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FAITH & FITNESS: Reaching out to the greater community in new ways P12

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August 10, 2017

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‘YOU JUST WANT TO BE HERE’ Teachers build

bonds with students at Barnum Elementary P2 FILLING IN THE GAPS: Plan tackles lack of trained childcare workers P5

HAVE YOU HEARD? A major music festival is coming to Overland Golf Course P6

TAKING THE PLUNGE: Pool at aquarium gives area residents a chance to try scuba diving P13

THE BOTTOM LINE PERIODICAL

‘If I were a teenager right now, and knew what was going on here and in the world, I might need all the help I could find. And all of the help that could find me.’ Craig Marshall Smith, columnist | Page 8 INSIDE

VOICES: PAGE 8 | CALENDAR: PAGE 9 | LIFE: PAGE 12 VOLUME 90 | ISSUE 42


2 Denver Herald-Dispatch

August 10, 2017

Southwest Denver’s oldest school looks forward Emotional, social factors build strong student-teacher bonds BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

It’s a place whose history began when famed showman P.T. Barnum bought hundreds of acres of land in 1878. It’s a place that’s about 79 percent Latino. It’s a place where mud — endearingly — is a symbol for the community. In the storied neighborhood of Barnum, Barnum Elementary School, the oldest school in the southwest Denver region of Denver Public Schools, is bringing kids up to be emotionally aware and to learn in their own ways. “Once you’re here, you just want to be here,” said Beth Vinson, principal at Barnum, which was built in 1921 according to its website. “I never feel like I don’t want to come to work.” Sticky, poorly drained soil made mud a symbol of the Barnum neighborhood community in its early days, Vinson said. “If you stick with Barnum, Barnum will stick with you,” Vinson said, reciting a neighborhood motto. And the keenly communal school embodies that, an environment where teachers build close bonds, engage in

From left to right: Beth Vinson, principal; Danielle Quinones, paraprofessional; Gelmarie Ortiz, dean of culture; Adriana Chavez, senior team lead; and Haleh Torbaghan, teacher, stand in the Barnum Elementary School library July 27. They hold plaques and historical artifacts of the school, including a list of principals and parentteacher association presidents that goes back decades. ELLIS ARNOLD personalized learning and even tackle institutional race issues. Getting to know students Teachers are “trying to get to the level of getting to know the students,” said Danielle Quinones, 33, a paraprofessional and parent of two current and two former Barnum students. “And if you like this, or don’t like this,

let’s try it this way.” Quinones said the teachers know the needs of almost every student in their class, “and if they don’t, they find out.” Two school years ago, Barnum began a personalized learning initiative, said Haleh Torbaghan, 31, a teacher who’s in her sixth year at the school. “We just spend a lot of time survey-

ing and inventorying our students,” Torbaghan said, which includes planning students’ professional development and getting to know their goals. Barnum’s commitment to DPS’ home visit program, in which teachers visit students and families at their homes, plays a role in that effort. “It helps us get to know families and get to know the hopes and dreams of students,” Vinson said. “Schools are starting to do it more because they see the success of it ... it’s the right thing to do.” Barnum had the highest number of home visits out of all DPS schools from 2012-2015 and was in the top three for 2015-2016, Vinson said. “And (the students) get so excited,” Vinson said. Quinones added, “Research says it eases kids into academic success. They’ll think, ‘I know my teacher, so if I don’t know something, I’m gonna ask about it.’” More than one way to learn But it’s more than just paying more attention to students one-on-one. In the new environment, children experience a whole different kind of classroom, and they’re taking well to it, Torbaghan said. For example, students might have beanbag chairs, stand up, sit on yoga balls or push bike-like pedals under their seats to keep them moving and focused. SEE BARNUM, P11


Denver Herald-Dispatch 3

August 10, 2017

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4 Denver Herald-Dispatch

August 10, 2017

Q&A with Angela

Cobián

Candidate for Denver Public Schools Board of Education District 2

teacher in the classroom and think about the elements that made me a successful teacher (at Cole). For students in (District 2), the challenges are related to language. 46 percent of students in this area are multilingual students. And if we’re able to have schools that ensure our students are fully bilingual, they’re going to be able to access the workforce and higher education with an advantage. I know that I earned more as a teacher because I taught in both languages.

BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Athmar Park was the first neighborhood where Angela Cobián’s family owned a home, nearly two decades ago. Her parents immigrated from Mexico to Los Angeles in the late 1980s, and five years after she was born in the United States, her family came to Colorado, where she went to two elementary schools in southwest Denver. Now Cobián, 28, lives near the southwest corner of Athmar Park — as a child, she lived near the southeast corner — and she’s a community organizer who has worked on education issues. She’s also translated rental contracts for parents and has written a letter to a federal immigration judge on behalf of the father of one of her students when the man was in deportation proceedings. She taught teachers in Mexico City on a Fulbright scholarship in 201314, worked with community organization Together Colorado from 2014-

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Angela Cobián, candidate for the Denver Public Schools Board of Education District 2 seat, stands at the Little Saigon Business District at South Federal Boulevard and West Mississippi Avenue Aug. 3. The business district runs along the edge where the Westwood neighborhood meets the Athmar Park neighborhood, where Cobián lives. ELLIS ARNOLD 2016 and now works with Leadership for Educational Equity. She taught at Cole Arts and Science Academy in Denver from 2011 to 2013. She has the endorsement of Rosemary Rodriguez, the current member in the Denver Public Schools Board of Education District 2 seat. She is running against Xochitl Gaytan.

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Why did you decide to run? I decided to run for the school board because I have the experience necessary to be able to make sure that our schools prepare students for life after high school. So that they can be the next generation of leaders — engineers, pipe-fitters, doctors — that Denver deserves as it is on its way to become a world-class city. I am able to work with all the stakeholders — students, teachers and parents. I did it when I was a teacher, and I did it as a community organizer. What are the most important issues facing DPS? What are the most important issues in District 2? I think most important issue for the DPS is the divide in the political landscape around the three different kinds of schools: charters, traditional district-run schools and innovation schools (which try out policies other schools don’t and apply for waivers like charter schools). I think it’s time that we come together to ensure that both students and teachers are supported to succeed. I think teacher turnover in all three kinds of schools is a problem. I would reflect on my time as a

With rising rent in the Denver metro area and concerns of gentrification, is DPS seeing enrollments fluctuate? Are student demographics changing? Yes ... The only district (in DPS) that is seeing enrollment increase is northeast Denver. Southwest Denver, like its counterparts, are all facing enrollment stagnation. And I think the city needs to invest in affordable housing and mixed-income housing if we want to be an inclusive city. Demographics, not really. Mostly just enrollment numbers (are changing). Kindergarten classes are smaller. Another reason why strong, quality schools are important to the community is because school quality affects property values ... all of us are affected by school quality. Some DPS schools will have air conditioning installed this summer. Are there other renovations necessary in District 2 schools? Yes. Let me tell you, on my first day of teaching second grade (at Cole, which also faces temperature issues), my classroom was 98 degrees by 10 a.m. Physical upgrades to facilities in schools in southwest Denver is one of the things I’ve heard (asked for) the most from parents and students.

What else do you want people to know about you? I’m doing this out of a deep love for my community. And that I’m acting directly out of my experience as a student in these schools, as a teacher in this city and an organizer in our community because I believe in the potential of southwest Denver.

