketing Coordinator Jess Mora Marketing Interns Niyat Ogbazghi, Pamela Amaya, Tiana Noble ADMINISTRATION Billing and Collections Manager Jessica McHeard DISTRIBUTION & CIRCULATION AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Audrey Congleton Audience Development Coordinator Caitlin Kittrell circulation@coloradoparent.com Printed by Publication Printers Please recycle this magazine.

YOU SAID IT Racism is something that’s taught or learned through observation. This is your opportunity to build in your child a sense of what is right and wrong. —Zaneta Evans, a licensed professional counselor, the manager for Mental Health Center of Denver’s Healthy Living Program, and mother of three, speaking to the importance of family discussions about race, prejudice, and diversity. Page 28.

Share your feedback and ideas! Email us at edit@coloradoparent.com.

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CREATIVE SERVICES Creative Services Director Carly Lambert Lead Graphic Designer Chelsea Conrad Digital Advertising Manager Nick Stonecipher Graphic Designer Caitlin Brooks Print Production Manager Megan Skolakz Production Coordinator D'mitrius Brewer Creative Services Intern Cole Navalta

Colorado Parent | July 2020

5280 PUBLISHING, INC. 1675 Larimer Street Suite 675, Denver, CO 80202 P (303) 832-5280 | F (303) 832-0470 Visit us online at ColoradoParent.com PRESIDENT & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daniel Brogan VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGY Andrea Bott VICE PRESIDENT, REVENUE Zach Wolfel Colorado Parent is published monthly by 5280 Publishing, Inc. Please note that the advertisements in this magazine are paid for by the advertisers, which allows this magazine to be free to the consumer. Limit of one free copy per reader. Additional copies can be purchased for $5.00 per issue. Call (303) 320-1000 to request additional copies. Unless specifically noted, no advertisers, products, or services are endorsed by the Publisher. Editorial submissions are welcome. Colorado Parent (ISSN 1937-1020) ©2020 5280 Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited.


PAIRS WELL with PARENTING.

Now Re-opened ! Visit theKidsDig.com for Updated Information

Indoor Sand Play & Birthday Parties theKidsDig.com 303-973-8407

For Parties Call or Book Online

Diapered Kids Welcome!

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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INTRODUCING

A FREE inside look at business news from across the Front Range. Stay in the know on all things Denver business.

A biweekly roundup of the deals, news, and trends shaping the Front Range economy.

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Good to Know HELPFUL NEWS, IDEAS, AND TIPS FOR COLORADO PARENTS

Boy swimming: Chris Quirarte and ActivArmor.

3D Printing Reduces Cast Limitations Almost nothing can stop an active child…except for maybe a broken bone and the cast used to immobilize the injury. And, swimming and bathing are typically a no-go or a big challenge with a cast. But thanks to custom 3D printing, kids with casts can now play in the water without worry. Children’s Hospital Colorado is the first

pediatric hospital in the nation, and first hospital on the Front Range, to begin offering waterproof ActivArmor casts, which use custom 3D technology to help heal pediatric injuries from acute fractures to chronic conditions. The casts are created using 3D body scans to mold the orthosis precisely to each patient. The innovative

design also allows doctors to monitor skin and surgical scar health (to avoid infection) without cast removal. “We’re working to improve the quality of life of patients, and let them focus on being kids, instead of on their injuries,” says Diana Hall, president of ActivArmor. activarmor.com

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

11


Good to Know

Children with flag: History Colorado Center. Crayola and shades: Crayola. Breast pump: Getty Images.

Young History Buffs Are Free! As the History Colorado Center reopens its doors, fourth graders and their families have a new budget-friendly option for learning about the Centennial State. History Buffs is a free yearlong membership for all Colorado kids entering fourth grade in the fall. Membership covers admission for one year for the student and up to five members of their family (including two adults and up to three additional kids), a free child’s ticket for the Georgetown Loop train, and discounts on History Colorado programs. Kids can treat their families to a day at History Colorado Center in Denver, Fort Vasquez in Platteville, Ute Indian Museum in Montrose, and five more history museums around the state. Parents must register their child and can pick up the History Buffs packet at one of eight History Colorado museums. historycolorado.org/historybuff

Fourth graders can treat their families to free visits at eight History Colorado museums.

Preparing for Baby Just Got a Little Easier With everything new moms have on their minds, it’s nice to know that there are little ways to lighten the nesting load. Walmart and Medline atHome offer expecting moms a way to check off the breast pump purchase and have it delivered right to their home. The free Breast Pump Program shows moms which breast pumps are covered by their health insurance, then a team of specialists will take care of the insurance paperwork—for both English and Spanish speaking families. The handy comparison guide shares different features of the best pumps from top brands like Medela, Evenflo, and Lansinoh. walmartbreastpumps-athome.medline.com

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

A Perfect Match For generations, little artists have had limited options for coloring skin tones. Crayola’s new Colors of the World crayon set gives kids 24 new crayon colors that celebrate the many different races and ethnicities in the world around them. Kids can reference the side panel to find exactly

the right color (formulated to reflect more than 40 global skin tones), and each crayon is wrapped in a gradient skin tone label with the color name in English, Spanish, and French. A special Colors of the World 32 pack, sold exclusively at Walmart, also includes four hair and four eye colors. crayola.com


Good to Know | Tech Dad

ABA Therapy, now available! Hello Front Range families! The Behavior Exchange is excited to announce that our new center servicing the greater-Boulder community is now open! As an accredited Behavioral Health Center of Excellence (BHCOE), we’ve been on a mission for 20 years to help children with autism and their families achieve meaningful change in their lives. As we welcome new families to our new hive, please understand the healthy & safety of our clients and staff is our #1 priority. Limited onsite therapy sessions are available in keeping with current health guidelines. Please call for details if interested. Our Telehealth services, including One-on-One and group therapy for children and special training for parents, are also available.

Call our Telehealth ABA therapy hotline today. We can help! 469.353.6634 | Mon-Sat 7:30am-7:30pm De

nv

Marshall Rd.

500 Discovery Pkwy. Suite 100. Superior, Colorado 80027

720.647.8541

Next Level Family Photos and Videos They say the best camera is the one you have with you. These days, that is almost always our smartphone, which has become the go-to camera for capturing priceless family moments. With that in mind, there’s still something to be said for a “real” camera. I took the Panasonic Lumix FZ80 for a test with my family.  The FZ80 has the look of a professional SLR camera without all the bulk. It’s not a pocket camera, but it also won’t require a separate camera bag. You’ll notice the buttons and shape resemble what many would consider a pro camera, but I promise you, it’s easier to use than you think. Auto mode is your friend until you find the desire to learn about the other options.  The biggest feature of the FZ80 is the insane zoom. Sure, your phone has a “zoom” but don’t confuse that with a real zoom. If your kid is in the outfield at a baseball game, you’ll be able to get a crystal clear headshot from the first base line. It is that good. It zooms 60x what you see with your eye. Always look for

“optical” zoom—what most of our phones provide is a “digital” zoom. Optical zoom uses lenses and still gives you a crisp 18MP snapshot no matter how far you zoom in. It just looks different and makes for those crisp, frameable pictures. Digital zoom does nothing more than cropping your actual photo. The other standout feature of the FZ80 is the crystal clear 4K video recording. Sure, your phone can record video, but in my testing, you simply can’t get the same quality, zoom, and options that you’ll get with a camera like the Lumix FZ80.  Overall, if you’re looking to step up your family photo game I think the FZ80 is an awesome option and a deal for $300. Frameable pictures and saveable 4K video can take your photography to the next level. 

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Kirk Yuhnke is the technology reporter and morning news anchor at Fox31 Denver. He’s also a proud father of three kids. You can catch him weekday mornings on Fox31.   

Now open! Face masks are required for riders age 3 & up. Small group reservations available.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

13


Good to Know | Read to Me

Mermaid and Me

by SOOSH (Little, Brown and Company, 2020)

Started as a series of illustrations posted on her Instagram account, author and artist SOOSH tells a story of a girl who imagined mermaids, until the day one actually showed up. The story highlights all of the adventures and similarities a girl can share with an underwater friend, and how her non-mermaid-believing friends come to her rescue when the mermaid needs help.

by B.J. Novak (Penguin Young Readers, 2019)

Kids can imagine their own stories with this fill-in-the-blank companion book to B.J. Novak’s New York Times bestseller, The Book with No Pictures. They can write their own rules, invent silly sounds, and reveal their “secret real names.” Stickers in the back help kids embellish their ideas.

READ TO ME

Books That Feed Kids’ Imaginations Through the Wardrobe: How C. S. Lewis Created Narnia by Lina Maslo (Balzer + Bray, 2020)

As a boy growing up in Ireland during the early 20th century, author C.S. Lewis didn’t always like the world he lived in, so he would so he would dream of other worlds. This nonfiction picture book about Lewis’ life shows that, even through challenging circumstances, his imagination stayed with him. As an adult, he began to write about the characters he imagined, which became the well-known book, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, and later, the Chronicles of Narnia series.

By Lydia Rueger Years ago, I attended a parent education seminar, sponsored by my school district, at which the speaker talked about the need for imagination in children’s lives. She quoted Einstein: “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” She made the point that humanity cannot have anything that it can’t first imagine. These days, when we are doing less outside of the home, it doesn’t mean we have to imagine any less, and these books can help.

Hey Grandude!

by Paul McCartney; illustrated by Kathryn Durst (Random House Books for Young Readers, 2019)

In singer/songwriter Paul McCartney’s debut picture book, Grandude greets his grandchildren on a dreary day, with a stack of travel postcards. With a rub of his magic compass, he takes his grandchildren on adventures all around the world, based on the photos on the postcards.

The Paper Kingdom by Helena Ku Rhee; illustrated by Pascal Campion (Random House Books for Young Readers, 2020)

When Daniel’s babysitter cancels, he has to go with his parents to their jobs as nighttime office cleaners. Daniel isn’t happy about it, until his parents concoct the story of a “paper kingdom” to entertain him. As Mama and Papa vacuum, mop, and dust, they add to the story, imagining a king, queen, and messy dragons in the office building. As the night continues, Daniel begins to imagine, too.

Find more books about imagination at ColoradoParent.com

14

Colorado Parent | July 2020

When You Need Wings

by Lita Judge (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2020)

When a little girl is nervous to attend a new school, she is reminded that the sound she hears is not her heart thumping, but the sound of her own wings. The wings allow the little girl to fly far away, find treasures, and dance with animals. Ultimately, the power of her imagination gives her strength to face a new challenge.

This Is a Good Story

by Adam Lehrhaupt; illustrated by Magali Le Huche (Paula Wiseman Books, 2017)

This book teaches kids the parts of a story—a character, setting, plot, conflict, and climax—in an imaginative way. The girl in the book helps come up with different details and contemplates what would make a good story every step of the way.

