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SPECIAL EDITION OF

CHIC TECHNIQUE: PLASTIC WELDING IN SEVEN SIMPLE STEPS!

PANE

FAST TIMES

AT ST. JOSEPH HIGH’S

TRAINING

An Edmonton school’s legendary autobody program engages the next generation of repairers!

The College of New Caledonia keeps its students’ skills sharp with a cutting-edge approach to glass repair!

PRIMED AND READY When it comes to her career, Amanda Greke never backs down from a challenge +Plus Five top tips to build a rewarding career in auto painting, a look inside the life of an auto recycling professional, celebrating Skills Canada, and much, much more! Visit bodyworxmag.com Summer 2019 l $7.95 l Canada Post Canadian Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement No. 40841632 l  86 John Street, Thornhill, ON L3T 1Y2


CONTENTS

COVER STORY

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12 THE CALLING As a child, Amanda Greke learned two key lessons from her repair professional father. First, that auto painting was her dream career. Second, that making it happen would require hard work, dedication and a spine of steel!

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CERTIFIED COLLEGE CURRICULUM

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The College of New Caledonia uncovers the details of its first online and in-class automotive glass technician apprenticeship program!

IN THE HEADLIGHTS Catch up on the latest training, OEM and industry news, and a look at the craziest auto-related headlines of the past quarter!

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GETTING AHEAD St. Joseph High School has the only autobody program in Edmonton! Take a look at how this program is giving students a head start in their careers.

ON THE COVER: Amanda Greke of Hallmark Auto Body in Calgary! Photos by: Theresa Galarneau

SUMMER 2019  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL

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CONTENTS

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THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX Thinking about pursuing a career in auto recycling? Michele Morrison, maps out her journey as the director of salvage administration and finance for SGI!

36 INDUSTRY INSIGHT Stay up-to-date with industry trends! President of CARSTAR Michael Macaluso discusses the impact a consolidated market has on independent shops.

REGULARS 06 PUBLISHER’S PAGE

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by Darryl Simmons

17 PAINTING TIPS by Josh Dobson

18 EDUCATOR INSIGHT by Cecile Bukmeier

46 FINAL DETAIL by Jordan Arseneault

PRODUCTS TO WATCH The latest and greatest plastic welding and plastic repair gadgets that can help your business stand out!

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PUBLISHER’S PAGE

HAILING THE TRAILBLAZERS Celebrating the women who opened up the industry DARRYL SIMMONS

A

few weeks ago, Shawaz Rumzi asked his three daughters, Marissa, Aleena (both eight) and Rielle (five) what they wanted to do when they grow up. Marissa said she wanted to be a dentist, Aleena, a librarian, and Rielle an automotive painter—an answer that thrilled Shawaz. As the former manager of a Discount & Car Rental, Shawaz is well aware of the many opportunities available in the collision repair industry today. He has also seen how quickly many of the barriers that once stood in the way of women who were considering building careers in the industry have now been torn down.

and dedication—not gender. This was not always the case. Like many industries, until the 1990s, quite a few people—both inside and outside the industry— saw a career in the repair trade as being a choice for men, and men alone. Fortunately, this is no longer the case. Today, in bodyshops across the country, women are conducting repair procedures, taking on managerial positions and opening their own businesses. With every one of their successes, old notions of a gendered workplace look ever more ridiculous.

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EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Gideon Scanlon 905.370.0101 gideon@mediamatters.ca ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jordan Arseneault jordan@mediamatters.ca

The shift in attitude did not happen overnight. For it to occur, brave women had to tackle the incorrect assumptions of the past. By refusing to be judged for anything but the quality of their work and dedication to the industry, these women have thrown open doors, blazing a trail for others to follow. This hasn’t just meant that the repair industry has become a more welcoming place; it has become more effective too. With fewer barriers preventing the most driven and talented professionals from entering the industry, businesses have benefited from an increase in high-quality tradespeople. In this issue of Bodyworx Professional,

TODAY, IN BODYSHOPS ACROSS THE COUNTRY, WOMEN ARE CONDUCTING REPAIR PROCEDURES, TAKING ON MANAGERIAL POSITIONS AND OPENING THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. WITH EVERY ONE OF THEIR SUCCESSES, OLD NOTIONS OF A GENDERED WORKPLACE LOOK EVER MORE RIDICULOUS.

When I heard the story, I was thrilled. It is a clear sign that the next generation is going to be more aware of the opportunities available in the collision repair industry, and that the opportunity to forge a career in it will be recognized as coming down to skill, talent

PUBLISHER Darryl Simmons 647.409.7070 publisher@collisionrepairmag.com

we are honoured to highlight a few of these pathfinding professionals, celebrating the contributions of women at every level of the industry. By telling their stories, we hope to shine a light on the fact that this wonderful industry has a heck of a lot to offer. If you have the passion, dedication and tenacity to find a rewarding position in it, the collision repair world can be your oyster. We also hope to demonstrate that for the women whose dedication to the industry hasn’t just been good for their own careers, but for the industry as a whole. Most of all, we hope to hear more stories like Rielle’s.

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STAFF WRITERS Lindsey Cooke lindsey@mediamatters.ca Graphic Designer Jill Thacker jill@mediamatters.ca VP, INDUSTRY RELATIONS & ADVERTISING Gloria Mann 647.998.5677 advertising@collisionrepairmag.com DIRECTOR, BUSINESS SOLUTIONS Ellen Smith 416.312.7446 ellen@mediamatters.ca PUBLISHER’S ASSISTANT Laura Jensen 647.998.5677 laura@mediamatters.ca CONTRIBUTORS  Cecile Bukmeier, Josh Dobson, Cindy MacDonald

SUBSCRIPTION One-year $25 / Student Discount is 10%

Bodyworx Professional™ is published quartely, and is

dedicated to serving the professionals of the collision repair industry. It is published by Media Matters Inc. Material in Bodyworx Professional™ may not be reproduced in any form without written consent from the publisher. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising and disclaims all responsibilities for claims or statements made by its advertisers or independent columnists. All facts, opinions, statements appearing in this publication are those of the writers and editors themselves, and are in no way to be construed as statements, positions or endorsements by the publisher. PRINTED IN CANADA ISSN 1707-6072 CANADA POST CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL SALES PRODUCT AGREEMENT No. 40841632 RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED Send change of address notices and undeliverable copies to: 317 Reid St., Peterborugh ON K9J 3R2

“We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada.”

Bodyworx Professional is published by Media Matters Inc., publishers of:


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THE HEADLIGHTS

OEM GM IN MEXICO

GM’S DETROIT PLANT LIVES ON

General Motors is now Mexico’s largest automaker in terms of vehicle output. With more than 830,000 vehicles manufactured in Mexico last year, GM surpassed Nissan, which slid by 10 percent in 2018, to become the country’s top vehicle provider. North American automotive production continues to grow in Mexico as manufacturers look to take advantage of low wages. In 2018, U.S. vehicle production slid by three percent, while Canada saw an 8.8 percent decline. In response to the news, GM stated that the company hasn’t increased output capacity in Mexico for a decade and as of now has no plans to do so.

General Motors announced that its plant in Detroit will not be shutting down this year and will live to see another year. The plant, which is on the border of Detroit-Hamtramck, will remain open into January of 2020 to produce a high-performance version of the Cadillac CT6 and vehicles such as the Chevrolet Impala, that use the OEM’s “Super Cruise” advanced driver assist system.

HONDA’S SEMICENTENARY Honda Canada celebrated 50 years in April with a commemorative ceremony at the company’s head office near Toronto. Among those in attendance at the event were Toshiaki Mikoshiba, chairman and CEO of Honda North America, and Dave Gardner, president and CEO of Honda Canada. During Honda Canada’s 50-year existence, it sold more than four million vehicles and became the first Japanese automaker to build vehicles in Canada. The ceremony launched a full year of anniversary activities designed to celebrate the milestone with customers, dealers, associates and partners.

MAZDA’S CLEAN SWEEP Mazda swept the most awards from the Automobile Journalists Association of Canada (AJAC), bringing them one step closer to winning the ultimate titles of Canadian Car of the Year and Canadian Utility of the Year. Mazda took home the following awards, Best Sports-Performance Car, Best Mid-Size Utility, and Best Large Utility.

FORD RECALL In mid-February Ford recalled approximately 1.5 million pickup trucks in North America due to the fear of their transmissions suddenly downshifting into first gear. The recall, which includes 1.26 million vehicles in the U.S. and 221,000 in Canada, covers F-150 models from 2011 to 2013 that have six-speed automatic transmissions. Ford explained that the defect is a result of a glitch affecting the transmission speed sensor. The manufacturer has been notified of five accidents resulting from the transmission failure, including one that caused a whiplash injury. Owners of 8

the affected vehicles began to be notified on March 4. Dealers will be updating the vehicle’s power-train control software to fix the problem.

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Honda Canada has grown substantially since its humble beginnings as a small network of motorcycle and power-equipment dealers. Almost 19,000 associates of the automaker are employed across the country in manufacturing, sales offices and dealerships. Honda Canada is a national network of more than 600 auto, motorcycle and powerequipment dealers. The company also is a major Canadian auto manufacturer that builds two models of automobiles, the Honda CR-V and the Honda Civic.