Tell us your breast cancer stories Are you living with breast cancer, or serve as support to a loved one currently going through treatment? Do you worry about treatment options? Did you overcome a breast cancer diagnosis? We want to hear from you. Over the next month, CCM will be collecting stories from women whose lives and experiences can help educate and inform others about breast cancer and other health issues facing women today. We are looking for stories from all ages. In honor of overall women’s health, we are also looking for stories from readers who have overcome health obstacles, or have worked with doctors and nurses who have gone above and beyond in care. If your story is selected, a member of the Colorado Community Media staff will contact you for an interview. Send your information to Thelma Grimes at tgrimes@ coloradocommunitymedia.com.


Denver Herald-Dispatch 5

August 10, 2017

Childcare industry faces staffing challenges Low pay amid high cost of living makes retention difficult

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Scattered around a meeting room in groups of three or four, 13 women hunched over laptop computers and smartphones, squinting at Colorado’s hundreds of childcare regulations. They were childcare and preschool employees from all over Denver on a scavenger hunt of sorts, searching for answers to worksheet questions such as how quickly childcare workers must be trained on child abuse reporting and which eight kinds of toys and equipment classrooms are required to have. The exercise on a recent Tuesday night was part of a 120-hour course — the equivalent of two college classes — that leads to a nationally recognized childcare credential. Leaders at Mile High Early Learning, which operates seven centers around Denver, decided last summer to launch the training program to help solve one of the organization’s — and the field’s — most intractable problems: A shortage of qualified teachers and assistant teachers. “We were having difficulty finding staff so we thought, `How could we grow our own?’” said Pamela Harris, the organization’s president and CEO. In a field known nationally for low pay and high turnover, Mile High’s staffing struggles are hardly unique. What’s more unusual is the organization’s decision to address the problem with a formal in-house training. It’s a move that illustrates the anxiety providers face in finding high-quality staff and the gaps that exist in the state’s early childhood worker pipeline. Over the next three years, a new state early childhood workforce plan aims to fill some of those holes, in part through alternative pathways like the training offered by Mile High. But experts agree the task is formidable. In Colorado, the dearth of welltrained child care and preschool teachers has worsened in recent years even as evidence mounts that quality caregivers play a critical role in setting kids up for long-term success. Christi Chadwick, who heads the Transforming Colorado’s Early Childhood Workforce project at the nonprofit Early Milestones Colorado, said the state’s population growth, stagnant wages in the field and more demanding worker qualification have exacerbated the problem. It’s particularly acute for community childcare providers, which can’t usually pay preschool teachers as much as school districts do. “The compensation is a challenge,” Chadwick said. “If we’re going to ever professionalize the field, we have to

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THE #1 BEATLES SHOW IN THE WORLD Malanna Newell is a toddler teacher at the Mile High Early Learning center in Denver’s Westwood neighborhood. She started as a teaching assistant before taking Mile High’s Child Development Associate training last fall. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHALKBEAT.ORG

think of how we have our teachers on par with those in elementary education.” A winding road Experts say many childcare workers back into the profession — following a twisting path that may not include any formal training on how to work with little kids. Some come in with only high school diplomas, some with associates degrees and some with bachelor’s degrees, though often in unrelated subjects. Take Muna, a 24-year-old participant in the recent Mile High training. She holds a bachelor’s degree in international affairs from the University of Colorado-Boulder and has held jobs working with adult refugees and teaching high school girls in Saudi Arabia. Until eight months ago when she became a staff aide at Mile High’s center in the Lowry neighborhood, Muna had never worked with young children. Staff aides are entry-level workers who make about $12 an hour. They allow Mile High to meet staff-child ratio requirements, but under state rules, can’t be left alone with children. Muna, who asked that her last name not be used, is exactly the kind of person Harris wants to nudge up the career ladder with the new training program, “We want to push them out of staff aide. We want them to be teacher assistants,” Harris said, noting that a pay bump comes with the promotion. Mile High is among a variety of organizations that offer the training, which leads to a credential called the Child Development Associate. Mile High staff can take the course for free as long as they commit to stay for a year. Employees at other Denver SEE CHILDCARE, P7

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6 Denver Herald-Dispatch

August 10, 2017

Overland Golf Course music fest gets green light 10-3 vote by Denver council means first event will be held in September 2018 BY JOSEPH RIOS JRIOS@DENVERITE.COM

Denver City Council members approved a contract July 31 to bring a three-day music festival to Overland Golf Course. The possibility of a major music festival at the golf course has been a controversial topicthat divided neighbors in Overland and Ruby Hill. The golf course is bounded by Florida and Jewell avenues, Santa Fe Drive and the South Platte River. Councilman Jolon Clark of District 7, which includes the golf course and surrounding neighbor-

Overland Golf Course, between Santa Fe Drive and the South Platte River, will host a three-day music festival annually from 2018 through 2022 under a contract approved by Denver City Council. KEVIN J. BEATY/DENVERITE hoods, said longtime members of the community really want to see the festival happen.

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“There are people who have worked for years, decades, for this neighborhood in hopes that something like this would be an opportunity that are really, really excited about this,” Clark said. Councilmembers voted 10-3 in favor of the festival. Councilmembers Kevin Flynn, Deborah Ortega and Paul Kashmann voted against the festival. Flynn told councilmembers to ask themselves if they would want a festival like one at Overland Golf Course to happen in their neighborhood. “Just in my gut, this feels like the wrong location to me. Ultimately it just feels wrong to use a golf course for this,” Flynn said. Ortega said she felt torn between her love for music and community concerns. She specifically raised concerns that potential generalobligation bond projects might be complicated by the presence of the festival. “We’re going to be having a lot of public works projects going on. A lot of folks are going to be trying to move these projects,” Ortega said. Kashmann felt similarly divided. “Next to my family and friends, music is the most important part of my life,” he said. “I can’t believe that I’m sitting here, and I’m going to have to vote no. The information that I need to get to that point (to vote yes) isn’t available to me.” Details on the contract Superfly, the organization organizing the festival, has worked on other music festivals like Bonnaroo and Outside Lands. The festival will take place on the second or third Friday, Saturday and Sunday each September. The contract requires the event to end at 10 p.m. each night it is taking place. Here are more basics of what the contract will entail. • Superfly will have a contract with the city until 2022. • Overland Golf Course will be closed for five weeks out of the year. • Superfly can host up to 80,000 people at the golf course. • It will be responsible for repairing damage to the golf course and

for ensuring the golf course is the same as it was prior to the festival. The promoters will pay a $50,000 damage deposit. • Superfly will pay $200,000 base rent to the Golf Enterprise Fund. • Superfly will also pay $5,000 per day for every day over five weeks that the golf course is closed and make a $25,000 payment to cover discounts for golfers who will have to play different courses during the festival. • Superfly will pay about $180,000 to $420,000 per year to build golf infrastructure and $100,000 to $200,000 per year for community improvements, with the money coming from fees on tickets. • Ticket taxes will generate an estimated $1 million to $2 million per year into the city’s general fund. • Superfly has promised to give discounted tickets to neighborhood residents. “I do believe that this is a good contract,” Clark said. “This is a group of people who know how to defend their neighborhood.” “I came into this meeting ready to vote no,” Councilman Wayne New said. “I trust Councilman Clark. I have great confidence in him, and he will make sure the residents have a voice.” Four stages, beer and food It is unknown which artists would perform at the Overland Golf Course festival. However, Superfly will look to promote local artists alongside national acts. Along with artists, local businesses and restaurants will also receive publicity from the festival. According to Denver’s Office of Special Events, the festival will be a mixture of different music genres, and it will aim to attract people of all ages. Based on festivals in other cities, Denver estimates the event would have a $60 million economic impact. “The work is not done. There is a lot ahead of us to ensure that everything happens like it is supposed to,” Clark said. Clark addresses concerns “I’m going to work really hard, and I know all of the leaders in Overland are going to work really hard, all of the folks in the city are going to work really hard to show them that we can manage their concerns,” Clark said. He also wants to bring those who were divided on the topic together. “I think that the neighborhood has a lot of healing to do because not everyone was on the same side on this one, and so I think the first thing to do is bring the neighborhood together to heal,” Clark said. Denverite is an online local news source for everything you need to know about Denver in 5 minutes. Visit denverite.com/subscribe for more.

