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T H E

B E S T

Modernism Week is Here

O F

C O L O R A D O

Confetti

Event Awards

L I V I N G

Shop Local

Cherry Creek North

O COLORAD expression BACK TO

SCHOOL AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 FOUR DOLLARS


A N O T H E R

S U C C E S S F U L

P A R T N E R S H I P

Fred Vierra and Jay Davidson, CEO, First American State Bank

Safe and Sound Banking, the foundation of a successful partnership. “The safety and security of my financial resources are very important to me – First American State Bank provides that.” – Fred Vierra Fred Vierra symbolizes the consummate businessman. He has served on numerous boards including Turner Broadcasting and Discovery Channel, and is a veteran executive with Coors and TCI. Fred knows business.

www.fasbank.com • 303.694.6464


CONTENTS

In this Issue

36

Out & About 8 Shot in the Dark

See photos from the latest nonprofit fundraisers around town.

22 Social Calendar By Elizabeth Jones

46

Sip & Savor 44 Kenichi By Lisa Perry

An Aspen staple since 1991, this long-time sushi-plus favorite shows its strength with edgy options, stylish digs, all-inclusive energy and giving back.

These upcoming events raise funds to support local nonprofit and charity organizations.

46

32

By Joy Lawrance

Bits & Pieces By Joy Lawrance

Find out about RiNo’s new music venue the Mission Ballroom, Denver Zoo’s latest fundraising events, the National Sheepdog Finals and more.

Centennial Celebrations The Junior League of Denver celebrates 100 years with a new cookbook, the sixth in the series, providing readers with recipes for every occasion.

50

Features 50

The Confetti Awards Event By Lisa Buscietta

Celebrate the talented event industry professionals across Colorado.

74 Back to School Fashion

Hit the halls in style in these fun, fashionable looks.

90 Denver Modernism Week By Marge D. Hansen

More than a flashback to a trend popular at an earlier time, mid-century modern design is here to stay.

36 Hot Tickets By Elizabeth Jones

Check out our calendar of great events in town and across the state that you won’t want to miss.

Cover

Photography: Elizabeth Hamilton

Facebook

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instagram.com/coloradoexpression COLORADO EXPRESSION (ISSN # 1070-5066) is published bi-monthly by New West Publishing Inc., 3600 S. Beeler St., Ste. 100, Denver, Colorado 80237, Elizabeth Hamilton, owner, 303-694-1289; fax: 303-694-6939; e-mail: info@coloradoexpression.com; website: coloradoexpression.com. Annual one-year subscription rate is $22.00, cover price is $4.00. Periodicals postage is paid at Denver, Colorado and additional entries. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Colorado Expression, c/o New West Publishing, 3600 S. Beeler St., Ste. 100, Denver, Colorado 80237. Copyright© 2019, New West Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

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CONTENTS

In this Issue 82 Getaways By Lindsay Mitchell

Discover the wonders of nature across the globe on one of the many Wildland Trekking customized hiking tours.

86 Enterprise By Danielle Yuthas

Family-held Perry & Co. Realtors specializes in helping residents and newcomers to Colorado find a home and community.

88 Body & Soul By Joanne Davidson 82

Departments 26

96 Art & Design

Public Persona

By Colleen Smith

By Scott S. Evans

For art collectors at any age or stage, curator and consultant Ann Benson Reidy shares her passion for having art in our environs.

Major League Lacrosse player and coach John Grant Jr. comes out of retirement to rejoin the Denver Outlaws.

28

Black Girls Hike has seen membership soar as participants find both physical and spiritual benefits.

88

Nonprofit Profile

100 Public Spaces

By Joanne Davidson

By Colleen Smith

Girls on the Run combines physical activity with lessons to boost emotional and social growth.

Dig Studio excavates deep meaning of how people relate to nature and each other through the studio’s private and public landscape architecture projects.

72 Art Scene By Elizabeth Kosar

Saks Galleries continues its tradition of representing high-quality artists.

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78

Facebook

Great Escapes By Irene Middleman Thomas

facebook.com/coloradoexpression

Waltzing down the Danube with Viking—an invigorating blend of culture and cuisine.

Twitter

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instagram.com/coloradoexpression

Pinterest 100

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From the Publisher

COLORADO expression OWNER/PUBLISHER

Elizabeth Hamilton MANAGING EDITOR

Elizabeth Jones CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Suzanne S. Brown OPERATIONS DIRECTOR

Lisa Buscietta DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Connie Robertson Andrea Späth PHOTOGRAPHY

Pamela Cress Caitlin Roth DIGITAL/SOCIAL MEDIA

Misti Mills CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Lisa Buscietta Joanne Davidson Scott S. Evans Joy Lawrance Marge D. Hansen Elizabeth Kosar Lindsay Mitchell Lisa Perry Colleen Smith Irene Middleman Thomas Danielle Yuthas

The Bittersweet End of Summer We glance back at the long hot summer as a few crisp mornings conjure memories of back-to-school and the excitement of the unexpected

M

uch of who I am was shaped by my time at school, so I’m happy to stir up nostalgia and feature my alma mater, Kent Denver, as the perfect setting for the back-to-school fashion story. Another childhood flashback is Colorado Cache open on the kitchen counter, my mom making notes in the margins as she prepared a meal out of the cookbook. “Yum, good, easy,” were her scribbles that I cherish as I make the same recipes. With that memory tucked away, it’s a pleasure to showcase the new Junior League of Denver cookbook, Centennial Celebrations. • Another nod to the past, that is also so today, is Denver Modernism Week. The beautiful midcentury homes, found in neighborhoods throughout the Denver metro area, are treasures to be explored. • Here at Colorado Expression we love to support local companies that make our cities and state distinctive. With that in mind, we encourage you to visit the businesses highlighted in the special Cherry Creek North section. What a joy to eat, drink and shop your way through CCN on a lazy summer day. That sounds so good to me, followed by a backyard barbecue, cooking up something yummy out of my new cookbook. I know exactly what I’m doing this weekend! I hope you find inspiration on these pages to spur you on to do something extraordinary to experience the best of Colorado. Enjoy!

CONTRIBUTORS

Chantal Henderson Shane Hendryson

Elizabeth Hamilton President and publisher, New West Publishing

Michael Moore ADVERTISING AND SALES

sales@coloradoexpression.com INQUIRIES AND SUBMISSIONS

info@coloradoexpression.com

FIND THE VERY BEST OF COLORADO Stay in the know so you can plan your next outing with our monthly newsletter. Sign up at coloradoexpression.com. And for the latest happenings around our state, follow us on Facebook (@ColoradoExpression), Instagram (@coloradoexpression) and Twitter (@ColoExpression). AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADO EXPRESSION 5


A

MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY


SHOT IN THE DARK

All for a Good Cause Confetti Awards Celebration The Confetti Awards Celebration, held at BMW Denver Downtown, benefited the Children’s Diabetes Foundation and various other local nonprofits. Photography by Caitlin Roth

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1 Paige Cosmas, Maria Shannon, Taryn Hohman 2 Amy Figge, Merritt Grothe, Meredith Calkins 3 Savannah Viereck, Isabel Macias 4 Shelby Anderson, Colbert Calen, Anthony and April Lambatos, Kari Dismuke 5 Carrie Alleman, Micah D’Hondt and Kelli Kindel, 6 Chris Comer, Susan Dearingbond, John Bourne 7 Maria Shannon, Ashtyn Makonese

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8 Mark Lewis, Chantal Henderson 9 Ashley and Phil Summers 10 Keith Hemeon, Elizabeth Restauri 11 Hilary Macarthur, Michelle Gillette, Alexis Kontgis 12 Lauri Sroczynski, Mike Thonus 13 Ashley Carney, Andrea Klodetski 14 Jerry Georgeff, Kim Gorgens 15 Syd Sexton, Leorah Young 16 Jody and Zach Zorn 17 Jerry Barnett, Connie Robertson 18 Terrance and Elsa Toomey 19 Adrienne Gardner, Kelly Knopp, Brynn Swanson 20 Walli Richardson, Linda Bluhm 21 Kacey Bingham, Brittany Bowlen 22 Lindsey Dienstbach, Meredith Olson

More photos for these events: coloradoexpression.com AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM

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SHOT IN THE DARK

A Taste of Camp Held at the Seawell Ballroom, A Taste of Camp benefited the Roundup River Ranch. Photography by Caitlin Roth

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1 Rabin Walters, Donavon and Bailey Suman, Laura Walters, Stephanie Hearn 2 Charlotte and Rob Gillespie 3 Frank Haluska, Lia Gore, committee/founding board member 4 Darren and Morgan Everett 5 Tom and Jennifer Darr 6 Lindsey Blacker, Annie Brouwer 7 Rick and Jennifer Geisman 8 Will Cudahy, Jordan and David Feiner, Megan Coon 9 Ruth Johnson, CEO/president Roundup River Ranch; Clea Newman-Soderlund, serious fun ambassador 10 Bruce and Bev Wagner, committee/Super Hero Award nominees 11 Ruth Johnson, Kris Sable 12 Brooke and Nick Sikonski

More photos for these events: coloradoexpression.com 10

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Jim Rhye, 720.436.9864

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Mary Jones, 303.886.2323

Cherry Hills Village

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Observatory Park • Denver

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2160 South Saint Paul Street • $1,600,000

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All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed and should be independently verified. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) nor Kentwood Real Estate shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless.


SHOT IN THE DARK

Children’s Museum 46th Birthday Bash: High Seas Soiree The High Seas Soiree, Children’s Museum 46th Birthday Bash, was held at and benefited the Children’s Museum of Denver at Marsico Campus. Photography by Pamela Cress

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1 Kynnie Martin, board member; Joel Martin, Mike Yankovich, CEO/president Children’s Museum; Cynthia Pesantez, board member 2 Elaine Weng, board vice chair; Gretchen Kerr, COO Children’s Museum; Melissa Little, committee member; Ty Little 3 Mary McGrath, Cheryl Smith, committee members; Libby Perkins, co-chair 4 Rachael and Jared Harding 5 Sarah Mohapp, committee member; Michael Mohapp 6 Zoe Ocampo, Kimber Kuhl 7 Nick Labor, Jennifer Alldredge 8 Libby Perkins, Cissie Busch, event chairs 9 Derek Conn, Megan Conn, committee member; Laura Koelbel, committee member; Walt Koelbel 10 Tom Fitzgerald, Jamie Fitzgerald, committee member 11 Gina Castagnozzi, Betsy Wagner, board chair; Melissa Little, committee member 12 Jon Rankin, Ashleigh Rankin, committee member 13 Megan Whelan, committee member; Matt Whelan

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SHOT IN THE DARK

Connect Now—It’s Never Too Late The International Women’s event Connect Now—It’s Never Too Late was held at the Seawell Ballroom to benefit INTL (It’s Never Too Late). Photography by Pamela Cress

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1 Jaylene Smith, Deborah Kerrigan, Jessica Pascual 2 Caitlyn Clark, Emily Rettig, Rebecca Kanov 3 Dana Parks, Elana Hirschfeld, Maia Sidon 4 Peggy Mayer, Robyn Naiman 5 Jane Bundy, Barbara Wilkins 6 Ashley Earls, Mary Taylor 7 Leslie Heins, event coordinator/chair; Margit Cox Henderson, guest speaker; Lisa Cook, event coordinator/chair

THE WAIT IS OVER!

Celebrate the Junior League of Denver’s 100th anniversary JUNIOR LEAGUE OF with our newest cookbook, DENVER

Centennial

Celebrations!

Centennial Celebrations is a journey of the senses featuring beautiful photography of fabulous gatherings at iconic Denver locations. The creative menus, recipes, and entertaining tips will inspire you to cook, connect, and celebrate… Colorado style! Centennial Celebrations, along with our other five award-winning cookbooks, are available for purchase at Barnes & Noble, Tattered Cover Book Store, Peppercorn, and other local book retailers. Proceeds from sales support our mission and community focus.

Learn more at JLD.org.

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM

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SHOT IN THE DARK

Waterloo, A Jubilee Celebrating the legacy of Tweet Kimball, Waterloo, A Jubilee was held at and benefited Cherokee Ranch & Castle Foundation. Photography by Pamela Cress

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1 Steven Wiskow, James Holmes, executive director CRCF 2 Destry and Marilyn Duckett, Jill Freeman, Shannon McQueen 3 Jeff and Alison Nelligan 4 John Lake, Meg Anderson, co-chairs of the CRCF Heritage Committee 5 Mike and Kristiana Vicchy 6 Jerry Georgeff, Kim Gorgens 7 Birdie and Al Lopez, Glenn Summers 8 Dana Keller, Donna Smith 9 Fritzi Riahi, James Holmes, executive director CRCF; Wendy Holmes 10 Sam Mitchell, Mary Ewing 11 Merlin Klotz, Lora Thomas, Paul and Bonnie Grenney 12 Peter and Geri Cline

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SHOT IN THE DARK

Women with Hattitude Held at the Seawell Ballroom, Women with Hattitude benefited the Denver Center for the Performing Arts. Photography by Pamela Cress

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1 Jada Fields, Marco Fields 2 Kevin Copenhaver, Neyla Pekarek 3 Marce Olsen, Keriann Davis, Wendy Wilbert, Kristen Burden 4 Elissa McClinon, Lovie Cunningham, Keisha Kayhill 5 Cindy Kelly, Carol Vasina, Pam Sletten, event co-chair 6 Sierra Wonderlynd, Stephinity Salazar

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SHOT IN THE DARK

Bow Wow Film Festival Held at the Highlands Church North Denver, the Bow Wow Film Festival benefited the Colorado Pet Pantry. Photography by Caitlin Roth

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1 Jude Herr, Jennifer Martin, Sam Kimpton 2 Katie Geilenkirchen, Jennifer Krajicek 3 Michelle Olmsted, Sonny Chan 4 Kyle and Ashleigh Valorz 5 Jeannine Spicer, June Eshelman 6 Tina Johnson, CJ Patton

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SHOT IN THE DARK

Museum After Dark The annual Museum After Dark gala was held at and benefited the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. Photography by Caitlin Roth

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1 Peter Levisay, Parsa Heydarpour, Leah Gidwani, John and Katie Levisay, event co-chairs 2 Brenda and Jeff Vaden 3 Hal Logan, Kurt and Tammy VerCauteren, Ann Logan 4 Amani Ali, Gloria Neal, Derek Okubo 5 Blair Richardson, Wes Brown, Hal Logan 6 Jena Hausmann, Leo Tilman, George Sparks, Shandra Wilson

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM

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SHOT IN THE DARK

Day of Rock

Life of the Party

Denver’s Day of Rock was held on the 16th Street Mall to benefit Amp the Cause. Photography by Pamela Cress

SINCE 1995

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THEPERFECTPETAL.COM

MOTHER’S DAY MAY 12TH

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1 Band Whitacre 2 Juan Fernandez, Maria Ferman 3 Sheridan Couture, Mitch Rivard, Travis Justis 4 Jacob Garcia, Christina Dunn 5 Walt and Christie Isenberg, founders Amp the Cause 6 Jeremy and Rebekah Watada, Amy and Larry Kirshenbaum 7 Elena and Chris Dunne, Tyler Rigg, Sarah Jasso 8 Aisbell Gonzalez, Michael Dunn

More photos for these events: coloradoexpression.com 20

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

8


To see a fish swim, go to the aquarium.