The Paper Kingdom, My Book with No Pictures, and Hey Grandude!: Penguin Random House. This is a Good Story and When You Need Wings: Simon & Schuster. Through the Wardobe: HarperCollins. Mermaid and Me: Hachette Book Group.

My Book with No Pictures


Ideas and inspiration

for your next home project.

Elevated living in the Mile High City. Visit 5280Home.com or Zinio.com to subscribe. Photo by Emily Redfield


Good to Know | In the Neighborhood

In the Neighborhood » New and noteworthy for Denver-area families. CAPITOL HILL Mural Remembers George Floyd Artists Thomas “Detour” Evans (@detour303) and Hiero Veiga (@hieroveiga) painted a mural on the side of the Ready Temporary Services building located at Colfax Avenue and High Street. The mural is a tribute to George Floyd, who died on May 25, 2020. instagram.com/detour303 ARVADA Mom Starts Errand Service Wife and stepmother Jennifer Hensley started Extra Hand Errand and Event Services to help elder citizens, busy parents, business owners, and anyone who needed an extra hand with routine tasks. Hensley, a former wedding planner, helps neighbors with personal shopping, library visits, mail pick-up, party delivery, and other errands, in Arvada, Westminster, Broomfield, and Thornton. facebook.com/extrahandees

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

THE HIGHLANDS Virtual Cooking Subscription for Families Stir Cooking School recently launched a monthly online class subscription for family home cooking, which will continue even after in-house classes resume. The service provides a minimum of three new recipes each week and cooking tips with easy steps from professional chefs for $20 per month. Get one month free using the code NEWSTIR. stirtolearn.com DENVER Lego Contest Winners Chosen The Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS) announced the winners of its Lego contest in conjunction with its new exhibit, The Art of the Brick, featuring the work of Lego artist Nathan Sawaya. Winners Emery Clark, age three, of Centennial; Magni Aquila Bennedsen and Modi Asher Bennedsen, age eight, of Pueblo West; Macy W., age 11 of Commerce City; and Austin Hocking, age 17, of Berthoud, will receive a display spot in The Art of the Brick, tickets to the exhibit, and an autographed copy of Sawaya’s book, The Art of the Brick A Life in Lego. dmns.org

Mural: Anna Sutterer. Lego: Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Child with bowl: Stir Cooking School.

ACROSS COLORADO Local Schools Receive Technology Grants Thirteen Colorado schools will receive technology grants this fall as part of the CenturyLink Clarke M. Williams Foundation 2019-20 Teachers and Technology grant program. Colorado recipients include Overland High School and Pine Ridge Elementary in Aurora; Bixby Elementary, Columbine Elementary, and Mackintosh Academy in Boulder; Horizon High School in Brighton; Cheyenne Mountain Elementary in Colorado Springs; Crested Butte Community School in Crested Butte; Jefferson Junior-Senior High School in Edgewater; Colorado SKIES Academy in Englewood; Mitchell Elementary in Golden; Challenge to Excellence in Parker; Yuma High School in Yuma. Grants of up to $5,000 per school will be used to provide a range of equipment including robotics, drones, virtual reality mechanisms, laptops, and microscopes.

AURORA Mobile Food Pantry Helps Residents Through the end of August, Aurora’s Mobile Food Pantry is providing meals, pantry items, pet food, and more to Aurora residents in need. In July, the pantry will be parked at Overland High School (12400 E. Jewell Ave.), on Thursdays at 10 a.m.; food will be distributed until the supply is gone. Recipients must bring a photo ID or proof of Aurora residency. To volunteer, email communityrel@ auroragov.org or call 303-739-7281. auroragov.org/mobilefoodpantry


Illustration: Lauren Rebbeck.

Good to Know | Parenting 911

PARENTING 911

My Child’s Birthday Falls on a Holiday THE PROBLEM: My daughter’s birthday is on a holiday and always seems to be overshadowed by that celebration. How can we make her birthday special and also participate in the holiday? THE EXPERT: Haley Ivy Di Virgilio, manager of Wands and Wishes Occasions THE SOLUTION: The world of a child is small, which makes a birthday celebration an especially big deal. If your daughter is having her festivities stepped on by another holiday, and they’re old enough to notice the injustice, it might be time to give her the reins. Some holidays are already a stressful time for many families; having a plan can keep things running smoothly and let the birthday kiddo know exactly what to expect. GIVE THEM THE POWER By giving your child the opportunity to choose what they want to do, you give them a feeling of control over the situation. Sit down with your child a few weeks in advance and talk about options for the special day. Outline two or three choices for them, giving them the power to choose, but don’t let them get overwhelmed with the possibilities. Here are a couple of examples: • If you are having a holiday dinner, let them choose whether they would prefer to have a birthday breakfast or lunch. They can pick their favorite food, blow out candles, unwrap presents, and still participate in other holiday activities. • Would they rather celebrate on another date that’s just for the birthday? Come up with a few specific dates that work with your family’s schedule and let your

child pick which of those days they’d prefer to celebrate. MAKE THEM FEEL SEEN Families can do many things to make a birthday special: • If your house is already decorated for the holiday, dress up a space that’s just for your child. Decorate their door or make birthday signs for their walls. Hang some streamers in doorways for them to walk through on their way into the kitchen. If you give them a space that focuses on their birthday, they won’t feel as overshadowed. • Create a scavenger hunt for the birthday child to find their presents. Make clues that send them throughout the house (you can use words or pictures to show them where to go). Put their presents in various spots and get the whole family to watch and participate. • Coordinate with friends for a special surprise. When changing the date isn’t a possibility, have close friends and family record a short video birthday greeting, write a letter, or take a photo with a handwritten birthday sign. You can gather everything from friends before the big day and present the greetings when your child wakes up or when it’s time to serve cake. • Celebrate a half birthday. Especially if your child’s birthday falls over winter break, determine a date in the summer that is close to six months away from their birthday, and plan a party then. —Courtney Drake-McDonough

5280 magazine is thrilled to recognize the Top Producers in Real Estate for the second year! We are accepting submissions for this incredible distinction until August 14th.

Submit your Top Real Estate Agents now at

SUBMIT.5280.COM/ TOP-PRODUCERS July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Good to Know | Good Stuff

Sun-Safe Swimwear From swimming pools to backyard sprinklers, kids love splashing around in water on a hot summer day. Keep them cool—and protected—with this swimwear made of UV-blocking fabric. By Christina Cook Mott50 girls Mini Kelly long sleeve one piece swimsuit in viva Portugal, $56, and boys Mini Major boardshort in avocado, $48. Sizes 2 to 10. mott50.com

J.Crew Crewcuts girls rash guard set in vibrant pink combo floral, $60 (sizes 2 to 14), and boys swim trunk in yellow green palms, $55. Sizes 2 to 16. jcrew.com

Mini Boden baby appliqué rash guard set in ivory/boto pink strawberry, $32, and sunsafe summer surfsuit in bold blue dino, $45. Sizes 3-6m to 3-4y. bodenusa.com Athleta Girl mock neck rash guard in wave break, $32, and matching reversible bikini bottom, $28. Sizes XS/6 to XXL/16. athleta.gap.com

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

Background: Memories /Getty Images.

Note: Swimwear pictured provides UPF 50+ protection.


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Health & Wellness

Doctor and child, doctor taking temperature: Getty Images.

What To Expect From Medical Checkups Now As medical and dental offices reopen for general checkups, your visit will be a little different. By Lydia Rueger

A

fter a flurry of canceled medical and dental appointments over the past couple months, healthcare offices are starting to reopen. While not every office is following the exact same safety protocols, there are some changes you will see happening everywhere to meet required guidelines. Here’s what your family can expect:

Someone will screen you at the door. Before you enter a medical facility, you might be asked if you are feeling sick and/or experiencing COVID-19-like symptoms. A screener will take your temperature and your child’s temperature before allowing entrance. Dr. Hilary Baskin, an orthodontist with All About Braces, says her practice asks patients to fill out a health questionnaire beforehand.

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

Wear a face mask inside the office. “Plan ahead, and allow kids to choose their own mask so they will be comfortable wearing it and understand its value,” suggests Dr. Savita Ginde, chief healthcare officer at Stride Community Health Centers, an 18-clinic integrated health system in the Denver metro area. Children under age two will not be required to wear a mask, she says, as they might not be able to breathe well.

The reception area will be different. Expect that chairs will be moved farther apart to follow social distancing guidelines. Some practices are asking patients to adhere to a “virtual waiting room” policy, meaning they would call the office when they arrive, and sit in the car until called for the appointment.

Waiting rooms that typically have books, toys, and video games will most likely be cleared. You’ll probably see a sneeze guard in front of the reception area, which Dr. Julie Vuong at Sugarbugs Pediatric Dentistry in Arvada says might be a good safeguard to leave in place, even after COVID-19 times.

Expect doctors to wear extra gear and follow additional safety measures. Your doctors should be wearing masks, face shields, and other protective gear. “In pediatrics, we are always trying to connect with kids, and the face and body is so important, so that is going to be different,” says Dr. Noah Makovsky at Stapleton Pediatrics. “Remind [kids] that their doctor will have a mask but he’s the same person, and will treat them the same.”


Health & Wellness

Precautions may vary somewhat depending on the type of appointment and procedure, and the doctor’s personal comfort level. For example, in orthodontics, Baskin says her doctors are changing into scrubs in the office, adding gowns in accordance with CDC guidelines, and wearing hair bonnets for aerosol-generating procedures in addition to regular mask and face shield use. “We aren’t able to maintain a six-foot distance—we are in the splash zone,” she says. While dentists aren’t able to maintain distance with patients, Baskin’s practice is separating patient procedure chairs by 12 feet. “The biggest thing that’s different for us is that in the past people were more concerned about bloodborne pathogens. Now this is about airborne pathogens. Anytime we’re opening our mouths, we’re creating some form of aerosol.” For pediatric dental visits, Vuong says because of the nature of dental work, “dentists were already ahead of the game when it comes to infection control,” but have still added more safeguards. For example, they only allow one operative dental procedure at a time, with an hour of time in between procedures for proper cleaning. Patients are asked to do a special mouth rinse before each appointment. Vuong also says she’s changed to a different local anesthetic that numbs patients

more quickly, so procedures can be finished more quickly. “We are doing everything we can to protect us and the patients,” she says.