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Denver Herald-Dispatch 7

August 10, 2017

Only one Colorado prisoner freed so far after court rulings

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But that spigot, while promising, is also very new. A recent survey of about 5,000 early childhood workers across the state revealed that while just over half of lead teachers have a bachelor’s degree, only 25 percent have degrees in early childhood education or a closely related field. (The full results of the survey are due out in mid-August.) Diane Price, president and CEO of Early Connections Learning Centers in Colorado Springs, was pleasantly surprised this summer to land three new teachers who’d recently graduated with bachelor’s degrees in early childhood. But with more than 40 percent of her staff turning over every year, recruitment is still a battle. “I firmly believe that right now in early education you either grow your own or steal from someone else,” said Price, who was a member of the steering committee that helped developed the state’s new plan. Early Connections doesn’t offer its own Child Development Associate training like Mile High does, but the course is available through local partners. Both Harris and Price say the training is enjoying a resurgence at the moment. It provides a gentle way of introducing child care workers, who may find college intimidating or unaffordable, to the prospect of higher education. “We don’t want this profession to be a dead end,” Price said. “We want them to see there is a pathway. You can become a teacher, you can be a lead teacher … You can be a director some day.”

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The changing pipeline Starting in the 1980s, state law prohibited Colorado’s universities from offering bachelor’s degrees in early childhood education. When that changed a few years ago, it opened the way for a new crop of college graduates with specialized coursework focusing on young children.

Long sentences The Colorado Supreme Court ruled in late May that extra-long sentences for juvenile offenders don’t violate the federal decision that inmates must have a meaningful opportunity to seek release. Colorado has nearly three dozen inmates who committed crimes as juveniles and who are serving virtual life sentences of 50 years or more, The Denver Post has reported . Some of these sentences mean an inmate is likely to die in prison.

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area centers can participate for a fee. Harris said one of Mile High’s next steps will be to offer the training in Spanish. For Muna, the course was mainly a way to learn the ropes of a profession she’s found both fulfilling and unfamiliar. “I felt like I really didn’t know anything,” she said. “I didn’t want to be making mistakes or doing anything wrong.” During the scavenger hunt activity, Muna and her two partners — both of whom work at centers outside the Mile High network — talked about the maze of rules that govern child care. Muna recalled how jarring it was to learn that she had to don gloves first before tending to a crying youngster with a bloody nose. Megan O’Connor, a former marketing officer and the mother of a teenage boy, laughed about the fact that there’s not only a specific technique for changing a baby’s diaper, but also for throwing the diaper away.

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How many cases? Colorado ended life-without-parole sentences for juveniles in 2006 but had 48 offenders sentenced between 1990 and 2006, when the term was an option. The state Department of Corrections says four have been resentenced, and one has been paroled. None has been resentenced to life without parole. “We are aware of four or five others that are potentially coming up for resentencing soon,” Mark Fairbairn, spokesman for the Colorado Department of Corrections, said in a statement. The prisoners still have life sentences — just with the possibility of parole. They generally aren’t eligible for that until they’ve served 40 years.

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In light of Supreme Court decisions banning life without parole for juvenile offenders, dozens of Colorado prisoners who committed crimes as minors could be eligible for release, but only one has been freed. It’s been more than a year since the U.S. Supreme Court made retroactive its 2012 ban on such sentences. Many states are grappling with the issue. Here’s a look at the situation in Colorado.

Seeking parole State lawmakers in 2016 ordered corrections officials to create a program for offenders sentenced to life terms as juveniles, with or without parole. Those inmates could join the program after serving 20 years or 25 years if convicted of first-degree murder. Upon completion, offenders could be eligible to apply to the parole board; release is up to the governor. Fairbairn further explains that in the cases affected by these Supreme Court rulings, the Department of Corrections contacts the inmate’s prison for a review of earned time, dating back to the original date of sentencing; the inmate is then scheduled for a parole hearing.

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August 10, 2017

VOICES Some conversations really are a matter of life and death

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don’t know from Hannah Baker. I just now read about “13 Reasons Why,” and why there has been a huge spike in searches for “suicide.” The series was a success, and QUIET though Baker DESPERATION even ended her life, she is returning for the sequel. I no longer underestimate the profit motive in some of us. Am I qualified to make informed remarks about suicide? Absolutely not, but it has Craig Marshall crossed my mind: I Smith think it should, just like a lot of other challenging subjects we all contemplate in life. But I know that there is a World Suicide Prevention Day, a National Suicide Prevention Week, and a Suicide Prevention and Awareness

Month. I don’t get it. It seems to me that it should be year-around. But we do like to compartmentalize some things, like Mother’s Day. Mother’s damn day is three hundred and sixty-five. The possible causes of suicide I will leave to scholars, but I know depression is one of them. Things (people) constantly depress me, but I do not have chronic depression. I know people who do, and when it takes over, the outcome can be tragic. What makes life worth living? And what makes life worth dying? Again, I am underqualified. But if I were a teenager right now, and knew what was going on here and in the world, I might need all the help I could find. And all of the help that could find me. The country has never been more divided, and it gets more so all the time. An 11-day White House communications director said things, on record, that were so vile they had to be bleeped when they were reported.

Almost daily, some segment of the population is undermined or denunciated. For example, the LGBT community. Maybe Baker was jilted. Overweight? Not pretty enough? How we are treated and mistreated by others when we are young can mean everything. Actor George Sanders left three suicides notes, but only one of them gets quoted. “Dear World, I am leaving because I am bored. I feel I have lived long enough. I am leaving you with your worries in this sweet cesspool. Good luck.” In the film “Wonder Boys,” Toby Maguire’s character recites all of Hollywood’s suicides, including Sanders’, by cause, in alphabetical order. Suicides have been featured in films for as long as there have been films. One, “The Children’s Hour,” was very controversial for its time (1961), because it focuses on two women who run a girls’ school who are accused of being lovers. One of the women com-

mits suicide. In 2015, California became the fifth state to allow physician-assisted suicide. I had a friend who often asked me to take her to Oregon. Oregon was the first to legalize assisted suicide for terminally ill, mentally competent adults. None of the five makes provisions for disconnected youth. It’s a good thing. Aren’t we all disconnected at one time or another, especially in high school? My own circumstances — single, older, retired male — are ripe for checking out, too. I have no plans. Many of us find comfort in faith, and then read about some faiths being targeted by graffiti, desecrations and violence. What would I say to my son or daughter about suicide? Perhaps nothing. I would listen first. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