VOLVO PARTS RESTRICTION Volvo Car USA’s announcement that it is restricting sales of its parts to Volvo-certified collision facilities, but the restrictions will not affect the Canadian market — at least, not immediately. A press release from Volvo states: “Effective March 1, 2019, Volvo Car USA is restricting sales of several highly specialized parts to Volvo-certified collision facilities. The motivation for this initiative is to ensure that in the event that one of these parts does need to be replaced, it is replaced by a highly skilled trained professional.” While collision repair facilities in Canada not currently certified by the Sweden-based OEM will still be able to buy parts from Volvo Car Canada, that situation may not last for long. According to Daniel Martin, Volvo Car Canada’s director of customer service, the company is looking at applying the same restrictions in Canada later this year or in 2020. “It’s a matter of ensuring we have trained, certified repairers to perform the proper repairs and provide safety for the customers,” says Martin, adding that Volvo Canada is not ready to implement these restrictions just yet because the program is running a bit behind.


THE HEADLIGHTS

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INDUSTRY ELECTRIC HIGHWAY Canada is well on its way to developing the first transcontinental electric highway. Former state-owned energy firm Petro-Canada announced the news, stating that 50 high-powered electric vehicle charging stations will be installed along the country’s 4,860-mile Trans-Canada Highway by 2020. Petro Canada, which is owned by Calgary-based Suncor Energy, will begin construction of the network starting this spring. The network will extend from Nova Scotia to British Columbia, with the exact locations of the charging stations still to be determined.

GO GET EM, GO AUTO

CAROLINE LACASSE NAMED CCIF DIRECTOR

Go Auto, one of Canada’s automotive dealership networks, has been named one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies by Deloitte. Go Auto has been known as a one-stop shop that offers insurance and collision repair. Canada’s Best Managed Companies is an award program recognizing Canadian-owned and managed companies for innovative and world-class business practices.

Caroline Lacasse will serve as the director of the Canadian Collision Industry Forum. She has been involved in the automotive industry for more than 20 years, with a special focus on training and organizational development. During her career, she has worked as a collision repair technician and teacher, an I-CAR instructor, university lecturer, and as a training coordinator for CSMO-Auto in Quebec. She is currently the chairperson of the Quebec I-CAR Committee.

CANADIANS LISTED AS WORLD TECHNICIANS OF 2019 The list of the recipients for the World Class Technician awards was released. Two Canadian technicians made it onto the list of 45 recipients this year: Kit Mak, from Vancouver and Mark Robinson from Mississauga, Ont. This award recognizes professional technicians who have achieved their ASE certification in 22 specialty areas during the 2018 certification test administration.

SOLERA’S NEW RESEARCH CENTRE

THE PRICE OF SAFETY As of March 1, Manitoba vehicle safety inspections will no longer be a flat fee of $55. New legislation allowing auto repair shops to set their own price for vehicle safety inspections. Rudy Epp, owner of Rudy’s Auto Service in Winnipeg, says this bill is a long time coming. Epp pointed out that the previous rate was getting expensive for shops and they weren’t making any money from it.

Digital technology company in data and software for the automotive, light and heavy truck fleets, Solera Holdings, held a ground-breaking ceremony for its new research and development centre on February 21. The centre, which will be a hub for North America, will curate data on reparability, diagnostics and procedures. The centre will also disseminate this research throughout training and deliver expert consultancy on advanced technology trends. SUMMER 2019  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL

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THE HEADLIGHTS

BELIEVE IT OR NOT FORD DEALERSHIPS DEAL WITH DIFFERENT SORT OF DEALER A number of Canadian Ford dealerships made an unexpected discovery. Dealerships in Ontario, New Brunswick and Quebec found large packets of methamphetamines hidden in the spare tires of Ford Fusions that didn’t match the make or model of the vehicle. The vehicles were shipped from a Mexico car factory. Police said they believe the shipment of illegal drugs was part of an operation run by the Sinaloa drug cartel, the group that controls the area around the Ford factory plant in Hermosillo, Mexico. In total, police found 180 kilograms of meth which has an estimated street value of $4.5 million.

BUGATTI BACK IN BLACK The most expensive new car has been sold for 16.7 million euros ($21 million). The oneoff Bugatti luxury sports car, also referred to as “La Voiture Noire” meaning “The Black Car,” is a low-slung sports car with a huge 16-cylinder engine and of course a Bugatti badge on the front grille. The vehicle made its debut at the Geneva auto show, where the automaker announced that it had been sold.

TOTAL WHITEOUT Terrifying dash-cam footage shows a blanket of snow coming down on a series of vehicles travelling on Colorado’s Ten Mile Canyon region. Shaune Golemon was driving on 1-70 when his daughter noticed a wall of snow coming down from the mountain that surrounded them. It was indeed an avalanche. The avalanche completely covered the vehicle, making it impossible to move or see. There were no reports of injuries and they were able to safely get out of the vehicle after the snow was finished coming down. Local media confirmed the avalanche was not a controlled slide. Warnings were in place at the time of the incident.

MEMBERS ONLY

BOMB ALERT A family in Edmonton is pretty freaked out after they discovered a pipe bomb taped underneath one of their vehicles. Police were notified after one of the family members discovered that something unusual was sitting under his sister’s SUV. The bomb was an eight-inch silver pipe with a wire coming out of it. Police evacuated the area and the Explosive Disposal Unit deployed a bomb disposal robot to investigate. Police said that they “disrupted the device by an approved method that in turn prevented the device from exploding.” It is still a mystery aboout how the bomb got there in the first place. 10

The Home Owners Association (HOA) in Tennessee charged a resident of a condo complex $100 because of the mark her vehicle left in the complex’s parking lot. The incident began on a morning in January following a light snowfall during the previous night and into the morning. The driver then got into her vehicle and drove to work, as she did on any workday. The next day, she received an email from the HOA that included a photo of the mark her vehicle had left in the parking space. The email stated that she would be fined $100 because her vehicle had violated one of HOA’s rules: displaying offensive images or slogans. The text of the email read: “Your car, specifically the Honda, left this offensive image on the ground after you left. I believe you will see why we have had [received] complaints about it. One of our residents took the photo and reported it to us out of concern for our younger residents.” The photo shows a peculiar and inappropriate image. As a result of the outline of the vehicle left by

BODYWORXMAG.COM  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL   

the overnight snowfall, an image resembling male genitalia was formed. The woman who drove the car was outraged, saying that the image’s creation was out of her control and that she wouldn’t pay the fine. Subsequently, the HOA decided not to pursue legal action.


THE HEADLIGHTS

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TRAINING EDMONTON EDUCATION

PAYING FOR TRAINING

Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA) hosted the grand opening of its state-of-the-art safety training facility located at the Edmonton International Airport, Airport City site. The facility will serve as a commercial transportation hub for safety training development and delivery, research and technology innovations, and will help in strengthening education for commercial drivers across the province. In addition to classrooms designed for driver education, the facility will also feature a five-acre training track manufactured to provide drivers

with comprehensive real-life road experience and vehicle-use training. Simulators will also be available for drivers to experience different road and travel challenges. The facility and training track are currently on seven acres of EIA land forming part of Airport City. AMTA has reserved 13 additional adjacent acres with plans to expand the facility as the association continues to grow.

Federal Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour Patty Hadju has announced a new apprenticeship incentive grant for women in autobody, collision damage repair, auto painting and auto glass repair technician programs. This new Apprenticeship Incentive Grant for Women provides $3,000 per year or level, up to a maximum amount of $6,000, to registered apprentices who have successfully completed their first or second year (level). While statistics from across the country are unavailable, in Ontario, there are 69 female licensed or apprenticed members of these trades compared with 5,338 males.

SAIT STUDENTS SATISFIED

AIA’S ACADEMIC AWARDS

The Southern Alberta Institute of Technology has partnered with AirPro Diagnostics to provide students with pre and post-scans and calibration training. The AirPro Diagnostics tool is designed to meet this unique requirement in a bodyshop. The autobody technician can quickly and easily hook up the AirPro tool, request an assisted scan—which is performed remotely by trained automotive service technicians utilizing OEM-licensed software—and have a full report with recommended repair suggestions in a very short time.

The Automotive Industries Association of Canada (AIA) announced the recipients of the 2018 Arthur Paulin Automotive Aftermarket Scholarship: Jordan Portelance – Georgian College, France-Line Cormier – CCNB – Bathurst, Olivier Kengnie – CCNB – Bathurst, Eric James Elvidge – Georgian College, Jessica Cowan – Georgian College, Joseph Atherley – Centennial College, and Andrew Faul – University of British Columbia. The program, which was established by members of the AIA, provides

Federal Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour Patty Hadju, Skills Canada's gold-medal winning auto painter Nicole Hamilton.

financial assistance to deserving students pursuing further education in the automotive field. The primary goals of the scholarships are to promote professionalism within the automotive aftermarket, create awareness of the aftermarket industry, attract new people to the industry and advance the state of knowledge within the industry.