Don’t bring siblings to appointments. Doctors are asking that only children scheduled for appointments come to the office, to cut down on the number of people in the waiting room. In some cases, you may not be able to accompany your child beyond the waiting area, or if you are, doctors ask that only one parent comes back. If the current guidelines won’t work for your family, consider a telehealth appointment. While this won’t work for every procedure, all the doctors contacted report positive experiences with telehealth, and are excited about continuing to reach patients, that otherwise wouldn’t be able to come in, this way. Doctors confirm that children in general are not in the highrisk category for contracting COVID-19, and urge parents to not get behind on vaccines and other health screenings. “Vaccines are really critical—our practice has done so many things to not get behind on health maintenance,” says Makovsky. “Don’t be afraid to make appointments.” Lydia Rueger is an Arvada-based freelance writer, mom, and author.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Learn & Grow

Boy on rock, Boy with armor: Getty Images.

Raising Brave Kids Courage comes from beyond testing kids’ limits through actions. It starts by developing deeper self-awareness. By Marsha Austin

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s parents, we know that we can’t protect our children from fear, harm, and loss. But as painful as these experiences are to witness, most of us wouldn’t take them away, even if we could. Challenge builds resiliency and capable adults later in life. “I believe wholeheartedly in our kids understanding what the real world is about,” says Kelly Dwyer, Denver-based mother of two. “We’re not always able to protect them.” But what if we could arm our children with a superpower that would lessen their anxiety as they face the inevitable ups and downs of life? What if we could help them to be brave? And what does “brave” really look like, anyway? Brave isn’t just “sucking it up,” stuffing fear deep down inside, or always “going for it,” according to child development experts. Being brave takes an even bigger act of courage: Letting go of

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

comparison, and embracing ourselves and our own experience. “To engage an unknown experience with bravery, we need to have a specific relationship established within ourselves,” says Becca Armstrong, a Broomfield-based registered psychotherapist. “This relationship is one that includes self-love, feeling safe being yourself, trusting yourself, and self-security.” It’s about learning to accept uncomfortable feelings, and taking action in the midst of them. LEAN INTO THE UNCOMFORTABLE “My youngest daughter was at her first swim team meet. She came up to me and said, ‘Mom, I have a heartbeat in my ears and my heart is pounding in my chest. I think I’m nervous.’” says Armstrong. “I replied, ‘Do you know that your body is doing something actually pretty cool right now? It’s get-

ting ready for your swim. It’s so smart and knows exactly what to do so you can trust it. It’s pumping all of the blood and oxygen it needs to every part of your body and your brain so when the “beep” happens and it’s go time, you can jump into the water and you have everything you need to swim as fast as you can. Now that you know, you can thank your body for what a good job it’s doing to get ready.’” “After the event, she came up to me smiling,” says Armstrong. “She had a great time. I asked her if she was proud of herself, which she responded with a huge, ‘YES.’ This is bravery.” Brave people strive to love and accept every part of the human experience: weakness and strength, sadness and joy, discomfort and ease. “It’s so important children believe in and feel proud of their accomplishments even when it doesn’t turn out the way they wanted,” says Armstrong. “This does not mean everyone gets


Learn & Grow

a trophy. It means helping them harness what they’ve learned in the loss and bring it to the next opportunity.” Often, parents are tempted to quickly shift their children—and themselves—away from uncomfortable feelings, or feelings some have labeled as “bad” or “wrong” like sadness, disappointment, and frustration, says Steve Sachs, co-director of Alaya Preschool in Boulder, who teaches parents to make friends with their emotions at the Shambhala Mountain Center’s Summer Family Camp. “Instead of just getting angry and doing our habitual thing that we do, we make the choice to breathe, take a moment, even walk away to do what we need to do to feel the feeling—its energy—instead of stuffing it down or acting it out,” advises Sachs. “This practice of self-love allows us to respond instead of react. With children who are feeling their big feelings, we help them in the same way: by bearing witness, giving space, and empathizing.” LISTEN TO YOUR CHILD Listening openly validates children’s experience, and builds the internal self-trust that leads to self-reliance and resiliency, Armstrong says. Sometimes listening means waiting until your child is ready to talk about something that’s troubling them, says Dwyer. “I think most importantly kids need to be heard and know that you’ll be there if and when they want to talk about something or just need a hug. They often process a scary or sad incident, or some sad state of affairs over time,” she says. “It can be days or weeks after learning about something scary that they’re expressing fear or sadness and asking questions. Or they don’t say anything. Their behavior changes and they aren’t necessarily aware of what’s eating at them.” ALLOW EXPLORATION For Amy Breeze Cooper, a Broomfield-based mother of four and host of the podcast Soul Path Parenting, cultivating bravery means giving her kids unfettered room to explore. “Being brave is about full acceptance and self-expression,” Cooper says. “As humans, we are creative beings. We are meant to express and create.” She recommends observing your children without judgment to discover where you can encourage their passions. “If it brings them joy, you’re on the right track,” she says. “Is it some kind of artistic expression? Dancing, singing, painting? Sidewalk art? Writing? Making up plays? Building with Legos? How can you support them doing more of this?” Cooper says her husband is a great example of how early exploration yields courage later on. “He was a very expressive child and his second grade teacher suggested that his parents put him into theater … No one in the family had ever acted. It was in this pursuit that he found his voice, his ability to improvise, and his gift for storytelling that has since made him a successful entrepreneur.”

4 WAYS TO BUILD BRAVERY IN YOUR CHILD Choose Empathy Over Judgment. When your child is upset, instead of trying to shift away from their big feelings by distracting them or soothing them, empathize. Say, for example, “I can tell you’re really mad!” or “It seems like you’re feeling really frustrated right now.” According to child development experts, we can give our children breathing room for their feelings in a few different ways: 1. Be silent; 2. Meet them with a “wow” or “I’m so sorry sweetheart”; 3. Distinguish their feeling from how they dealt with their feeling. For example, say, “I can tell leaving your friend really made you sad. Next time, you can tell me you’re sad instead of pulling the cat’s tail. It’s OK to be sad. I’m sad too when I leave my friend.” Most importantly, we give the message—to our child and to ourselves—that it’s OK to feel what we feel. Practice Mindful Self Care. Big emotions can of course be way more challenging to befriend than smaller ones. If we practice self-care each day, even for five to 10 minutes, this space to respond will grow within us to meet the more sensitive trigger points. Have a moment of silence before dinner when the child is empowered to ring a little bell or light a candle; create time as a family without screens by taking a nature walk or bike ride. When you transition from adult work to engaging with your children, take a moment to close your eyes, be still, and focus on your breath.

This allows you to avoid taking the stresses of the day into your interactions with your kids. You’re more likely to meet them with acceptance and understanding, and less likely to have a “snappy” moment, or be critical. Keep Your Interpretation Out of Conversation. We can start to practice “no comment” when our child says something. It’s not an act of ignoring; let their words and feelings speak for themselves, stand on their own merits, and allow the child to feel themselves, instead of us taking over the space with our own big words and presence. Ask Affirming Questions. Instead of saying, “Don’t worry, you’ll do better next time,” help children connect with what creates the outcome they desire. Ask: “Do you believe in you?” Then say “It’s so good to believe in you. I believe in you.” Or consider: “Are you proud of yourself? You deserve to feel really proud of yourself. I am proud of you too.” When it comes to the internal skills needed to cultivate bravery in children, “these don’t need to be perfect or completely established,” says Armstrong. “They can be in development, however, the more established these are, the braver we are able to be.” Marsha Austin is an award-winning journalist who writes about parenting, spirituality, wellness, and healthy lifestyles. She lives in Boulder with her husband and three-year-old daughter.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Family Food

Stars, Stripes, and Sparkles! Declare your independence from the hot kitchen! These festive desserts are ideal to make on warm summer days—no oven necessary. By Kara Thompson

Star Sparklers YOU WILL NEED: 1 watermelon 1 package of blueberries 1 package of 12-inch wooden skewers Star cookie cutter

DIRECTIONS: 1. Rinse blueberries, then place a handful of them on each skewer. 2. Carefully cut the watermelon into approximately 1-inch thick slices. 3. Use a star cookie cutter to cut star shapes from the watermelon slices. Push the watermelon stars onto the top of the skewers. 4. Serve on a large platter with a bowl of whipped cream as a topping option.

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Colorado Parent | July 2020


Family Family Family Food Food Food

Shimmering Haystacks YOU WILL NEED: 1 11-ounce bag of chocolate chips 1 11-ounce bag of butterscotch chips 1 12-ounce bag of La Choy Chow Mein Noodles 1 12-ounce bag of salted peanuts 1 bag of white Wilton Candy Melts Assorted sprinkles (We used Fancy Sprinkles) Prism Powder edible glitter (optional)

DIRECTIONS: 1. Melt chocolate and butterscotch chips in a large pot over low heat on your stovetop, stirring frequently. 2. Once the chips are completely melted, add chow mein noodles and peanuts. Mix thoroughly. 3. Use two spoons to scoop and mold small piles of haystacks on a baking sheet lined with foil or parchment paper. 4. Decorate each haystack with sprinkles, candy melt drizzle, and edible glitter. 5. Refrigerate for at least an hour to set.

Patriotic Pretzels YOU WILL NEED: 1 bag of pretzel rods 1 bag each of red, white, and blue Wilton Candy Melts Assorted sprinkles (We used Fancy Sprinkles)

DIRECTIONS: 1. Microwave white candy melts in a microwave-safe container at 50 percent power for one minute. Remove from the microwave and stir.

2. Continue microwaving at 50 percent power in 30-second intervals, stirring in between each set until completely smooth and melted.

Tip: Place the plastic storage bags inside a mug and fold the top of the bag over the rim of the mug to make filling the bag easier.

3. Over a bowl, use a spoon to coat ž of each pretzel rod with the white candy melt.

7. Use your filled plastic bags to drizzle each pretzel with red and blue melted chocolate.

4. Place on a baking sheet lined with foil or parchment paper.

8. For sprinkle-covered pretzels, coat each pretzel rod with the white candy melt. Then, pour sprinkles over it while slowly rotating the rod. (Tip: Do this over a large bowl to collect and reuse the sprinkles that don’t stick.) Place on a lined baking sheet.

5. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for the red and blue candy melts. 6. Pour the melted red and blue candy melts in separate small plastic storage bags, then clip off one corner of each bag to make a tiny hole.

9. Leave all pretzels out in a cool room or refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before serving.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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EDUCATION & ENRICHMENT

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Ricks Center for Gifted Children 2040 S. York St. | 303-871-3715 ricksctr@du.edu | du.edu/ricks

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develop a strong academic foundation, self and community awareness, and a love of learning.

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SUMMER CAMPS Small group sizes! • Marine Science • Outdoor Family Experiences • Education in Nature www.shopoceanfirst.blue/swim

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!