Energy drinks can pose health risks, and are sometimes deadly

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nergy drinks are popular, but that doesn’t mean they’re safe. They may even be deadly for some. There are many things to consider GUEST before consuming COLUMN an energy drink. Known for their high caffeine levels, energy drinks also contain other additives that tout “energy production,” yet these ingredients haven’t been tested for safety or efficacy. Caffeine remains Leticia A. Shea the only ingredient proven to have stimulant effects. These additives are touted as helping with “energy production,” but this is a marketing gimmick. One ingredient that’s promoted for boosting energy is guarana, a plant whose seeds contain caffeine. When a product lists both caffeine and guarana on its label, the producer

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is saying it contains caffeine from multiple sources. Additionally, these caffeine sources may interact with other ingredients, exacerbating their potency. The concerns associated with energy drinks are real and documented. Adverse effects vary from minor heart palpitations to death. A common side effect is becoming jittery, but caffeine in high doses affects the entire body, causing agitation, anxiety, dizziness, headache, insomnia, irritability, muscle twitching, restlessness, raised blood pressure, heart palpitations, decreased insulin sensitivity, heartburn and an increased risk for osteoporosis. It also may affect fertility in men. Each of us metabolizes caffeine differently, depending on our genetic makeup. An enzyme in the liver called CYP1A2 oversees how caffeine is metabolized, but genetic variations of this enzyme means some individuals are able to metabolize caffeine faster than others. Those who metabolize caffeine slower experience a higher exposure to caffeine. Thus,

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200 milligrams of caffeine might not affect some individuals while greatly affecting others. This genetic variation is not rare. Caffeine at doses considered “nontoxic” could be toxic for anyone depending on their genetic makeup and other health considerations. The general recommendation for healthy adults and non-pregnant women is not to exceed 400 milligrams of caffeine daily (again, doses below 400 milligrams may be harmful for some). There is no simple test to determine your genetic makeup, so it’s important to pay attention to how your body responds to caffeine. Keep in mind you may be ingesting caffeine throughout the day, such as in your morning coffee and lunchtime soda, in addition to that found in the energy drink. We need to be mindful of how much caffeine we put into our bodies. It’s simply not healthy to overburden our bodies with high doses of daily caffeine. Additionally, some prescription and over-the-counter medicines, and some dietary supplements, have caffeine or

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additional stimulants. Many supplements that claim to boost energy or help with weight loss have stimulants that can lead to dangerous outcomes when taken with caffeine. Case reports of otherwise healthy individuals having consumed dietary supplements with stimulants have reported events from strokes to sudden cardiac death. It’s dangerous to consume these stimulants at rest but even more so if consumption is prior to or during physical activity. Stimulants should not be used when working out. The cardiac risk outweighs any perceived benefit. How badly do you need an energy boost? Before you take a sip of an energy drink, consider the risks it poses to your health. Assess how much caffeine you already have circulating in your body from various food, drink and medication sources and whether this addition will overload it. I recommend not consuming energy drinks at all. Rather, stay hydrated

Columnists & Guest Commentaries Columnist opinions are not necessarily those of the Herald-Dispatch. We welcome letters to the editor. Please Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone. Email letters to letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com Deadline Fri. 5 p.m. for the following week’s paper.

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August 10, 2017

THINGS to DO

THEATER

Prairie Home ‘Love and Comedy’ Show: 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13, at Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms, 8500 W. Deer Creek Canyon Road, Littleton. Presented by Garrison Keillor. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. Go to www.botanicgardens.org. One-Man Comedy Show: Through Aug. 20 at the Lakewood Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway. “My Mother’s Italian, My Father’s Jewish & I’m In Therapy” stars Peter J. Fogel. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Thursdays; 7:30 p.m. Fridays; 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays; and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are available at lakewood. showare.com or by calling 303987-7845. ‘On Golden Pond’: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Mondays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Aug. 26 at the John Hand Theater, 7653 E. 1st Place, Denver. Presented by Lowry’s Spotlight Theatre, the heart-warming love story of Ethel and Norman Thayer and their long life together. Contact 720530-4596 or www.thisisspotlight. com

MUSIC

Hudson Gardens Concert: 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13, Los Lobos & Los Lonely Boys at 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Tickets on sale at www.altitudetickets. com. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. For information, call 303-797-8565 or go to www.hudsongardens.org. Parking is free. Lineup includes: Saturday, Aug. 19, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts; Sunday, Aug. 20, Kool & The Gang; Sunday, Aug. 27, The B-52s; Sunday, Sept. 3, YES featuring Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin, Rick Wakeman.

Dancing in the Streets: summer concert series, runs 6:30-8 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays this summer at Commons Park at the Streets at SouthGlenn, at University Boulevard

Denver Herald-Dispatch 9

this week’s TOP FIVE Colorado Foodways: A Celebration of Local Food: 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 12, at Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms, 8500 W. Deer Creek Canyon Road, Littleton. Celebrate Colorado history, music, food and cocktails featuring local chefs, tours and live music. Go to www. botanicgardens.org.

‘Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story’: 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through Aug. 19 at The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Presented by Equinox Theatre Company. Recommended for mature audiences only. Go to www.EquinoxTheatreDenver.com Photographs by Fazal Sheikh: Sunday, Aug. 13 to Sunday, Nov. 12 at the Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver. “Common Ground’ features more than 170 portrait and landscape photographs by critically acclaimed photographer Fazal Sheikh (1989-2013). Go to http://denverartmuseum.org/exhibitions/commonground-photographs-fazal-sheikh-1989-2013. Dinos! Live Traveling Exhibit: through Oct. 31 at The Denver Zoo, 2300 N. Steele St., Denver. Exhibit features 21 life-sized dinosaurs, 18 of which are animatronic. Sculptures will mostly be located near a Denver Zoo animal species that shares common traits. Go to DenverZoo.org for details about the exhibit and about the special events planned.

and Arapahoe Road, Centennial. Admission is free. Go to www. shopsouthglenn.com or contact margaret@stephens-studio.net. Concert schedule: Aug. 23, FACE, all vocal rock band.

ART/FILM

Art on Film Summer Series: 7:30-10 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at the Center for Visual Art, Metropolitan State University of Denver, 965 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Each installment includes an outdoor screening of a critically acclaimed feature film, food for purchase and live music. Series features “La La Land” and Workout Palace on Aug. 17. The finale on Sept. 21 features “Network.” Go to artdistrictonsantafe.com. Drive-In: Personal Space: 7-10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19 at Construction Lot in RiNo, 2606 Lawrence St., Denver. One-night exhibition brings together 13 local artists (and their cars) to feature experimental installations in the artists’ vehicles. Visitors will be invited to sit inside of (or peer into) car windows to see a variety of multi-media installations. ‘The Western: An Epic in Art and Film’: open through Sept. 10 at the Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver. Mu-

‘ROAD CarFit for Seniors: 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month through September, at Dahlia Campus for Health and Wellbeing, 3401 Eudora St., Denver. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month through September, at AAA-Colorado Southglenn, 700 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Presented by the Reaching Older Adults Program, the 20-minute checkup is free but registration is requested. Call 303-991-5740 for an appointment.

seum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, with extended hours until 8 p.m. Fridays. Closed Mondays. Western genre, including moving pictures. Requires special tickets. 18 and younger admitted free. Go to www.DenverArtMuseum.org. ‘Calder Monumental’ Sculptures: on display through Sept. 24 at Denver Botanic Gardens, 1007 York St., Denver. Sculptures by American artist Alexander Calder (1898-1976). The Gardens also presents concerts this summer. Go to https://www.botanicgardens. org/ for details.

