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THE MAGAZINE FOR THE ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF COLLEGIATE SCHOOL

Full Circle Faculty inspire students to pursue passions – and some return to share with a new generation

Reunion Recaps Alums Serving Others Distinguished Guests

SPRING 2010


COLLEGIATE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION Keith A. Evans, President/Head of School Alex Smith, Vice President-Development Phyllis Palmiero, Vice President-Finance Lindy M. Williams, Associate Head of School Patrick Loach, Interim Head of Upper School Charles L. Blair, Jr., Head of Middle School Jill S. Hunter, Head of Lower School

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2009 – 2010

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD 2009 – 2010

Mark J. Hourigan, Chairman of the Board Terrell Luck Harrigan, Vice Chairman of the Board A. William Hamill, Immediate Past Chairman of the Board Keith A. Evans, President/Head of School Phyllis Palmiero, Treasurer Nancy M. Harrison, Secretary Susan C. Wiley, Assistant Secretary Richard L. Bennett Kenneth T. Berents Michael G. Bland John G. Davenport D. Ralph Davison, Jr Braxton Glasgow III Margaret N. Gottwald Martha Estes Grover Malcolm S. McDonald Gaye C. Montgomery Joan Olmsted Oates* John D. O’Neill, Jr. Kamini Pahuja Tracey A. Ragsdale Elizabeth A. Richardson*** C.B. Robertson III* Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt** Robert W. Shinn Steven Spinner Wallace Stettinius* Brude D. Stoever John L. Walker III Richard W. Wiltshire*

Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85, President Duncan Owen ’86, VP/President Elect Paige Ingram Fox ’86, Recording Secretary Stella Crane Alexander ’85, Corresponding Secretary Catherine Crooks Hill ’85, Finance Chairman Haley Coulbourn Ottley ’87, David Wilkins ’94, Annual Fund Chairs Beth Vetrovec Smith ’90, Past President Helen Tanner ’49, Town School Rep. Mary Kennon McDaniel ’61 Betsy Hart Lecky ’68 Lewis Little ’73 Pem Boinest Hall ’75 Anne Preston Robertson Farmer ’76 Raleigh Robins ’79 Sara Maynard Sommers ’80 Stanton Thalhimer ’82 Deane Cheatham ’84 Sujit Mohanty ’84 Billy Tunner ’86 Jay Jamison ’89 Mark Stepanian ’89 Armistead Edmunds Henderer ’90 Clark Coulbourn ’93 Alice Collins Fruth ’97 Ted Lansing ’98 Tayloe Moore ’98 Marshall Schutt ’98 Drew Wiltshire ’99 Peter Farrell ’02 Ginnie Friddell ’04

* Life Trustee ** Alumni Association President *** Parents’ Association President

Alex Smith ’65 VICE PRESIDENT – DEVELOPMENT Elizabeth Woodroof Cogar ’77 EDITOR, SPARK DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Anne Bruce Baskerville Ahearn ’87 ALUMNI DIRECTOR Weldon Bradshaw, Gracie McGurn CONTRIBUTORS Weldon Bradshaw, Al Cothran, Taylor Dabney, Journalism Class, Jay Paul, Wendell-Powell Studio PHOTOGRAPHY Scout Design GRAPHIC DESIGN B&B Printing PRINTING Thanks to all parents, students, alums and friends who share generously of their information, photographs and archives. The Spark is published twice of year by Collegiate School. We welcome letters from readers, though we may not have room to publish them all. Submissions may be edited for publication. Photographs deemed unsuitable in quality by the Spark’s designers may not be included. We make every effort to return photographs shared with us – please send high resolution (300dpi) digital images whenever possible (to: ecogar@ collegiate-va.org). Class Notes and Photographs: Please send your news and photographs, and we will use them in an upcoming issue. Digital images must be high resolution (min. 300dpi). ADDRESS Spark Editor Collegiate School Development Office 103 North Mooreland Road Richmond, VA 23229 E-MAIL ecogar@collegiate-va.org Visit our web site at www.collegiate-va.org PHONE Spark: (804) 741-9781 Alumni Office: (804) 741-9766 or (800) 522-1915

103 North Mooreland Road Richmond, Virginia 23229 (804) 740-7077 FAX: (804) 741-9797 Collegiate does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion or national origin in the administration of its educational, admission, scholarship or employment policies, or any other programs administered by the school.