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EDUCATION &

ENRICHMENT MULTIPLE LOCATIONS New Horizon Academy Preschool and Early Education Multiple Denver area locations newhorizonacademy.net New Horizon Academy provides high-quality care and education to young children. While focusing on developing a healthy sense of self in each child, we strive to provide your child with the necessary skills to succeed not only in school but also in life.

ENRICHMENT ART artSPARK Creative Studio 2630 W. Belleview Ave., Ste. 160 303-795-7897 info@artsparkcreative.com artsparkcreative.com A unique art making and sewing space for ages one to adult. artSPARK teaches you to think and work like artists through techniques, concepts, process, and play, using your own ideas. Purchase art kits and alternative summer options during COVID-19.

MARTIAL ARTS ATAFMA (Family Martial Arts) 4510 S. Reservoir Rd, #A, Aurora 303-690-0560 info@atafma.com atafma.com Traditional Martial Arts classes for ages four and up. We focus on teaching discipline and respect in a fun, active environment. ATAFMA has been serving the Aurora/Centennial

Tiger Kim’s Academy Taekwondo & Tang Soo Do 1480 Steele St., Denver 303-388-1408 tigerkim.com Our mission is to inspire each member to strengthen their mind and body through taekwondo, tang soo do, and hapkido, striving for excellence. We provide individualized attention through understanding student needs and encouraging them to attain their best.

SWIMMING Ocean First 3015 Bluff St. | 303-444-7234 swim@oceanfirst.blue shopoceanfirst.blue/swim Offering small group size summer camps. With our on-site location in North Boulder and a satellite site up Flagstaff Road, you can choose from a number of different marine science or nature based camps for the kids or the whole family!

VIRTUAL Adventure Quest with Renaissance Adventures 303-786-9216 info@renaissanceadventures.com RenaissanceAdventures.com Online adventure role playing (RPG) summer camps for ages seven to 17. Kids work together to solve riddles and mysteries, and outwit monsters to save the kingdom. Free intro classes online each Friday. Be the hero of a mythic quest! “ONLINE10” for $10 off.

Forming faithful disciples today to be strong leaders tomorrow. • Offering Preschool through 8th Grade with a licensed faculty • Rigorous curriculum • Christ-centered, Catholic faith formation • Comprehensive community service program • Exceptional faculty and staff involvement • Before and After care available • Extensive selection of extracurricular activities including a strong athletic program Contact Marie Young for a private tour or information

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Now enrolling ages 15mo. - 5 years. Flexible options available. Want to learn more about us? Check out our website fplc.org and then give us a call for a tour where you will learn more about our wonderful community. Please call Noanie Geistert, FPLC Director, at 303-762-9355. Everybody, welcome. Seriously. Everybody.

Tell Colorado Parent readers about your school or classes! For more information, contact sales@coloradoparent.com.

area for 25 years.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Talking to Kids About Racism Eight practical tips for initiating race-related talks with your child, plus three topics all anti-racist parents should cover. By Jamie Siebrase

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Colorado Parent | July 2020


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couple weeks ago, my nine-year-old son came home from a socially distanced bike ride frantically asking, “Mom! Did you know a police officer killed a black man by kneeling on his neck? There’s a video on YouTube!” Information is power, and so I’m always willing to have candid conversations with my children. We’d talked about race and racism before, but I shied away from the topic of police brutality against African Americans because I wanted to shelter my school-aged kids from a topic I assumed they couldn’t handle emotionally. (Which seems ridiculous, in retrospect, since African American mothers have never had the luxury of hiding police brutality from their sons.) When my son approached me about George Floyd’s death, I knew it was time to talk about the violent impact of institutional racism—like, really talk. What I didn’t know was how to broach the subject. For this story, I consulted with Zaneta Evans, a licensed professional counselor and the manager for Mental Health Center of Denver’s Healthy Living Program. Evans is raising three black children; I have three white kids. Evans shared these practical steps all parents can use to launch a race-related talk.

1. START WITH A SIT-DOWN CONVERSATION. For heavy topics like police brutality, you’ll need to carve out designated time. “If you want to drive change and build awareness, you have to be direct and intentional,” Evans explains. She recommends calling a family meeting, and inviting extended family members (grandparents, aunts, and uncles) to the table, too, since children will benefit from hearing a variety of viewpoints. If you already have a tradition built into your week—a Sunday dinner or a family game night, for example—launch a race-related talk during that preset gathering.

2. MAKE RACE TALKS ROUTINE. While the death of George Floyd isn’t a “casual conversation,” as Evans puts it, broader topics surrounding racism can—and should—be addressed on an ongoing basis. (Think marathon versus sprint.) After the “big talk,” take advantage of casual moments by discussing racism while you’re preparing dinner or driving to pick up coffee. Lots of little talks again and again can make a huge impact over the course of a childhood. When it comes to timing, Evans recommends chatting in the afternoon and early evening. While some children are groggy in the morning, and find it difficult to focus, other “morning people” are so hyper-focused on greeting the day that they’re unable to process information until they’ve accomplished their morning agenda.

Opener, background: Getty Images.

3. LET YOUR CHILD LEAD THE WAY. Evans hadn’t planned to talk to her middle child about racism last year. But when her then six-year-old daughter came home from school upset because a student had made a comment about her skin being “too dark,” Evans knew it was time for a conversation about skin tone. “My daughter’s personal experience drove the conversation,” Evans recalls, noting that it was a jumping off point to discuss ignorance, racism, and bias. For these complex subjects, Evans used simple language to explain that, “Some people don’t know better, and some people are taught that color makes a difference.” Evans' oldest child is 21 and able to drive these conversations even more without Evans having to manage them. “She comes to me with questions, and I’m always open and honest when I respond,” Evans says.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Parent and child on couch, family in ibrary: Getty Images.

4. ASK OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS. Asking questions, Evans says, is one of the simplest ways to engage children at any age. “When you ask a question, when you’re coming from a place of curiosity, it can remove some of the judgment,” Evans explains. If you haven’t talked to your kids about racism yet, ask questions about what they notice among their friends. For example: “Do any of your classmates have a skin color that is different from yours?” or “Is there anyone in your class who comes from a different culture?” Once you’ve initiated a conversation, say to your child, “I’m curious, what do you think of when you hear the word racism?” Or try showing an older adolescent or teen a race-related story in the news, and ask, “What do you think about this?” “Current events can be a great conversation starter,” Evans notes. “Sometimes it helps to be a little removed from a situation.” If there’s something happening specifically in New York, for example, that might feel like a less threatening topic to a Colorado-based kiddo.

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

There’s a lot of news about racism right now, but don’t let that stop you from telling your children about positive, race-related stories, too—like new anti-racist legislation, for example.

5. MAKE SURE THE CONVERSATION IS AGE-APPROPRIATE. By age four at least, children have begun to show signs of racial bias, according to two studies published in Developmental Science in 2019. While it’s still too early to explain nuanced concepts such as institutional racism and white privilege, parents to preschoolers can certainly talk about skin tone. At this age, keep the conversation simple. Let your child know that it’s fine to notice skin color, and explain that underneath the skin, at a musculoskeletal level, everyone looks exactly the same. A good way to start a bigger conversation is by using metaphors that a young mind can grasp. Evans uses this with her two-year-old: “Explain that there are all different kinds of fruit. They taste


different and look different, but that doesn’t make one fruit worse than another,” Evans says. As your child grows and develops, so should the race-related talks.

6. DON’T BE AFRAID TO ADDRESS VIOLENCE. Be straightforward with your children about bigotry and oppression. As Evans points out, “Our kids are smarter and more developed than what we give them credit for.” If your child heard about or saw the video depicting George Floyd’s death, don’t turn him or her away. “Especially with something that’s all over social media, it is going to be hard to keep a protective bubble around your kids,” Evans says. Instead of giving your six-year-old all of the details, start with the basic facts: George Floyd was killed by a police officer. Some kids will ask follow-up questions. Provide more information gradually, Evans recommends. “Tell your child the police officer put his knees on George Floyd’s neck,” Evans says. If your child asks for more information, add, “George Floyd couldn’t breathe anymore.” Especially when discussing violence, make sure to look for any signs of trauma in your child. “If your child is experiencing trauma, you might need to seek professional help,” says Evans.

7. DON’T OVERTHINK YOUR CHILD’S REACTION. When your child is learning about racism, there’s not a “right” or “wrong” response. Some kids will be outraged, while other children might seem ambivalent. Kids may share a response you might not expect, one that might not reflect your own response that’s informed by your experiences as an adult. “It is OK if your child isn’t angry,” Evans says. “That signifies that they aren’t interested in a conversation right now, and that’s fine.” The only thing that would be concerning, Evans says, is if your child is being mean to another child because they look different.

THREE TOPICS ALL ANTI-RACIST PARENTS SHOULD COVER Privilege “Think of all the houses in Colorado,” Evans says. “What if they were built for people who were 5-foot-10?” she asks. “What would you do if you were only 5-foot?” Let your child have an opportunity to respond, then continue with, “What if you couldn’t reach the doorknobs and faucets? You’d have to make accommodations to live in the house,” Evans says. This is what white privilege is, and the metaphor will help your children understand it. “It’s not that white people today asked for this privilege, it’s just something that exists,” Evans says. That’s a good point to bring up since some white children will feel guilt after learning about their privilege. “This doesn’t have to be a negative conversation,” Evans says. “Remember, nobody got to pick or choose their race or skin color.” History History is written by the victors, and so it’s important to teach your children facts that might not be included in mainstream history books. But don’t worry: You don’t have to be an expert on race or U.S. history to expand your child’s knowledge. One of the simplest things to do is visit museums and cultural institutions with exhibits exploring untold aspects of history. While some local centers are still shut down

in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak, check out their virtual offerings. History Colorado Center is a fantastic place to start. As cultural institutions reopen, take your children to the Black American West Museum & Heritage Center and the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library, a branch of the Denver Public Library located in Denver’s historic Five Points neighborhood. Diversity and Inclusiveness Children notice everything, and it’s natural for them to be curious about different skin tones. “We can be different,” says Evans. “That’s what makes the world go ‘round.” To this end, Evans cautions parents against teaching children to be “color-blind.” Instead, parents should encourage their children to celebrate differences. If your child’s school isn’t diverse, enroll him or her in an activity with children from different neighborhoods around the Denver metro area. Certain YMCA locations have some of the city’s most diverse sports leagues, and many local libraries and recreation centers offer classes for diverse groups of visitors. At home, read books about people of color. “Racism,” Evans says, “is something that’s taught or learned through observation. This is your opportunity to build in your child a sense of what is right and wrong.”