TRAINING THE NEXT GENERATION When former Discount & Car Rental manager, Shawaz Rumzi, asked his three daughters what they wanted to do when they grow up, his two eight-year-old daughters, Marissa, and Aleena Rumzi said a dentist and a librarian. His five-year-old daughter Rielle said, “I want to be an automotive painter.” The doting father asked his friend, Jack Martino, co-owner of CSN Martino Brothers, for assistance in giving Rielle and her two eight-year-old sisters the opportunity to try their hands at the trade. With some help from AkzoNobel paint jobber Dan Treschak and Centennial College,

the girls were equipped with the proper suits and safety gear as well as paint that contained corn starch, food colouring and water for the girls to practice with. The shop’s autobody apprentice, 20-yearold Shanyce Neale, acted as the sister’s team leader. She showed them the ropes, and practiced painting on some of the shops scrap fenders. The shop’s autobody apprentice, 19-yearold Shanyce Neale, was delighted to hear of Rielle’s interest in the industry at such an early age. Acting as the team lead, she showed the girls the ropes and helped them

CSN Martino Brothers’ Shanyce Neale with her team of aspiring auto painters: Marissa, eight, Shawaz, five, and Aleena Rumzi, also eight.

paint some of the shop’s scrap fenders. Check out the next edition of Bodyworx Professional for our full breakdown of Neale’s lesson and her advice for other aspiring auto painters. SUMMER 2019  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL

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ON THE COVER

PRIMED AND READY AUTO PAINTING AMBITIONS ACHIEVED BY JORDAN ARSENEAULT

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ON THE COVER

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A

manda Greke has never been one to back down from adversity. Like many women in maledominated professions, Amanda’s journey to becoming an automotive painter didn’t come without its bumps in the road. “When I first started my career it was a bit of a challenge to gain respect for my work and move past the fact I was a female wanting to be in this trade. I felt there was a bit more pressure to show I was capable of doing this work and doing it well,” said Amanda. Pressure or not, Amanda was determined to become an automotive painter. Not only was the automotive industry her passion, it was in her blood. Growing up in Linden, Alta. Amanda spent countless hours watching her father, a Red Seal-licensed autobody technician, perfect his craft. The shop was a second home to Amanda and, more important a place that taught her the importance of hard work and dedication. “It was such a big part of my life growing up and something I’m really grateful for,” said Amanda. It was during this time with her father that Amanda saw her future flash before her eyes. “I always had a talent for art and loved being creative,” Amanda said. “I remember hand-painting a Pink Floyd album cover in high school art class, which really exemplified my creativity at a young age.  I saw automotive painting as a way for me to combine my passion of being creative with my love of autobody.” Amanda’s start in the industry came when her sister helped her get a job at a local bodyshop. Wasting no time, Amanda quickly picked the brain of the shop’s painter, trying to learn as much as she could about the trade. Fortunately for Amanda, her colleague offered far more than just some tips on how to paint a car. “He told me about his previous workplace and how he thought it would be a great environment for me to start an apprenticeship,” said Amanda. “He ended up getting me an interview and, not long after, I was starting as an apprentice.” In March of 2008 at the age of 21, Amanda began her apprenticeship at Hallmark Auto Body in Calgary. Realizing the opportunity in front of her, Amanda wasted little time making an impression on the shop’s owners, Joe,

Amanda Greke’s passion for automotive and artistic abilities made it easy for her to choose a career in automotive painting.

From left: Franco Borelli, Amanda Greke and Rob Borelli.

“I SAW AUTOMOTIVE PAINTING AS A WAY FOR ME TO COMBINE MY PASSION OF BEING CREATIVE WITH MY LOVE OF AUTOBODY.” — AMANDA GREKE

Franco and Rob Borrelli.   “Amanda’s pride and dedication in producing quality work was very evident from the start,” said Franco Borrelli. “She had very little experience when she started; however, her willingness to learn and apply her talents is what sets her apart from many other apprentices we’ve dealt with in the past.” After learning how to properly prep and paint a vehicle, Amanda was brought on as a full-time painter at Hallmark. Despite her lack of particular experience, Amanda more than made up for it with her willingness to succeed — a character trait she’d developed

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ON THE COVER

Amanda Greke nailed a job at Hallmark Auto Body 11 years ago and hasn’t looked back.

years ago working with her father. “Amanda has always been eager to learn, committing herself to doing her duties properly,” said Borrelli. “Her willingness to learn and careful attention to detail have been big parts of her success as a painter.” With the confidence of an established owner and bodyshop behind her, Amanda pursued her Red Seal certification, becoming a licensed automotive refinisher in 2013. “I would definitely have to say that getting my Red Seal ticket was my proudest accomplishment in my career,” said Amanda. “There was a great sense of accomplishment and a big smile on my face when that certificate came in the mail. It was after this achievement when Amanda’s talents really began to flourish. Being given the flexibility to experiment with colours, Amanda was finally able to put her skills to the test, an opportunity she’d been looking forward to her entire life. “Being able to be creative and artistic every day for work is really a dream come true,” said Amanda. “There’s nothing quite like looking at

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a smooth, shiny fresh clear-coat.” Just recently Amanda painted a fully restored 1965 Shelby Cobra with a racing stripe. “This Shelby Cobra was one of the best paint jobs to ever be performed at Hallmark Auto Body, and that’s saying a lot; Amanda has worked with some very talented painters here during her career,” said Franco. “She takes great pride in her work, and her color tinting and matching is her greatest strength. Today’s colours are extremely difficult to deal with, yet Amanda remains confident and patient when dealing with those issues.” It’s been 11 years since Amanda first walked through the doors at Hallmark Autobody. Despite her responsibilities having changed, Amanda’s passion for the industry remains the same. The once inexperienced apprentice now finds herself in a leadership role, a position she worked so hard to achieve. “Amanda likes to share her past experiences with our current apprentices. She really embraces taking on a leadership role and is the perfect example of someone who committed

BODYWORXMAG.COM  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL   

herself to excelling in this trade,” said Franco. Not only has Amanda developed as a role model inside the shop, but she also is one outside it too. Now the mother of three young boys, Amanda works hard at balancing a busy life with her responsibilities in the workplace. “Being able to raise three children and still work in a field I’m passionate about is really a dream come true,” said Amanda. “It’s definitely not easy and sometimes it feels like there aren’t enough hours in the day, but I’m able to make it work and wouldn’t trade it for anything.” Amanda’s willingness to go above and beyond to do the things she’s passionate about has been a quality the young tradeswoman has carried with her since she was a young child. It is this very attribute that Amanda hopes to inspire in her children. Lucky for Amanda, she has a good idea of where to start. “My oldest boy helps me do oil changes and already says he wants to work with me when he grows up,” said Amanda. “Looks like I’ve got my work cut out for me.”


PAINTING TIPS

SO YOU WANT TO BE A PAINTER? Five tips on how to succeed as an automotive painter BY JOSH DOBSON

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K, you’ve been sweeping the shop for about a year now. You’ve seen what everybody does around the shop and know what you want to do for a career. You want to be a painter. You want to make vehicles shine. Well, if that’s the case, here’s five things you need to know to become a great automotive painter.

1. PATIENCE Oh man, do you need patience! Automotive refinishing is a very fulfilling and rewarding trade, but it takes a long time to master. I'm not trying to intimidate you, but you need to know it's going to take some time to learn. Just when you think you've got it … BAM, you get a big run, the blend panel is full of sand scratches or the metallic is all blotchy. Remember, this isn’t supposed to be easy; just be patient and you'll be rewarded in the long run.

staying determined to constantly improve is what this career is all about. Succeeding in these times of self-doubt will determine your future and teach you the lessons you need in order to confidently tackle anything that comes your way.

4. CONFIDENCE Don’t let the nay-sayers get you down. When you've put your blood, sweat and tears into your work and someone isn't quite happy with the result, it can be hard to take. Whether it's a boss, co-worker or even a customer, have the confidence in yourself to address the issue and fix it.

5. SENSE OF HUMOUR You have to be able to laugh at yourself when you mess up. It’s OK, and it’s going to happen again and again. You're only human! Until they find a way to put a robotic arm in your booth, they need you to do the job! It’s important to remember to laugh because, after all, you're just playing with paint! Josh Dobson, Refinish Technican @ Fix Auto Stratford. You can reach Josh at jdobson@rogers.com or on instagram @jdob78.

2. FOCUS You have to focus every day on your process. Sometimes when you miss the smallest detail, it can end up turning into a major mistake. Stay focused on those details and you’ll begin to dial in your process. Finding what works for you and sticking to that routine will help you immensely in the long run, as it will provide you with the proper template to achieve amazing results.

Josh Dobson takes a break from his work to pose for a photo.

3. DETERMINATION Determination is essential in order to excel when times get tough. There will be plenty of situations over the course of your early career when you will question your ability to complete a job. Learning from these situations, and

Josh Dobson mixes paint for a future project.

SUMMER 2019  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT

THE OPPORTUNITY OF A LIFETIME Taking chances and building skills BY CECILE BUKMEIER

M

y life changed the moment I crossed paths with the Skills/Compétences Canada competitions. I had been working as a car painter in a collision centre full-time for a couple of years when I started to notice that my skills in the shop were getting better. Tasks became easier and faster to complete. I was able to fix jobs that started to go sideways on me and understand application processes. Many of my good habits were reinforced and my infractions were pointed out. I was then able, to demonstrate my knowledge and abilities in front of industry experts from across Canada at the Skills Alberta competition for car painting. I never felt so exhausted in my life. I still remember the feelings I had right after the competition: pride and relief. Relief that I had made it through, but overwhelmingly proud that

being a part of the team and I felt like I had gained so much knowledge from the whole competition journey. The 2018 Skills/Compétences Canada National Competition was a qualifying year for the 45th WorldSkills Competition. The two top age-eligible candidates were selected in 29 skill areas and are training this year with the help of a mentor and an expert. The competitors will face off at the World Skills Selection event, which will take place in conjunction with the Skills Canada National Competition 2019 in Halifax on May 28 and 29. The prospects will complete a test project that has been created according to the WorldSkills technical description. The winning participant will join WorldSkills Team Canada 2019 and represent their skilled trade or technology during a four-day competition

MY JOURNEY STARTED WITH A SIMPLE “YES” TO THE PROVINCIAL SKILLS/COMPÉTENCES CANADA ALBERTA COMPETITION.