D E N V E R • C H E R RY C R E E K • G R E E N WO O D V I L L AG E • C H E R RY H I L L S • CA ST L E R O C K • CA ST L E P I N E S

To see a house sell, go to Rike & Jonathan. RIKE PALESE 303-522-5550 rpalese@classicnhs.com

JONATHAN KEILER 303-619-2917 jkeiler@classicnhs.com visit our website at rikejon.com


SOCIAL CALENDAR

Colorado’s Social Scene By Elizabeth Jones

23

At the Denver Botanic Gardens Fête des Fleurs gala, enjoy cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, an elegant seated dinner and dancing to live music. 720-865-3500 • botanicgardens.org 24

August 2

Held at Buttermilk Mountain, ArtCrush is Aspen’s premier summer event benefiting the Aspen Art Museum. 970-925-8050 • aspenartmuseum.org

The Trailblazer Challenge is a hike catered to all levels. Challenge yourself while supporting MakeA-Wish Colorado. 303-750-9474 • colorado.wish.org 10

3

Cooking Light and Health magazines return for the Fit Foodie Festival & 5K at Westminster City Park to benefit No Kid Hungry. fitfoodierun.com/denver-colorado 3

The Run for the Ring 5K and Kids Fun Run on the Anschutz Medical Campus benefits the Children’s Diabetes Foundation. 303-863-1200 • childrensdiabetesfoundation.org 3

Urban Nights Ignite The Night—Runway for a Reason at the EXDO Event Center benefits Urban Peak. 303-974-2900 • urbannightsdenver.org 7

The Motorized Madness Media Challenge is a morning of remote control car fun at Children’s Hospital Colorado and the race against pediatric cancer. 303-758-2130 • morganadamsconcours.org 10

Fill your senses at the ninth annual A Grateful Harvest; wine, dine and be inspired, proceeds benefit Roundup River Ranch in Gypsum, CO. 970-524-2267 • agratefulharvest.com

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Get glammed up for The Old Hollywood Gala, featuring honorary chair Richard Dreyfuss, at the Seawell Ballroom benefiting Shining Stars Foundation. 970-726-8009 • shiningstarsfoundation.org 10-11

Join The Morgan Adams Foundation and Rocky Mountain Vintage Racing at High Plains Raceway for the ninth annual Race Against Kids’ Cancer. 303-758-2130 • morganadamsconcours.org 17

The 18th annual Lulu’s BBQ at the Dumb Friends League Harmony Equine Center will feature a Grammy award-winning band to benefit Dumb Friends League. 720-241-7123 • ddfl.org 17

Save the date for the ninth annual 5K Pajama Jog at City Park to benefit Sleep Tight Colorado. 720-295-9276 • sleeptightcolorado.org 18

The annual Race For Research 5K run/ walk at Washington Park raises funds for the Cancer League of Colorado. race4research.com

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Held at the Seawell Ballroom, The Belinda Carlisle Benefit Concert 2019 will raise funds for the CeDAR Scholarship Fund. 720-848-3000 • cedarcolorado.org 24

The Morgan Adams Concours d’Elegance is an exclusive, exhilarating aircraft, automobile and motorcycle event to benefit pediatric cancer. 303-758-2130 • morganadamsconcours.org 26

The 15th annual Colorado Sports Hall of Fame Golf Classic at The Broadmoor Golf Club benefits the Hall of Fame. 720-258-3536 • coloradosports.org

September 5-7

At Over the Edge, rappel 38 stories at the Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center to benefit the Cancer League of Colorado. denverovertheedge.com 6

Havana Nights, an evening with authentic Cuban flair held at Worldwide Vintage Autos, benefits the Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center. 303-692-1165 • childlawcenter.org 7

Fizz & Feathers, 5280 AIR Society’s signature event, will be held at Ironworks to benefit Morgridge Academy for Chronically Ill Children. 877-225-5654 • nationaljewish.org


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SOCIAL CALENDAR

19

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The Zarlengo Foundation presents Larry the Cable Guy for the annual Evening of Comedy at the Bellco Theatre. 303-357-5633 • zarlengofoundation.org 12

Denver Children’s Home 18th Annual Gala at the Seawell Ballroom is a lively evening featuring cocktails, dinner and more than 100 auction items. 720-881-3350 • denverchildrenshome.org 12

A Force of Nature Gala, an inaugural fundraiser held at and benefiting the Denver Zoo, will honor longtime supporters Susan and Eddie Robinson. 720-337-1400 • denverzoo.org 12

Gala on the Bridge, on the historic 19th Street pedestrian bridge in downtown Denver, benefits The Greenway Foundation. 303-455-7109 • thegreenwayfoundation.org 13

The 10th Annual Flight to Luxury at Centennial Airport benefits PIVOT, founded by John Elway, Larry Mueller and George Solich to help Colorado’s NextGen succeed. 720-708-2200 • pivotdenver.org 14

Wine, Stein & Dine at The Cable Center benefits youth in Denver’s public housing neighborhoods through The Bridge Project. 303-871-2651 • denverbridgeproject.org 14

Rocky Mountain MS Center Gala at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel raises funds for individuals and their families living with MS and related neurological diseases. 303-788-4030 • mscenter.org

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Held at Ellie Caulkins Opera House, The Succeeds Prize is a collaborative effort between 9NEWS, Colorado Succeeds and mindSpark Learning that recognizes Colorado’s top performing schools and educators. coloradosucceeds.org 19

Fill a Plate for Hunger, held at the Denver Botanic Gardens, is an evening of fun and inspiration to benefit We Don’t Waste. 720-443-6113 • wedontwaste.org 21

Sunset in the Country will be held at the J-5 Equestrian Center to benefit the Anchor Center for Blind Children. 303-377-9732 • anchorcenter.org 24

Celebrity Waiter at Ocean Prime on Larimer Square is a fun way to support the mission of Amp the Cause. 303-605-2885 • ampthecause.org 25

Denver Scholarship Foundation’s Annual Gala at the Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center supports DPS students. 303-951-4140 • denverscholarship.org 26

The fourth annual Art from the Heart held at the Children’s Museum of Denver will benefit Denver Children’s Advocacy Center. 303-825-3850 • denvercac.org 26

Building Futures at Mile High Station is the signature fundraising event for Mile High Youth Corps. 303-433-1206 • milehighyouthcorps.org 26

Hope for the Future will be held at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park raising

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

funds for most vulnerable individuals and families through Hope Communities. 303-860-7747 • hopecommunities.org 26

Light the Night Walk in Washington Park funds patient’s treatments through the Rocky Mountain Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 720-440-8620 • lightthenight.org 26

Save the date for The Women United Luncheon, featuring guest speaker Norah O’Donnell, host of CBS “Evening News,” to benefit Mile High United Way. Location TBA. 303-433-8383 • unitedwaydenver.org 28

This year’s Booklover’s Ball “Bard at the Ball,” held at and benefiting the Denver Public Library, will be a celebration of the legacy and works of William Shakespeare. 720-865-2050 • dplfriends.org 28

The 37th annual Tribute Gala at the Hyatt Regency at Colorado Convention Center benefits Mental Health Colorado. 720-208-2220 • mentalhealthcolorado.org 28

The Warren Village Fall Gala—Taking Flight will be held at The Ritz-Carlton, Denver to benefit Warren Village. 303-321-2345 • warrenvillage.org 29

The Komen Colorado More Than Pink Walk at the Auraria Campus will benefit Susan G. Koman Colorado. 303-744-2088 • info-komen.org

Social Calendar covers formal fundraising events for nonprofit organizations throughout Colorado. If you wish to have an event listed, please contact Colorado Expression at 303-694-1289, or email info@coloradoexpression.com.


PUBLIC PERSONA

What surprises people about you? Probably how shy I am. Borderline deathly afraid of meeting new people. How do people describe you? Clown. I always show that I am having a blast. Who do you most admire? I grew up idolizing the Gait brothers and Wayne Gretzky. I’m a Canadian after all. Favorite Denver metro restaurant? Los Dos Potrillos. What was the last great book you read?

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John Grant Jr.

Photo: Pretty Instant

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JOHN GRANT JR. IS CURRENTLY offensive coordinator and player for the Denver Outlaws and the assistant coach of the United States Air Force Academy men’s lacrosse team. He has also been the MVP forward for the Colorado Mammoth, and previously won a World Championship for the Denver Outlaws. His jersey hangs in three stadiums … and counting. He also won two state championships as the head coach at Valor Christian High School. Simply put, Grant is widely considered the GOAT. As in Greatest of All Time. On the field, he is known for his creativity in scoring goals. He perfected the behind-the-back, between-the-legs, one-hander shots watching his dad play in Canada and for the professional team in Philadelphia. Hours spent picking up loosies (translation: ground balls) at the local barn (translation: iceless concrete indoor hockey rink) in Peterborough, Ontario, taught him the fundamentals of the Creator’s Game. But despite being the GOAT, Grant may have left his most indelible mark on thousands of Colorado boys and girls, men and women, by nurturing the love of the game in everyone he encounters.

MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE PLAYER AND COACH COMES OUT OF RETIREMENT TO REJOIN THE DENVER OUTLAWS By Scott S. Evans Name: John Grant Jr. Age: 44 Marital status: Married to Raygen Children: Gabrayel, 7 Career: Assistant coach and player, Denver Outlaws; assistant men’s lacrosse coach, U.S. Air Force Academy Hometown: Peterborough, Ontario, Canada Home today: Highlands Ranch Website: boltslax.com

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019


GET TO KNOW COLORADO’S TOP PERSONALITIES

The Energy Bus: 10 Rules to Fuel Your Life, Work and Team with Positive Energy by Jon Gordon. It really changed my life and came at the right time for me.

What piece of advice do you give to college athletes today? Put as much or more effort into your academics as you do into the athletics or social aspects of school. .

What is one thing that you absolutely can’t live without? My family. Talking to my girls whether I’m home or on the road.

What was the hardest part about being a student athlete at the University of Delaware? Prioritizing my time. Athletes don’t have the same experience as most students and have to sacrifice and plan because it takes up so much time.

What was your last major purchase? My home in Highlands Ranch. What are your hobbies? Golf and playing with my daughter. What is your most memorable Colorado experience? The 2014 Outlaws championship. It was great helping my home team win their first championship. It was my giveback to the community that embraced us. What one word describes Coloradans to you? Free-spirited. What is your favorite spot in Colorado to visit? Red Rocks. Are you involved with any charities? Denver City Lax, Make-A-Wish Foundation. What took you down this career path? I wanted to be better than my dad and beat all his accolades. That propelled me at a young age. Once I realized that I could do that, it was just a desire to be the best that I could be. Once I won a bunch of trophies, it became about being the best teammate that I could be. Now, I’m really focused on being the best coach that I can be. Like a lot of great athletes, college wasn’t particularly easy for you.

Were there any unique challenges being a native Canadian in the U.S. educational system? Not really. It was more the SAT. There were things on there that I had never even heard of. I loved the college experience. In some ways, you get even more attention. What is your most memorable professional experience? My first championship in 2007 with Rochester. It’s still regarded as one of the best games ever played, and I had lost so many championships. It was a huge monkey off my back and I played it with a severely separated shoulder. It was one of the closest groups of guys I ever played with. [He was also the league MVP and championship game MVP that year.] Do you get any grief for being a Canadian national champion and being a coach at a United States military academy? They give me grief about Canada all the time. Now they don’t say much. I’m a proud American now. What’s the biggest difference between coaching at Valor and the Air Force Academy or the Outlaws? There are really pretty close. I spent a lot of time mentoring and teaching at Valor. With the Outlaws and at Air Force, I don’t get to see the guys as much outside of practice or games. I still see myself as a players’ coach

What unique challenges does coaching at a military academy pose? Bringing in Canadians. I’m attracted to a style of play that is really creative that Canadian box lacrosse fosters. But the growth of box lacrosse in America is helping. All of our players are committed to serving our country and that commitment carries over into serving our team. I’ve fallen in love with the place. What characteristics in your former coaches had the most impact on you? You learn from each coach something different. For example, I picked up passion from my dad. A lot of coaches are volunteers and they really teach and model dedication and sacrifice. How would you describe your coaching style? I’m a player’s coach. I love to both learn and teach. I keep getting better because I am around so many good teachers. I also understand now how my body language impacts my players. Where do you see yourself in ten years? Hopefully still here in Colorado coaching lacrosse. Hopefully putting my wife and daughter first more than I have been able to in the past. What is the best/worst thing about coaching with this article’s author? Giving up control is hard for me, but it was easy with you because of your obvious love of the game and the kids. Scott S. Evans is graduate of Dartmouth College and the University of Virginia School of Law and is a father of two, a business litigation attorney, writer and high school lacrosse coach living in Centennial. Scott has freelanced for various newspapers, magazines, journals and academic publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Military Law Review and the Manchester Union Leader.

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NONPROFIT PROFILE

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WHEN “MS. JONES,” A TEACHER AT a Denver-area middle school, noticed one of her pupils struggling to solve a math problem, she asked the young girl if she needed help. “No,” the student replied. “If I can run a 5K, I can figure it out.” The student, it turns out, was one of the 6,000 who participate annually in Girls on the Run of the Rockies, a nonprofit organization that over a 10-week period of twice-weekly, after-school sessions incorporates running with “dynamic, interactive lessons” to help elementary- and middle school-aged girls enhance their physical, emotional, social and spiritual well-being. In other words, to become joyful, healthy and confident—with the ability to look at both sides of a coin, to know that it’s OK to have an opinion different from another’s and to have the wherewithal to power through, or solve, a difficult problem. The organization is headquartered in Greenwood Village and is one of 225 chapters, or councils, of the Charlotte, N.C.-based Girls on the Run International. Since its start in 2005, it has served 35,000 girls from third through eighth grades. Founder and executive director Lisa Johnson started the nonprofit with 90 girls at four schools in the greater Denver area. Today there are teams at some 300 schools stretching from Fort Collins to Walsenburg. Girls on the Run of Western Colorado, with headquarters in Grand

The Details Girls on the Run of the Rockies Vision: (To build) a world where every girl knows and activates her limitless potential and is free to boldly pursue her dreams. 7000 E. Belleview Ave., Suite 130 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 720-879-2354 girlsontherunrockies.org

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Sprinting for More than the Finish Line

With Girls on the Run, the finish line is just the beginning

GIRLS ON THE RUN COMBINES PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WITH LESSONS TO BOOST EMOTIONAL AND SOCIAL GROWTH By Joanne Davidson . Photography by Katie Redfield

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AN INSIDE LOOK AT THE ACTIVITIES AND BENEFICIARIES OF LOCAL NONPROFITS

Junction, serves a territory including Western Colorado, Eastern Utah and Northern New Mexico. Researchers throughout the world have said it for decades: aerobic exercise such as running is a proven way to reduce stress, improve heart health and alleviate symptoms of depression. And the earlier one starts, the better. As Johnson points out, “A girl’s self-esteem starts to drop at age 10, so it’s important that we get to them before that. Even at 8 or 9 years old, the world is coming at them fast. Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, the number of television channels … all of that can make them feel like they’re missing out or not keeping up, which in turn can lead to depression or low self-esteem.” Coaches, who are carefully screened volunteers, act as mentors, letting the girls know that they do have a voice and if it can be heard it can make a difference, an impact, on the world. “They have the girls ask who am I as a person? What are my values and beliefs? How can I be a good friend and listener and how can I show gratitude?” The lessons are conveyed through games like this one: The coach will say “It’s important to never tell a lie,” and then the girls will run to signs that read “I agree,” “I disagree” and “Undecided” and tag their answer. Then they run back to the starting point and discuss why they chose the answer they did. Once, “All but one girl tagged the ‘I agree’ sign,” Johnson recalled. “Her rationale for choosing ‘I disagree’ was that if a robber broke into her home and her brother was hiding in another room, it was OK to lie to the robber and say he wasn’t home. “Her answer was not the same as everyone else’s, but it was important to let her know it was OK to have a different opinion, that she should be true to herself and not feel bad because she felt that way.”