8. YOU DON’T HAVE TO HAVE ALL OF THE ANSWERS. Try not to put too much pressure on yourself as a parent. If you’re caught off guard by a question, don’t panic. “Slow things down,” Evans says. “If you need time to process a question, it’s OK. You don’t have to have an answer immediately.” If you have gaps in your own knowledge that need to be filled, what an amazing opportunity this will be to learn alongside your curious child. Jamie Siebrase is a Denver-based freelance writer, mother, and author.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Kids

LOVE

MUSEUMS + C U LT U R E Denver is filled with many options to get kiddos involved in educational experiences and cultural activities. Get an in-depth look into individual museums, zoos, music programs, and so much more. Discover what makes Denver special to families and our community, and why both kids AND

parents

love

these

experiences.


Nature Connects , Art with LEGO Bricks ®

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ALL STRIPES WELCOME This summer, Nature Connects®, Art with LEGO® Bricks returns to Denver Zoo with inspiring creations by Artist Sean Kenney. Don’t miss this award-winning traveling exhibit, which connects you to the world’s vanishing species with larger-than-life plant and animal sculptures made entirely of over 1 million LEGO bricks.

July 17–November 1 Tickets at DenverZoo.org


Kids

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LOVE MUSEUMS + CULTURE

 C LY F F O R D STILL MUSEUM 

Why kids love it.

Ex p l o re a n e w w o r l d a t t h e C l y f f o rd S t i l l M u s e u m , w h e re a d m i s s i o n i s a l w a y s f re e f o r c h i l d re n a ge s 1 7 a n d u n d e r. U s e yo u r i m a g i n a t i o n a n d m a ke yo u r o w n i n t e r p re t a t i o n s o f S t i l l ’s v i b r a n t a r t w o r k s . C re a t e a n a r t i s t i c m a s t e r p i e c e w i t h a t a ke h o m e a r t m a k i n g a c t i v i t y p a c ke t . Ex p e r i e n c e a v a r i e t y o f f re e v i r t u a l e ve n t s i n c l u d i n g f a m i l y t o u r s , w o r k s h o p s , c o n c e r t s , a n a r t c l u b j u s t f o r s t u d e n t s , a n d m o re.

Why parents love it.

D i s c ove r n i n e b e a u t i f u l ga l l e r i e s o f C l y f f o rd S t i l l ’s a r t a n d l e a r n a b o u t a g ro u n d b re a k i n g a r t i s t w h o w a s u n w i l l i n g t o c o m p ro m i s e h i s a r t i s t i c v i s i o n f o r m o n e y o r re c o g n i t i o n . D e s i g n e d s p e c i f i c a l l y t o d i s p l a y S t i l l ’s a r t , t h e M u s e u m i s h o m e t o n e a r l y e ve r y t h i n g h e c re a t e d , a p p rox i m a t e l y 3, 1 2 5 p i e c e s , re p re s e n t i n g 9 5 % o f h i s l i f e t i m e o f w o r k . Le a r n m o re a b o u t S t i l l , h i s a r t , w h a t i n s p i re d h i m , a n d e n j oy a v a r i e t y o f f re e v i r t u a l p ro g r a m s a t h o m e !

How we adjusted in response to COVID-19.

T h e M u s e u m w i l l l i m i t c a p a c i t y by s e l l i n g t i m e d t i c ke t s (e ve r y 1 5 m i n u t e s) , w h i c h m u s t b e p u rc h a s e d i n a d v a n c e o n l i n e o r ove r t h e p h o n e. A l l v i s i t o r s w i l l re q u i re a t i c ke t f o r e n t r y. A l l p e r s o n s ( a ge s 3 + ) m u s t w e a r f a c e c ove r i n g s a t a l l t i m e s . T h e M u s e u m w i l l c o n t i n u e t o o f f e r v i r t u a l e ve n t s . A d d i t i o n a l p o l i c i e s a n d i n f o r m a t i o n a re a v a i l a b l e o n l i n e .

Museum Info

ADDRESS: 1250 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80204 WEBSITE: clyffordstillmuseum.org

PHONE: 720.354.4880

EMAIL: info@clyffordstillmuseum.org HOURS: Monday: Closed to the public Tuesday–Sunday: 10 a.m.–11 a.m. Member Hour Tuesday–Sunday: 11 a.m.–5 p.m. General Public Hours

34 | K I D S L O V E M U S E U M S + C U L T U R E 2 0 2 0 | C O L O R A D O P A R E N T. C O M


IT’S ABOUT TO GET WESTERN. . .

Explore 6.5 acres of Colorado history with interactive exhibits!

20 AUTHENTIC BUILDINGS

GOLD PANNING TABLE AND MUCH MORE !

Open Year Round MONDAY-SATURDAY 9-5

1-800-288-1334 oldtownburlington.com Just 2 hours east of Denver C O L O R A D O P A R E N T. C O M | K I D S L O V E M U S E U M S + C U L T U R E 2 0 2 0 | 35


Kids

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

LOVE MUSEUMS + CULTURE

 DENVER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 

Why kids love it.

Discover your creative side when you explore characters, paint backdrops, design props and act. There’s no limit to your imagination! DCPA Education encourages kids to tell stories, write songs and dance—in the living room and on stage. Plus, engaging community and school programs make learning fun! From Book Stars early childhood literacy to partnering with Phone a Story at the Denver Public Library, there’s a whole world to encounter through dramatic play.

Why parents love it.

Ac t i ng c l a sses w i t h DC PA Educa t i o n g i ve chi l dren t he s k i l l s t hey ne e d to s ucce e d— co nf i d e nce, co l l a bo ra t i o n a nd c rea t i v i ty. S t ud i es s how t ha t ea rl y ex posure to t he pe rfo rm i ng a rts i nc rea ses a ca de m i c per fo r m a nce a nd st i m ul a tes c rea t i v i ty. P l us, i t ’s pl a i n o l ’ f un! One pa rent desc ri b e d i t b est : “My c hi l d be ca m e ‘ tal l er ’ i n ever y way.”

How we adjusted in response to COVID-19.

T h e D C PA i s o f f e r i n g m o re t h a n 4 0 o n l i n e s u m m e r c l a s s e s i n a c t i n g , vo i c e ove r, a u d i t i o n p re p a n d m o re f o r i n c o m i n g t h i rd g r a d e s t u d e n t s t h ro u g h a d u l t s . Pr i v a t e c o a c h i n g i s a l s o a v a i l a b l e.

Theatre Info

ADDRESS: 1101 13th Street, Denver, CO 80204 WEBSITE: denvercenter.org/education PHONE: 303.446.4892

36 | K I D S L O V E M U S E U M S + C U L T U R E 2 0 2 0 | C O L O R A D O P A R E N T. C O M

*SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE


Kids

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

LOVE MUSEUMS + CULTURE

 DENVER B O TA N I C GARDENS 

Why kids love it.

Kids learn about the natural world through fun, handson activities where they can be scientists, artists, gardeners and more.

Why parents love it.

The Gardens offers creative programming for ages toddler to 12, plus a 24acre campus to spark their curiosity and imagination.

How we adjusted in response to COVID-19.

The Gardens now offers online programming for home nature exploration! On-site operations comply with state and municipality guidelines and requirements.

Museum Info

ADDRESS: 1007 York Street, Denver, 80206 WEBSITE: botanicgardens.org | PHONE: 720.865.3500

virtual and in-person tiny tots subscriptions

Performances, videos, and interaction with professional musicians. Plus musical games, activities, and more! Designed for kids 6 and under.

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PRESENTS

Top Town Of the

LET’S CELEBRATE THE BEST OF DENVER!

July 16th

We’ve reimagined this annual celebration to bring the best of Denver to your doorstep.

LIVE broadcast featuring:

2020

• 2020 Top of the Town readers’ choice winners

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Host a No-Slumber Sleep-Under! By Kara Thompson

H

ere's an idea for a gender-neutral, customizable, and (bonus!) budget-friendly birthday party theme: a sleep-under. Similar to a traditional sleepover, guests indulge in popcorn, play simple games, and wind down with a movie. But, instead of having a houseful of kids (and drama) overnight, everyone gets picked up before bedtime. Hooray for a not-too-late night! From DIY decor to creative games, our dreamy party guide will help you pull off your child’s best soirÊe yet.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Calling all Guests! Slumber parties are a hit no matter what, but receiving an invite to one in the mail? That will only add to the excitement! Although texting or emailing a party announcement might be the easiest route, mailing a personalized invitation will help set the overall vibe for the party you’re planning. Include any essential party information on the invitation, then hint at the other party fun. Ask younger guests to bring their favorite stuffed animal and older guests to bring a cozy pair of slippers. Don’t forget to note that pajamas are a must! The three invites shown right, which were made by Denver stationery and specialty paper companies, prove just how versatile a sleep-under party theme can be.

Movie Night Amp up the theater theme! Order invites that display images of popcorn and movie lights, and put your child’s name in lights. Invite from The Lettery Co

Girls Night Cursive fonts and soft tones set the scene for a girlie gettogether. Include a sleep mask with each invitation. Invite from Lucky Onion

“Party lengths can vary, but a four to five hour event is a good amount of time—it will run on the slightly longer side if showing a movie. Plan the first half hour to hour for late arrivals and for all the kids to mingle before starting games, food, and activities.” —Elizabeth Restauri, owner of Total Imagination Events, an event planning company located in Denver

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

Starry Night A night sky paired with whimsical fonts gives off a storybook vibe, which is ideal for a gender-neutral event. Invite from Wordshop Paperie


Rather than going overboard with decor, keep things simple by sticking to budget-friendly and easy DIY options. Hang a star banner (Target, $5) or make your own bunting banner out of colorful cardstock, ribbon, and stencils or stickers. You can customize the banner with the paper you choose, the shapes you cut out (we did stars and moons), and the wording. Tip: Go with a more general design, like something that says “Celebrate” so it can be reused for future parties.

Dreamy Party Decor

Every birthday party needs balloons! These star and moon balloons (Target, $6) are ideal for carrying the sleep-under theme throughout the decor, and they add a bit of shine and texture to an otherwise ordinary room. Let each guest bring a balloon home with them when they leave, which serves as one small party favor, and less cleanup for you.

“Planning ahead will give you plenty of time to source the details that will make the event spectacular. Think about how you can amplify the theme by incorporating small details that immerse your party guests in the concept at every turn.” —E.R.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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DIY Party Games Breakfast Cereal BINGO

Take a game night classic up a notch by crafting your own breakfast cereal BINGO game. Using a traditional BINGO game as a reference, draw a grid on a sheet of cardstock. Make a list of six to eight different cereals and draw a doodle for each. Fill in the BINGO grid with the cereal doodles and remember to leave a FREE SPACE in the center of the card. Make one card for each guest, mixing up the order of the doodles on each. Make calling slips by writing a letter and a cereal name on pieces of paper, (N-Lucky Charms, B-Golden Grahams, etc.) Enlist the help of your little one while you’re crafting so they get a chance to be a part of the party planning process. When game time comes, dump the calling slips into a bowl and call out the letter and cereal listed on the slips as you draw them. Use your child's favorite cereals in place of traditional BINGO tokens—but head’s up—some snacking might take place! The winner is the first person to fill five squares across, down, or diagonally, and yell BINGO.