‘At the Water’s Edge: Floral and Fowl’: open through Sept. 30 at Old South Frame and Gallery, 1588 S. Pearl St., Denver. Features artwork of Michael Warren and Darryl Trott. Call 303-715-3828. Water Line: A Creative Exchange: through Oct. 21 at Metropolitan State University of Denver Center for Visual Art, 965 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Exhibit features 19 artists working in photography, mixedmedia installation, video, ceramic and sculpture. Go to http:// msudenver.edu/cva/exhibitions/.

EVENTS

Colorado Foodways: A Celebration of Local Food: 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 12, at Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms, 8500 W. Deer Creek Canyon Road, Littleton. Celebrate Colorado history, music, food and cocktails featuring local chefs, tours and live music. Go to www.botanicgardens.org. The United Nations: 1:302:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 16 at Washington Street Community Center, 809 S. Washington St., Denver. Join Active Minds for a look at the United Nations. We will examine the origins and history of the U.N. as well as its current and future role in the world. No RSVP needed; call 303733-4643 ext. 100 for information. The Nuremberg Trials: 2-3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17, at Windsor Gardens, 597 S. Clinton St., Denver. Over seventy years after the world brought charges against individuals for their actions in World War II, crimes against humanity are still part of the fabric of the world in which we live (ISIS, Syria, etc). Join Active Minds as we look back at the series of trials known as the Nuremberg Trials and trace its impact on the creation of the International Criminal Court and how the world views war crimes.

Turbulent Waters: Conflict in the South China Sea: 3-4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17 at Ross-University Hills Library, 4310 E. Amherst Ave., Denver. The South China Sea is an incredibly strategic body of water located between China, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. At stake is one of the busiest trade routes in the world as well as oil and fishing rights. Recently China has been pressing its claim to long disputed parts of the South China Sea, raising concerns as to what may happen as tensions rise. Join Active Minds for a closer look at this delicate situation. Teddy Bears and Tea Cups High Tea: 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4, at Highlands Masonic Temple, 3550 Federal Blvd., Denver. Presented by the El Mejdel Daughters of the Nile. Vendors, 50/50 raffle and entertainment. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. Space is limited; reservations required. Tickets on sale now through Saturday, Oct. 28. Contact Jo Ann Van Trump, 303-232-3542.

NATURE/OUTDOORS

Butterflies at Chatfield: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Sept. 24 at Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms, 8500 W. Deer Creek Canyon Road, Littleton. This seasonal habitat, in partnership with Butterfly Pavilion, is home to hundreds of native butterflies, such as swallowtails, monarchs, mourning cloaks and painted ladies. There are more than 50 native plant species in this garden. Go to www.botanicgardens.org

Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Thursday for publication the following week. Send listings to calendar@ coloradocommunitymedia.com. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.


10 Denver Herald-Dispatch

August 10, 2017

Dragons, racing and all kinds of fun

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he 16th annual Colorado Dragon Boat Festival at Sloan’s Lake Park drew thousands to a weekend of fun showcasing the Denver area’s diverse Asian community and its culture. The two-day event, held July 29-30, included the first spicy ramen-eating contest, performances of traditional Asian and contemporary Asian-American culture, a multitude of food vendors and, of course, boat racing with teams coming from all over the country. Dragon boat racing is an ancient Chinese tradition more than 2,000 years old that has grown into an international competitive event with races also held in London, Sydney and Hong Kong. PHOTOS BY ANTONIO HERNANDEZ

Teams from throughout the state and the country raced boats on Sloan’s Lake during the 16th annual Colorado Dragon Boat Festival at Sloan’s Lake Park. The two-day event, held July 29-30, included the first spicy ramen-eating contest, performances of traditional Asian and contemporary Asian-American culture, a multitude of food vendors and, of course, boat racing with teams coming from all over the country. Dragon boat racing is an ancient Chinese tradition more than 2,000 years old that has grown into an international competitive event with races also held in London, Sydney and Hong Kong..

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Buddhist monk Jianhu Shifu from the Chung Tai Zen Center in Sunnyvale, California, performs a purification ritual on the boats before the races. Marie Makinano of Dumpling Love, one of the many vendors at the festival, serves up some steamed dumplings.

Tell us your breast cancer stories Are you living with breast cancer, or serve as support to a loved one currently going through treatment? Do you worry about treatment options? Did you overcome a breast cancer diagnosis? We want to hear from you. Over the next month, Colorado Community Media will be collecting stories from women whose lives and experiences can help educate and inform others about breast cancer and other health issues facing women today. We are looking for stories

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from all ages. n In honor of overall women’s t health, we are also looking for s stories from readers who have overcome health obstacles, or have worked with doctors and nurses who “ have gone above and beyond in care. y If your story is selected, a member of the Colorado Community Media f staff will contact you for an inter- g a view. Send your information to Thelma i Grimes at tgrimes@coloradocommu- i p nitymedia.com.


Denver Herald-Dispatch 11

August 10, 2017

It’s Almost Here!

An entrance at Barnum Elementary School in Denver July 27. The school was built in 1921, according to its website. ELLIS ARNOLD

BARNUM FROM PAGE 2

“I think it helped my little brother because he has ADHD ... staying moving while he’s working,” said Quinones, whose brother attends Barnum. Vinson said it gives students a sense of agency. “Not just ‘you’re here to be taught by us,’ but ‘you’re here to learn,’” Vinson said. “(How) doesn’t matter to me, as long as you’re learning.” Funding for the personalized learning strategies comes through the Imaginarium, Denver Public Schools’ “innovation lab,” as its web page calls it. Some DPS schools are involved in a partnership with the organization, but not many, Vinson said. One part of the strategy is gathering learning profiles for students. “We really ask students about their preferences,” Vinson said. “You would think that all kids would want to write a report on a computer, but some kids said they want to do it on paper; (it’s) how they want to access that learning. It opens up that door of communication.” Life lessons And communicate Barnum does. Vinson said that this year, classes school-wide will talk every morning about topics like conflict resolution to encourage positive relationships and character development. “For the kids to express some of their personal things that they’re feeling at the moment, if something happened at home where they need to get it off their chest,” said Gelmarie Ortiz, dean of culture. The focus on emotions falls in line with more schools in Colorado and nationwide having students practice mindfulness — concentrating on thoughts, emotions and their environment. At least 40 Denver schools are incorporating mindfulness into the school day, Chalkbeat reported in December. Vinson said the “social-emotional” needs of students who experience trauma are a priority for the upcoming school year. “It’s different kinds,” Vinson said. “Students tell you their stories, and you’re like, oh my goodness.” Quinones said some students are from foster homes or live with their grandmothers or uncles, and Vinson added that some students may be dealing with having a parent in jail. Those issues, including family members passing away or students experiencing