Girls on the Run 5Ks are open to the community

When the girls run laps, coaches can send them on their way with a game called Fill in the Blank. “They’ll tell the girls to think of things like ‘When I’m happy, I ...’ and then fill in the blank.” “It’s amazing the things that come to you when you’re running,” Johnson said, adding that during her high school years she found she could write a whole term paper in her head while running. Sixty percent of the program’s participants are from low-income families. Those whose families are able to pay the $170 membership fee do so. Those who can’t afford the fee are eligible for a either a reduced rate or one of the $400,000 in scholarships awarded each year. Athletic abilities range from firsttime runners to those who, Johnson says, are “super-duper” active in sports. The weekly meetings begin with quiet time, where the girls enjoy a snack and fill their water bottles before going outside for the running-based activities. Each week the length of the laps they run increases, building up to the grand finale: a celebratory 5K run. “The one thing girls love is that GOTR activities are non-competi-

tive,” Johnson says. “We’re about setting your own goals and building on them.” Success is measured in the response from teachers and parents. “They tell us that behaviors improve, confidence increases and struggles become easier to work through. Christa, the mother of three Girls on the Run participants, expressed her gratitude in a note posted on the organization’s website. “I really love this program because it helps the girls realize you don’t have to be a supermodel to move your body and have a healthy relationship with your body. As my oldest enters 8th grade, I see how these lessons from GOTR have impacted her and her body image. Such valuable lessons for our girls.” In the end, Johnson says, it’s all about lighting a spark and keeping it lit. Joanne Davidson’s first exposure to Girls on the Run of the Rockies was when one of the teams met at Steck Elementary School, a block from her home in Denver’s Hilltop neighborhood. Her afternoon dog walking schedule seemed to coincide with the time the youngsters were doing warm-up activities on the playground and their happy laughter helped put a spring in her step.

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PERRY & CO. REALTORS, 5375 LANDMARK PLACE #104, GREENWOOD VILLAGE, CO 80111 • 303.399.7777 • PERRYANDCO.COM


BITS & PIECES

What’s Happening in the West

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Mission Ballroom Grand Opening DENVER TAKES ANOTHER LEAP forward in the live music scene as AEG Presents announces a trio of concerts to launch the opening of the highly anticipated Mission Ballroom. The Denver-based band The Lumineers officially open the venue on Aug. 7, Anastasio Band performs Aug. 9 and 10, and co-headliners Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals and Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue perform on Aug. 12. The Mission Ballroom opening is the culmination of years of planning

and effort by AEG Presents to bring Colorado a new live music experience. With state-of-the-art sound and lighting, the 60,000- square-foot concert space uses mobile stage technology and can accommodate 2,200 to 3,950 guests. The Mission Ballroom anchors North Wynkoop, a 14-acre mixed-use project located at the north end of River North. AEG Presents also introduces a groundbreaking ticketing program: Mission Fair Ticketing. missionballroom.com

“AFTER RECEIVING STRONG encouragement to share the details of what it felt, smelled and tasted like for me to experience chemotherapy and radiation, I decided to transform my journal into a memoirstyle book. My goal was to bring more attention to the often-overlooked long-term psychological impact of a traumatic health experience such as cancer.” These words from Diane M. Simard, author of “The Unlikely Gift of Breast Cancer,” offer clues to her journey with this disease. Simard is one of the inaugural “Top 100 National Women in Business to Watch” by bizwomen.com. An angel investor and blogger, she is the founder of the Center for Oncology Psychology Excellence at the University of Denver. She is also senior vice president of investor and media relations and member of the board of directors of Bye Aerospace. dianemsimard.com

Photo: Tommy Collier Productions

Rendering: Works Progress Architecture, LLP

By Joy Lawrance

August 7

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An Unlikely Gift

NATIONAL SHEEP DOG FINALS AT STRANG RANCH IN CARBONDALE

Photo: Kerri Black

If you’re an avid dog handler, dog lover, secretly cheering for the sheep, or just looking for open air and big meadows, then the Strang Ranch in Carbondale, Sept. 10-15, is the place for you. At the National Sheep Dog Finals, the very best dog handlers in North America will compete for the title of National Sheepdog Champion and a purse of $40,000. This is the fourth time the Strang ranch has hosted the finals, a hugely popular event where families enjoy the outdoors, competition, dogs and food. The Strangs are committed to preserving the agricultural and natural values of the ranch in perpetuity by conserving 460 acres in permanent conservation easements held by the Aspen Valley Land Trust. “It’s a special piece of ground,” says Bridget Strang. “It’s a beautiful place we can share with the public as open space and working ranch.” sheepdogfinals.com

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BITS & PIECES

UNIQUE EATS AND EATERIES OF DENVER

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This is the party you should NOT miss: the 9th Annual Barn Party at an exclusive estate open only twice a year. On Sept. 14, the evening party includes food, drinks, live music, local artists and tons of fun at what has been called the “Best Party in Cherry Hills Village.” On Sunday, Sept. 15, bring the whole family for the third Annual Family Trail Walk as you explore open spaces and learn about local conservation along the way. The Land Preserve published a trail guide with activities for families to use on over 27 miles of trails. Kids who complete at least 10 trails are eligible for prizes at the Trail Walk. The events support the mission of the Cherry Hills Land Preserve to protect open lands through leadership, stewardship, education and advocacy. cherryhillslandpreserve.org/events

Where the Chefs Eat Paul Anders, Executive Chef/ Partner of Sweet Basil & Mountain Standard

Photo: Sean F. Boggs

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER and travel writer Chad Chisholm leads readers on a culinary tour in his latest book, Unique Eats and Eateries of Denver. From the city’s Wild West days of campfire cooking, the Mile-High city has become a foodie’s paradise. The Denver scene now hosts refined restaurants headed by renowned chefs and international fare. Chisholm shares tales of the history and people behind the restaurants that have endured in the city, one since 1893. If you’ve never tried Rocky Mountain oysters, he offers tips for the best places to try them. You’ll learn about the Englewood brewery with hundreds of arcade and board games filling tabletops. Denver folks love to eat out, so if you’re looking for something a little different, grab a copy of the book and explore places to satisfy your taste buds. Available at reedypress.com, amazon.com, or local bookstores

Cherry Hills Land Preserve Barn Party and Family Trail Walk

Mountain Standard, 193 Gore Creek Dr. Vail, CO 81657 970-476-0123, mtnstandard.com Sweet Basil, 193 Gore Creek Dr. Vail, CO 81657 970-476-0125, sweetbasilvail.com

Craftsman Tap and Sandwich (Edwards): Simply put, delicious and perfectly executed food in a modern fast casual environment. It’s easy, it’s delicious and washes down with a brew from their ridiculous craft beer list!

Photo: Reedy Press

Photo: Pamela Cress, EclairQ Photography

Chad Chisholm’s New Book

Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas (Avon): Generally speaking, when you are one of the few gringos in a taco shop, it’s a real good sign. Not only are the tacos super good and authentic, they have a pretty great burger, too. Don’t miss the crinkle cut fries, hot and salty, so good!

Almresi and/or Alpenrose (Vail Village): I would go to either of these German/Alpine restaurants based on the decor and service alone. It is so well done and transports you to another place in the world. The good news is, the pretzel, tarte flambé, and German drafts are worth the visit, too. Joy Sushi (West Vail): Discount and sushi are two things that should not go together, but the level of quality they serve at what is a reasonable price point makes it hard to beat. My kids love it as well.

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BITS & PIECES

What’s Happening in the West New Executive Chef at The Ritz-Carlton, Denver

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RITZ-CARLTON DENVER, the Mile-High City’s first and longest running AAA Five Diamond property, selected Michael Poompan as its new executive chef. Poompan, along with a team of 35, spearheads the food and beverage operations of the hotel. His career began at the Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel followed by stints at the Renaissance Long Beach Hotel, The Ritz-Carlton, Rancho Mirage and recently as executive chef of the Coronado Island Marriott Resort & Spa. Chef Poompan says, “As I discover Colorado’s ingredients and seasonality, I am excited to craft menu favorites, new dishes and memorable events with fresh creativity.” He focuses on sustainable programming, ingredients from local farmers, artisans and ranchers while leading the way in reducing food plastic

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THE TEN EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN selected for this honor were chosen by a committee of their peers, led by Selection Chair Kim Bimestefer, Woman of Distinction 2015. They are chosen based on their contributions to the community, professionally and personally, and are the best examples of corporate, civic and philanthropic leadership who serve as role models for female leaders of tomorrow. They are dedicated to raising support for Girl Scout leadership programs.

The women honored are: MARTI J. AWAD Founding partner, Cardan Capital Partners THE HON. DIANNE L. BRISCOE Elycia Cook, president and CEO Friends First, Inc. waste. Poompan, passionate about connecting with the community, is sure to be seen around town as he reaches out, especially to children, to increase nutritional knowledge. ritzcarlton.com/denver

Carousel Ball Announces Honorees And Entertainment The signature event for the Children’s Diabetes Foundation and the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes is near and dear to Denver’s heart. The 33rd annual Carousel Ball takes place on Oct. 19 at the Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center. Every other year the gala is held in Beverly Hills, Calif., so supporters eagerly await this grand evening of cocktails, silent and live auctions, dinner, entertainment and musical performances. Chairman Dana Davis and Honorary Chairman Barbara Davis announced the honorees for this year: High Hopes Tribute Award Honorees, Lisa and Tom Corley; Founder’s Award Honoree, Dr. Richard Abrams. This year’s featured performer is the ever-popular Reba McEntire. Tickets start at $1,000 per couple. childrensdiabetesfoundation.org

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Girl Scouts honor the 2019 Denver Metro Women of Distinction

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

HELEN DREXLER President and CEO, Delta Dental of Colorado VERÓNICA FIGOLI President and CEO, Denver Public Schools Foundation HELEN YOUNG HAYES Founder and CEO, Activate Workforce Solutions VANECIA B. KERR Regional executive director, College Track Colorado THERESA SZCZUREK Chief information officer and executive director, Colorado Governor’s Office of Information Technology DR. SARAH WINBOURNE Medical director, Kids First Health Care ROBIN WITTENSTEIN CEO, Denver Health They will be honored at the annual Thin Mint Dinner on Oct. 30. girlscoutsofcolorado.org


BITS & PIECES

Rebecca Crowe named President of Clayton Early Learning

September 12

After an extensive search, Clayton Early Learning chose Rebecca Crowe as its next president and chief executive officer. Her extensive leadership background in education as well as management, philanthropy, research, community engagement and more comprise the unique combination of qualities that led to her selection. Crowe also served as the executive director of Partners in School Innovation aimed at transforming the quality of early literacy teaching and learning in San Francisco Bay Area schools. She said that she is honored to have been selected. “Clayton’s track record of directly impacting the learning and development of children while influencing systemic change through research, evaluation, professional development, and advocacy is truly inspiring.” Clayton impacts the school readiness of more than 20,000 children in Colorado each year through a wide range of services to children and families. claytonlearning.org

DENVER ZOO FUNDRAISING GALA: A FORCE OF NATURE

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THE INAUGURAL FUNDRAISING event, Denver Zoo: A Force of Nature Gala takes place on Sept. 12 to celebrate the zoo’s efforts to care for and conserve wildlife worldwide. Longtime Denver Zoo philanthropists Susan and Eddie Robinson will be honored and National Geographic Photographer Joel Sartore will be the keynote speaker. A limited number of tickets will be available to the public. The Denver Zoo is re-engineering its events to meet its mission and raise funds to support the more than 3,500 animals in its care. This includes a series of smaller, more casual evening events geared towards adults with tickets starting at $15 for members. denverzoo.org

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM

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HOT TICKETS

In Town Through Aug. 13 Summer Concert Series, Denver Botanic Gardens This year see Bob James with David Sanborn and Marcus Miller, Judy Collins, John Hiatt and more. 720-865-3500 • botanicgardens.org

Can’t-miss Events Throughout Colorado By Elizabeth Jones

Through Aug. 25 Concert Series, Hudson Garden Enjoy one of the area’s outdoor concert venues with Styx, Atlantic Rhythm Section, Chris Isaak and War. 303-797-8565 • hudsongardens.org

Through Aug. 25

Photo: Matthew Murphy, MurphyMade

Leonardo da Vinci, Denver Museum of Nature & Science The most comprehensive exhibit presented on da Vinci—Leonardo da Vinci: 500 Years of Genius. 303-370-6000 • dmns.org

Through Aug. 25 Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America, Denver Art Museum Designers bring fresh ideas to the American home, children’s toys and play spaces and corporate identities. denverartmuseum.org

Anastasia, Buell Theatre, Aug. 7-18

Through Sept. 15 Human | Nature, Denver Botanic Gardens 18 sculptures, figures from the Craig Ponzio collection, explore the human form in classical and abstract styles. 720-865-3500 • botanicgardens.org

Through Sept. 27 Summer Concerts, Levitt Pavilion See a variety of both paid and free concerts at Ruby Hill Park to include Tower of Power and Three Dog Night, with more shows to be announced. levittdenver.org

Through year end Stickwork, Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield Farms This outdoor exhibit by Patrick

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Dougherty, created by weaving flexible saplings into complex and whimsical architectural forms, will remain on view until they naturally fall apart. 720-865-3500 • botanicgardens.org

show in Broadway history and one of the most beloved musicals of all time. 303-893-4100 • denvercenter.org

Aug. 2-4

Flamingle After Dark, Denver Zoo Flamboyant and fun, enjoy Denver’s best food trucks, pink drinks, dancing under the stars, up-close animal encounters and more. 720-337-1400 • denverzoo.org

Movie at the Symphony, Boettcher Concert Hall Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Relive the magic of Harry’s sixth year at Hogwarts set to music with the Colorado Symphony. 303-623-7876 • coloradosymphony.org

Aug. 1-25

Aug. 7

Chicago, Ellie Caulkins Opera House Phamaly celebrates 30 years with its production of the longest-running

The Lumineers, Mission Ballroom Kick off the opening of the new Mission Ballroom with the Lumi-

Aug. 1

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HOT TICKETS

neers. Future events include Ben Harper, the Steve Miller Band, Herbie Hancock, Maggie Rogers and more. missionballroom.com

Aug. 7-18 Anastasia, Buell Theatre From the Russian Empire to the euphoria of Paris in the 1920s, a young woman sets out on a journey to discover the mystery of her past. 303-893-4100 • denvercenter.org

Aug. 8 Billy Joel, Coors Field The “Piano Man” will play his firstever concert at Coors Field in Denver during his summer tour. ticketmaster.com