Spark


SPRING 2010

AROUND CAMPUS NEWS from Mooreland Road······································································································ 04 TRAVELS to Mexico, India, New York, Quebec · ······································································· 13 PAST FACULTY / TRUSTEES LUNCHEON············································································· 16 NEW FACULTY & STAFF ········································································································· 18 FALL SPORTS ROUNDUP by Weldon Bradshaw · ·································································· 20 HOLIDAYS ON CAMPUS ·········································································································· 25

FEATURE FULL CIRCLE: Alumni who found inspiration here to follow their dreams and some who have come back to share their expertise with new generations of students ······································································································································ 26

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES ALUMNI NEWS: Giving on a global level·················································································· 36 HOMECOMING: Oyster Roast, Alumni Soccer Game, Reunion Lunch, Football···················· 42 GATHERINGS: New Yorkers at ‘21’, Young Alum Get Together · ············································ 48 THE LOST: Help find these missing reunion year alums (0s & 5s) ········································ 5 1 PAGEANT LUNCH & REHEARSAL: Girls celebrate the season ··········································· 52 CHIPS: Legacy sons and daughters who joined the Collegiate family this year ···················· 54 CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Athletic Hall of Fame, Distinguished Alumni and Alumni Service················································································ 56 BACK IN THE DAY: The Bug Story by Alex Smith··································································· 60 WINTER PARTY & AUCTION: Seuss and Lots of Loot!··························································· 62

CLASS NOTES Including profiles of James Hatcher ’80, Stephen Drake ’92, Stephanie Swisher ’05·············· 66

EXTRAS MYSTERY PHOTO: Wherein we set forth another photo mystery to solve····························· 90 PARTING SHOT: Remembering Madame Powell ·············································· inside back cover COVER: 2009– 2010 E.E. Ford Fellow Claiborne Buckingham ’05 and her mentor, Upper School art teacher Pam Anderson, work with freshman art students. Photo by Jay Paul.


2010 ALUMNI DATEBOOK Collegiate alumni are invited to attend the following events. For more information on events at Collegiate, visit our web site at www.collegiate-va.org/alumni/events

MAY

Friday, 7 Thursday, 27

Alumni Baseball Game Senior Supper and Slide Show

JUNE

Friday, 4 Thursday, 10 Friday, 11

Lower School Graduation Middle School Graduation Upper School Graduation

JULY

Tuesday, 13

Alumnae Tea

OCTOBER

Friday, 1 Saturday, 2

Homecoming / Reunion Weekend (Classes ending in 0 and 5)

NOVEMBER

Saturday, 6

Athletic Hall of Fame Induction

The Class of ’59 ladies kick up their heels at their 50th Reunion.


FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL Dear Friends, Two seniors dropped in at the end of last week looking for an idea. They wanted to find a lasting way to honor a teacher who had made an impact on them and their classmates. Two days prior to that, a former parent made an appointment to offer his assistance in any way that we might need it. “When my kids were here, I was too busy going to their games and performances to do much else. Now that my nest is empty, I want to help Collegiate move forward if I can.” In this same week, I had a long conversation with a young alum who was conducting some cutting-edge research and using Collegiate as his subject. I am eager to see his results and what we can learn from his in-depth study. In the week before that, three Lower School parents – two in person and one by email – conveyed the same essential message: “My child is having a great experience here, and I want to volunteer my support for what Collegiate is doing.” A few weeks back, I had dinner with an alum just starting his career. He asked some great questions about giving to Collegiate and remarked, “I may not have much to give Collegiate now, but you can be sure I’ll give what I can.” Our cover story features a collection of similar stories about the strong connection that alumni feel to Collegiate as a result of their experience here. Giving back begins on campus and is integral to the student experience. The “generosity gene” is a powerful influence at Collegiate and starts early. Drop by campus on a Sunday this spring, and, you will find our Upper School students engaged with autistic children from the community in our Open Gym program. Saturday mornings are regularly designated for clean-ups on Blair Road, the pathway to the Robins Campus. Special Olympics will be on campus this spring, and, after graduation, Upper School students will head out to Pronino in Honduras and the Youth Service Opportunities Project in Washington, DC, while Middle Schoolers will travel to the Appalachian region of southern Virginia. The spirit of entrepreneurial service is also alive and well through the R.A.M.P.S. program, a nonprofit established several years ago by some enterprising students who saw a need among low-income, disabled Richmonders for ramp access to their homes. That is what making a difference looks like. I suppose there are a lot things in life that work in straight lines. We march through grades in school in sequence from Kindergarten to 12. Our kids grow up through childhood to adolescence to adulthood. If all goes well, we move forward in a career from apprenticeship to mastery, from being mentored to mentoring. Generosity, on the other hand, seems to work in circles. Benefiting from the good works of others inspires in us a deeply-rooted desire to give back, to come full circle. And we are better people for it. The legacy of those who have given us a hand up also gives us something to live up to. Each act of service, each gift given, ripples out and multiplies. I can think of no higher calling for the Collegiate community and no more fulfilling purpose for all of the time, effort and treasure that is dedicated to our children.