I had made it as far as I did. I had no idea what the judges thought of my performance, I couldn’t even remember the competition; it was all a blur. I only knew that I managed to make it through the challenge, and I was proud. During the Skills Canada National Competition (SCNC) opening and closing ceremonies, all the provincial teams were together. The energy in the building was so positive and it connected the different teams. I think everyone enjoyed the experience over anything else, sharing the podium or cheering on new friends, it was an experience that I will never forget. My confidence grew from

in Kazan, Russia. More than 1,300 competitors from up to 79 countries and regions will compete in

About Skills/ Compétences Canada Skills/Compétences Canada(SCC) was founded in 1989. The organization promotes skilled trade and technology careers to youth. It is a national, multitrade and technology competition for students and apprentices. SCC provides students with an opportunity to showcase their competence in a trade or technology by participating in simulated challenges and are scored according to industry standards. The Skills movement is international, with a global competition held every two years. The organization inspires youth to discover careers that are available in the skilled trades and technology industries. The event changes lives and demonstrates the expertise and increasing demand for skilled workers. It also gives an opportunity for schools to travel with their students and see the events first-hand. It sometimes sparks an interest in a career that a student has never considered.

more than 50 skill areas at the Kazan Expo International Center on August 22 to 27. Autobody repair and car painting are both trades that are represented at the global event. Four young apprentices are currently in the middle of their training for the WorldSkills Selection event. Jason Sherle and Muhammad

The team of Canadian competitors that will be participating in the 2019 WorldSkills competition, which will be taking place in Kazan, Russia. 18

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT

Afzal are training for autobody repair. Maggie Friesen and Adrien Roy are training for car painting. The challenge the competitors will face is not only that of trade task completion, but also their mental dexterity. They will be out of their comfort zone, away from their country. Foreign foods, languages and places will be a big distraction for them. They may see equipment or materials that are unfamiliar to them. On top of that, there will be more people watching and filming them then ever before. Preparing for this type of competition requires a lot of preparation and collaboration. This year, I will have the opportunity to travel to Kazan, Russia, with Team Canada to participate in the WorldSkills Competition as the expert for car painting. I am working with 31 experts from other countries to give the competitors the best circumstances to demonstrate their abilities. My role is to provide guidance to WorldSkills Team Canada prospects and their trainers and to work with industry members to help contribute resources and training. I have had the pleasure to meet and spend time with Maggie and Adrien, developing and assessing their abilities for the challenge. Both are very strong prospective competitors, they are working full-time and training throughout this year. The opportunities they have this year will put them ahead in their career. Receiving specialized training and getting the opportunity to represent Canada at the World Skills competition will be a lifechanging event for all the competitors. Over the past couple of years, I have been able to talk to young students about their experiences in the trades — how they get involved and what interests them about a Skills Canada event. I help organize the Skills Canada Alberta provincial competition and I travel with the Skills Canada National Competition (SCNC) and participate on the technical committee for the car painting trade.

Jason Sherle will be competing in the WorldSkills competition in autobody repair.

Adrien Roy prepares to compete in the upcoming WorldSkills compettion.

My involvement in the organization has allowed me to see and connect with the passion that students have for many trade industries. The connection to other people and pushing themselves to do the best they can is a common point. The events allow younger students to see the perseverance the high school and postsecondary competitors have. Many competitors gain valuable knowledge from experts in their field and improve their skills in their industry. Helping organize and judge the competition and meeting industry members from across Canada has been an amazing experience for me. Interacting with competitors has helped me to see what brings people to the trade and what drives them to compete against their peers. A whole group of people from different trades and technologies have touched my life through Skills Canada. I feel connected to many amazing people in each event; I feel inspired and grateful. My journey started with a simple “yes” to the provincial Skills/Compétences Canada Alberta Competition.

Maggie Friesen is a WorldSkills competitor in car painting.

Bukmeier had the pleasure of helping Maggie Friesen prepare for this year’s WorldSkills car painting competition.

Cecile Bukmeier is an autobody instructor at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology. You can email her at CECILEB@nait.ca.

Autobody WorldSkills competitor Muhammad Afzal.

Adrien Roy is a WorldSkills competitor in car painting.

SUMMER 2019  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL

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TIME

TO TALK

TRAINING

THE FUTURE STARTS NOW Being a top shop means having top talent, and that means trained talent. Escalating vehicle technology demands upgrading skills, as well as embracing new ones. The 2019 Training Directory makes it easy to find the right course, the right location and the best trainers. It is the only comprehensive guide to training in, and for, the Canadian collision repair industry. The 2019 Training Directory, powered by Collision Repair magazine is here.

• EASY ACCESS • EASY NAVIGATION EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT COLLISION REPAIR TRAINING

TRAINING‘19 PRESENTS THE

DIRECTORY

Check out trainingmatters.ca, the complement to the 2019 Training Directory. Contact us at 905-370-0101 or email us at info@trainingmatters.ca


TRAINING MATTERS

CHANGE IS FAST AND FURIOUS Take control of your professional destiny with the 2019 Training Directory BY CINDY MACDONALD

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ot long ago, electric vehicles were curiosities and self-driving cars were the stuff of science fiction. But the pace of change in the modern automotive world is furious. Repair technicians, estimators and even customer service personnel must keep up with changing technology or risk losing business. It’s an exciting time to be in the automotive industry. To repair modern vehicles requires both upto-date equipment and up-to-date technicians. Emerging technologies force technicians to continually upgrade their skill sets. It’s not just the relatively rare electric vehicles or exotic luxury rides that require specialized knowledge. Even the best-selling Honda Civics and Ford F-150s have advanced materials and electronics that add complexity to collision repairs. That very complexity is an opportunity for those who want to advance within the industry. Doug Kelly, CEO of AsTech, recently told Collision Repair magazine: “Education, especially a formal education, will always help you in your career—but so will hands-on experience. To succeed in this industry, you have to read and stay current and learn and you have to practise what it is you’re learning.” For painters, preppers and repair technicians, bridging that gap is the path to higher compensation, more confidence and advancement. One tool to help bridge the knowledge gap is the Training Directory, published by Collision Repair magazine. This comprehensive guide provides one-stop access to the entire spectrum of technical and management training available in Canada. The Training Directory shines a spotlight on training resources, highlighting companies, instructors, programs, courses and education opportunities for youth. As vehicles become more advanced, so do the methods needed to fix them. The Training Directory and its online counterpart,

directory.trainingmatters.ca, allow both employees and employers to see the range of options, from one-hour online courses to full-day courses onsite to longer college certificate-level programs. To turn an automotive job into a career, continuous upgrading of skills is the answer. Go Auto Group is one of the employers profiled in the Training Directory. Executives from this Edmonton-based group of automotive dealerships told us: “We constantly strive to improve the employee experience and retain our best talent through training.” At Go Auto, employees, advancement is based on their actions. “Everything is based on merit, so if you work hard, learn as much as you can and take

TRAINING

DIRECTORY advantage of the numerous [free] programs we offer, you’ll get the promotion[s] you want and achieve any goal you have.” Well-trained employees also benefit the business. A few years ago, I-CAR studied the impact of role-relevant education and training on shop KPIs. After undertaking training, shops in the study improved cycle time by 14.35 percent, and frequency of supplements for necessary repairs overlooked in the estimate dropped by 11 percent. Available this summer, the 2019 Training Directory sign up for a digital or print copy of your own at directory.trainingmatters.ca!

“EDUCATION, ESPECIALLY A FORMAL EDUCATION, WILL ALWAYS HELP YOU IN YOUR CAREER—BUT SO WILL HANDSON EXPERIENCE. TO SUCCEED IN THIS INDUSTRY, YOU HAVE TO READ AND STAY CURRENT AND LEARN AND YOU HAVE TO PRACTISE WHAT IT IS YOU’RE LEARNING.” — ASTECH CEO DOUG KELLY

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SCHOOL PROFILE The College of New Caledonia is located in Prince George, B.C.

B.C. COLLEGE OFFERS AUTOMOTIVE GLASS TECHNICIAN PROGRAM COLLEGE OF NEW CALEDONIA BLENDS ONLINE AND IN-CLASS TRAINING FOR APPRENTICES BY CINDY MACDONALD

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or the first time, the College of New Caledonia (CNC) offered an automotive glass technician apprentice certification program in the fall of 2018. This program is the first trade at CNC to use a blended online/ face-to-face model. The 16-week course will see students complete 15 weeks online with the last week spent in the shop at CNC applying their knowledge in a practical setting. This online model allows students to get their certification without having to leave work for long periods of time and makes it more accessible to students outside the Prince George area of British Columbia. ”Blended delivery can really enhance the apprenticeship experience,” said program instructor Ken Rowell. “This allows an apprentice to spend more time learning at their job while still being able to develop a network of peers outside of their workplace.” Automotive glass technicians are in high demand in northern B.C. CNC opened two

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“A MODERN AUTO GLASS TECH NEEDS TO BE A LIFELONG LEARNER TO KEEP UP WITH THE CHANGING TECHNOLOGY. BUILDING A NETWORK OF EXPERTS IS VERY IMPORTANT FOR THEM.” — KEN ROWELL

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sections of the program, with registered students from local glass shops, dealerships and communities as far away as Terrace, B.C. (almost 600 kilometres from Prince George). “We hoped for at least enough interest to get the program running. We ended up receiving a very large response and filled two 16-seat classes, says Rowell. The classes are running as one group for the online portion of the program, while the practical weeks will be separated into two groups. Frank Rossi, CNC’s dean of trades and technologies, says the college is ver y responsive to the communities it serves. The auto glass program was developed and launched very quickly, Rowell adds. “I was very impressed by the CNC trades department’s ability to take an identified industry need and then consult, develop, fund, acquire equipment and start a program like this in such a short time. It is quite a bit of work for all involved.”