Cirque Corteo, Pepsi Center, Aug. 15-22

Aug. 9 Zac Brown Band, Coors Field “The Owl Tour” marks Zac Brown Band’s third consecutive touring run in a year. ticketmaster.com

Aug. 9 Backstreet Boys, Pepsi Center Formed in Orlando, Fla. in 1993, this best-selling boy band comes to town with its “DNA” World Tour. 303-405-1100 • pepsicenter.com

Aug. 10 Rolling Stones, Broncos Stadium at Mile High What is sure to be an unforgettable show, the Stones include Denver in the 13-date U.S. “No Filter Tour.” fielddenver.org

Aug. 9

Aug. 15-16

The Lumineers, Mission Ballroom, Aug. 7 Photo: Scott Dressel-Martin

Dave Chappelle and Jon Stewart, Red Rocks Making good on their promise, Chappelle and Stewart turn a handful of dates into a national tour. 720-865-2494 • redrocksonline.com

Mumford & Sons, Fiddlers Green Mumford & Sons ends its extensive arena tour in support of its new album “The Delta” at Fiddlers Green. fiddlersgreenamp.com

Aug. 15-22 Cirque Corteo, Pepsi Center Corteo, which means “cortege” in Italian, is a joyous procession, a festive parade imagined by a clown. 303-405-1100 • pepsicenter.com

Aug. 25

Stickwork, Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield Farms, through year end

Chevy Chase Live, Bellco Theatre Part of The Backlot Project, Chase comes to town for a showing of the 1980 golf comedy Caddyshack. 303-228-8260 • bellcotheatre.com

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HOT TICKETS

showcases her exceptional lyricism and agility as featured soloist. 303-623-7876 • coloradosymphony.org

Sept. 23 The Black Keys, Pepsi Center Formed in Akron, Ohio, the Black Keys “Let’s Rock Tour” features opener Modest Mouse. 303-405-1100 • pepsicenter.com Photo: Matthew Murphy

Sept. 25 Herb Alpert and Lani Hall, Newman Center Jazz up your night with acclaimed jazz duo Alpert (remember Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass?) and wife Lani Hall. newmancenterpresents.com

Miss Saigon, Buell Theatre, Sept. 10-22

Aug. 28

Sept. 10-22

Josh Groban, Red Rocks Internationally renowned singer, songwriter and actor Groban performs with the Colorado Symphony. 720-865-2494 • redrocksonline.com

Miss Saigon, Buell Theatre See Cameron Mackintosh’s multiaward-winning production of Miss Saigon from the creators of Les Misérables. 303-893-4100 • denvercenter.org

Aug. 30-Sept. 1

Sept. 20-22

Phish, Dick’s Sporting Goods Park Hitting the road this summer, the 26-date tour will close with the traditional Labor Day run of shows in Colorado. 303-272-3500 • dickssportinggoodspark.com

Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, Boettcher Concert Hall To honor her 20th season as concertmaster, Yumi Hwang-Williams

Erma Bombeck: At Wit’s End, Garner Galleria Starring “Suburban Outlaw” and columnist Pam Sherman, this is the story behind America’s favorite average housewife. 303-893-4100 • denvercenter.org

Sept. 7 Bobby McFerrin, Boettcher Concert Hall Ten-time Grammy winner McFerrin returns to perform with the awardwinning Colorado Symphony Chorus. 303-623-7876 • coloradosymphony.org

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Photo: Ron Heerkens Jr. / Goat Factory Media Entertainment

Sept. 4-22

Erma Bombeck, Garner Galleria, Sept. 4-22

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Sept. 26 Latin Beats, Boettcher Concert Hall The Mexican Cultural Center, with the Colorado Symphony, presents Latin Beats: Sonidos de las Américas, a free community concert. 303-623-7876 • coloradosymphony.org

Sept. 28 Rhapsody & Rhythm, Boettcher Concert Hall This definitive Gershwin concert experience offers a unique and entertaining multimedia musical celebration. 303-623-7876 • coloradosymphony.org

Sept. 29 The Who, Pepsi Center The “Moving On! Tour” is a 29-city outing in support of the band’s first new album in 13 years. 303-405-1100 • pepsicenter.com

Oct. 1 Jonas Brothers, Pepsi Center Brothers Nick, Joe and Kevin are reuniting and hitting the road on their “Happiness Begins Tour.” 303-405-1100 • pepsicenter.com


HOT TICKETS

Aug. 22-25 Colorado Classic Women’s Event, Steamboat Springs The 2019 Colorado Classic will become the Western Hemisphere’s only women’s stand-alone stage race. coloradoclassic.com

Photo: Braden Mayfield

Aug. 30-Sept. 1

International Festival of Arts, Breckenridge, Aug. 9-18

Out of Town Through Aug. 4 Bravo! Vail Music Festival, Vail Four of the world’s greatest orchestras make their summer home at Bravo! Vail for a season of extraordinary music. bravovail.org

Through Aug. 6 Central City Opera 2019 Festival, Central City Opera House Main stage productions include Benjamin Britten’s Billy Budd and Giacomo Puccini’s Madama Butterfly. centralcityopera.org

guest artists convene to study and perform for concertgoers. aspenmusicfestival.com

Aug. 9-18 International Festival of Arts, Breckenridge The Breckenridge International Festival of Arts offers an eclectic mix of music, dance, film and visual arts. breckcreate.org/bifa

Through Aug. 4 Our Senses: Creating Your Reality, Denver Museum of Nature & Science An exhibition that playfully reveals how and why what we perceive is not all, or exactly, what’s going on. 303-370-6000 • dmns.org

Water World, Federal Heights Celebrating 40 years of fun in the sun, featuring nearly 50 attractions for the entire family. 303-427-7873 • waterworldcolorado.com

Through Nov. 2 Elitch Gardens Theme & Water Park, Denver New this season, the first artistdriven dark ride the world has ever seen. Meow Wolf’s Kaleidoscape— Take the Ride 2019. 303-595-4386 • elitchgardens.com

Vail Dance Festival, Vail More than 150 dancers, musicians, composers and choreographers will enchant attendees during 11 performances. vaildance.org Photo: Kate Russell

Ongoing

Through Aug. 18

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For the Kids

Through Sept. 2

Through Aug. 10

Aspen Music Festival and School, Aspen More than 1,000 of the world’s best music students, artist, faculty and

JAS Aspen Snowmass Labor Day Experience, Snowmass This world-class music festival features headliners including Sting, John Mayer, Weezer, Luke Combs, Portugal and more. 970-920-4996 • jazzaspensnowmass.org

Kaleidoscape, Elitch Gardens Theme & Waterpark, through Nov. 2

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Adventure Forest, Children’s Museum Explore the new brilliant, bold, 500-foot. long aerial adventure course and immersive art installation. 303-433-7444 • mychildsmuseum.org


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SOLD


FOR THE FOODIE

An Aspen Institution Longtime sushi-plus favorite shows its strength with edgy options, stylish digs, all-inclusive energy and giving back By LISA PERRY

W WHEN THE WINTER X GAMES ARE happening in Aspen, events go far into the night, leaving athletes and fans scrambling for a late dinner when restaurants are closed. Kenichi Aspen has become a welcomed exception, staying open till midnight. Owner Brent Reed says the venue had the opportunity to serve a happy goldmedal winner who spoke minimal English, but was able to convey a “great meal” sentiment to the staff. “We’re fortunate to be able to participate in guests’ special moments. It’s special for us too,” Reed says, Kenichi has been an Aspen staple since 1991. “We have a world-class amazing sushi bar with sushi master chef Kiyomi Sano, from Tokyo, at the head,” Reed says. “We have a full hot kitchen and great steaks—a wonderful Wagyu New York strip and 16-ounce Angus ribeye.” The most-ordered item is yellowtail serrano sashimi. “It’s because of the basil sauce with yuzu— a neat, interesting Japanese (citrus) flavor,” says Reed. “The quality of the hamachi yellowtail is amazing, and the light, tangy basil sauce just makes it mouth-watering.” Reed says Asian barbecued ribs are another crowd favorite. “Our chefs really strive to accommodate any palate. We’re always trying to impress and enhance.” The restaurant’s name comes from co-founder/chef Kenichi Kanada (now running Kenichi Pacific in Hawaii), and also translates as “healthy, strong one.” With its exten44

WORLD CLASS ABOVE: Chef Kiyomi Sano presenting his Tuna Carpaccio Special OPPOSITE PAGE LEFT: Wagyu Tataki RIGHT: Nigiri Sushi

sive selection of rice-based dishes, the menu attracts health-conscious customers, and gluten-free options are a given. “We really care about allergies, and care about making sure the customer is taken care of,” the owner says. Chef’s specials are offered every night, largely based on the contents of fish box deliveries from Tokyo. Customers have also enjoyed kitchen surprises such as Wagyu tataki, sesame seed-crusted with black pepper, plus red Hawaiian sea salt accompanied by ponzu sauce, Fresno peppers, fresh fennel, daikon sprouts and microgreen garnish. Masterful sushi and sashimi creations demand star-quality ingredi-

COLORADO EXPRESSION AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

ents. “We get some of the freshest fish in the world,” Reed says. “I’ve never found fresher and better fish than what we have. It’s because of the whole way our staff handles the fish. We’re about food safety, food safety, food safety, and making an amazing experience for the customer and employees too.” When restaurant reservations are scarce, there’s hope for walk-in customers. “We don’t take reservations at the 19-seat sushi bar,” says Reed. “You can walk in and sit at the first three seats in front of Kiyomi Sano, and have the best seat in town.” Kenichi offers the town’s only private tatami room, seating 10 to 12 people. Guests don’t sit on the floor—instead, the space is a sunken lounge with cushioned seats at low tables. “You can have your own music and design your


own event,” says Reed. A year-round daily happy hour with half-off sushi rolls offers a low-cost way to introduce youngsters to Japanese cuisine—and it’s a bonus for the grownups. Kenichi receives rave reviews about the food, sleek decor and overall energy. But Reed says the restaurant has had staying power because of its staff. “We have people who have worked here since the day we opened,” he says. “We’ve always been very lucky because we have great people who care about the food, care about service and really care about each other. The most important thing to me at the restaurant is how we treat each other. I have two businesses with 82 employees at the height of ski sea-

Kenichi Aspen 533 E. Hopkins Ave. Aspen, CO 81611 970-920-2212 kenichiaspen.com

Izakaya Carbondale 225 Main St. Carbondale, CO 81623 970-340-4225 izakayacarbondale.com

son. I know every one of them and their family, and I care about every one of them as if they’re my family. And I have four nephews and a niece that work for us.” For customers, he says: “I want them to join our family, be treated as an equal … and we expect to be treated as equals too. We’re ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen.” The restaurant is known for giving back to the community, hosting fundraisers four times a year. Guests receive half-off their bill and a $20 admission charge garners $3,000 to $5,000 per event for a specific organization. “We also donate 100 to 200 gift certificates to local nonprofits for their silent auctions,” says Reed. “We generate $25,000 a year. That’s more than $700,000 raised for local charities—and we’re proud of that.” Under the category of “new business,” Reed opened Izakaya Carbondale in July, 2018. “It has a smaller sushi bar and a little more family, home-style Japanese cooking,” he says. The restaurant’s concept came from Kenichi chefs using curry, fish and whatever was on hand at the end of the night to create a staff meal full of delicious flavors. “Things learned from mom, such as 36-hour ramen stock and fried rice, and Japanesestyle fried chicken.” Reed says Izakaya exudes a warm feeling with a touch of elegance. “It transforms you into a Tokyo izakaya (neighborhood pub): 100 seats inside, 30 outside on

a 900-square-foot patio.” Reed has no family ties to Japan, but has enthusiastically adopted the country’s cuisine, culture and philosophies. “Our management style is kaizen, the Japanese way of life of continuous improvement. The American way says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. The Japanese way says that it’s your responsibility to keep learning for yourself, your family and your community, and learning is good and learning is change.” Reed has changed from CPA to restaurant owner, and after completing an intensive sushi school course in California he has spent the past eight months utilizing his skills as a sushi chef. “The biggest stress of my day now is making sure my knives are very sharp before I start making rice,” he says. Reed sums up with: “Experiences are the most valuable things in life, and one of the most enjoyable experiences that you can have to encompass many generations is going and sharing a meal together. Our focus is to try to make this an enjoyable experience with amazing food from all over the world.” Lisa Perry has been writing about Colorado restaurants and entertainment for 25 years, and has covered Denver nonprofit fundraisers for the past decade. She loves Kenichi’s menu, is a sushi fan and whenever she uses chopsticks, only drops her food about 40 percent of the time.

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADO EXPRESSION

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COOKBOOKS

JLD Celebrates 100 Years with New Cookbook Centennial Celebrations features recipes for every occasion and helps us discover Denver

R

By JOY LAWRANCE Photos by BRIANA MARIE

RAISE YOUR HAND IF YOU HAVE A Junior League of Denver cookbook on your shelf. Now wave your hand if you have more than one JLD cookbook. I imagine that most everyone reading this is waving wildly since the JLD has sold more than 2.1 million of their treasured cookbooks since Colorado Cache was published in 1978. To commemorate the JLD’s 100th Anniversary, their sixth book, appropriately titled Centennial Celebrations, is waiting in bookstores for you to add to your collection. With Denver—and the Centennial state—fast becoming widely recognized for innovative food, breweries, music and a thriving art scene, this latest edition features not only the creative recipes we have come to expect and love, but it also serves to excite the senses through beautiful photography of wonderful gatherings and events at iconic Denver locations. I asked Mary Beth McErlane, Centennial Celebrations chair, what prompted her to take on this monumental project. “I volunteered,” she said. “I knew about cookbooks more than I knew about the JLD. My mom had a lot of cookbooks from Los Angeles and from Texas. We had Junior League cookbooks from all over the country.” It’s still no easy task to produce a volume such as this, and she described the process: “We [the committee] decided what we wanted it to be, decided that it should coincide with the 100th anniversary [of the 46

JLD]. We put a call out to members and the public and we got almost 1,000 recipes. Once we had those, we got a team of recipe testers—over 100 people from our committee, plus volunteers. We divided them up [into

smaller groups] and had three rounds of testing.” She explained that each group filled out detailed forms, so every recipe needed to pass rigorous scrutiny before being deemed worthy of inclusion. She added, “We were also doing

COLORADO EXPRESSION AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

photography in Denver, photographing places around the city, events and food that might go along with those events and places. We have “Discover Denver” insets with photos and interesting blurbs.” “A lot of people buy our books because of the Denver feel,” said Vanessa Banker, communications director for the Junior League of Denver. “ It’s also a great gift for out-oftown visitors, housewarmings or wedding presents.” Hint, hint! The 232 recipes are arranged in the traditional succession of eight chapters including appetizers/beverages, bread, salad, pizza/pasta, main dishes, soup/sandwiches, vegetarian/sides, and, of course, desserts. But McErlane described a unique twist: “It also moves through the seasons and events that go along with the season. For example, in Appetizers there’s a Tail-

A CLASSIC IN THE MAKING ABOVE: Grilled Peaches with Whipped Ricotta Fig Toast OPPOSITE PAGE: Asian Marinated Chicken Wings

gate at Red Rocks idea. For Soup/ Sandwiches, it’s “Après Ski … or anything. Pizza/Pasta might be a pizza


party at the Children’s Museum like a kid’s birthday, and a Fall Harvest menu suggests an event at Four Mile Historic Park.” You are sure to find a wide and varied range of ideas for crowd-pleasing game day appetizers, traditional holiday favorites, light summer recipes and winter comfort foods. How many times have you picked up a book looking for ideas? “When you open up a cookbook, you think “what do I have?” McErlane said. “Sometimes you want only four ingredients and easy, other times more complicated. For any time of year, you can find something that will fit what you need. The main thing is that we tried hard to have recipes for every season.”