“Two to three games are appropriate for a child’s birthday party, but be sure to allow a little bit of time for transition in between each activity.” —E.R.

Pin the Popcorn

Create your own pin the popcorn in the box game with cardstock and craft paint. Cut out small pieces of popcorn for blindfolded party guests to try pinning to the top of the popcorn bucket (the smaller you make the pieces, the more challenging it will be). Hang the game up on a wall, blindfold and spin one player at a time, then ask them to try and get their popcorn piece into the top of the bucket. The popcorn piece closest to the top is the winner. This is the perfect game to play right before you start a movie to release any jitters, and get kids excited to snack on popcorn.

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Colorado Parent | July 2020


Movie Night Magic

No sleepover (or sleep-under) is complete without a movie. Roll out sleeping bags on your living room floor for kids to slip into, or set out blankets, tents, or chairs on your lawn for an outdoor movie night. If you have a trampoline, dress it up with fabric drapes and twinkle lights and let the birthday bashers watch a movie underneath the stars. Regardless of where you set up your theater, make each child feel extra cozy by placing pillows and stuffed animals around each guest. Tip: On the invitation, you can ask guests to bring their own pillows or blankets to the party if you don’t have enough. Movie snacks are another must. Make a “build your own popcorn” bar by setting out an oversized bowl of buttery popcorn along with a variety of fixings, like candy and snack mix. Serve in small, disposable popcorn bags, which are available at stores like Amazon, Target, and Michaels.

“Consider sourcing unique seating for a movie night, which will add a fun element to the party. Air mattresses and bean bags make great kidfriendly seating both indoors and outdoors.” —E.R.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Crowd-Pleasing Party Bites It can be easy to overthink food when you’re hosting a group, but keep in mind that kids are generally easygoing when it comes to party snacks. Stick to tried-and-true basics like open-faced sandwiches or hot dogs, which are quick to prepare and affordable to buy. Serve with your child’s favorite type of chips, cheese cubes, or a fruit and veggie platter. It might seem messy, but go buffet style and let each guest make their own plate. Kids love to be in control whenever they get the chance, so by letting them lead you’ll not only be making them happy, but you’ll also be giving yourself a break.

Sandwich Slippers WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Hot dog buns Cheddar cheese slices Star cookie cutter Sandwich fixings or hot dogs INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Cut off a small portion of each hot dog bun to create a slipper shape (as shown). 2. Use a cookie cutter to cut cheese stars. 3. Place the cheese stars on the top of each slipper. 4. Serve on a platter with sandwich toppings or hot dogs.

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Colorado Parent | July 2020


Sweet Dream Sweets Most kids love cake, and this one from Happy Bakeshop is loaded with eye-catching rainbow sprinkles. Make things personal by crafting your own cake toppers that match the rest of your party decor. Simply attach paper cutouts to the tops of wooden skewers and carefully stick each into the cake. Don’t have a cake fan? There are plenty of other tasty treats that are easy to DIY or outsource. Even if party attendees aren’t sleeping over, a mini pancake bar is a delicious and on-theme dish that works just as well for dessert as it does for breakfast. To make things extra sweet, set out bowls with different toppings like chocolate chips, sprinkles, and whipped cream. Stack the pancakes on a big plate and add candles so your child’s guests can sing to the birthday child. Another beloved breakfast food that works perfectly as a dessert: Doughnuts! Stop by your local shop (we found these cakey delights at Berkeley Donuts) and pick up an assorted dozen. Set them out along with glasses of milk for the perfect late-night treat.

“For another dessert option, set out milk and cookie shooters! Line glasses of milk along your countertop next to a platter of cookies. Guests will enjoy dipping their treats into their milk.” —E.R.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Dream Buckets

More often than not, party favors can feel junky. Rather than filling a goodie bag to the brim, opt for fewer, more useful favors instead. Spruce up plain white party favor pails (Michaels, $4.50 two-pack) with colorful paper or stickers. Then, place glow in the dark stars, notebooks, and colored pencils in each pail. It will be easier for guests to say goodbye if they’re leaving with something exciting, and parents will appreciate adding something useful to their child’s stack of toys.

Festive Favor Ideas • Mini lanterns • Slippers • Softcover book • Dreamcatchers • Flashlights

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• Sleep masks • Pillow cases • Nightlights • Bath Bombs

Colorado Parent | July 2020


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BIRTHDAY PARTY GUIDE

ACADEMIC/STEM

artSPARK Creative Studio 2630 West Belleview Ave. 303-795-7897 info@artsparkcreative.com artsparkcreative.com

Code Ninjas Arvada, Broomfield, Denver, Highlands Ranch, Louisville, and Parker codeninjas.com

Code Ninjas teaches kids ages seven to 14 to code by building video games and robotics. Students advance from white to black on the path to coding enlightenment. Programs include year-round drop-ins, weeklong camps, birthdays, parents’ night out, and more.

ART Art Garage 6100 E. 23rd Ave., Denver | 303-377-2353 katie@artgaragedenver.com artgaragedenver.com

If you choose artSPARK Creative Studio to celebrate a birthday, your child and their friends will have fun creating a unique art piece in our studio or virtually. Contact us with your request and we will do our best to make your event SPARKtacular!

We do all the work so all you have to do is enjoy the smiles! • Two items to cook and enjoy at the party • Cupcakes, drinks and decorations included • Decorate a take home chef hat Book online today!

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We offer hands on interactive cooking parties for kids six to 17 years. Choose from one of our themed menus or customize one to your Junior Chef’s desires! Package includes up to 10 guest children, all you have to do is bring the camera!

COOKING Flour Power Kids Cooking Studios 2030 E. County Line Rd., Highlands Ranch 720-656-9405 highlandsranch@flourpowerstudios.com flourpowerstudios.com/highlandsranch

The Art Garage is a non-profit that offers toddler and me classes, summer/school day out camps, after school classes and birthday parties. Ceramics, drawing, painting, illustration, and more! Check out our adult classes too!

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GET YOUR KIDS COOKING THIS SUMMER! Week long Themed Day Camps. Half day & full day programs available. Ages 7- 17. Small class sizes of 6-10 kids. Your child brings home DINNER every day!

UncorkedKitchen.com 720.907.3838

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

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Calendar JULY 1 WEDNESDAY

VIRTUAL DPL Maker Challenge Denver Public Libraries

wants to see what you and the family have made during stay-at-home and safer-at-home times. Upload an image, video, and/or sound recording of something you’ve made—a painting, something you’ve cooked, a quilt, a robot, a song—to share it with the rest of Denver and be entered to win prizes. Find inspiration for what to make and instructions on sharing your creation online. Submissions are accepted through Aug. 8. denverlibrary.org

Struggle of Love Foundation Volunteering July 1, 3, and 8, 9am-3pm. Help the Colorado Black Women for Political Action support the Struggle of Love Foundation. This food pantry is feeding families living in Montbello, Denver, Park Hill, Green Valley Ranch, and more. Ten volunteers are needed each day. eventbrite.com/event/108807770972

3 FRIDAY

VIRTUAL Kids Move Improv with James Brunt

Art of the Brick: Nathan Sawaya.

2-3pm. Wiggle, shout, let it all out, and learn body confidence and movement skills with Denver’s own award-winning actor, James Brunt. This month’s theme is mountains. Recommended for ages 4-7 with parents. Donations suggested. secondstartotherightbooks.com/events

Parker Arts Drive-In Series

NOW OPEN

Nathan Sawaya’s Lego rendition of The Kiss, by Gustav Klimt.

The Art of the Brick

Explore the amazing Lego creations of Nathan Sawaya, during The Art of the Brick exhibit. Also view the winning entries of the Art of the Brick contest, which challenged local kids to turn their own Lego bricks into works of art. See page 16. Free with general admission through Labor Day. Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver. dmns.org

July 3, 10, and 24, 8:30-10pm. Get back together at PACE with live music and socially-distanced activities. The vintage style event series takes place in the PACE Center parking lot with radio frequencies for parkers to tune in to. Streaming options are also available. $30 per car, $5 per streaming household. PACE Center, Parker. parkerarts.org

Struggle of Love Foundation Volunteering See July 1.

July 2020 | ColoradoParent.com

49


Calendar | July

Goat Yoga: Rocky Mountain Goat Yoga.

HEADS UP! Events may change after publication deadline. Please phone ahead to confirm important information.

Get listed! Items to be considered for the monthly printed calendar must be received at least six weeks before the month of publication. Email event information to calendar@coloradoparent.com. Information cannot be accepted by phone. See our calendar online at ColoradoParent.com and use it to post your own events at any time.

Join in a goat yoga class for all ages at Skal Farm, July 4.

4 SATURDAY

Breakfast At Urban Peak Volunteering 8:30-11:30am. Join Off The Mat Colorado, a yoga community that works in the service of others, for their monthly breakfast provision at Urban Peak youth shelter, which provides services for youth ages 15-24 experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of becoming homeless. Sign up online to bring a meal item and join the group to prepare a nourishing meal. Urban Peak, Denver. facebook.com/ events/566691904170271

Goat Yoga July 4 and 5, 9am, 10:30am, and noon. Hop in your comfy clothes and get ready to downwarddog with some hoofed friends. Rocky Mountain Goat Yoga is open and taking steps to mitigate the spread of coronavirus during animal-based events. Class sizes are limited to 15 per session, and guests are spaced out and asked to wear masks before entering. Reserve a mat space online. All ages. $35. Skål Farm, Golden. rockymountaingoatyoga.com

meeting up for the traditional community celebration and concert, ice cream delivery will occur in the neighborhoods throughout Snowmass Village. Fanny Hill, Snowmass Village. gosnowmass.com

5 SUNDAY

Goat Yoga See July 4.