SCHOOL PROFILE

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BLENDED FORMAT BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

Speaking to Bodyworx Professional in December, Rowell said the online portion of the course was going well. “Everyone has a personal schedule and they are doing well. One of the big benefits of online education is the ability for a student to make it fit their life. Many of the apprentices have a lot of experience and skill, but found it difficult to get their certifications in the North because nothing had been offered locally.” Rowell says the blended format has benefits for both novice and experienced technicians. For less experienced students, the course helps formalize and improve on traditional workplace training. More experienced technicians are less in need of the hands-on practice, but value the theoretical learning. Rowell says the students will have completed several practical workplace assessments by the time they come to the college for their week of in-shop classes in addition to all the online work. “The practical week is largely designed for assessment and review. I am sure it will be especially good for the more

entry-level apprentices in the classes to learn not only from me, but from those experienced people in their class too. It should be a good time.” The instructor has been actively encouraging communication among the students via an online forum to create a learning community that he hopes will carry on after this course ends. “This is one of the reasons for having

one group of 32 online,” Rowell explains. “A modern auto glass tech needs to be a lifelong learner to keep up with the changing technology. Building a network of experts is very important for them.” For more information about the program, contact CNC Trades by calling 250-561-5804 or emailing trades@cnc.bc.ca.

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FRAUD CLODS

LAW AND ORDER: SGI’S TOP FIVE FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OF 2018 IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM, FRAUDULENT CLAIMS ARE CONSIDERED HEINOUS. IN SASKATCHEWAN, THE DEDICATED INSURANCE DETECTIVES THAT INVESTIGATE THESE ANNOYING CRIMES ARE APART OF AN ELITE SQUAD KNOWN AS THE SPECIAL INVESTIGATIVE UNIT. THESE ARE THEIR STORIES...

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s March is devoted to fraud prevention month in Canada, Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) has laid out the top five insurance fraud schemes that they have caught over the past year. When suspected fraudulent insurance claims are made, SGI’s Special Investigative

Unit is responsible for investigating them. Over the course of 2018, the SIU has saved SGI an estimated $5.6 million. SGI keeps in mind that discovering these acts of fraud means keeping insurance rates low. “SGI, like any insurance company, is focused on loss prevention and reduction – this includes

crime and fraud prevention,” said Penny McCune, executive vice president, and chief operating officer of the Auto Fund. “To that end, the SIU is concerned with finding the truth and getting our customers the benefits, they’re entitled to. Insurance fraud means higher rates for everyone.”

multiple fires had been purposely set in the vehicle. Video footage was uncovered, and it showed someone approaching the truck and moving about, opening different doors and then returning indoors. Seconds later, the video shows snow melting off the truck’s roof

and the individual shown earlier returns to the scene. The insurance claim was denied and the replacement costs for the truck were about $28,000. The fraudster was charged with arson under the Criminal Code.

NUMBER ONE THE DNA SAYS OTHERWISE

One customer claimed to have had her keys stolen but was discovered at the scene of the accident. The driver was caught when SGI’s SIU obtained a DNA sample from the vehicle’s deployed airbag – and it was a match to the vehicle’s owner. The claim was denied, and the would-be fraudster was subsequently held responsible for paying back the $15,000 in damages that SGI has initially paid out to cover his vehicle and the others that had been damaged.

NUMBER TWO FRAUDSTER FIRE

The second claim that SGI listed came from a vehicle owner who said they had gone to heat up their vehicle on a cold day, but when they came back out, they saw their car in flames. However, the SIU found evidence that

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FRAUD CLODS

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NUMBER THREE OH-DEER  

One customer claimed to have hit a deer while driving down a rural road. But SGI found it suspicious when just 100 km down the road, police were investigating a suspected hit and run involving the same vehicle. When interviewed by SIU, the customer admitted her original statement had lied and that she had loaned her vehicle to an unlicensed relative. The insured was denied coverage and recovery were sought for the damages to the vehicle struck during the hit and run. This fake claim was worth more than $13,000.

NUMBER FOUR CAUGHT ON CANDID CAMERA

Another customer was caught on camera in a lie with the SGI. The driver had claimed to have swerved into a slough, attempting to avoid a dog. The vehicle was completely submerged, and the claim was settled. A little while later, SGI received a tip that the claim was fraudulent. In fact, video existed showing the customer purposely driving into the slough–meaning they are now required to pay back the $2,000 SGI had originally paid out.

NUMBER FIVE TOTAL BURNOUT

The next incident involves another vehicle that went up in flames, except this time the driver claimed that the vehicle was stolen. A witness to the incident described an argument occurring prior to the fire and video evidence emerged showing multiple individuals leaving the scene where the vehicle had been set ablaze. When the witness caught up with one of the individuals

walking away from the scene, the individual blurted out “let it burn!” The SIU soon after realized that it had not been stolen at all and the insurance claim was then denied for providing a false statement to SGI. The individual was charged with mischief by arson for burning their own vehicle. SGI’s total savings were $4,400. The vehicle was a total loss.

SUMMER 2019  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL

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Buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide Put your products and services directly in front of your key targets. Connect with your target customer. Increase leads and sales with Collision Repair magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Buyers Guide. Engage your audience in both print and online. To reserve your FREE product spotlight listing, simply follow these steps and our editors will do the rest! 1

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COPY Spotlights are in standardized format with a 110 word count. Product descriptions can be submitted via pdf brochures, web links or other sources of information.

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>>>

EDUCATOR’S INSIGHT Stefano Liessi has been teaching the autobody program at St. Joseph Catholic High School for the past four years.

St. Joseph’s Grade 10 autobody students learn how to repair minor dents, prep and apply undercoats and, if time permits, students will learn how to perform top coats and polishing.

GETTING AHEAD

BY LINDSEY COOKE

ST. JOSEPH HIGH SCHOOL’S LEGENDARY AUTOBODY PROGRAM

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earning the skills of the collision repair trade in high school could bring more of the younger generation to the industry— at least that's what St. Joseph Catholic High School teacher Stefano Liessi believes. Liessi has been teaching the autobody program at the Edmonton school for the past five years. But this isn’t just a class about cars. Liessi says it’s the only autobody high school program in the city and it gives students the hands-on, real-world experience of working in a collision repair shop. “We run the program like an actual shop,” Liessi said. “The students are exposed to real scenarios, estimating, parts procurement, new and used parts, various levels of repairs, and customer requirements. I try my best to have all the students experience every aspect of the collision repair industry.” Liessi also didn’t fail to point out that the vehicles these students are working on are not just props. They’re actually client vehicles, so these students are being taught the proper repair procedures. “Therefore the repairs must meet industry standards. It may take them much longer, but you will get a repair that is equivalent, if not better, than industry standards.”

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St. Joseph High School is known for its Career Technical Studies (CTS), ones that give students real-life experience in a specific career. As the only school in the Edmonton area with the space to retain a spray booth and other equipment for the autobody program, it also carries the square footage of space for a number of other programs. Baking, construction, cosmetology, fashion studio, com tech, culinary and a top-notch welding program are among the many. While it might seem that the autobody program has always been a favourite to many students, Liessi admits that it has only just begun to slowly grow in popularity because there is such a negative stigma attached to the trades. One of the common misconceptions that parents often comment to him about is that this is an industry that is going nowhere. “The fact is, there is a great deal of knowledge and competency that goes into repairs on today's vehicles, and the industry is gaining support with the OE’s increasingly as we move forward.” The other comments he’s heard are revolved around the “unhealthy environment” that is associated with a career in autobody. “This is an incredibly misguided statement. We have seen great advancements with

BODYWORXMAG.COM  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL   

Matteo Medoro, a Grade 11 student enrolled in St. Joseph’s autobody program was awarded a gold medal for autobody at the 2017 Provincial Skills Canada competition.


EDUCATOR’S INSIGHT

equipment and technology with regard to health and safety in our industry, fresh air masks, auto darkening, prep stalls, and air makeups, to name a few. Not to mention the increased awareness that is growing amongst the tradespeople about these available safety items.” Although the industry gets caught up in negative stigmas, the program has also brought proven success to students. Over the past few years, students from the program have been taking home gold, silver and bronze medals from competing in the Skills Canada Provincial and National Competitions. Matteo Medoro is a St. Joseph High School graduate and former student in the autobody program for both Grades 11 and 12. Medoro had competed in the Provincial Skills Canada competition for autobody two years in a row and was victorious in both. “In Grade 11, I won gold in provincials and was one away from getting bronze in nationals. In Grade 12, I won gold again in provincials and ended up winning silver in nationals,” he said. But for Medoro, this wasn’t just a high school class he had to take. “The class was the best thing about the school and I always looked forward to going there after my main

classes.” For a student who wants to pursue a career in autobody, he feels as though he is already ahead. Emma Lawes is another recent graduate and was victorious in the Skills Canada provincial and national competition for car painting. Being so successful in her high school autobody class, she is now pursuing a career in car painting, making $25-an-hour. St. Joseph’s autobody program offers

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students a program after high school that acts as a pre-employment or apprenticeship experience. Students can come back after Grade 12 and enter the program full-time where this would give them the ability to write the first year technical exam for the AIT apprenticeship course. “As we speak there are currently eight students that are gainfully employed in the industry because of this opportunity,” said Liessi.

Skills Alberta contestants from St. Joseph High School: Michael Hussynec, Matteo Medoro, and Emma Lawes.

Students in St. Joseph’s autobody class performing repairs on clients’ vehicles.