“Our books are some of the bestselling Junior League cookbooks in the country,” Banker said. “Colorado Cache alone has sold over one million copies. There’s a lot of longevity for the books, and a lot of excitement when a new one comes out. Colorado Cache still sells, even though it came out in 1978.” It’s nice to know that I could replace my taped-together, saucesplattered and dog-eared copy. However, each little stain and smudge tell a story and bring a memory to mind. I guess I’ll just keep it as is.” There’s a purpose behind all these books, though, and that is the primary mission of the league, “an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing

the potential of women, and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively education and charitable.” Those 2.1 million books sold since 1978 have raised close to $7 million for League programs. That fact alone is reason enough to acquire this latest book, knowing that the proceeds serve to elevate women and our communities. While that is the long-term purpose of the JLD, the immediate goal of Centennial Celebrations is to offer you creative menus, recipes and entertaining tips. The hope is that these will inspire you to cook, connect, and celebrate, Colorado style!

Grilled Peaches with Whipped Ricotta Fig Toast

Asian Marinated Chicken Wings

SERVES 16

SERVES 12

4 medium peaches, pitted and cut into halves 2 ½ Tbsp honey ½ cup ricotta cheese 3 Tbsp fig spread 16 slices French bread, toasted 1 ⁄8 tsp sea salt 3 Tbsp chopped fresh mint Preheat the grill to medium. Drizzle the peach halves with the honey. Arrange cut sides down on the grill. Grill for 3 to 4 minutes or until grill marks appear. Remove to a cutting board. Cut into slices. Combine the ricotta cheese and fig spread in a food processor. Process until smooth and creamy. Spread equal portions of the cheese mixture over each toast and top with a peach slice. Sprinkle with the sea salt and mint. Drizzle with additional honey if desired.

6 pounds chicken wings 2 ⁄3 cup soy sauce ½ cup apple cider vinegar 1 ⁄3 cup packed brown sugar ¼ cup sugar 2 tsp garlic powder 1 tsp ground ginger 3 Tbsp diagonally sliced green onions Sesame seeds to taste Cut the tips from the chicken wings and cut the wings through the joints into halves. Combine the soy sauce, vinegar, brown sugar, sugar, garlic powder and ginger in a large sealable plastic bag and mix well. Add the chicken and turn the bag to coat the chicken well. Chill, covered for 8 to 12 hours, turning over the bag occasionally. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Remove the chicken from the marinade, arranging in a single layer on two baking sheets and reserving the marinade. Bake the wings in the top third of the oven for 45 minutes or until tender and brown, basting twice with the reserved marinade. Remove to a platter. Sprinkle with the green onions and sesame seeds. Garnish with minced multicolored peppers. Serve with Sriracha sauce if desired.

Creamy Goat Cheese and Jalapeño Dip SERVES 6

2 Tbsp unsalted butter 1 ½ cups chopped yellow onion 2 cups fresh sweet corn kernels 1 tsp salt ½ tsp cayenne pepper 1 Tbsp chopped garlic 1 medium jalapeño, seeded and chopped 16 oz goat cheese, crumbled ½ cup heavy cream Chopped fresh cilantro to taste

*

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADO EXPRESSION

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COOKBOOKS

Creamy Goat Cheese and Jalapeño Dip (continued)

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Cook the onion, corn, salt and cayenne pepper in the butter for 6 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in the garlic and jalapeño. Cook for 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the goat cheese and cream. Cook until the cheese is melted, stirring frequently. Spoon into a serving dish. Sprinkle with cilantro and serve immediately, keeping dish warm.

Remove to a cutting board. Let stand to rest for 5 minutes or longer. Process the garlic in a food processor just until chopped. Add the cilantro, parsley, vinegar, olive oil remaining ½ teaspoon salt and cayenne pepper. Process until the herbs are finely chopped, adding additional vinegar and/or olive oil if needed for the desired consistency. Cut the steak against the grain. Serve with the chimichurri.

Mason Jar Key Lime Pies Flank Steak with Chimichurri SERVES 4 TO 6

1 ½ lbs trimmed flank steak 2 tsp ground cumin 1 ½ tsp kosher salt, divided 1 tsp ground coriander ¼ tsp black pepper 3 large cloves garlic 1 cup packed fresh cilantro 1 cup packed fresh Italian parsley ¼ cup (or more) white vinegar 1 ⁄3 cup (or more) extra-virgin olive oil 1 ⁄8 tsp cayenne pepper or red pepper flakes Preheat the broiler or grill to medium. Pat the steak dry with paper towels. Combine the cumin, 1 teaspoon of the salt, coriander and black pepper in a small bowl and mix well. Rub over both sides of the steak. Grill the steak or broil 3 inches from the heat source for 5 to 7 minutes per side for medium-rare.

Centennial Celebrations

Available at a number of bookstores including Tattered Cover, Barnes & Noble, and other local shops. It can also be ordered on Amazon. Visit jld.org for more information on locations. Price: $29.95 Centennial Celebrations is the sixth cookbook published by the JLD. Others are Colorado Cache, Crème de Colorado, Colorado Collage, Colorado Colore and Colorado Classique.

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COLORADO EXPRESSION AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

SERVES 8

8 half-pint Mason jars ½ cup graham cracker crumbs 2 Tbsp butter, melted 2 Tbsp sugar 5 egg yolks, beaten ½ cup Key lime juice (about 12 to 15 limes) 1 (14-oz) can sweetened condensed milk Coconut Whipped Cream (recipe below) 2 tsp grated Key lime zest (optional) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray the inside of the Mason jars with nonstick cooking spray. Arrange the jars in a small baking pan. Combine the graham cracker crumbs, butter and sugar in a bowl and mix well. Press 1 heaping tablespoonful of the mixture over the bottom of each prepared jar, reserving any remaining mixture. Bake for 3 minutes. Let stand to cool. Whisk the egg yolks, Key lime juice and sweetened condensed milk in a bowl until blended. Divide evenly among the jars. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or just until set but not firm. Let stand to cool completely. Dollop or pipe equal portions of the Coconut Whipped Cream into each jar. Sprinkle with the reserved graham cracker mixture and Key lime zest. Chill until serving time.

Coconut Whipped Cream

1 cup heavy whipping cream ½ cup canned coconut milk (white part only) 2 Tbsp powdered sugar Beat the whipping cream, coconut milk and powdered sugar at medium-high speed in a mixing bowl until soft peaks form.


Salted Caramel Bars MAKES 28

1 (14-oz) can sweetened condensed milk 2 cups butter, softened 1 cup granulated sugar 1 ½ cups powdered sugar 1 Tbsp vanilla extract 3 ½ cups all-purpose flour 2 tsp coarsely ground sea salt Pour the sweetened condensed milk into a pint-size canning jar and cover with the lid. Place in a slow cooker. Add enough water to reach just below the bottom of the lid. Cook on low for 8 hours. Remove the jar carefully from the slow cooker. Let stand to cool completely; caramel will thicken as it cools. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9×13-inch glass baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. Cream the butter, granulated sugar and powdered sugar in a mixing bowl. Add the vanilla extract and mix well. Add the flour ½ cup at a time, beating until incorporated after each addition. Cut the dough into halves. Wrap 1 half in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator. Press the remaining dough over the bottom of the prepared baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes or until the edges are light golden brown. Let stand to cool for 15 minutes. Maintain oven temperature. Pour the caramel over the crust. Sprinkle with the sea salt. Crumble the chilled dough into pea- to marble-size pieces over the caramel. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until golden brown. Sprinkle with additional sea salt if desired.

Joy Lawrance is a freelance writer in Golden who writes frequently for the New West family of publications. She loves to cook and owns at least three Junior League of Denver, cookbooks which are the first ones she goes to for menu ideas.

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C CONFETTI Event Awards CELEBRATING COLORADO EVENT PROFESSIONALS

The ICON gala that we have all known and loved for 20 years returned in 2019 as the Confetti Event Awards. This beloved annual event was redesigned with a new concept while continuing to celebrate Colorado’s best events and the talented professionals in the event planning industry all while raising money for numerous Colorado nonprofits. Event Chair

and Colorado Expression Publisher Elizabeth Hamilton gathered an amazing team and began planning the redesigned event last fall. John Tobey and Shannon McLaughlin with John Tobey Events led the team along with Brittany Dosdall of By Design Collective. Other members of the team included Ashley Summers, Kelli Kindel and Brynn Swanson. The event started in March with a kick-off party at the beautiful JW Marriott Denver Cherry Creek Hotel organized by Leorah Young, senior catering sales manager. Guests enjoyed appetizers, a pasta bar and libations provided by Blanchard Family Wines along with music by Mannequin the Band. Perfect Petal designed stunning floral displays. Woody Creek Distillers created a signature cocktail dubbed the Confettitini, a coral drink in keeping with the theme colors. For the main event, gone would be the ballroom setting and the sit-down dinner. In its place would be an interactive event with small guest lounges and food stations strategically placed throughout the venue. The showroom at BMW of Denver Downtown provided the perfect location for this event. Veteran event planner John Tobey, celebrating his 20th year in the business, specializes in the layout, design and flow of an event. He and the other talented event planners took the open showroom and transformed this space into an incredible event venue. The theme of the event was Colorado Contemporary with a nod to the Southwest. Colors included slate blue, blush, gold and living coral. The vendors could not have done a better job collaborating and bringing the theme to life with a playful bright vibe. BY LISA BUSCIETTA


Photo: Zorn Photography

C


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COLORADO EXPRESSION AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Photo: Zorn Photography

Photo: Zorn Photography

Photo: Pamela Cress Photo: Pamela Cress Photo: Zorn Photography

Perfect Petal provided amazing florals on the bar and food stations as well as in the guest lounges and up the staircase. Woody Creek Distillers, a long-time contributor to the awards gala, along with Mondo Vino, provided liquor and beverages and Rob Schenk of ShowTek 2.0 handled lighting and production for the event. Yours Truly Cupcake treated lounge guests to mini-cupcakes in delicious flavors including Key lime, graham cracker cake with key lime frosting and Sprinkle Cake with cream cheese frosting. Catering by Design presented an array of scrumptious food for the evening featuring innovative displays and the newest trends in the market. Their selections were based on recent culinary adventures. Custom uniforms were designed specifically for the event featuring chambray aprons and bandanas for a pop of color. Decor by Design created the interactive food stations throughout the venue and set the tone with sleek wood designs and bold colors. Inventive and cutting-edge is the only way to describe both the food and the presentation of the culinary selections. The “Over the Top” pour-over station featured large urns filled with fresh herbs. Guests chose their lamb or cheese ravioli and then watched as the chefs poured a piping hot broth through fresh herbs over the ravioli to complete this delicious sampling. Later in the evening this station transformed from savory to sweet and featured burnt honey ice cream with ginger-flavored cotton candy and gold flake “confetti”. This decadent dessert was finished with a pour-over of chai. Guests were in awe of the “Best Fishes to You” raw bar table featuring scallop, hamachi and watermelon crudo served in globes. After selecting their crudo, guests moved to a spinning display of tasting vinegar pipettes containing Thai basil, pomegranate and honey ginger vinegars to complement the dish. Eclectic Hive took charge of the decor and collaborated with Catering by Design and By Design Collective to pull the theme together throughout the event space. They styled the guest lounges and did a wonderful job of using the existing BMW furniture and bringing in pieces that seamlessly came together to create the perfect ambiance. Guests entered through two 9-foot iron rings decorated with LED lights and salmon-colored balloons by Deann Espinosa of Denver Balloon Animals. The balloons were tone-on-tone using different textures, from shiny to luster, and various sizes. Coral baby’s breath that had been handdipped added a final touch to the arches. The


Photo: Pamela Cress

BEVERAGES GOODHART COFFEE MARBLE DISTILLERY MONDO VINO WOODY CREEK DISTILLERS CATERING CATERING BY DESIGN INTRICATE ICINGS YOURS TRULY CUPCAKE Photo: Pamela Cress

Photo: Pamela Cress

MANY THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

DECOR DECOR BY DESIGN DENVER BALLOON ANIMALS ECLECTIC HIVE EVENT RENTS PERFECT PETAL ENTERTAINMENT JORDAN KAHN ORCHESTRA SOCIAL LIGHT PHOTO EVENT SCENTS THE SENTOLOGIST GRAPHIC DESIGN HANNAH LEE CREATIVE SIGNED & SEALED BY STEPH SUNSET DESIGNS HOTEL JW MARRIOTT DENVER CHERRY CREEK MASTER OF CEREMONIES ED GREENE PRODUCTION SHOWTEK EVENTS 2.0 VALET JAY’S VALET VENUE BMW OF DENVER DOWNTOWN


Lisa Buscietta is the operations director at New West Publishing and plays an integral part of the awards.

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COLORADO EXPRESSION AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Photo: Pamela Cress

Photo: Pamela Cress Photo: Zorn Photography Photo: Zorn Photography

Sentologist, Tiffany Goodyear, scented the entrance with a fragrance of Pom Pom Llama with notes of cantaloupe and black pepper. One of the many highlights of the evening was the awards presentation. The event space lent itself perfectly to holding the awards in the upstairs showroom. A beautifully decorated stage and seating for all guests provided for a captive audience as awards were given to the winners in each of the 12 categories by emcee Ed Greene. A long-standing tradition of the event has been the drawing of the name of one lucky nonprofit to be awarded $25 from each ticket purchased. This year’s recipient was the Children’s Diabetes Foundation. After the awards were presented it was time to get the party started. Guests danced the night away to the fabulous Jordan Kahn Orchestra who flew in from Dallas. Social Light Photo Booth provided fun photos in front of a beautiful backdrop designed by Ashley Summers. Brynn Swanson worked with Rachael Teufel of Intricate Icings to design and implement a custom cake especially for the awards with a mini confetti cannon erupting from inside the cake. As the evening came to a close, guests were surprised by a final sweet treat from Yours Truly Cupcake. A cotton candy cart was set up so that guests could gather a sugary sampling as they waited for the valet to deliver their cars. The new style of this event received praise from both attendees and vendors. Guests mingled amongst friends and peers and commented that it was a refreshing change that allowed them to mix and mingle while enjoying libations and delicious food. None of this would have been possible without the event chairs, who brought their expertise, vision and resources forward to create this special evening. There are no words to express our gratitude to the vendor partners who came together and went above and beyond to provide everything needed for this special evening. Please see the sidebar to this story for a complete listing of our vendors. We encourage our readers to use these individuals and companies for your next private event or gala. They are simply the best. The inaugural year of the Confetti Event Awards was a great success. We congratulate the finalists and winners and again thank everyone who contributed to this re-designed and re-imagined awards gala. See you next year!