8 WEDNESDAY

Struggle of Love Foundation Volunteering See July 1. VIRTUAL Write & Talk

for Teens with Lighthouse Writers Workshop 4-6pm. Creative writers (or those interested in becoming a creative writer) are invited to join local author and Lighthouse Writers Workshop instructor Whitney Gaines to free write, converse, and try a new writing genre or topic. Grades 6 and up. Register online. denverlibrary.org

July 4 Ice Cream AntiSocial All day. Celebrate the Fourth

VIRTUAL Foster Care Informational Meeting

of July in Snowmass, with their twist on the ice cream social. Instead of

6-8pm. Denver Human Services’ Foster Care Informational Meetings

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

guide folks through the first steps in certification and offer valuable information with an opportunity to hear from specialists about the experience. Register through Eventbrite. Contact 720-944-4000 or fostercare@ denvergov.org with any questions. eventbrite.com/event/87827677949

9 THURSDAY

VIRTUAL Arts Thornton Virtual Art Club July 9 and 23,

2-3pm. Art teachers at Thornton High School and artist residents at the Globeville Riverfront Arts Center are teaming up with Arts Thornton and the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD) to host virtual art clubs. Join online! thorntonco.gov VIRTUAL Museum Virtual Summer Concert Series

7:30pm. Thursday nights call for fine music streaming to your own safe spot. Join the Longmont Museum’s concert series on Facebook for a night of jazz with the 101st Army Dixieland Band. New band each Thursday night. View the live videos on Facebook. longmontcolorado.gov

10 FRIDAY

Parker Arts Drive-In Series See July 3. VIRTUAL Colorado Black Arts Festival July 10-12, noon-8pm.

Bringing you visual and performing arts from the African Diaspora, this festival was built (in 1986) to establish pride in Black culture and engage the community. This year is a virtual cultural experience. Find more details about program schedules and ways to get involved online. colbaf.org VIRTUAL Anythink Libraries Backyard Concert Series 6:30-8pm. Don’t miss Anythink’s

summer concert tradition, this year with streamed online performances so listeners can set up a personal backyard concert. There will be ways to interact and connect with the bands, the library, and with each other. This month enjoy the sounds of Leon and the Revival. All ages. anythinklibraries.org

11 SATURDAY

VIRTUAL Colorado Black Arts Festival 10am-8pm. See July 10.


Denver Mart Drive In: Denver Mart Drive In.

Calendar | July

Preview Music Class 10am and 10:45am. Parents with little musicians who are interested in the Children’s Music Academy curriculum can join a free introductory class that will include keyboard, rhythm instruments, games, and activities. Register online, only one parent may attend due to COVID19 restrictions. Ages 4-2nd grade. Children’s Music Academy, Centennial. childrensmusicacademy.org

Family Day Out: Sushi Time! 1:30-4:30pm. Cook together as a family during this hands-on, in-person class. Learn to make a Japanese feast, including California roll, spicy tuna roll, chicken teriyaki roll, and green tea ice cream. Children must be age 6-17 and attend with an adult. $60 per attendee. Uncorked Kitchen, Centennial. uncorkedkitchen.com VIRTUAL Relay for Rescue 2020 2pm. Have some fun with a

virtual scavenger hunt while raising money for local animal welfare organizations, including 4 Paws 4 Life, Animal Rescue of the Rockies, Douglas County Canine Rescue, No Kill Colorado, and more. Join one of these organization’s teams by registering online. Download the GooseChase app before the event and get ready to complete your mission. $35. relayforrescue.com

18 SATURDAY

Family Yoga in the Gardens on Spring Creek 9:15-10am. Roll out your mats to enjoy a meditation and flow yoga session with the family. Wear a mask and comfortable clothing, and bring your own mats, water bottles, and sunscreen. All experience levels, age 4 and up with their caregivers. Register online. $15 adult, $12 child. Cost includes class and admission to The Gardens and the Butterfly House. The Gardens on Spring Creek, Fort Collins. fcgov.com/gardens/yoga VIRTUAL The Blues & BBQ Festival for Better Housing

July 10.

July 18 and 19, 1:30-10:30pm. This rockin’ fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity Metro Denver is back with tributes to Bruce Springsteen, The Who, Santana, and The Rolling Stones. The in-person concert/community event will have seating for 50 inside the restaurant. Tickets are available per band to keep capacity at a safe level. For those who’d like to enjoy the event from home, there will be live streaming on Facebook. $30 per ticket for in-person. Free online, donations encouraged. The Venue, Denver. bluesnbbq.com

Classic Italian Dishes for the Whole Family 5-6pm. Join

19 SATURDAY

12 SUNDAY

VIRTUAL Colorado Black Arts Festival 10am-7pm. See

Stir Cooking School in the Highlands for a delicious class and family bonding moment. On the menu: Risotto Milanese, Caesar Salad with Herb Croutons, Three Meat Lasagna, and Cannoli. Age 6 and up. $65 per person. Stir Cooking School, Denver. stirtolearn.com

VIRTUAL The Blues & BBQ Festival for Better Housing

13 MONDAY

24 FRIDAY

Kids 5-6pm. Discover the three

See July 3.

VIRTUAL Kitchen Clay for

fundamentals of hand-building with clay: pinch pots, coils, and slabs. From there, young artists can

Movie Moments

express themselves making things like birdhouses and chia pets. Finish the course with five hand-built creations. All pieces will be glazed and fired by staff at Studio Arts Boulder’s Pottery Lab. No minimum tuition, $100 suggested contribution. studioartsboulder.org

11:30am-8:30pm. See July 18.

23 THURSDAY

VIRTUAL Arts Thornton Virtual Art Club See July 9.

Pull up to Denver Mart’s big screen for double features on the weekends. 88 Drive-In Through early fall, 8:45pm. This Denver institution of almost 50 years welcomes patrons back for another season of backto-back movie showings. Social distancing and occupancy restrictions will be enforced, snack bar open. $9, free ages 12 and under. 88 Drive-In, Commerce City. 88drivein.net Comanche Drive-In Fri-Tue through Labor Day, dusk. This big screen near Buena Vista offers 4K digital clarity, FM radio sound, and an all-summer season. Concession stand is open with “curbside” service only, order at the entry window or call in. Gates open at 7:45pm, parking is one space apart, masks and exact change are requested. $10 adults, $5 kids 12 and under, free kids age 5 and under. Comanche Drive In Theatre, Buena Vista. comanchedrivein.com Dairy’s Drive-In Cinema 8pm. Located in the West Entrance parking lot of the Dairy Arts Center in Boulder. Please purchase your ticket in advance. The gates open at 8pm and the movies will screen when it is dark enough. Prices vary. The Dairy Arts Center, Boulder. thedairy.org Denver Mart Drive-In Fri-Sun through Sept. 6, 8:15pm. Gates open at 8pm. Purchase a ticket online and pull up to the Denver Mart’s massive movie screen this summer. Patrons are expected to wear masks and stay in their cars other than to use the restroom. $10 age 7 and up. Denver Mart Drive In, Denver. denvermartdrivein.com

Parker Arts Drive-In Series Holiday Twin Drive-In Through Sept. 6, 6pm. Order tickets and concessions online for this Fort

Collins attraction. Find two-screens and double features with movies and live music concerts. Be sure to abide by social distancing requirements and wear a mask. $6-9. Holiday Twin DriveIn, Fort Collins. holidaytwin.com Loveland Drive-In Fundraiser Fri-Sun through July 24, 9am, 5pm, and 8pm showings. Drive in and enjoy family-friendly movies. Local food trucks and vendors will sell to-go items. Attendees must wear masks at all times when outside of their vehicles. Bathrooms will be available and sanitized regularly. Tickets online. Tickets by donation. The Outlets at Loveland. lovelanddrivein.com The Orchard’s Canned Film Festival: National Treasure July 2. Parking lot opens at 7:30pm; movie begins around 8:30pm. Relax and safely watch the movie National Treasure while enjoying snacks from an Orchard Town Center restaurant. Proceeds from movie tickets benefit Food for Hope. Select restaurants are offering a discount with movie ticket purchase and/or car-side delivery. $15 per car. The Orchard Town Center, Westminster. theorchardtowncenter.com/events Summer Movie Series by Avanti and Alamo Thu through August, 9pm. Join Alamo Drafthouse Cinema and Avanti F&B, who’ve partnered to bring a movie festival on the lawn every week. Bring your own lawn chair and sponsors New Belgium will give adults a free beer. Special menus provided by Lea Jane’s Hot Chicken and Meta Asian Kitchen. Avanti Food & Beverage, Denver. avantifandb.com

July 2020 | Colorado Parent

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Calendar | July

through Aug. 31, will be reserved for members only, and other visiting days require timed tickets. $14 adults, $12 seniors, $10 students, $8 youth, free children 4 and under and members. History Colorado Center, Denver. historycolorado.org

Butterfly Pavilion Using timed, small group tours that maintain social distance and sanitation, the Butterfly Pavilion restores in-person interaction between families and the live animals and invertebrates the center has facilitated for 25 years. Online reservations and face coverings for ages 3 and up are required. $12 adult, $8 child, $10 senior, free age 2 and under and members. Butterfly Pavilion, Westminster. butterflies.org

Carousel of Happiness

Hudson Gardens

Ancient relics and natural wonders are on display again for DMNS visitors.

Fri, Sat, and Sun, 10am-6pm. This participatory piece of folk art in Nederland is a nonprofit wonder of whimsy with hand-carved animals on a restored 1910 carousel. Nine visitors are allowed at one time, and all ages above 3 are required to wear masks. The Story Catcher recording booth will be accessible by appointment only. Puppet theater and party room are closed at this time. $2. Carousel of Happiness, Nederland. carouselofhappiness.org

flowers at both DBG locations. Patrons are asked to reserve tickets online, wear masks, social distance, and shop outdoors from the gift shop. Mordecai Children’s Garden at York Street and Deer Creek Discovery Children’s Play Area at Chatfield Farms remain closed. $15 adult, $11.50 senior, $11 child and students, free for members. Denver Botanic Gardens, Denver and Jefferson County. botanicgardens.org

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

visitors back and taking precautions for social distancing and disinfecting, as well as altering exhibit interaction to keep visitors safe. Patrons, wearing face masks, will be admitted every 20 minutes beginning at the top of each hour. $18.95 adult, $13.95 youth, $15.95 seniors, free for members. Purchase tickets online. Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver. dmns.org

Be among the first to see the new Water’s Edge exhibit. Limited timed e-ticket admissions are available through July 4 and require a reservation. Watch the zoo’s website and social media details for further opening details. $19.75 adult, $14.75 child, $17.75 senior, $0.75 ages 2 and under, free for members. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, Colorado Springs. cmzoo.org

Colorado Railroad Museum Hop on the tracks for another roll through this Golden attraction. With new safety measures including prepurchased tickets, required masks, closures on Mondays, and increased cleaning, patrons can feel safe while supporting the museum. $10 adults, $5 ages 2-17, $8 seniors, free for members and active-duty military. Colorado Railroad Museum, Golden. coloradorailroadmuseum.org