Best Wishes,

Keith Evans Head of School


AROUND CAMPUS

News From Mooreland Road

Upper School art teacher Pam Anderson and class of ’84 photographer Gordon Stettinius are two recipients of this year’s Theresa Pollak Prizes given by Richmond magazine to honor area contributions to the arts. At a reception at VCU last fall, Ms. Anderson and Mr. Stettinius received prints of a woodcut done by the late Ms. Pollak, longtime VCU professor and acclaimed artist.

Dr. George Trivette, parent of sons Proctor ’02 and Alex ’08, donated three sculptures to Collegiate last summer. Crafted by noted contemporary sculptor Slaithong Schutzmart, two sculptures are outside on the Lower School campus, and another has been placed upstairs in the hallway of the North Science Building. 4

Following the earthquake in Haiti, the Collegiate community was moved to offer assistance in some way. Grades K-12 gathered in the Seal Athletic Center to learn more about Haiti from Head of School Keith Evans and an 11th Grader (seen in photo addressing students) who has traveled to the country as part of a family mission trip. The student presented a slide show of numbers – dollar amounts and the help that can be funded by even the smallest donation. Students were asked to contribute $1 (or more) to the International Red Cross. When all was counted, Collegiate had raised more than $13,500. Spark


Nick Bollettieri, Tennis Coach to Champs, on Campus

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o kick off construction of a new 13-court tennis center at our Robins Campus in Goochland, world famous tennis coach Nick Bollettieri visited Collegiate last September. While here, he conducted a tennis clinic on our Mooreland Road campus with parents, coaches and community tennis enthusiasts. After lunch, Mr. Bollettieri worked with Collegiate’s varsity and junior varsity boys and girls teams. They listened to his stories of working with tennis greats, and they participated in drills designed to improve footwork and positioning on the court.

Nick Bollettieri founded his Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy in 1978 and has since worked with many major tennis players including Andre Agassi, Boris Becker, Venus and Serena Williams, Anna Kournikova and Tommy Haas. Passionate about his system of instruction, he is a motivational coach who trains players technically for the court and strategically for a successful life off the court. Many thanks to Jonnie Williams, friend of Collegiate and grandparent of kindergartner Jonnie Williams ’22, for helping bring Mr. Bollettieri to Collegiate. His visit was instructional and lots of fun!

During his day on campus, tennis coach Nick Bollettieri conducted a clinic for our varsity and JV team players.

Last summer Strength and Conditioning Coach Will O’Brien (left) worked with Ukrop’s and Jewett Manufacturing to convert old grocery carts into fitness instruments that were used by teams in the fall. Ukrop’s donated the carts, and Jewett renovated them for athletics use. Here, a student demonstrates use of the finished product. Thanks to both companies for their help! Spring 2010

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Tennis Center Complete Collegiate School’s Tennis Center features the following components: •

A 1,600-square-foot Tennis House

13 courts with four-coat acrylic finish

Walls and a seating bowl with a view of the Championship Court •

Learning Bridge

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Bart Thornton and a Learning Bridge friend get acquainted.