Photo: Pamela Cress

CONFETTI EVENT AWARD WINNERS BEST PHOTOGRAPHY ZORN PHOTOGRAPHY for Tiffany and Eric at Denver

Country Club BEST INVITATION TABLE 6 PRODUCTIONS for Mary and Austin’s Wedding BEST ENTERTAINMENT CONCEPT AND EXECUTION IMPRINT EVENTS GROUP for Beaux Arts Bollywood Ball BEST SOCIAL EVENT PRODUCED FOR A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION DESIGNWORKS for Beaux Arts Bollywood Ball BEST EVENT PRODUCED FOR A CORPORATION E5 EVENTS for 1144 Fifteenth Tower Grand Opening

Photo: Zorn Photography

BEST FOOD PRESENTATION AT AN EVENT FOOTERS CATERING for Thank You Celebration BEST FLORAL DESIGN DESIGNWORKS for Hauck-Juma Wedding BEST DECORATING DESIGN DESIGNWORKS for Beaux Arts Bollywood Ball BEST WEDDING (under $1,000 per guest) TOTAL IMAGINATION EVENTS for Tamra & Dustin’s NYE

Old Hollywood Speakeasy Celebration BEST WEDDING (over $1,000 per guest) AFFAIR WITH FLAIR for Nat and Tmo’s Wedding AND EPICUREAN CATERING for DiPasquale-Wolfert Wedding BEST SOCIAL EVENT PRODUCED FOR AN INDIVIDUAL TGE EVENTS for Union Station Rehearsal Dinner AND ASHLEY NICOLE EVENTS for Ladies Luncheon Photo: Pamela Cress

Bridal Shower BEST OVERALL EVENT (under $1,000 per guest) TOTAL IMAGINATION EVENTS for Tamra & Dustin’s NYE

Old Hollywood Speakeasy Celebration AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADO EXPRESSION 55


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CRYO THERAPY Whole Body Cryotherapy uses liquid nitrogen to create sub-zero temperatures (-249ยบ to -321ยบ) in order to induce the fight-or-flight response. This stimulus causes the blood to rush to protect the core organs resulting in a highly oxygenated blood that is enriched with collagen, enzymes and other essential nutrients while simultaneously flushing toxins and lactic acid from the body. Facial Focus and Spot Specific Cryotherapy uses a hand-held device that is applied to the body or face to quickly repair and rejuvenate the selected area. The Benefits: rapid athletic recovery, anti-inflammatory, pain relief, accelerated healing, weight loss, improved sleep, + more.

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ART SCENE

Art as a Family Affair

Saks Galleries continues its tradition of representing high-quality artists By Elizabeth Kosar

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CATHERINE SAKS BELIEVES THAT “Being interested in art is bigger than being interested in something to decorate the walls. It’s being interested in culture—our culture—and ourselves.” Fortunately for the artists they represent from all over the world and their well-traveled clients, Catherine and her husband Mikkel Saks own and run Saks Galleries, which has been family owned and operated for 50 years. Saks Galleries was originally founded by Mikkel’s father in 1963. A Danish immigrant, Lemon Saks sought to bring collectible European art to the Denver market. Today, his son’s family continues his legacy by serving as art brokers and appraisers. Respectful of the gallery’s past, Mikkel explains that “Saks Galleries was originally famous for 19th century paintings … but we are very much into current trends. Yet we still have that expertise in old things.” According to Mikkel, Saks Galleries is “right on top of what is happening today.” A Saks Galleries customer can be assured of the significance of their piece and not just in terms of monetary value. “The people who buy things from us are getting artists that we’ve vetted and are currently important, either artistically or socially and you know we’re really offering a service that’s really hard to find.”

Saks Galleries on 2nd Avenue in Cherry Creek North

They make it a point to keep up with the current trends and per Mikkel, “The world has turned modern. We’re looking for post-impressionist ideas that have to do with color and form and line … and these are issues that artists have dealt with for centuries.”

THE DETAILS Saks Galleries, Cherry Creek 3019 E. Second Ave., Denver, CO 80206 303-333-4144 denverartgalleries.co

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Certified appraisals are available

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Catherine and Mikkel use a combination of skill and talent to choose the artists whom they represent. Mikkel describes his process by noting that “We look at the quality of the artist, the artistic merit, do they have original themes, the price point … an artist can ask whatever they want, but we will not represent an artist who is overpriced in the market.” He also recognizes the human element present in attraction to art. “You can have two paintings, side by side, both by well-known artists and people will be drawn to one thing and not another.” He’s also quick to honor his wife’s influence on the business: “Catherine is very good with relationships. It’s a group effort to make it all work out. We will not represent an artist that we would not be happy to go have lunch with.” One of the many assets that Catherine brings to the


A PEEK INTO THE MINDS AND HEARTS OF COLORADO’S MOST TALENTED PEOPLE

business is her eagerness to work with young collectors. She begins the process by asking a new client what speaks to them. As she says, “We’re here to help guide you to that connection by discussing the elements of the painting, why you might be gravitating toward that particular palette or composition, and to help clarify for you why it might be a worthwhile purchase. We can explain why it’s not just a canvas, stretcher and $20 worth of paint. We only represent mid-career artists, simply because we want our collectors to see that value that comes from time, just like any other genre, you don’t just pick up a paintbrush and produce quality work.” Though Saks Galleries boasts the quality, service and attention that one would expect from a local gallery with a storied history, it can still access art from across the globe. While Mikkel isn’t interested in social media himself, he’s pleased that “Everything’s connected. That’s the interesting thing about the change the internet has made, everything is international today. Something is just as salable right here as it is in New York, London or China.” The gallery has facilitated global transactions and only anticipates this business increasing.

Saks Galleries has been family owned and operated for 50 years

The other important part of the business is appraisals, according to Catherine. “It’s always been important but it’s becoming increasingly important. Insurance companies will no longer just take your word for it— now you need a certified appraisal, and Mikkel has had his certification since 1984. He’s been writing appraisals for a long time.” Indeed, as estates increasingly disperse their wares, be it paintings, sculpture, jewelry and more, the appraisal business is positioned for substantial growth.

Originally famous for 19th century paintings, Saks is very much into current trends

The future of this family business may rest in the hands of the next generation: Bekka Saks, appraiser and art consultant. “Bekka has become a generalist which is a great, great title to have. She’s positioned herself so that she’s very valuable,” according to her mother. Her father agrees: “The IRS is very involved in the art business, such as with complicated tax issues. For someone like Bekka, with the certifications that she has, there are only about 1,000 appraisers in the country.” It’s apparent that this iteration of Saks Galleries has proved itself more than equal to its formidable legacy and that it is well-situated for the future. And while Mikkel and Catherine are “continuing to reinvent ourselves and remain relevant,” as Mikkel says, some things about Saks Galleries remain just as always have—unparalleled knowledge, a talented team, and a dog-friendly space, including treats and water for furry friends. Elizabeth Kosar is a Denver-based writer and communications strategist. Her passion for art began at an early age when she requested to paint on her first day of preschool. While painting was not on the agenda for day one, it was added to the schedule for day two.

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GREAT ESCAPES

Waltzing Down the Danube Viking river cruise offers an invigorating blend of culture and cuisine By Irene Middleman Thomas . Photography by Viking

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Guests dine al fresco on the Aquavit Terrace while enjoying scenic sailing on the river

THE DETAILS Viking Cruises Founded in 1997 with the purchase of four ships in Russia, Viking expanded into the American market in 2000, establishing U.S. headquarters in Los Angeles. Operating a fleet of more than 70 state-of-the-art ships, Viking has grown to be the world’s leading river cruise line. 877-705-7631 vikingrivercruises.com

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IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS THAT CAN make the difference when choosing a hotel, a restaurant or in this case, a river cruise line. The pretty bookmarks which were discreetly placed into the books we were reading by the cabin steward when attending to our room. The chef printing out a customized recipe for me after I gushed over the après-concert Hungarian goulash he prepared. The mini Linzer tortes at the ship’s 24-hour coffee station during our stay in Austria. It’s those little things, along with the sublime big things,

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

that made our Viking River Cruise trip even more than what we hoped it would be.

Welcome Aboard

Boarding the Hermod, our sleek longboat Viking River Cruise, we were struck immediately by the lack of British accents. In actuality, most Viking travelers are from the U.S., along with a smattering of Canadians, Brits and others. These cruises are for an educated, cosmopolitan crowd that wants to immerse in fine cuisine, cultural experiences and


HOT TRAVEL DESTINATIONS

Photo: Irene Middleman Thomas

On Viking’s Danube Waltz cruise guests enjoy scenic sailing

The port of call in Bratislava, Slovakia, is part of Viking’s Danube Waltz itinerary

A Viking Longship docks at the port on the Rhine River in Breisach, Germany

The Dohany Street Synagogue in Budapest

social encounters with like-minded folks. But stuffiness? Absolutely not, as we saw from those who came to dinner with sport shirts, shorts and even flip-flops. If you choose to dress up, however, you’ll have plenty of company. Our Danube Waltz cruise launched from Budapest and ended in Passau, Germany, but Viking also offers the cruise in the opposite direction. Upon arrival to the ship there is time to unpack, explore, settle in and join the crew for an orientation meeting and toast, followed by dinner. The next six days are a glorious, exciting, exhilarating melange of cultural, arts and gastronomic experiences in postcard-perfect Budapest; the fairy tale-

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GREAT ESCAPES

like Bratislava (Slovak Republic); stately, beautiful Vienna (Austria); scenic cruising on the Wachau Valley; the charming town of Cesky Krumlov (Czech Republic); and pretty and pleasantly non-touristy Passau, (Germany). Walking/bus excursions are included while optional excursions incur additional charges.

Market for a “Taste of Hungary” and a class in pancake preparation. On deck we gazed at the ever-present terracotta rooftops, their orangeyred contrasting with the deep moss

Exploring the Local Culture

We researched our options and opted for the Mozart and Strauss Vienna Residence Hofburger Orchestra concert at a concert hall in a historic palace in Vienna (and sat in the front row) as well as a tour of Budapest’s Doany Street Synagogue, the second largest in the world, and the Jewish sector of Budapest. While in Budapest, others chose to visit the famed thermal spas of Budapest, visited the renowned Hungarian horsemen in an equestrian park, or toured the Grand

The Kadlin Restaurant onboard

Ship Shape Accommodations

A Viking Longship outside stateroom

Sailing on the Danube River in Budapest, Hungary

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green of the hillsides and the deep tones of the vineyards and pine forests. We marveled at strolling down cobblestone streets which folks walked on 1,000 years ago, or at homes that had seen countless generations and were still inhabited. Our local guides were uniformly excellent and enthusiastic and never lost patience with our relentless questions. We learned about architecture, religion and art, and somehow, the memories stay fairly distinct despite visiting five countries in a week. It’s not meant to be an immersion course into each country. Rather, a Viking River Cruise is invigorating yet relaxing; fascinating yet fun.

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

The cuisine is delectable and is tailored to each destination, offering a “regional specialties tasting menu,” but there are always several standard


HOT TRAVEL DESTINATIONS

choices (such as rib eye steak and Norwegian poached salmon) as well as rotating specials. Breakfast is a sumptuous buffet, replete with omelet station, an array of fine European cheeses and cold cuts, fresh fruit, baked breads and pastries and usually even smoked salmon and/or other fish. Lunch and dinner are served tableside, but lunch also features a hefty salad bar. The dinnertime tasting menu is a delight, with most of us choosing that. For example, in Germany we raved over our “Ochsenmaulsalat & Knödel Carpaccio” (beef salad over sliced dumplings with cherry dressing), and our Braised Lamb Shank with Basil Oil, followed by Scheiterhaufen (baked apple bread pudding with red currant compote). Lunch and dinners come with complimentary beer and high-quality house wines. Our evenings were spent with engaging conversations at dinner, followed by an outstanding shipboard musician who kept us dancing and singing along, as well as several visiting troupes. The large, comfortable staterooms are well-equipped, replete with heated bathroom floors, ample storage and big screen TVs with an extensive movie list and live broadcast offerings. Perfect for an evening or two if you choose to skip the entertainment and just relax. Viking offers guests “the thinking person’s cruise” as an alternative to mainstream cruises. Itineraries are designed for maximum time in port, often with late evenings or overnights, so guests can experience local culture at night or evening performances. Viking River Cruises knows its market and its destinations and offers a vacation experience which will linger in your fond memories.

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Choos * Un

Irene Middleman Thomas travels the globe regularly, writing for many publications. When it was time to decide on a special wedding anniversary trip, she and her husband immediately decided to book another Viking River Cruise.

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GETAWAYS

Off the Beaten Path

Discovering the wonders of nature with customized hiking tours By Lindsay Mitchell

Laugavegur to Skogar backpacking trip in Iceland

THE DETAILS Wildland Trekking operates tours in 31 national parks and wilderness areas in 10 states as well as other countries around the world. 844-294-4946 wildlandtrekking.com

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Photo: Paula Talbott

Hiking Tours

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Photo: Seth Quigg

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SEVERAL YEARS AGO, SCOTT Cundy was working for a big corporation in Chicago that left him feeling unfulfilled and restless. Then one day a friend asked him a question that challenged him and changed the course of his life: “If you had one year to live, what would you do with it?” The answer was immediately clear to Cundy: “I’d travel the world and backpack through every mountain range I could in that time.” His friend pushed on. “Okay, now imagine you did that and when you returned, the doctors said they’d made a mistake; you weren’t going to die. Would you regret that year?” Again, Cundy’s response was immediate: “Heck no, it would be the best year of my life!” His friend looked at him and replied, “Then why don’t you just go do it?” Cundy didn’t have an answer this time. He gave his two weeks’ notice the next day and was soon trekking through Central America and then living and guiding in Alaska. Meanwhile, Cundy’s brother Steve had been working as a New Mexico State forester, where he met his friend and colleague Brad Ball. While out working together in the mountains, they began discussing the idea


Photo: Russ Nordstrand

INSIDERS’ VACATION GUIDE

Bear Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park

of starting a guiding company. Ball had worked extensively in the field of outdoor education and guided rock climbing in Wyoming and South Dakota, and his passion and excitement for the industry was contagious. And while working in forestry was engaging in certain ways, they both felt ready for a new adventure.

Blazing Trails

After a few more twists and turns, Steve, Brad and Scott teamed up to start Wildland Trekking in 2005. “We were all so passionate about both the need for conservation and the idea of enriching peoples’ lives by connecting them to the natural world,” Cundy says, adding, “It just felt right.” Mirror Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park

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GETAWAYS

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Wildland Trekking at Mummy Pass, Rocky Mountain National Park

That first year they started operating trips in the Grand Canyon, Utah and Yellowstone, and they’ve added new destinations every year. “We saw really rapid growth right from the start, and that has continued,” Cundy says. Today Wildland Trekking is operating in 31 national parks and wilderness areas in 10 states (Arizona, California, Colorado, Montana/ Wyoming, Utah, Washington, Vermont, and North Carolina/Tennessee), as

well as in nine other countries, with numerous international destinations from Canada to Patagonia, Iceland to Tanzania, Southeast Asia to New Zealand and more. In Colorado, the company offers a variety of trips from about June through October to destinations in Rocky Mountain National Park and Flat Tops Wilderness. “Rocky Mountain National Park is especially unique because it has every type of trip style the company offers. Day hikes, backpacking trips, innbased tours, basecamp tours, snowshoe tours—and for the first time this summer, our popular porter and llama treks—are all available in Colorado,” Cundy says.