Denver Botanic Gardens Wander through mazes of plants and

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

Denver Museum of Nature & Science DMNS is welcoming

Denver Zoo Say hello to furry, feathered, and otherwise-textured friends you’ve been missing at the Denver Zoo. Be sure to snag a ticket online, wear a mask (if over age 3), social distance, and follow the one-way path for all patrons’ safety. Check out the Nature Connects, Art with Lego Bricks exhibit July 17 through Oct. 31. Find more information about cleaning and health procedures online. $20 adult, $17 senior, $14 child, free age 2 and under. $3-$15. Denver Zoo, Denver. denverzoo.org Dinosaur Ridge Roam the ridge, learn, and enjoy this National Natural Landmark once again with the park’s

new safety guidelines including private and audio tours, mask wearing indoors, and limited capacity summer camps and birthday parties. $3-$15 depending on activity. Dinosaur Ridge, Morrison. dinoridge.org

Denver Firefighters Museum Book a reservation online for your family to spend an hour in the museum. Masks are required at all times (age 3 and up). Check back for details about possible mid-to-late-August summer camps. $9 adults, $8 students/seniors, $6 juniors (2-12), free kids 2 and under and members. Denver Firefighters Museum, Denver. denverfirefightersmuseum.org

Four Mile Historic Park This community favorite and throwback in time opens its gates with new summer hours Fri-Sun, 10am-4pm, and special hours reserved for high-risk populations on Fri, 10am-noon. Small groups with timed tickets are invited to once again stroll the grounds, visit the animals, have a picnic, and enjoy the outdoors while maintaining adherence to the state public health guidelines. $5 adults, $4 seniors and military, $3 youth, free age 6 and under and members. Four Mile Historic Park, Denver. fourmilepark.org

History Colorado All eight of History Colorado’s museums across the state are reopening for in-person visits along with continued online events and resources. History Colorado Center opens with exhibits about John Denver, Hecho en Colorado (Made in Colorado), 100 Years of Negro League Baseball, and more. Mondays this summer,

Stroll through the garden exhibits and walking trails from sunrise to sunset each day, just like good old times. Distancing and mask wearing is strongly advised. Grab a cup of something good or a to-go treat from Nixon’s Coffeehouse in the northwest corner of the Gardens on the Mary Carter Greeenway Trail. Welcome center and gift shop remain closed. Hudson Gardens & Event Center, Littleton. hudsongardens.org

Museo de las Americas The long-awaited Rhythm & Ritual: Music of the Ancient Americas exhibit opened to the public June 19 with advance ticket sales and health guidelines for gallery-goers. This unique exhibit is a hybrid of in-person museum experiences and digital engagement opportunities on social media @MuseoDenver. $8. Museo de las Americas, Denver. museo.org

The Gardens on Spring Creek The Gardens are re-opened with capped numbers, timed entry, pre-purchased tickets, and online member reservations. Arrive up to 30 minutes after your ticket time to limit crowding at the entrance. All visitors are required to follow City of Fort Collins mask protocols and practice social distancing. $11 adult, $9 senior and military, $8 child and student. The Gardens on Spring Creek, Fort Collins fcgov.com/gardens

Wild Animal Sanctuary Visit the home of more than 550 rescued lions, tigers, bears, wolves, and other animals enjoying some R&R on this 10,473-acre facility. Walk the elevated walkways to get a close look and learn more about the rehabilitation efforts. All visitors must wear masks and follow distancing rules. $30 adult, $15 child, free seniors and ages 2 and under. The Wild Animal Sanctuary, Keenesburg wildanimalsanctuary.org

Denver Museum of Nature and Science: Evan Semón

Now Open


Calendar | July

Home Theater

Ongoing Events Aurora Public Library Pop-Up at Stanley Marketplace Fri, 11am-1pm. Bookworms, get your fill at this pop-up program every Friday in the Community Area at Stanley Marketplace. Sign up for a library card and learn more about year-round library programming while picking up some good reads. Masks required. Stanley Marketplace, Denver. facebook. com/events/2601062726886729 VIRTUAL Art Rebels Club

Thu, 12:30–2:30pm. Spend some time online with Clyfford Still Museum educators to learn about revolutionary kids, artists, musicians, and writers in this new program series. Participate in movement activities and games, and hang out and make art with other kids. The club culminates on July 30 with a showcase for everyone to share their art with the world. Grades 4th-6th. clyffordstillmuseum.org

Color Field Installation

Father and daughter: Getty Images. Dancers: Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance.

Through September. City Park attracts many families for contented walks, picnics, bike rides, and trips to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. Now a piece of the large park that went underutilized, according to

artists Sarah and Joshua Palmeri, features an immersive 3D painting using colorful stakes. City Park, Denver. colorfielddenver.com

Crested Butte Wildflower Festival July 10-19, 9am-8pm. Fresh air and fantastic florals await at this year’s festival, which includes hikes, art/ photography classes, educational workshops, and birdwatching. Participants for each activity will be limited. Register for events online. Prices vary. Crested Butte. crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.org VIRTUAL mySummer

Through July. Anythink Libraries’ annual summer program for all ages returns with new opportunities to Read, Think, and Do. Participants will be mailed a journal to capture ideas, doodles, and events through the summer. They’ll also be able to join Anythink staff for weekly videos with prompts to write, draw, and think critically. anythinklibraries.org

Sloan’s Lake Farm & Flea Fri, 3-8pm. Shop for locally and sustainably grown produce, farmed and fished foods, grocery items,

and baked goods at this weekly Friday farmers market. If shopping in person: wear a mask, no more than two people per party, follow one-way traffic flow, use hand-washing stations, leave the dog at home, and stay home if you feel sick. Card payments preferred, cash is accepted. Curbside ordering available at denverbazaar.com. Sloan Lake neighborhood, Denver. eventbrite.com/ event/106996477344 VIRTUAL Storytime with Bookbar Mon-Fri, times

vary. Join Bookbar’s Ms. Marilyn and Ms. Carly, and special guests, for storytime every day. Sign up by email: marilyn@bookbardenver.com. bookbardenver.com

Union Station Farmers Market Sat, 9am-2pm. Find fresh, healthy, locally grown and locally produced food every Saturday outside Denver’s Union Station. In-person shoppers must limit to 1 to 2 people per party, wear a mask, use the handwashing and sanitizing stations. Online ordering and pickup is also available. See website for more details. Union Station, Denver. bcfm.org VIRTUAL Watch Me Read, Watch Me Succeed Literacy Bootcamp July 16-30.

Black Child Development InstituteDenver and Project Proud Fatherhood present this annual Bootcamp. This year’s virtual session’s theme is Harlem Renaissance, a celebration of black culture and history. Activities include literacy, art, STEAM, music, and holistic medicine. Supplies pick-up starting July 9. Open to African American children ages 3-8. Register online. facebook.com/BCDIDenver VIRTUAL Yoga for Kids with

WOW! Children’s Museum Tue, 4-4:30pm. Join WOW! Children’s Museum online for an encouraging beginner level yoga class for kids of all ages. Learn basic poses to create healthy energy and a physical challenge. Parents are welcome. $10, free for members. wowchildrensmuseum.org

Watch Ratcracker by Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance and others online. VIRTUAL Cleo Parker Robinson’s Cyber Dance 2020 Join daily drop-in virtual

classes for dancers of all ages and experience. Classes include children’s open level Hip-Hop, Intro Tap, Zumba, and more. $10 per household. cleoparkerdance.org VIRTUAL Colorado Music Festival Through July 30, times

vary. The beloved classical music festival hosted in Boulder shifted to a virtual experience this year, including on-demand videos of performances from Colorado Music Festival Orchestra members. Young musicians, grades nine and up, can learn from festival director Peter Oundjian and other professionals through a fourday online seminar. High school and college age musicians can register for individual sessions or a full seminar online. coloradomusicfestival.org VIRTUAL Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance Performances

Join the company’s newsletters to receive access to Vimeo pre-recorded performances including Comic Book Heroes and more. Once you have the video link and password, it won’t expire. frequentflyers.org VIRTUAL Historias Bilingües Para Niños: Bilingual Stories for Kids

Fri through Aug. 28, 11-11:30am. Muévete, usa tu imaginación y contar una nueva historia cada semana en Inglés y Español con Sra. Jeli a la FISH y Sra. Felicia a la BackStory. Get moving, use your imagination, and tell a new silly story every week in English and Spanish with Ms. Jeli from FISH and Mrs. Felicia from BackStory! 3-7 años/ years. backstorytheatre.org

July 2020 | Colorado Parent

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Roundup

Mountain bikers: Getty Images.

Mountain Biking Hot Spots for Young Riders Beginner to advanced, these trails help kids get into the flow. By Anna Sutterer

T

ree-lined rides in the Rockies are great adventures, but the Denver metro area also has plenty of parks for kids looking to build skills on their mountain bikes. Best practices at these recreation areas include parent supervision for riders under 12, wearing face coverings, keeping groups below 10 people, not sharing equipment, and staying home if you’re sick. Grab some safety gear and get out there!

into separate beginner, intermediate, and advanced trails. Riders meet back at the climbing trail to give it all another go. Join the Golden Bike Park Group on Facebook for more information. cityofgolden.net

VALMONT BIKE PARK, BOULDER This free park is a fam favorite just off Foothills Parkway east of central Boulder. With 42 acres, the park includes flatter trail routes and slope and jump features—there’s a riding style for everybody. Families often post up with snacks between runs, and dogs are welcome in the nearby dog park. Follow the park’s Facebook and Twitter feeds, which are regularly

RUBY HILL BIKE PARK, DENVER Open daily from sunrise to sunset, this 7.5-acre park is complete with two slopestyle courses, dirt jumps, skills course, small jump track, pump track, and a loop track encompassing the lot. Beginners can ride slopestyle and dirt jumps of varying difficulties, and pro-level riders can take advantage of expert slopestyle lines. Pump tracks provide opportunities for tots with pedal-less

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Colorado Parent | July 2020

updated with trail conditions and weather. bouldercolorado.gov GOLDEN BIKE PARK, GOLDEN Located in Tony Grampsas Park, this downhill flow trail includes widened jumps, small and large jumps, and “rollable options” for each feature providing riders opportunities to bail if they feel uncomfortable. The trail also splits around the midway point

bicycles to seasoned adults. Follow @DenverBikeParks on Twitter for current information. denvergov.org BARNUM BIKE PARK, DENVER At the intersection of West Sixth Avenue and Federal Boulevard sits the Trestle Bike Skills Course, designed by pro rider John Cowan and Gravity Logic (the Canadian company that also constructed the award-winning Trestle Bike Park in Winter Park). It offers multiple slope lines for different skill levels and a pump track. Riders will feel like they’re racing right over the cars on the highways. Follow @DenverBikeParks on Twitter for current information. denvergov.org


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