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Notes from the Dean of Faculty by Z. Bart Thornton

uring the school year, I serve as Upper School English Chair; as such, I get a front-row seat for the eclectic and dynamic teaching that occurs in the department. I’m fortunate to be able to observe my talented colleagues in action. Take it from me: few things are more compelling than watching Mil Norman-Risch zip around the classroom, declaiming Shakespeare; listening to Lewis “Bubba” Lawson riff on the intricacies of American grammar; or eavesdropping on Linda Rouse’s symbolic analysis of gunfights in the Wild West. Accustomed as I am to working with veteran teachers, I was eager to assume a new role last summer as Dean of Faculty in the Learning Bridge summer program. In this capacity, working alongside Cheryl Groce-Wright –the program’s talented director – I would mentor 12 beginning teachers (ranging in age from 17 to 23), who were charged with teaching middle schoolers from Richmond city schools. Our program has a dual focus: in addition to offering enrichment opportunities for inner-city youngsters, it also provides high school and college students thinking about a career in teaching with a valuable exposure to the profession. Cheryl and I were delighted that we could count three Collegiate alumni among our teaching faculty: Jack Bisceglia and Jack

Melson, both ’08, and Rawls Bolton ’09. (And, of course, Harrison Roday ’09 kept our computers humming.) Mil, Lewis, and Linda – and the rest of my Collegiate colleagues – would have been proud of our young instructors, who taught with imagination, energy, and verve. Hannah Curley, a Spanish teacher, played a vocabulary game which culminated in her students putting on dresses and big hats. (The boys looked especially fetching.) Meredith Graham, a history teacher, taught her students to sing a song that taught them all the dynastic rulers of Chinese history. And, in their afternoon elective, Alexa Williams and Jack Melson showed students how to grow impressive gardens using easy-to-obtain materials. One day a student proudly displayed the beautiful flower he had blooming in a twoliter Coke bottle. With a minimum of money – we were all impacted by the economic downturn – our teachers found impressive and creative ways to make their subjects come to life. They taught French using simulated criminal investigations; they taught legal theory by focusing on the Salem Witch Trials; and they taught geometry by looking at the architectural shapes on the Collegiate campus. Our middle school students were the primary beneficiaries of their meticulous preparation and indefatigable energies. But I know that I learned a great deal, as well; from now on, whenever I see a peony blooming in a bottle, I’ll think of Learning Bridge and the coolness that was the summer of 2009.

Spark


Singing a Global Song

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everal Upper School Spanish classes are fully engaged in the realm of global collaborative education – with a song. Spanish teacher Dr. Chris Little is leading Collegiate’s involvement in an international cooperative effort with 40 classrooms to make music. The project is called Rock Our World. Classes from New Zealand, Japan, Peru, and Zambia, among others, are working together to create songs, hold international videoconferences, and generally just have fun together. According to Dr. Little, here’s how it works: “Back in September, classes created drum tracks on Garage Band (a Macintosh tool), and they were loaded onto an international server. The next week, every class was assigned one of those tracks, downloaded it, and added a bass guitar track, and the dual track was loaded onto the server. The process continues every week, adding a track until we have a whole song with drums, bass guitar, lead guitar, synthesizer, a sound of our school, and other instruments. Our song went to Mexico, Peru, New Zealand, Japan, Poland, New Hampshire, and Florida. “In December, all the classes around the world had a massive Skype online dance party to listen to the music, watch the music videos, and see each other again. “A central aspect of this project is connecting up classes, so videoconferencing is essential,” says Dr. Little. “We’ve talked to Polish classes; we are collaborating with Peru and Mexico to create a Spanish language song, and we’ve had short chats with other schools in the world. These are classes from kindergarten up to seniors in high school, so students love breaking down the barriers between the different ages. Our students are seen as the wise old people of the group, and it is a blast to see

Spring 2010

seventh graders from New Zealand listening so attentively to what they say. “We’ve had some amazing partners in this project. A Grammy Award-winning songwriter, Steven Petree, has joined us to make a sort of anthem for the project, which all the classes around the world are singing and turning into a music video. This anthem has been picked up by Universal Studios, and they will be publicizing and distributing it world-wide. It will be available on i-Tunes later this year. We have an Academy Award winning documentarist making a video about the project, travelling around the world to film different classes, and hopefully entering his video in the Sundance Film Festival.