Choose Your Own Adventure

In addition to the specific trip style categories mentioned above, Wildland Trekking provides a variety of trip durations—from day hikes to threeweek international trips—as well as customizable options. “We really try to have something for everyone— whether you’re an extremely experienced backpacker, a novice hiker, a solo trekker or a family or group,” Cundy says. “Anyone who likes to

6380 S. Fiddler’s Green Cir. Suite 108C Greenwood Village, CO 80111 pilatesdenverstudio.com 303.779.0164 Moose in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains

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Photo: Russ Nordstrand

Located at Village Center Station


Photo: Chris Hoge

INSIDERS’ VACATION GUIDE

Shining Rock Wilderness backpacking in North Carolina

hike or has the desire to learn— assuming they meet the minimum physical requirements for safety— is welcome to join one of our excursions.” Cundy also emphasizes that the experienced staff at Wildland Trekking is one of the best reasons to consider going with their company. “Our customer service team is great at helping people find the right trip for them—not only difficultly-wise but also in terms of what their interests are and the type of experience they want to have,” he says. For those who might be new to hiking or unsure about a hiking trip like this, there is a lot of support and “coaching” available to make sure you’re ready before you embark on your journey, Cundy explains. “Even for experienced trekkers, there’s a huge advantage of going with our company because we take care of everything, so you don’t have to worry about all the planning, permits, traveling with gear, or any of those other annoying details. You can just sign up and then let us handle the rest so you can fully enjoy the experience.” No matter what your current experience or knowledge is, you’re sure to learn something new. “Our guides

are so knowledgeable about the areas they work in, and they love to share what they know about the local history, culture and environment. Traveling with a local expert truly provides a deeper and richer experience for everyone,” Cundy says.

Mobilizing Against Hunger SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

DENVER BOTANIC GARDENS

Forging Ahead

From the beginning, Wildland Trekking has been about much more than just business. The three cofounders, now supported by a large global team, plan to continue their mission to build and grow a reputable company that serves as a vehicle to positively impact people’s lives and our planet. “One of biggest things for us is integrity,” Cundy says. “Whether it’s through our business practices and ethics, environmental conservation efforts, or contributions to at-risk populations and efforts to honor the unique cultures of where we work— we always strive to provide the best experience possible and to be a force for good in the world.”

PRESENTED BY

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Lindsay Mitchell is a writer and content marketing specialist based in Colorado Springs. Learn more at coloradocreativecontent.com.

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ENTERPRISE

Perry & Co. Realtors

Helping residents and newcomers to Colorado find a home and community

With its Third and Fillmore Street office situated in the heart of Cherry Creek, Perry & Co. is able to service its luxury clients

Perry & Co. has been based out of the 101 S. Madison St. location since 1971

THE DETAILS Perry & Co. Realtors Cherry Creek Main Office 101 S. Madison St. Denver, CO 80209 303-399-7777 Cherry Creek North Office 2902 E. Third Ave. Denver, CO 80206 303-399-7777 South Suburban Office 5375 Landmark Pl., #104 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 303-399-7777 perryandco.com

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Photo: Jon Larrance

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AS DENVER’S LONG-RUNNING population boom continues, large corporations are rapidly joining the mix. When a company like VF Corporation, the parent company of 20 brands including The North Face, JanSport, Eagle Creek, Altra and Smartwool decides to migrate to Denver, the organization and the employees face the logistics of relocation, which can be daunting. Especially for companies moving across the country with no layoffs and more than 800 positions, it’s critical to take care of employees, who are willing to make the change, in order to achieve a high acceptance rate. Whether companies are moving here for tax incentives, a large, talented labor pool, lower real estate prices or the Colorado lifestyle, the market remains strong and making the decision to partner with an expe-

Photo: Jon Larrance

By Danielle Yuthas

rienced real estate partner is a wise one. Founded in 1971, Denver’s own Perry & Co., one of the oldest and most experienced real estate companies in Denver, specializes in not only providing personal attention to each company and employee involved in such corporate relocations, but also attending to the real estate needs of current residents. “Denver is a great place to live and the rest of the world is figuring that out. We have major sports teams in every category, the mountains are close, we have 300 days of sunshine and now an improving transportation system,” said Perry & Co. chief executive officer, Jon Larrance,

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

speaking of the firm’s relocation capabilities and who has also focused on building up the company’s more than $62 million per year relocation department. Perry & Co. is a one-stop shop for companies looking to assist employees in corporate-led relocation. It has an assessment system to match the agent to the employee based on specific employee needs and they walk through every step of the process, from finding home options to move in, including showing the employee around Denver and assisting with furniture delivery, electrician service, landscaping and more. If the client is coming to Denver from another country, the firm’s full-service real estate professionals will go as far as educating clients on how to use an ATM and operate a gas pump in this country. Though Perry & Co.’s real estate assistance capabilities are global through its partnerships with Leading Real Estate Companies of the World and Luxury Portfolio International, the locally owned and operated company keeps dollars in the Denver economy as opposed to national firms and franchises headquartered in other cities, states and even countries. Many of Denver’s original big-name players in independent real estate have been acquired, franchised or merged. Mark Tenney, the company’s vice president of marketing writes in a recent article on the firm’s website that the local presence helps the company “remain 100 percent committed to the Denver market, both relationally and financially.”


INSIGHTS INTO COLORADO’S BUSINESS COMMUNITY

Photo: Betsey Holley

Drop Quote: “The customers are the heroes in our story” – Jon Larrance, chief executive officer/owner Perry & Co.

Perry & Co.’s annual client party at Denver Botanic Gardens is always a highly anticipated event for the firm’s clients

To further support the local community, Perry & Co. sponsors fun events like the Denver Botanic Gardens summer concert series and promotes Zoo Lights each holiday season at the Denver Zoo by hosting a private client event. Perry & Co. also truly operates like a family, which is why they have many long-tenured and dedicated team members. For instance, agent Chuck Anderson has been with Perry & Co. for 46 years, and employee Jennifer Schell Young, who has been with the company for 17 years, is the president of the firm today. Speaking of family, Larrance’s eldest daughter, RuthAnne Bennett, is also on staff as a transaction manager; and former chief executive officer Don Larrance is onboard as the company’s chief financial officer. This close-knit culture landed Perry & Co. on the Top Workplaces of 2019 list by The Denver Post based on employee feedback.

In today’s employment landscape, culture is under the microscope. The core values Perry & Co. built the culture off of are family, integrity, innovation and independence, which they feel set them apart in the marketplace. In order to ensure employees in all positions, as well as agents, are aligned, the real estate company involved everyone in the company in a values exploration exercise in order for leadership to listen to employees and rally behind what they heard. Perry & Co. only recruits through establishing relationships and each agent goes through a two-step process that concludes with a group interview. As Larrance says, “You can’t buy or manufacture culture.” Larrance’s relatively new leadership role as CEO has invigorated Perry & Co. and poised it for a forward-thinking future. Perry & Co. still provides the same level of expertise in the luxury market that it has built on over the years and now

has even more of a mindful strategy toward growth. According to Larrance, not a lot will change in the Denver real estate market in the next five to 10 years; however, customers will continue to want personal service. “A customer can’t buy a house solely online. Each person wants to see the house, the view, the neighborhood and every detail, especially considering it’s the biggest purchase most people ever make, and a trusted advisor is invaluable in the process,” he said. With a decades long record of real estate excellence, Perry & Co. is focused on supporting its agents, providing one-on-one care for its clients, and looking ahead to many more years as a Denver tradition. Danielle Yuthas is a fifth-generation Denver native with a particular fondness for luxury living, local historic homes and buildings with character.

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BODY & SOUL

Take a hike

Started in Colorado, Black Girls Hike has seen membership soar as participants find both physical and spiritual benefits By Joanne Davidson

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Hikers range in age from 18 to the mid-70s

Photo: Winston Walker

PORTIA PRESCOTT AND JESSICA Newton were surrounded by breathtaking sights whenever they hiked Colorado’s picturesque trails, canyons and open spaces. What they rarely saw, though, was hikers who looked like them. Certainly, they could have shrugged their shoulders and said, “Gosh, that’s really a shame.” Instead, they took action. They formed Black Girls Hike (Colorado). The organization had its start in 2017 when Prescott and Newton, who’d become acquainted through membership in Colorado Black Women for Political Action, built a deeper friendship based on a mutual love of hiking. “I kept seeing pictures that Jessica posted (on social media) from hikes she had taken,” Prescott recalls, “and since I was primarily hiking alone, the next time I saw her I said ‘Hey, maybe one day we can hike together.’ ”

THE DETAILS Join the Group

Hikes are held on the first Saturday and third Sunday of each month, until it snows. Participants must be at least 18 years old and sign a waiver relating to risk, fitness and personal liability. In addition, participants are encouraged to go on one or two hikes prior to committing to a full season’s membership. blackgirlshikeglobal.com @BlackGirlsHike

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A snowshoe trek on the south Fraser River trail near Winter Park

Their conversations on and off the trail always seemed to come back to the same point: that not only was it a pity that more African-Americans, especially African-American women, weren’t enjoying the great outdoors, it was equally sad that they weren’t using hiking as a fun, inexpensive and easy way to exercise.

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

And then the proverbial light flashed. Why don’t we, they mused, put a message out on social media that says anyone who’d like to come hike with us on such-and-such a date .... As an actress, model, business owner and community activist, Prescott is well-versed on the power of social media. “It’s insane,” she says. Still, even she was surprised by the response generated by that initial query on a meetup.com site. “We figured that maybe five or 10 (African-American) women would respond,” Prescott recalls. “We were totally caught off guard when 30 said they’d join us.” And from there it snowballed. “We went from 30 to 80 to over 1,000 participants in one year,” Prescott says. Black Girls Hike (Colorado) caught the attention of producers at the “NBC Nightly News” with Lester Holt. After a segment filmed during a hike in Conifer aired on Jan. 27, “Calls starting coming in from L.A., Buffalo and Atlanta—all over the U.S.—asking if we had a chapter in their city.” In response to the growing interest, Newton and fellow hiker Tinelle Louis created Black Girls Hike Global, an organization whose 2,000 members belong to 16 chapters in 14 states. Black Girls Hike (Colorado) is one of the 16; a second Colorado chapter is being formed in Colorado Springs. “Destination hikes” to foreign countries are being planned. Initially, Prescott says, “We were shocked at the number who had never hiked before, and who admitted they weren’t sure if it was the thing for them. But we made it clear


Photo: Winston Walker

LIVING A LIFE OF BALANCE

Hikers enjoy the trails the trails in Conifer Community Park at Beaver Ranch

that we welcomed all ages, shapes, genders and fitness levels—and that hiking as a group would alleviate any fears associated with being in the outdoors.” Weight is a touchy subject, she adds, “So we don’t promote hiking as a weight-loss tool; instead, we remind them that African-American women have the highest rates of cardiovascular disease and that hiking is one way to combat it.” The social and spiritual aspects are also emphasized. Hiking, Prescott and Newton say, is “Good for the soul as it connects you to nature and that helps relieve stress.” They encourage hikers to keep a journal or blog about their outdoor adventures, to pause and absorb the beauty around them and to take plenty of pictures to share with family and friends. Hikers range in age from 18 to the mid-70s and include doctors, engineers, students, housewives and college students who believe that “If

you can walk you can hike.” In the beginning, Prescott and Newton led Black Girls Hike (Colorado) participants to some of their favorite trails around St. Mary’s Glacier, Breckenridge and Eldorado Springs. Later, Winston Walker, who Prescott describes as “the Zen master of hiking who knows every trail in Colorado,” came aboard to share his extensive knowledge of the intricacies of highaltitude hikes and the history and other highlights of the trails they could visit. Walker now heads the Denver chapter, where recent outings have included snowshoeing at Brainard Lake and hiking at the Paint Mines Interpretive Park, a 750-acre open space in El Paso County that contains stunning geological formations and evidence of human life dating back 9,000 years. The Black Girls Hike Global website carries news of upcoming hikes; it also contains a hiking guide for be-

ginners, answers to frequently asked questions, a pre-hike checklist (water, compass, sunscreen, attire, etc.), instructions on trail etiquette, pictures from previous hikes and a blog. Newton scouts each trail before putting the word out for sign-ups so that participants will know the level of difficulty, the gradient of the hill and the type of terrain. Hikers are free to proceed at their own pace, hiking as far as they can, or care to. Some pause to write in their journals or absorb the beauty. “We’ve created a movement,” Prescott concludes. “A wonderful, positive and supportive community.” Joanne Davidson isn’t insulted whenever anyone tells her to go take a hike. Instead, she laces up her faithful New Balance shoes and replies, “Sure! Where?” While she’s not about to set out on the grueling Colorado Trail, she does look forward to the summer months and enjoying both the beauty and solitude that can be found on any number of mountain trails.

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Photo: Jenny Clawson

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MOD DENVER MODERNISM WEEK

MORE THAN A FLASHBACK TO A TREND POPULAR AT AN EARLIER TIME, DENVER MODERNISM WEEK CONFIRMS THAT MID-CENTURY MODERN DESIGN IS HERE TO STAY Summer in Denver is a series of colorful, energizing events that applaud the city’s history, food, music, art and architecture. It’s living in the moment, treasuring the past and marveling at what might come next. Denver Modernism Week is based on these ideas, paying homage to an era when people were ready for a change in outlook, lifestyle and the feel of the homes they lived in. Adrian Kinney, Atom Stevens and Dana Sednek,

the three founders of Denver Modernism Week, are so passionate about midcentury modern home design that they created a citywide celebration to educate and share the nuances of the concept with, as Sednek puts it, “the curious and committed.” With more than 6,000 mid-century modern homes in and around Denver, the Mile High City is the perfect venue to display the mid-mod aesthetic. By Marge D. Hansen

DENVER MODERNISM WEEK Aug.16 to 25 denvermodernismweek.com


Photo, above: Jenny Clawson

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Photo, below: Atom Stevens


W What’s it all about?

Building on last year’s inaugural, Denver Modernism Week 2019 will offer talks and discussions on home and landscape plans to enhance the educational piece and combine it with more social events to add to the fun quotient, including a tiki-themed party and a salute to Arapahoe Acres’ 70th anniversary. Since visuals strengthen the narrative, openhouse style tours of mid-century modern neighborhoods will provide an “up close and personal” experience of this enduring architecture. A local resident or historian will “help interpret the stories and history behind each home and neighborhood,” says Kinney, who is a Denver realtor, designer and preservation activist that specializes in midcentury modern properties. One of the highlights of the tour is a visit to a mid-century modern residential high rise. “We are excited to once again have the long-running Denver Modernism Show as part of our programming,” Kinney says. “The show is about more than modernism; it is a vibrant celebration of mid-20th-century pop culture, which we will always want to be a strong component of Denver Modernism Week.” The final week of the “Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America” exhibit at the Denver Art Museum is a nice tie-in to both Denver Modernism Week and the Modernism Show. Some additional events are in the works to celebrate the midcentury modern vibe that will light up Denver in mid-August.