emotional or physical abuse, are what the social-emotional learning periods aim to address. Barnum will now also have a full-time social worker and will give students in “extreme life circumstances” a safe space to express anger and sadness. “There’s always challenges with students who need that extra TLC,” Vinson said. “How are you going to make sure you provide for students who need that extra care? It’s part of learning. Not just academics — it’s learning to be a whole person.” Respecting differences Barnum also makes an effort to pay attention to the racial and cultural factors in the lives of its students, a large portion of whom are Spanishspeaking. Some students whose first language is Spanish progressively get more English instruction as they get older; the hope is that they achieve biliteracy or are close by fifth grade, staff said. Students in kindergarten can learn mostly in Spanish, which is common in elementary schools in the area, Vinson said. Barnum has teachers who come from Colombia, Mexico and Puerto Rico. “There’s a tradition here to value the Spanish language and keep that going,” Vinson said. Barnum is also looking at how to prevent achievement gaps for students of color in general. Some leaders from Barnum went to a conference at the University of Texas this spring about inequity in schools. “A lot of times in schools ... you hear about the school-to-prison pipeline,” Vinson said. “Not intentionally, but ... the conference told us how to raise the bar and (have the boys) be proud of who they are and be leaders, and (know) that they can do anything that anyone else can. And that they’re part of a community that’s there for them.” Amid the attention students get outside regular curriculum, Barnum’s making academic improvements. The school had strikingly high growth in reading proficiency — the amount of kindergarden through third-grade students reading at grade level jumped from 33 percent to 56.6 percent over the 2016–2017 school year based on Colorado READ Act assessment results. The focus on shaping children as people and not just students builds strong relationships with teachers, Ortiz said. “Kids all go to my house, and I tell them to go home,” Quinones laughed. “Kids spent the night in my camper last night. It’s not like a day — it’s like days. They want to live there.”

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12 Denver Herald-Dispatch

Finding

LOCAL

August 10, 2017

LIFE

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Athletes seek a greater purpose through community, sportsmanship and athleticism

TO LEARN MORE • Fellowship of Christian Athletes in Colorado, www.fcacolorado.org • Red Rocks Sports, redrockssports.com • Christian Cycling, christiancycling.com

BY STEPHANIE MASON SMASON@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

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ravis Carey, sports director at Red Rocks Church, will tell you that athletics have greatly improved his life. He met his wife while on a Red Rocks Church sporting team team and has grown lasting friendships through various other athletic ventures. Most importantly, his Christian faith has grown through his sports participation. “Your body is a temple; it is where the Holy Spirit is,” Carey, 32, said. “What we do with our bodies is a form of worshipping God. Sports play a huge role in that because it is maintaining the house.” Carey is not alone in his pairing of sports and faith. Young, old, beginner and experienced athletes alike have found a deeper faith through their favorite sports, which are being used more and more by churches, school and club organizations as a medium to building a stronger spiritual life. Here are a few examples. Sports ministry through church Red Rocks Church, which has campuses in Littleton, Arvada, Lakewood and Evergreen, is home to a large sports ministry. The church uses its competitive and noncompetitive athletic teams to build community. “We believe that it is a part of making the kingdom more crowded,” Carey said. “There are a lot of people who speak the universal language of sport.” Last year, more than 3,000 people participated in the various teams. Basketball, volleyball, softball, soccer, backyard games and many other sporting leagues are held throughout the year. People may be intimidated by going to a church service, Carey said, but they feel more comfortable meeting people and learning about God through a sports team. “Sports help to break down a lot of barriers,” he said. “When

A volleyball player serves the ball during Red Rocks Church sports ministry’s volleyball tournament. Pairing faith and sport is a large ministry at Red Rocks Church.

Team members and opponents gather together to pray before a soccer game at Red Rocks Church’s sports ministry tournament. COURTESY PHOTOS

‘We believe that it is a part of making the kingdom more crowded, there are a lot of people who speak the universal language of sport.’ Travis Carey, sports director at Red Rocks Church it comes to sports, people can instantly connect and build trust and credibility with each other.” Sports ministry through school sports Fellowship of Christian Athletes is an organization that creates a community for coaches and athletes to come together in their faith. “Personally, as a former athlete, I found my identity in my performance on the field,” said Seth Olsen, the Denver metro south director at Fellowship of Christian Athletes. “When I came to know Jesus, I learned that it’s not about

my performance, rather it’s about His performance on the cross.” FCA is found in junior high schools, high schools and college campuses across 47 countries, according to its website. More than 12,500 certified groups are led by students and coaches involved in pairing faith with a passion for sports. Chapters are active across Colorado, with groups in Douglas, Arapahoe, Jefferson and Boulder counties. The organization teaches athletes how to play sports and use them as a common ground to witness to other team members and

even opponents, Olson said. “Christianity is not about religion,” Olsen said. “It’s about a relationship with Jesus Christ. As a Christian, I’m not pursuing Jesus as a lucky rabbit’s foot to help me play better or win the big game. I’m pursuing Jesus because of His great love for me demonstrated by dying on the cross for my sins. I’m pursuing Him because He’s the author and director of my life.” Sports ministry through clubs Christian Cycling is a worldwide organization that meets in smaller “spokes” in different areas around the globe. According to Cody Newcome, head of the Colorado spoke, most of the members in Colorado, approximately 100 cyclists, live around Highlands Ranch. It is important for members of the spoke to demonstrate good sportsmanship, Newcome said. “We, together, can be a testimony and a light to everybody else,” Newcome said. “We want to be loving, kind and helpful to show people what we believe in through our actions.” The cyclists do more than ride with good sportsmanship — they have a passion for volunteering. Some members volunteer to build bikes to give to underprivileged youth and others teach youth with disabilities how to ride bicycles. “We ride for the Lord,” Newcome said. “Being able to ride and enjoy God’s creation is a huge blessing.”


Denver Herald-Dispatch 13

August 10, 2017

Pool preps future scuba divers The Go Dive Now pool allows public to try scuba gear BY SHANNA FORTIER SFORTIER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

David Knoll, 28, had never before worn scuba gear. But July 22, the Centennial resident suited up and went for a dive. Knoll was one of many Denver area residents taking part in the Go Dive Now Pool, which was set up in front of the Downtown Aquarium in Denver. The Go Dive Now Pool is produced by the nonprofit, Diving Equipment & Marketing Association (DEMA) and allows visitors to try scuba diving with a certified dive leader in the warm, safe confines of a 4-foot deep portable swimming pool. The 30-foot, 15,000-gallon pool and exhibit was staffed by professional instructors and dive leaders from A1 Scuba and Travel in Littleton. “We’re trying to make a way for people to try scuba without even thinking about it,” said David Reidenbach, pool tour coordinator. The pool has been traveling the United States for 20 years introducing people to scuba without the risk of the open water. It makes a stop in Denver once a year. Reidenbach said despite what many think, Colorado actually ranks in the Top 10 list of most divers per capita in the United States. “Think about it,” Reidenbach said. “You have everything in your back yard. You can go skiing, mountain biking, rock climbing, kayaking any time you want. So, when it’s time to take a vacation, you want to go somewhere different.” Kayla Whiting, 20, of Highlands Ranch, began her diving journey at a Go Dive Now event. “I fell in love with it,” she said. “I think it’s an awesome idea to figure out if you like it or if you’re comfortable.” Whiting and Knoll, friends and sign language interpreters, hope to one day combine their skills to sign an underwater wedding. The Downtown Aquarium does offer two scuba programs inside the animal tanks. One is a volunteer program fro certified divers. The other is for the general public who would like to dive in one of three tanks at the aquarium, including the shark tank.