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CAREER PATHS

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REPAIRING BEYOND BORDERS CHRIS MENCHACA’S WORK REDEFINES THE ROLE OF AUTO TECHNICIANS Chris Menchaca, senior manager of training and development for asTech at the company’s Dallas headquarters

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s the senior manager of training and development at the remote diagnostic repair giant asTech, Chris Menchaca is responsible for overseeing the training of asTech’s small army of remote service technicians. It is no easy task. For one thing: just a few years ago, remote service technicians did not exist at all, so Menchaca’s role is as much about defining the position as it is about ensuring his team is able to handle repairing new technologies. For another, asTech is renowned for its work in taking diagnostic repairs from science fiction to reality—something that has enabled it to build-up clients across the continents. For Menchaca, that means his training needs to cover vehicles not sold in the United States. Menchaca sat down with  Bodyworx Professional in asTech’s Dallas offices to discuss his approach to training, the emergence of diagnostic repairing as a profession within the broader collision industry and the importance of training to all repairers—whether they work remotely or in bodyshops.   Bodyworx Professional : How does your training change based on the experience of the technician? Chris Menchaca: Our training is adaptable and capable of providing instruction for technicians from a wide array of backgrounds and experience levels. Whether a technician has 20 years experience across many different brands or three years experience with one manufacturer, we take the time to understand the unique needs of these individuals so that we can best serve the

BY GIDEON SCANLON

customer. In the end, our technicians are taught how to identify issues faster, and how to become more efficient, which directly results in more capable and confident employees. BP: What should a technician be focused on today to stay ahead in the business?   CM: When it comes to training, the approach has stayed the same. Whether it was 20 years ago or now, it’s all about understanding the fundamentals—the automotive basics.  If you don’t have the basic foundation, then everything else you try to build on top of that is going to crumble. Just because you’ve done your own brakes, your own alternator, or you’ve cooked up your own aftermarket radio, doesn’t make you a professional.   BP :  What are some of the biggest challenges facing technicians using these new technologies?   CM: Technicians who do this job for a living never stop learning. They are constantly combing new information and skills. You don’t ever learn anything by reading it once, and must work diligently to stay on top of things in order to be successful.   BP: What separates diagnostics from other tasks within a bodyshop?   CM: Technicians, good technicians need to always be looking at the manufacturer’s information and doing their research. Doing brake jobs, oil changes, service, those are mindless movements. But when you are diagnosing, that’s when you’re drawing on

your abilities and you’re starting to field those diagnostic skills. The benefit during training is they do it every day and become sharper as a result of it.   BP: Where is the industry headed with all of the changes in technology and robotics?   CM: There’s always going to be a need for someone to fix a car. The skill set of that person is going to change, the training is going to change, and all those things are going to change. Despite this, technicians will adapt, we’re going to adapt, just like we are adapting now.   BP: What advice would you give to a young tech that has aspirations about moving up through the ranks?   CM: The one thing that managers always ask is ‘Does this person care about their job?’ Generally, if they care about the job they care about the customer. Being school-smart and good with your hands is important but if the technician doesn’t care about the job, then you can’t trust them. In other words, do they care to learn? Do they want to take care of your customer? Do they care to follow instructions? To me, it’s all about caring. If they do, then you can train them to do anything. The worst mistake you can make is getting into something you hate. I would say for anybody, it doesn’t matter if they are going to eventually be a technician or a doctor or lawyer, whatever it is if you have a passion for something you should follow it.

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PAINTER’S CORNER

A translation error lead to Ferrari briefly offering vehicles in rape yellow. The Rape seedis an archaic name for the canola plant.

DISTURBING DESCRIPTORS

CELEBRATING THE MOST HORRIFYING OEM COLOUR NAMES

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rom pepperdust metallic to bamboo garden green, the list of insane names is nearly endless. Some, like Honda’s burgundy night pearl and Lincoln’s blue diamond metallic seem self-contradictory, others surreal—like Ford’s tangerine scream and moondust silver. Unusual as those name may be, they are not the ones we are celebrating in this issue of Bodyworx Professional. In this issue, we are raising a toast to the names that don’t just defy reason, but good taste as well. Here’s to you, nightmarish auto paint names!

TROUBLING TRANSLATIONS

In 2010, Italian OEM Bugatti suffered some embarrassment when it translated the name of its canola coloured schemes into English. Rather than using the word canola, the translation used the flower’s old English name—the rape. While Bugatti was quick to apologize for and change the name of rape yellow, it is not the only OEM to come up with a coating name capable sending shivers up spines. Like Bugatti, one can only imagine that online translation services have played a role in turning perfectly serviceable names into terrifying ones.  Volkswagen’s tornado red must make more sense in its original German—after all, it would take a truly disturbing scenario for a tornado to turn red. Likewise, whatever Hyundai’s  iLoad creamy white means in Korean is (hopefully) lost on English-speakers.

Suzuki dealers celebrated the popularity of savannah ivory on Twitter. Elephants were less enthusiastic.

Volkswagen’s tornado red provides an answer to the question: “What do you call a cyclone that hits both a glass factory and a petting zoo?”

HIDE BOUND HORRORS

Not all hair-raising names can be blamed on translation issues. Consider Mitsubishi’s Labrador black metallic— available to today’s drivers—which forces

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PAINTER’S CORNER

Mini Coopers in liquid yellow. 1960s chic has never sounded so horrifying.

A caviar-coloured Lexus, the colour named for the roe squirted out of sturgeons.

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the mind to imagine what it would be like to have the pelts of many-a-beloved family pet stretched across the exterior of a vehicle. For Lexus drivers, their own version of the same shade is known as caviar—which a less graceful translator could have correctly rendered as clumps of sturgeon eggs. Given the tendency for animal rights activists to respond to any number of contrived controversies, it is somewhat astounding that there has not been an outcry against Suzuki’s decision to call one beige option savannah ivory. The savannah roaming elephants of Africa are, after all, threatened with extinction by ivory poachers.

KNOCKING DARK OUT OF THE PARK

As an American OEM, one might expect Ford’s team to be aware to the sensitivities of the modern era. The still available grabber blue, however, breaks this illusion. It isn’t even the only option that appears to have drawn some inspiration from the U.S. President—winning blue is also available. While Cooper Minis have remained a symbol of minimalist elegance for decades, its coating names are anything but. It offers customers the option of both a liquid yellow coating and black eye purple.

Just in case you’d forgotten that it is a symbol of American enterprise, Ford’s winning and grabber blues.

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CAREER PROFILE

Michele Morrison standing outside SGI Salvage.

Top: SGI Salvage vehicle yard. Below: SGI Salvage warehouse.

THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX WORKING TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE BY JORDAN ARSENEAULT

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ichele Morrison’s work as a recycler doesn’t end when she leaves the office. “My family considers me a little obsessed with recycling,” said Morrison. “I’m always looking for environmentally responsible options for disposing of materials around our home.” Morrison, who began working for SGI in 1997, became involved with the Saskatchewan Auto Recycler’s Association through a promotion she received from the public insurer in the fall of 2016. She took on the role of director of Salvage Administration and Finance, a position that designated her as SGI Salvage’s delegate for supporting SARA’s activities. Despite having no formal auto recycling experience, Morison jumped at the opportunity; quickly falling in love with SARA and the impact its members were having on reducing the ecological impact of the automotive sector. By operating according to Canadian Auto Recycler’s Environmental Code (CAREC), SARA has strived to work towards its goal of decreasing the industry’s environmental footprint, something that Morrison takes great pride in. “It’s not just about selling auto parts; we also care for the environment and promote

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best practises within the auto recycling industry,” said Morrison. “Working with SARA has given me perspective about the challenges of the private auto recyclers in Saskatchewan. Not all auto recyclers in the province operate to the same high environmental standards as our SARA members do and environmental regulations would help level the playing field.” One of Morrison’s biggest accomplishments since working with SARA has been getting the association’s website up and running. Morrison, who graduated from the University of Regina with a certificate in Computer Science, consulted with Steve Fletcher for suggestions on how to best connect with the auto recycling community. Having previously held the position of manager of Financial Analysis and Administration for SGI, Morrison also provides SARA with both accounting and administrative support. “In my role as Director at SGI Salvage, I have been focused on creating administrative and accounting process efficiencies and improving the financial reporting available to Salvage leadership,” said Morrison.“Our Prince Albert Salvage satellite salvage operation became a separate branch in 2017 and I facilitated

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Michele Morrison, director of Salvage Administration and Finance at SGI.

getting the systems and financial reporting in place to support its operations.” Moving forward, Morrison hopes to continue to learn more about the industry by working with auto recyclers and attending auto recycling events and educational sessions. Her eventual goal is to find easier ways for consumers to purchase parts and equipment from SARA,


CAREER PROFILE

while taking advantage of the most current technology available. By co-operatively working with industry partners, Morrison believes there is potential to encourage the use of recycled parts in the claim process. “Repair shops can improve their profitability on claim repairs by selecting recycled parts rather than new. Recycled auto parts are original equipment parts, designed for your vehicle and are available at a much reduced price from new,” said Morrison. “Collision repair costs are minimized by using recycled auto parts. Lowering collision repair costs helps keep insurance costs down because the costs of claim losses are passed along to us as policyholders in the form of premiums.” Morrison believes that to be successful, and further promote sustainability in Canada, recyclers must adapt to changes in informationtechnology, in order to effectively meet the needs of customers. Having the necessary skills to do so will require organizations to recruit employees with skills sets outside of industry, much like in the case of Morrison herself. “You can contribute in this industry even if you’re not an automobile recycling expert. In addition to knowledge of automobiles and

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Michele Morrison inside SGI Salvages warehouse.

their parts; knowledge about information technology, business, accounting and the environment contributes to a successful career in our field,” said Morrison.

“We need to work together to develop a strong presence and create public awareness of how our industry contributes to a green society.”

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INDUSTRY WISDOM

AS PART OF BEING A FRANCHISEE YOU HAVE ALL THE BENEFITS OF OWNING YOUR OWN BUSINESS,WHILE ALSO HAVING AN ENTIRE SUPPORT SYSTEM BEHIND YOU.

MICHAEL MACALUSO MAPPING FUTURE SUCCESS BY JORDAN ARSENEAULT

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INDUSTRY WISDOM

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odyworx Professional caught up with CARSTAR president Michael Macaluso to discuss a number of industry-related topics, including market consolidation and the impact it will have on independent shop owners.

BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL : What options do independents have in a consolidated market?

MICHAEL MACALUSO: Independents basically have three choices, they can sell, try to go in alone—which we feel is not the optimum move—or they can join a company like CARSTAR. Regardless of their choice, now is the time to start making those decisions. As franchise groups, CARSTAR included, start to consolidate the market, it becomes increasingly important for independents to join one of those entities in order to avoid being shut out of the market space.

BP: What would you say to someone considering joining CARSTAR?

MM: As part of being a franchise you have all the benefits of owning your own business, while also having an entire support system behind you. The key differences between CARSTAR and our competitors are our operational platform, our national insurance contracts and arrangements, our proprietary IT data analytics engine, and our training platform which helps in operating a better business. We feel being able to fix a car properly in this day and age is certainly table space, but what we bring to the table is that we can help you fix that car in the right sustainable way so that you can be successful, while also meeting the needs of the national insurance partners. Can some of our competitors do the same? I don't know. We have a footprint of about 50 people dedicated to our operation's platform in a program that we've been growing for about 30 years and have had multi-success points. So we really see the differentiators of CARSTAR as performance driving growth to our operations platform.

BP: What’s your goal moving forward in the Canadian market? BP :  How does CARSTAR stand out amongst other franchises?

MM: We’ve really layered on our value preposition to independent collision centres that want to stay a thriving business. We provide our franchisees with a national presence and an operational platform. Our IT and analytics division can assist in helping stores run their businesses by the numbers in a more efficient way. We firmly believe performance drives growth and that scale will drive success, so we are pressuring that multi-prong approach of more stores and more sales through insurance and OE opportunity, to help owners run a better business.

MM: Canada’s been a great market for us. The Canadian marketplace is more consolidated versus the U.S. market, which is still consolidating. We are very excited about the Canadian market and currently sit at just north of 300 locations; a number we feel has the opportunity to be at around 500 stores. The goal across all CARSTAR is to hit 1,000 stores by 2021. The bulk of that growth will be in the U.S., but we do feel we can inch towards at least 400 locations by 2021 in Canada. Our business in Canada is slightly different than in the U.S. for three reasons, with the first being that more than half of our stores are owned by multi-store owners, who are continuing to acquire existing franchises or independents. We built many consolidators within the CARSTAR Canada group, which predominantly accelerated our growth. The second phase of it is, we’re much further down the path in terms of dealership engagement. We have dozens of locations that are owned by dealerships, and are also branded as CARSTAR’s—the third aspect is growth within open market. There are at least 50 major communities across Canada that we do not have a store in. What it all comes down to is market share. Our Canadian market is just north of $2 billion dollars, and we feel we can have a much higher share of it then what we currently have.

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STUDENT PROFILE Twenty-year-old Alex Creal is in her second year of the three-year automotive service technician program at Centennial College.

Creal is currently finishing her apprenticeship at Midas Automotive in Barrie, Ont.

DRIVEN TO SUCCEED SHE MAY BE THE ONLY GIRL IN CLASS, BUT CENTENNIAL STUDENT ALEX CREAL NEVER FEELS OUT OF PLACE ON THE SHOP FLOOR

Creal has always had a passion for the automotive industry and enjoys working on her ‘98 Prelude in her spare time.

BY LINDSEY COOKE

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t is a truth self-evident that women are underrepresented in Canada’s trades. According to Stats Canada, women aged 25 to 34 make up just three percent of the workforce. For those who do, however, many find themselves in richly rewarding careers. Twenty-year-old Alex Creal hopes to become one of them. Now in her second year as an automotive service technician at Centennial College, Creal hopes to one day up her own shop. While she may be the only woman in her class, Creal has no doubt about her ability to make it within the auto repair industry— something that was sparked in her childhood. “I have always loved playing with cars, ever since I was little,” she says. It wasn’t just her childhood toys that inspired her interest in vehicles. Growing up, her mother worked as a saleswoman at a car dealership—and Creal learned all about the vehicles she sold. In Grade 10, Creal enrolled in an automotive program which gave her a taste of the profession and left her wanting more. Two years later she completed a co-op program at Stouffville

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Nissan dealership, where she performed oil, tire and brake changes. “This was a starting point for me, now I have a lot more experience working on vehicles,” she said. Fast forward to two years later and Creal is now working as an apprentice automotive technician at Midas Automotive in Barrie, Ont. She works on anything from vehicle alignments to changing front and rear end parts. “The list goes on,” Creal says. Even though she isn’t the strongest technician

“YOU WILL ALWAYS HAVE PEOPLE PUTTING YOU DOWN, SAYING YOU’RE TOO SMALL OR YOU’RE A FEMALE OR NOT STRONG ENOUGH.” — ALEX CREAL

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in the shop, she acknowledges that she can do pretty much everything the men can do. “My challenges are having the strength for small things. Tires I don’t have problems with, I have managed my way with that but leverage on certain bolts, nuts, screws are for sure a challenge for being a small woman in the shop. Working on tall lifted vehicles is something I also struggle with, but I find my way around it.” This isn’t it for Creal, she says she might expand her knowledge in the trade. “I’ve been thinking about other programs I could take such as heavy-duty mechanics … I have a passion for electrical as well.” Entering these trades as a woman can be intimidating for some, but Creal believes in a very different approach. “You will always have people putting you down, saying you’re too small or you’re a female or not strong enough,” she said. “You learn just like any human being, and if you’re interested in something you shouldn’t have others putting you down. Everyone starts from the bottom and makes their way up.”


NEW NOW INCLUDES WHEEL ALIGNMENT DIAGNOSTICS SOFTWARE


Walter Rostkowski, Jeffrey Furtado, and Bruno Silvestri.

ASSURING OPPORTUNITY Building a rewarding career with Assured

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hen it comes to fixing cars, automotive apprentice Jeffrey Furtado has never lacked motivation. “When I was in elementary school I would go to my cousin’s bodyshop to help take apart cars,” said Furtado. “People used to be shocked by the speed I would work at—I would attack anything in my sight. For me it wasn’t work, I was just out there having fun!” After graduating high school, Furtado’s first experience in a facility was as a detailer, before enrolling in a three-year autobody program at Mohawk College. With both practical shop experience and an automotive education behind him, Furtado was ready to take on the next chapter in his young automotive career. This chapter would lead Furtado to Assured Automotive in Milton, a shop he is more than proud to be a part of. “It’s been a great pleasure to work with such an amazing team,” said Furtado. “I’ve learned so much from the staff here, as they’ve given me the opportunity to work through problems and figure things out on my own. When they see that I’m struggling that’s when my colleagues step-in and show me a better way of approaching a problem.” Not only has Assured provided Furtado with the opportunity to learn in a staff friendly environment, but also the chance to diversify his skills.

“To be a good bodytech you need to be well-rounded,” said Furtado. “No collision is the same and you must be able to adapt to the needs of each specific vehicle. Assured has given me the opportunity to learn the different facets of this industry in order to properly understand all the elements involved in a repair.” With so much still to learn, Furtado knows that the journey to becoming a certified mechanic won’t be an easy one, but one he is more than happy to be a part of.

“The feeling I get seeing a customer happy with the final product is what motivates me to get better every day,” said Furtado. “I’m grateful for Assured and how they helped me turn my hobby into a career.”

Assured Automotive Milton’s general manager Walter Rostkowski with star apprentice Jeffrey Furtado.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE: ASSUREDAUTO.CA ADVERTORIAL


PLASTIC WELDING

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BREAKING DOWN THE BASICS A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO PERFORMING BASIC PLASTIC WELDING REPAIRS

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ore often than not, plastic bumpers have cracks that need to be repaired. Bodyworx Professional has prepared a step-by-step guide on the basics of plastic welding. While there are different methods of doing this, Bodyworx Professional is going to explain the easiest way, with the help of a hot-air plastic welder.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN, THERE ARE A FEW THINGS TO NOTE. ∙ T he temperature on your welder should be approximately 830 degrees Fahrenheit.  ∙ When you begin welding, be sure to angle the torch and the plastic at a 45-degree angle, pushing down half a pound of pressure.

STEP ONE Make sure the area with the damage is clean on both sides. When cleaning the area, wipe the surface with plastic cleaner in one direction, then use a DA sander to remove any primer or paint. Keep sanding the area until it’s raw plastic.

STEP THREE

STEP TWO

Use a rotary tool with a teardropshaped bit on the end and apply it to the crack. Ensure that the edges are smooth.

Align the damage, then apply aluminum body tape to the underside of the crack. Be sure to apply it to the whole crack and use a body spreader to ensure that there are no air bubbles under the tape and that it lies flat.

STEPS FOUR & FIVE

STEP SIX

Grab a plastic rod that correlates with the type of bumper that is being operated on. Then start to heat the tip of the rod against the bumper with the welder until the plastic starts to melt into the bumper. Be sure to apply downward pressure during this process.

When both sides are complete, use the rotary tool again to shave down the excess plastic so it sits a bit below the level of the base plastic. Use a DA sander to abrade the surface.