The mid-century modern aesthetic “Modernism, as it relates to home design, is not a style, but rather a philosophy of design that explores the human relationship to the home,” Stevens explains. “They are built to connect to nature through natural materials, natural light, outdoor vistas and outdoor living rooms. They are sensitive to privacy, with clear delineations between living spaces and sleeping spaces and by creating outdoor areas that are as private as indoor spaces. Mid-century modern homes are simple, minimal, often geometrically playful, whose design elements work to improve the quality of living, whether it is a 900square-foot Cliff May pre-fab in Harvey Park or a 3,000square-foot Cherry Hills Village rambler,” says Stevens, who has a degree in interior architecture from Kansas State University and is a Denver freelance designer, developer, photographer and owner of The Happy Atom Creative. The use of post-and-beam construction and deep eaves are recognizable characteristics of mid-century modern home construction. Several interior walls are non-loadbearing for flexibility in layout, and the exterior connection is achieved through the use of window walls. Glass gables make the roof look like it is suspended above the home. Just as the glass gables allow more natural light, the wide eaves protect the interior from too much sunlight. MID-MOD COOL PREVIOUS PAGE: Deza Estates CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: Exterior of a recently renovated Lynwood A-frame; post-and-beam constructed home in Lynwood developed by H. B. Wolff & Co. in the mid-50s; a Cliff May tract home in Harvey Park


Photo: Jenny Clawson

Photo: Jenny Clawson

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OUTDOOR COMES INSIDE CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: A home in Arapahoe Hills in Littleton, the sister neighborhood to Arapaphoe Acres; a glimpse of the bright orange found throughout Wellshire Arms; a 50s gem in Northglenn’s Deza Estates

Kinney uses phrases like “based on functionality and livability, feels proportional and pieces of art” when he describes the core appeal of the iconic design. “Whereas typical homes might show their best faces to the street, the best parts of mid-century homes are often saved for the private areas of the home,” he says. Sednek, who works for Intuit as a staff learning architect, with digital learning and collaboration expertise, has an easy commute to the office in her mid-mod backyard tiny shed. “I’m the neighborhood historian for the historically significant South Dahlia Lane community here in Denver. It was the first—and only—single family cooperative of 32 homes backed by the FHA in the ’50s.” She recently launched a mid-mod blog called DaynStarr. “When it comes to lifestyle elements that a homeowner might bring into their living situation, the word modernism evokes for me a sense of joy, awakened by mid-century optimism, an appreciation for color and art, delighting in industrial-age innovations to make our home and lives work better.”

Photo: Atom Stevens

Striking form. Maximum function. Most of Denver’s residential and commercial mid-century modern buildings were designed by local architects. The impressive list includes Eugene Sternberg, Charles Deaton, William Muchow, Joseph and Louis Marlow and others. “In the mid-1950s, Denver was growing at four times the national average (during a time in which the national population was booming),” Kinney says, relating that neighborhoods like Arapahoe Acres in Englewood, Arapaho Hills in Littleton, Krisana Park and Lynwood in Denver, the Cliff May Homes and Carey “Holiday Homes” in Denver’s Harvey Park, and Alta Vista in Arvada were enclaves of modern homes, which was unusual to see outside of California. Mid-century modern design was a new approach that incorporated futuristic features. These same elements were the forerunners of today’s popular open-floor plan concept, the incorporation of wood and natural stone into a living space, expansive use of floor-to-ceiling windows and the blending of indoor-outdoor living. Denver Modernism Week is a great way to become more familiar with this classic design concept. Like Kinney, Stevens and Sednek, you might already have a passion for the clean lines, open plan, angular detailing, mix of materials, bold front entrances, and a strong color palette that embraces orange, turquoise, red and redwood finishes. And if you feel nostalgic or simply drawn to the movement that brought these design principles to prominence, you won’t want to miss Denver’s week-long celebration of mid-century modern architecture and design. Marge D. Hansen is a Broomfield-based writer/editor. She grew up in a suburb of Chicago where mid-century modern homes transformed the residential landscape. AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 COLORADO EXPRESSION 95


ART & DESIGN

The Art of Collecting Curator and consultant Ann Benson Reidy shares her passion for having art in our environs By Colleen Smith

Photo: Colleen Baz

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“I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO BE raised in a household with parents who loved collecting art, people who understood and valued art, so I inhaled it at a really young age,” says Ann Benson Reidy. “I always felt alive walking into a museum or gallery, and I capitalized on my passion when I went to college.” After earning degrees in art history and American studies at Smith College, she served as a founding member of Culture Haus at Denver Art Museum. She brought her art expertise to Le Jeune Salon and to art events benefiting various charities. And she founded her two companies: Ann Benson Reidy + Associates to work with residential clients and ABR Corporate Art Services to serve businesses. “My clients find me almost strictly through word-of-mouth. They call and say, ‘I need a piece over the fireplace.’ I set a time to go into the home to review their current

Ann Benson Reidy, art curator and consultant

aesthetic, understand the budget, genre, size and colors and then offer options across the board from across the country,” she says. “I give an array of different pieces and bring them directly to the home and talk about if it’s creating the look and feel they want,” she says. “I like to give clients 48 to 72 hours to live with the art to see if it creates a story or sparks something, if they dream about it or connect with it. I’m always looking for something that fills them up.” Reidy deals with clients across a range of art collecting experience and interests, from neophytes to advanced Andrew Wyeth aficionados. “A lot of people don’t know what they like. Some grew up with Hudson River Valley and can’t be around

THE DETAILS Ann Benson Reidy + Associates

ABR Art Services (corporate) 424 Broadway, Suite 200 Denver, CO 80203 303-522-2979 annbensonreidy.com

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Corporate Project, Ward Village, Ae’o Tower, Honolulu; Artist: Kalani Largusa

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Ann Benson Reidy guides residential and commercial clients through the process of purchasing and installing art, helping them make the best aesthetic and financial decisions in their acquisitions.


Photo: Emily Minton Redfield

AT HOME IN THE WEST

Residential Project; Artist: Andrew Millner

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ART & DESIGN

that anymore, but a lot want to be surrounded with the familiar,” she says. “Some want to be on a fearless track and find things that move them that are different to create a new journey in how they view the world.”

Whether working in Colorado, Hawaii or elsewhere, Reidy supports local and regional artists and galleries. “There’s nothing more exhilarating. I truly believe that art and the spirit within, what we have collectively as people, lifts us up and brings us joy and makes us think differently,” she says. “Keeping galleries viable brings so much to our community. Having them thrive and stay in this com-

Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Supporting local artists

Corporate Project, Ward Village, Ae’o Tower, Honolulu; Artists (left to right): Andrew Jensdotter, Jeremy Holmes

Residential Project; Artist: Allison Gildersleeve

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Photo: Emily Minton Redfield

munity is really important, not only to lure in big businesses, but to give small businesses a place to find a good selection of art.” In addition to assisting clients with purchases, Reidy applies expertise to art installations. “It’s my business to make sure a house feels spatially correct, that the genre works and scale is correct when it comes to art so there’s harmony and fluidity,” she says. “I correct heights of paintings hung too low or too high or not with equidistance. We correct framing every day on pieces that look dated, stale or drab or flat,” she says. For Reidy, respecting a client’s current collection is tantamount. “I’m not that person who tells clients to buy all new art. I never, ever do that because art always has a story and a history. Maybe it was a piece from your grandfather in 1983, and you have heart in it, and you don’t want to let go,” she says.

The stages of collecting

Reidy typically works with three categories of residential clients. “A lot of people—young buyers don’t know how to look at art—don’t know how to talk to an artist or a gallerist or know what they like,” she says.


Corporate Project, Ward Village, Ae’o Tower, Honoulu; Artists (left to right): Katy Stone, Khalilah Birdsong

Another group consists of people with young families. “These clients could be 25 or 45, and some have started collecting, but then started a family and got busy with school and soccer and lacrosse. I bring pieces to look at in the home.” Older people who are downsizing make up the third group. “They ask, ‘what do I do with all this art?’ We reframe and rehang an entire house so it feels new with the existing collection. They value some of what they have, and other pieces we crate up and ship to auction or to sell privately,” she says. Reidy, the mother of four, hones her own aesthetic constantly by perusing magazines, following fashion trends and visiting museums or galleries. She emphasizes that art is ever more important in the digital age. “One thing I really value in art is feeling the touch of the human hand. When you see paint or stain or graphite or pastel placed on any type of medium, you can sense the hand of the artist and the work becomes humanized,” she says. “That’s really lost with screens. The tactile feeling is lost,” she says, “but I do have admiration for a lot of video artists.”

For art collectors at any age or stage, Reidy offered this advice: “Really be fearless in looking at what art can do for your soul and your personhood and your thinking. Art can release you into a different state of contentment,” she says. “Art can really help with perspective and outlook on life. And it doesn’t have to be thousands of dollars. It can be inexpensive and available, as well. Art is for everybody.” For Reidy, curating art and consulting with collectors brings gratification and a touch of magic. “It makes me feel so good to do what I do. It’s so fun, and needs to be fun and not laborious,” she says. “I get to watch a client go weak in the knees and tear up when she sees a piece of art. That emotion: that’s magic. And that’s exactly why I do this.”

2914 East Sixth Avenue 303/333/2493

Photo: Aaron Yoshino

AT HOME IN THE WEST

Colleen Smith, an author and journalist in Denver, was awarded 2018 and 2019 grants from the Haven Foundation for freelance artists. She won the 2018 Screenplay Contest co-sponsored by the Colorado Office of Film, Television and Media and Women in Film and Media Colorado. She writes for numerous magazines and newspapers specializing in fine arts, contemporary pop music and nature.

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PUBLIC SPACES

Designs on Landscaping

Dig Studio excavates deep meaning of how people relate to nature and each other

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Photo: Robb Williamson

By Colleen Smith

This Cranmer Park residence pool house supports an outdoor, healthy lifestyle

The Details Dig Studio Dig Studio principals describe their landscape architecture firm as “a 30-year-old start-up,” and “a young company of seasoned professionals” with “a good studio culture.” 1521 15th St. Denver, CO 80202 720-328-1986 digstudio.com

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LAUREL RAINES SEEMS AN IDEAL name for a landscape architect. “My sisters are Heather and Holly,” says Raines, a landscape architect and the founding principal at Dig Studio. “My mother loved plants. In college, I wanted to be Jane Goodall. But landscape architecture combines art and science; and I always loved art and science, the outdoors and flowers and plants—I learned through her.” Raines studied plants and soil as an undergraduate, designed her first landscapes in 1977, then earned her landscape architecture degree from

COLORADOEXPRESSION.COM AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Harvard University. She is, in effect, the mother plant of Dig Studio, with offices in Denver and Phoenix and a total of 32 employees. The firm coined the term “humanature.” “We see design of environment being about humans and nature simultaneously—that’s tied together for us and a very important mission we keep in our minds,” Raines says. “We’re working with the health of people and improving the environment with comfort, shade, way-finding and what we see visually. Our goal is to get people outside and


The interior of the “Mic Tower,” a large microphone-inspired climbing structure at Paco Sanchez Park

Photo: David Lauer Photography

Photo: David Patterson

WHERE COLORADOANS WORK & PLAY

Hotel Born’s porte cochere is packed with detailed design elements

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PUBLIC SPACES

tain existing trees and plant new trees. We create habitat for animals even in residential situations.” Dig Studio’s prestigious public landscape architecture projects include Denver parks, City Park Golf Course, Denver Country Club and multi-use redevelopment around Union Station and RiNo. The firm also has designed landscape architecture for high-end residences. The company’s recently finished first phase of Paco Sanchez Park near Federal Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue in Denver demonstrates a focus on health and wellness. A Colorado Health Foundation grant helped underwrite development of the park located in an underserved neighborhood with a high incidence of child obesity. “Play was not big in the park,” Raines said. “We always try to have a design concept. Paco Sanchez had Denver’s first Spanish-speaking radio station in 1954 at his house. He was a community leader, a state repre-

sentative, and we wanted to celebrate him with a broadcast theme. We designed a gramophone slide, a microphone tower, guitar pick climbers, a record stage and three sound waves pods. We dig in deeper to find layers of meaning. It makes our designs rich.” Another case in point: Dig Studio’s collaboration with Denver Parks and Recreation and the Downtown Denver Partnership for the Square on 21st pop-up park in downtown Denver. “We designed a space that brought people together. They had no place to go, no park. We added a dog park, too. Programming brought people together so they were meeting and knowing people, which is healthier and safer,” Raines says. “Stapleton is another really good example of our exterior spaces that promote connectivity and activity that brings people together and creates environmental health and habitat.” Raines and Baertlein credit the city of Denver for upholding the

The sculpture-lined walk at Heron Pond / Heller / Carpio Sanguinette Park acts as an active connector for visitors

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Rendering: Dig Studio

socializing to help physical, social, mental and spiritual health.” LaDonna Baertlein, Dig Studio’s director of business development, has worked with Raines for the past 25 years. She says the company is in the process of registering “humanature” as a trademark. “We’re rebranding, and this is how we can easily describe our firm.” “‘Place-making’ captures so much of we’re designing: places for people to use, to interact with each other,” Baertlein says. “It’s so important to social health in this age of loneliness. We design places that inspire people to meet and talk to one another, total strangers, because the place causes social collisions of a positive kind.” Raines emphasizes the international landscape architect community’s devotion to alleviating climate change. Dig Studio often opts for native plants and xeriscapes. “Water is very important,” she says. “We use plants without lots of water. We only use lawn where it’s really going to be used. We main-


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The gramophone slide at Paco Sanchez Park

Mile High standard for plenty of parks and for supporting a national goal to have a park within a 10-minute walk of all citizens. “They’re very cognizant of ways to add more exterior spaces,” Raines says. “It could be an alley developed not just with greenery, but so it feels safe, has good lighting, places to sit, a place to take dogs and interact instead of being inside on machines. We’re looking for ways to pick small parcels to add open spaces or plazas—not always big, but a welcoming place for people to be together.” Dig Studio does not design and build. It only designs, creating comprehensive drawings submitted for approval, providing guidance for all construction, laying out plantings for landscapes, designating materials and installation, conducting grading, specifying irrigation systems and detailing. “When you install what we design, you can price accurately, not running into unknowns,” Raines says. “We represent a lot of work in 3-D renderings modeled to scale. We even can now do models so clients can use headsets with an Oculus and move around inside the space as if already built around them.”

Landscape architecture demands different designs for each job. “Every project is unique. It’s a bigger picture than just planting design,” Raines says. “We’re designing specifically to the site, responding to grade, soil conditions, exposure, light and at the same time wanting things to be beautiful and comfortable and so you can find your way around. With residences, we’re working with architecture and the siting of the building and the clients’ desires.” For Dig Studio, the rewards run deep. Raines recalls an anecdote. “At Paco Sanchez Park, I was showing some students around, and two boys went down the slide after me. They were ooohing and aaahing, and I said, ‘I designed this.’ One boy said, ‘No, you didn’t.’ And I said, ‘Yes, I did.’ And the other boy said, ‘Thank you.’ This is enormously gratifying work,” Raines says. “We feel we’re doing work for the greater good.” Colleen Smith is an award-winning writer in Denver. She has published garden articles in magazines such as Sunset, Coastal Living, Architecture and Design of the West and Enchanted Living and is a longtime regular contributor to the Grow section of The Denver Post.

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Back to School

We had to share one more photo from our cover shoot. Enjoy! —Elizabeth Hamilton


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Profile for Colorado Expression magazine

Colorado Expression magazine - August-September 2019  

Colorado Expression magazine - August-September 2019