SHEA FROM PAGE 8

during exercise and keep your energy levels up by maintaining an active life and eating meals that provide nutritional support without leading to blood-sugar crashes. Being active increases one’s energy, and low-sugar meals provide us

Centennial resident David Knoll, 28, talks with a dive professional from A1 Scuba and Travel in the Go Dive Now Pool.

PHOTOS BY SHANNA FORTIER

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Kayla Whiting, of Highlands Ranch, dives in the pool in front of the Downtown Aquarium in Denver.

with energy without experiencing sugar-related crashes. Additionally, high sugar intake leads us to crave more sugar. Meals high in vegetables and lean protein are a sure bet for providing energy that’s natural and supportive. Avoid sugar and energy drinks, both of which result in lethargy. Your body will thank you for taking good care of yourself. Leticia A. Shea, Pharm.D., is a Regis

University School of Pharmacy associate professor who has performed research on energy drinks and other products containing caffeine and stimulants. Cultivate Health partners with area residents and nonprofit groups to promote the health and social connectivity of those who live near Regis. For more information about the Regis University School of Pharmacy or Cultivate Health, visit www.regis. edu.

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14 Denver Herald-Dispatch

August 10, 2017

Water theme runs through exhibition in art district BY SONYA ELLINGBOE SELLINGBOE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Water — it’s hard to focus on any single aspect of this vital element in our environment — especially as Westerners. Artists of all persuasions wrestle with communicating their diverse feelings in paint, sculpture, music, dance, installations, film and fascinating combinations related to water in our world. “Water Line,” opening Aug. 4 at the Center for Visual Art, Metropolitan State University’s handsome gallery in the art district on Santa Fe Drive, includes artwork that conveys 19 artists’ ideas about stewardship, advocacy and activism. They have interacted with students, policy analysts and scientists, as they process reactions to individual and institutional actions that contribute to the water crisis. Artists include: • Anna McKee of Seattle, whose “WAIS Reliquary” is a sculptural representation of 68,000 years of climate records taken from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Created from wood, silk, glass and glacier water, it is 22 feet long and includes a multi-channel soundscape by Steve Peters. • Aurora Robson is a multimedia artist known for her work intercepting the waste stream. • Cannupa Hanska Luger, born on the Standing Rock Reservation, of Indigenous and Norwegian descent, creates socially conscious work about his identity and global issues • “The Infamous Flapjack Affair and the National Park Experience” traces an indie folk band’s journey along the Colorado River in a multimedia installation. • Isabelle Hayeur, Montreal-based artist, exhibits “Desert Shores,” her response to the flooding and later drying up of the Salton Sea in California. • Matt Jenkins and Lynna Kauchek (Food and Water Watch). Jenkins is

IF YOU GO “Water Line” runs through Oct. 21 at the Center for Visual Art, 965 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Admission is free. Hours: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays; noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays. 303-294-5207, msudenver.edu/cva.

an assistant professor at MSU with research interests in performance art, socially engaged art, internet art and land art/environmental art. He focused on Flint, Michigan’s tap water in the installation. • Natascha Seidneck, born in Germany, lives in Denver, a member of Tank Studios and visiting professor at MSU. She will contribute photos, video and installation work reflecting on global warming. • Nicholas Galanin and Merritt Johnson, part of Winter Cloud Collective, collaborated on addressing the Dakota Access Pipeline. • Tomiko Jones and Jonathan Marquis explore transitions in landscape in social, cultural and geographical terms. • Vibha Galhotra is a New Delhibased conceptual artist concerned with globalization and growth. She responds through intricately sewn metal ghungroo tapestries. The Winter Count collective (Luger, Johnson, Galanin, Ginger Dunhill, Dylan McLaughlin) come from across the nation. and in this exhibit focus on the threat to land and water at Standing Rock, North Dakota. Related programs: From 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 4, opening reception. At 6 p.m. Aug. 14, artists’ talk with Anna McKee and Jim White, CU professor of geological sciences and environmental studies. At 6 p.m. Sept. 20, “Art, Democracy and Water,” artists’ talk with Matt Jenkins and Lynna Kauchek of Food and Water Watch. At 6 p.m. Oct. 4, “Uncanny Territory,” artist’s talk with Natascha Seideneck.

Answers

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August 10, 2017

Public Notices Public Notice

Name Changes PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult was filed with the Denver County Court on July 14, 2017. The Petition requests that the name of Craig Matthew Eidson be changed to Craig Mateo Eidson Case No.: 17 C 02158 By: Judge B. J. Campbell Legal Notice No: 8137 First Publication: July 27, 2017 Last Publication: August 10, 2017 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Ann Crampton, also known as Ann Messigner Crampton, and Ann M. Crampton, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 030855

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 10, 2017 or the claims may be forever barred. Leroy E. Opp Personal Representative c/o Goddard & Hawkins, P.C. 1444 Blake Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Legal Notice No: 8150 First Publication: August 10, 2017 Last Publication: August 24, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Thomas A. Siratovich, a/k/a Thomas Adam Siratovich, a/k/a Thomas Siratovich, and a/k/a Tom Siratovich, Deceased Case Number: 2017PR30825

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before November 27, 2017, or the claims may be forever barred. Alexandra E. Tindle, Personal Representative 35 South Hoyt Street Lakewood, CO 80226 Legal Notice No.: 8136 First Publication: July 27, 2017 Last Publication: August 10, 2017 Publisher: Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of: MARCELLINE MARGARET BISHOP, Deceased Case Number: 17-PR-0238

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Denver County, Colorado on or before December 11, 2017, or the claims may be forever barred. Dated this 10th day of August, 2017. JIMMY RAY BISHOP Personal Representative to the Estate 1709 S. Bryant Street Denver, Colorado 80219 Home Phone: 303.934-0369 Legal Notice No.: 8154 First Publication: August 10, 2017 Last Publication: August 24, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Elizabeth Jean Southerland, Deceased Case Number: 2017PR30853

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Roger Paul Thomasch, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 30922

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 4, 2017, or the claims may be forever barred.

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Co-Personal Representatives or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 10, 2017 or the claims may be forever barred.

Jeanne Lyn Tourney Personal Representative 4931 S. Clarkson Englewood, CO 80113

Paul B. Thomasch Laura T. Uzzle Co-Personal Representatives 13740 Telluride Drive Broomfield, Colorado 80020

Notice To Creditors

Legal Notice No: 8140 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 17, 2017 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Lucille Duran, aka Lucille V. Duran, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 30808 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado, on or before December 4, 2017, or the claims may be forever barred. John Merrill Duran Personal Representative 5065 Decatur Street Denver, Colorado 80221 Legal Notice No: 8142 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 17, 2017 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Louis Joseph Buonaiuto, aka Louis J. Buonaiuto, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 30881 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 4, 2017 or the claims may be forever barred. Edward Buonaiuto Personal Representative c/o Katz, Look & Onorato, PC 1120 Lincoln, Suite 1100 Denver, Colorado 80203 Legal Notice No: 8144 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 17, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Aldeena G. Osgood, aka Aldeena Greenfield Osgood, aka Aldeena May Greenfield Osgood, aka Deena Osgood, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 30880 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 27, 2017 or the claims may be forever barred. Charles E. Osgood III Personal Representative 10 Glendale Street, No. 205 San Francisco, CA 94114-2701 Legal Notice No: 8145 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 17, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of John Giannes, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 30661 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 4, 2017 or the claims may be forever barred. Douglas J. Nelson Personal Representative 328 Timber Drive Blackhawk, Colorado 80422 Legal Notice No: 8147 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 17, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Elizabeth Jean Southerland, Deceased Case Number: 2017PR30853

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Roger Paul Thomasch, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 30922

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 4, 2017, or the claims may be forever barred.