Once the rod has covered the entire crack, start to work on the other side of the bumper. Remove the tape while the plastic cools and apply the same steps to the reverse side. STEP SEVEN Following these steps, a repairer will have to apply an adhesion promoter to the plastic weld, use a sander to sand down the bumper and damaged area. Then the repairer can go forward with spraying primer on any areas that need to be top-coated. SUMMER 2019  BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL

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PLASTIC WELDING

Plastic Welding EZ Nitro Plastic Welder Generator Dent Fix Equipment The DF-EZN1G EZ Nitro Plastic Welder Generator eliminates the need for refilling nitrogen tanks and takes up less space in the shop thanks to its onboard nitrogen generator. The proprietary Flow Adjust Switch Technology (FAST) system makes the DF-EZN1G one of the easiest nitrogen welders to learn and use. It simplifies nitrogen welding and eliminates flow adjustments by the user. According to Dent Fix, this significantly reduces the time needed to set up the welder. A high-pressure N2 Outlet gives you the ability to attach air-powered tools to the side of the unit. Equipped with two welders, the DF-EZN1G incorporates both a nitrogen welding torch and an airless welding torch. The unit comes with plastic rods in various types and sizes to enable the user to weld different types of plastic and repair various types of damage. dentfix.com

Nitro Fuzer Lite Polyvance Welding with nitrogen gas creates the strongest welds possible because it eliminates oxidation of the plastic during the welding process. Think of it like TIG welding for plastic, there’s no oxidation, no burning, and no weld contamination. The 6049-C Nitro Fuzer Lite Plastic Welding System combines a simplified nitrogen welder with a traditional airless plastic welder. By combining these welders into one package, it allows you to economically make nitrogen welds to virtually any automotive plastic. The 6049 features precision flow control so the user can match the flow and temperature to substrate types and thicknesses. The flow and temperature can be reduced to a very low point in order to weld thin, fragile substrates, something competitive units may not be able to do.The integrated airless welder is ideal for smoothing out welds, repairing thermoset polyurethane, and adding reinforcing mesh to welded thermoplastic parts. polyvance.com

Nitroweld NW-650 Nitroheat The Nitroweld NW-650 is a complete plastic welding station with built-in temperature controllers, including nitrogen (N2) and compressed air selection. This unit can be used with an external nitrogen tank or it can be attached to a nitrogen generator. If used with a nitrogen cylinder, the built-in selector allows the user to pre-heat and cool down with compressed air and only use the N2 supply for the direct welding process. nitroheat.com

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PLASTIC WELDING

Plastic Fusion Pro BETAG Innovation The Plastic Fusion Pro Unit is BETAGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top-of-the-line welding unit. The unit performs several functions. It has an integrated tacker with three power levels. These can be adjusted for different plastics. For the fusion function, there are three modes available depending on the desired options. With the internal compressor, the temperature can be preset and the real temperature can be seen on the display. The Fusion Pro can achieve a higher temperature at a lower air volume, which is the key to achieving a good bond. The Fusion Pro can also connect to an external air source, so the user can increase the air volume if desired. On some repairs, a higher air volume is desired as this can speed up the bonding process. The unit can also use nitrogen to perform nitrogen welding. betaginnovation.com

0-31878 Nitrogen Gas Plastic Welder Arslan Automotive This trolley mounted 110v plastic welding tool from Arslan Automotive is designed to be an all-in-one plastic repair tool. With an included hot stapler, smoothing tip and a plastic parts cleaning cutter, the device also comes equipped with a metal roller engineered to make precise plastic surface leveling swift and simple. Pre-cut inside corner staples and two sizes of wave staples are available for the hot staple. arslanauto.com

Fusion Plus Plastic Repair Station Wedge Clamp Systems Developed for collision repair professionals, Fusor 132/133 repair adhesive can be used on bumpers, bumper tabs, emblems, door trims, interior, and exterior plastic repairs and cosmetic repairs. With capabilities to be used on all types of plastic (doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require plastic identification), this product sands to a perfect feather edge, without roll up, in just 10 minutes. With quicksand and clamp times, touch time is reduced. Fusor 132/133 repair adhesive has OEM approval from GM, Ford, Chrysler for collision/ warranty repair. The manufacturer says Fusor 132/133 repair adhesive is stronger than stapling and may be faster than plastic welding. wedgeclamp.com

Plastic Adhesive Weld Kit (XPSA) Dominion Sure Seal This high-performance grade cyanoacrylate adhesive with pump spray accelerator is designed to provide a near-instant-bond of maximum strength to various tears in plastics, elastomers and metals while performing permanent repairs with plastic fillers. Described as having exceptional high-temperature tolerances, the adhesive is also said to be able to withstand impact effectively. Engineered to be crack and craze-resistant, the curing process is complete within 10 to 30 seconds. The product is available in many sizes. dominionsureseal.com

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PLASTIC WELDING

Nitrogen Plastic Welder Pro-Spot Pro-spot’s NP-3 Nitrogen Plastic Welder uses hot nitrogen gas to restructure common plastic components in automotive repair, from cracked bumper cover surfaces to hinged tabs. It is very easy to use with a short learning curve. The unit has digital controls for adjusting air, nitrogen flow, and temperature settings. A unique feature of the NP-3 is that it is designed to save nitrogen gas costs. The NP-3 blows compressed air through the gun until you push the weld trigger, then it automatically switches to nitrogen gas. When the weld trigger is released, it switches back to air. This minimizes gas consumption. The NP-3 kit includes various plastic welding necessities such as thermoplastic filler rod, aluminum tape, and fine grit sandpaper. The welder works with 110V or 220V and is extremely portable. prospot.com

Plasto-Mend Plastic Repair Transtar Plasto-Mend Rigid Plastic Repair, #1478, is a high-strength, epoxy-based adhesive designed to work on all rigid substrates, such as PC, SMC, BMC, and fiberglass. It can be used to bond plastic to plastic, steel, aluminum, and other rigid substrates. It is most commonly used for: rejoining cracked or broken panels, sectioning rigid parts, or as a filler material for repairing cracks, holes, and gouges. The work time for this material is five minutes, and the full cure is achieved in 24 hours. tat-co.com

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EXPERT ADVICE

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PREPPED FOR SUCCESS

AUTO PAINTER JOSH DOBSON’S ADVICE FOR ASPIRING TECHNICIANS BY JORDAN ARSENEAULT

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ith more than 2,500 followers on his auto painting-themed Instagram account, Fix Auto Stratford's refinish technician Josh Dobson is something of a flag-bearer for the industry. Collision Repair recently caught up with Dobson to talk about training in the industry, as well as what he sees as the biggest misconceptions about careers in auto painting. Why is regular training so important in your field? Training is something that is not only important for newcomers to the industry but also experienced painters. In automotive painting, there are always new processes that keep coming out. These processes are meant to speed us up in the shop, to increase production and productivity. It’s important as experienced painters to be up-to-date with the latest training not only for yourself but so that you

can also explain the “why” to inexperienced workers. As journeymen sometimes were not well versed in explaining why something is the way it is. We can show you how to do it but not necessarily explain why, so for this very reason it’s important for the training to be a priority for all levels within the industry. How do keep up to date with your own training? I stick to my paint manufacturers training courses. I'm fortunate with Axalta that they have E-Training modules that are ten to 15 minutes long. These modules run through their products and processes, and are quick, easy and can be done at home. I also like taking in-class courses at Axalta’s training facility. Being able to maintain your certifications is important, not only to pick up new things but also as a way of staying ahead of the new changes entering the industry.

What do you foresee being the biggest change to the current training process? Probably the in-class courses being phasedout. This industry continually pushes for production and that's what we’re striving for. The number one goal is to speed up production and touch the car less. Sending a tech off for two or three days for training is inefficient when you can offer an online course that condenses it down to two or three hours and can be taken at your shop. What do you see as the biggest misconnection about automotive painting? I think the biggest misconception is that some people think it’s dirty, grungy, nasty work. This stigma seems to be attached to working in a bodyshop. In reality, it’s the complete opposite. It’s fun, it's lively, it's clean and it's rewarding. As far as painting goes, you get to put the finish on a car to make it look beautiful again!

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FINAL DETAIL

RECOGNIZING OUR OWN How a little time can make a big difference BY JORDAN ARSENEAULT

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t doesn’t take much to show someone appreciation. Finding the time to let someone know they’re doing a great job, and that you’re appreciative of their efforts, is such a minor task, but something that has the power to completely turn someone’s day around. Being able to recognize the great efforts of the hard-working individuals of our industry is what makes being a part of it so special. Bodyworx Professional is a tightly knit community and in order to bring the best out of each other, members of the industry must unite.

We at Bodyworx Professional are excited about the direction the automotive industry is heading in and look forward to being able to continue to tell the stories of each and every deserving individual from within this great community. In covering the rapid pace of technological changes reshaping the way auto repairs are performed, it is easy to forget the things that has remained consistent: when it comes to the final product, there is no room for error, and there are lives on the line. It takes a special resolve to for a person thrive in

WE AT BODYWORX PROFESSIONAL ARE EXCITED ABOUT THE DIRECTION THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY IS HEADING IN AND LOOK FORWARD TO BEING ABLE TO CONTINUE TO TELL THE STORIES OF EACH AND EVERY DESERVING INDIVIDUAL FROM WITHIN THIS GREAT COMMUNITY.

In this edition of Bodyworx Professional we focus on recognizing the women of industry and the profound impact they’ve had on inspiring future generations of women. Stories such as the likes of automotive painter Amanda Greke or automotive technician apprentice Alex Creal are just a couple examples of the tremendous work women are doing in the automotive industry. These women are not only leading the way in their own respected fields, but also paving a way for other women to follow behind them. Having more and more women get involved in this rewarding trade will only strengthen the industry moving forward. Regardless of your gender, if you are a driven and hard working individual this profession is one where you will be able to succeed.

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such a high-stakes field. Only those who possess it are interested in a career where delivering consistently high-quality work is not the exception, it is the rule. While the methods used to repair vehicles will change, the incorrigible resolve displayed by technicians will remain a fixture forever. For those who have the backbone to succeed, there will always be a bright future in the collision industry.

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Jordan Arseneault is an associate editor with Media Matters and editor of Bodyworx Professional. He can be reached by phone at 905-370-0101 or emailed at jordan@ mediamatters.ca.


Profile for Media Matters

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