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Co-Personal Representatives or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before December 10, 2017 or the claims may be forever barred.

Jeanne Lyn Tourney Personal Representative 4931 S. Clarkson Englewood, CO 80113

Paul B. Thomasch Laura T. Uzzle Co-Personal Representatives 13740 Telluride Drive

Notice To Creditors

Legal Notice No: 8153 First Publication: August 10, 2017 Last Publication: August 24, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

Misc. Private Legals

Deed of Trust was executed Donald F. Chambers and Geraldine F. Chambers, as Grantors, in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, as Subsidiary of IndyMac Bank, F.S.B., as Beneficiary, and the Public Trustee of Denver County, Colorado as Trustee, and was recorded on January 7, 2005, at Reception Number 2005003867 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado; and

The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if it is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the Foreclosure Commissioner no less than the United States Secretary of Housing and Urbthree (3) days before the date of sale, or otheran Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the wise, that the default or defaults upon which the National Housing Act for the purpose of providforeclosure is based did not exist at the time of ing single family housing; andTo advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100 service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of the Deed agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure of Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuCommissioner, in the form of a certified ant to an assignment recorded on September cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of 16, 2013 at Reception Number 2013136389 he HUD, before the public auction of the property is office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of completed. Denver, Colorado.

Misc. Private Legals

Misc. Private Legals

WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in that Paragraph 9 (a) (i) has been violated; and

The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is $197,927.53 as of July 7, 2017, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the deed of trust had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out of pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement.

WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent is $197,927.53 as of July 7, 2017; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust to be immediately due and payable;

Dental patient record destruction notice: Susan H. Kurtz D.D.S. and Anne Gittings D.D.S. will be destroying dental records for their adult patients who have not received dental treatment or examination from them since August 1, 2010. If you do not want your records destroyed, please contact Dr Kurtz & Dr Gittings before August 31, 2017.

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to the powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded on July 19, 2017 at Reception No. 2017094067 notice is hereby given that on August 28, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following described premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder:

Legal Notice No.: 8146 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 24, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

THE NORTH 50 FEET OF LOT 13, BLOCK 3, MANLEA SUBDIVISION, SECOND FILING, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

Public Notice

PUBLIC NOTICE Eco-Site intends to submit a Section 106 submission for the construction of a new telecommunications facility located 501 Raleigh Street, Denver, CO 80204. Eco-Site is publishing this notice in accordance with federal regulation 37CFR 1.1307, the NEPA and the ACHP 36 CFR 800. Eco-Site proposes to construct a 55’ concealment canister monopole tower. Parties interested in submitting comments or questions regarding any potential effects of the proposed undertaking on historic properties may do so by contacting Rosie Makoski, Advantage Engineers, LLC at 1025 Andrew Drive Suite 100. West Chester, PA, 19380, 484-401-9779 or mmakoski@advantageengineers.com. Legal Notice No.: 8149 First Publication: August 10, 2017 Last Publication: August 10, 2017 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch Public Notice Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to build a 31-foot CityPole Communications Tower at the approx. vicinity of 1445 22nd Street, Denver, Denver County, CO 80205. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date of this publication to: Trileaf Corp, Alex, a.grigsby@trileaf.com, 10845 Olive Blvd, Suite 260, St. Louis, MO 63141, 314-997-6111. Legal Notice No.: 8151 First Publication: August 10, 2017 Last Publication: August 10, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to build a 31-foot CityPole Communications Tower at the approx. vicinity of 1925 Sherman Street, Denver, Denver County, CO 80203. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date of this publication to: Trileaf Corp, Alex, a.grigsby@trileaf.com, 10845 Olive Blvd, Suite 260, St. Louis, MO 63141, 314-997-6111. Legal Notice No.: 8152 First Publication: August 10, 2017 Last Publication: August 10, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE WHEREAS, on December 13, 2004 a certain Deed of Trust was executed Donald F. Chambers and Geraldine F. Chambers, as Grantors, in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, as Subsidiary of IndyMac Bank, F.S.B., as Beneficiary, and the Public Trustee of Denver County, Colorado as Trustee, and was recorded on January 7, 2005, at Reception Number 2005003867 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado; and

Commonly known as: 871 South Vrain Street, Denver, CO 80219 The sale will be held at 871 South Vrain Street, Denver, CO 80219 The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid the lesser amount of the loan balance or the appraised value obtained by the Secretary prior to sale. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorated share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling 10% of the Secretary’s bid in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not be accompany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of 10% of the Secretary’s bid must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extension will be for 15-day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of HUD. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit, or at the election of the foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative, will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of such failure. The Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein, HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant.

WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of the Deed of Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuant to an assignment recorded on September 16, 2013 at Reception Number 2013136389 he office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado.

The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if it is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to the Foreclosure Commissioner no less than three (3) days before the date of sale, or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure is based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before the public auction of the property is completed.

WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in

The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is

WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and

Denver Herald-Dispatch 15

mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein, HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant.

Tender of payment by certified or cashier’s check or application for cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below. Dated: July 24, 2017 Foreclosure Commissioner Deanne R. Stodden 1430 Wynkoop Street, Suite 300 Denver, CO 80202 (303) 623-1800 dstodden@messner.com Legal Notice No.: 8148 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 17, 2017 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice Family Court of the State of New York County of Nassau In the Matter of Proceeding under Article 6 of the Family Court Act Docket No: V-10248-14 NORBERT SHERON STEWART, Respondent In the name of the People of the State Of New York to the above-named Respondent: NORBERT SHERON STEWART is found at Denver, Colorado

A petition under Art. 6 of the Family Court Act having been filed with this Court requesting sole custody of Jakai Monroe-Stewart dob: 9/23/2003

You are hereby summoned to appear before Nassau County Family Court Judge Ayesha K. Brantley 1200 Old Country Rd. Westbury, NY 11590 Room 113 On August 16, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. To answer the petition and be dealt with in accordance with Art. 6 of the Family Court Act

On your failure to appear as herein directed, a warrant may be issued for your arrest, or an order of custody can be issued in your absence regarding Jakai Monroe-Stewart Dated: June 8, 2017, Rosalie Fitzgerald To the Above-Named Respondent: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Honorable Ayesha K. Brantley, Judge of the Family Court, Nassau County Dated and filed with the petition and other papers in the Office of the Clerk of the Family Court, Nassau County

“Trust Us!”

Legal Notice No: 8143 First Publication: August 3, 2017 Last Publication: August 10, 2017 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch

Without public notices, the government wouldn’t have to say anything else.

Public notices are a community’s window into the government. From zoning regulations to local budgets, governments have used local newspapers to inform citizens of its actions as an essential part of your right to know. You know where to look, when to look and what to look for to be involved as a citizen. Local newspapers provide you with the information you need to get involved.

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved!

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August 10, 2017

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