“Our students have really stepped up in this process. They are extraordinary songsters, and their discussions (in Spanish!) about the project, its theme of tolerance, and the music itself, really gives them a sense that what they learn in class means something outside of class. This type of international cooperative project based education is one of the most important elements of the School of the Future, and Collegiate is riding the wave on our long boards, loving the ride!”

Rock Our World students respond to students in other countries during a Skype session.

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AROUND CAMPUS

Coins Add Up to Record Total

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ccording to Interact Club faculty sponsor Lewis Lawson, all of the coins collected in the big bath tub on Halloween added up to a new record sum. “As of the last count we are right at $11,200, thereby significantly passing last years $9,600 in coins,” says Mr. Lawson. “Thank you so much for your wonderful help and support in this project which creates learning opportunities for others to benefit from a Collegiate education. It’s a glorious day at Collegiate when so many file by the tub in this way of expressing their generosity and concern for others less fortunate.” Interact’s motto is “Many little hands working together can make a big difference.” This school – wide project is one of the many Collegiate endeavors that define us as a school and epitomize the special uniqueness of being a Cougar. Interact thanks you for your help in enabling us once again to break this record and to express our concern for others in this manner!

Lower School students put their change in the tub with help from Upper Schoolers.

Collegiate 5th and 6th Grade boys who read the middle school version of Three Cups of Tea attended a Richmond Forum presentation by the book’s author Greg Mortenson. The author visited them in the special “student” room before the program and during intermission. He signed books, shook hands, and took photos with each of the 100 students in the room. Says Middle School teacher Laurie Shadowen, “Our students were so inspired by Mortenson’s efforts that they are ready to start a student-run fundraising effort called Pennies for Peace to raise money for Mortenson’s schools and have a positive impact on children less fortunate than themselves, and I’m ready to help them. What an awesome experience this was for all of us!” 8

5th and 6th Graders met author Greg Mortenson at the Richmond Forum.

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The following four friends of Collegiate have recently joined the Board of Trustees. Richard L. Bennett graduated from Collegiate in 1990 and has been a member of the Alumni Board since 2007. He received his B.A. from UNC Chapel Hill, his M.D. from VCU and is in pediatrics with Lillie R. Bennett, M.D. Richard is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Richmond Academy of Medicine, National Medical Association and the Richmond Medical Society. He sits on several committees including St. Joseph’s Villa Advisory Board, Noah’s Ark Advisory Board, Southern Health Advisory Board, Commonwealth Family Foundation Board, Beta Tech Advisory Board, Optima Healthcare Advisory Board and is a VCU School of Medicine Association Clinical Professor. Gaye C. Montgomery is the mother of Jordan ’12 and Briana ’15 both at Collegiate. She is a member of the Finance Committee at Collegiate, was recently elected deacon at her church, West End Assembly of God, and sings in her church choir. Gaye is a Vice President at Altria Client Services Inc. As Senior Assistant General Counsel, Ms. Montgomery leads the Law Department’s Sales Practice Group. She received her B.A. degree from Princeton University and worked for three years as a Systems Engineer with Electronic Data Systems before going to Yale Law School.

Spring 2010

Members of the Board of Trustees gathered for a photo prior to a fall meeting. Seated: Dr. Jill Hunter, Meg Newell Gottwald, Tracey Ragsdale, Gaye Montgomery, Terrell Luck Harrigan, Joan Oates, Martha Estes Grover, Susan Wiley, Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt, and Liza Andrews Richardson Standing: Patrick Loach, John Walker, Michael Bland, John O’Neill, Ralph Davison, Mark Hourigan, Mac McDonald, Alex Smith, Ken Berents, Brude Stoever, Lindy Williams, Phyllis Palmiero, Richard Bennett and Keith Evans Not Pictured: Braxton Glasgow, Bill Hamill, Kamini Pahuja, C.B. Robertson, Rob Shinn, Steve Spinner, Wally Stettinius and Dick Wiltshire

Welcome, New Board Members Tracey Armstrong Ragsdale and her husband Duane have two children at Collegiate, Jake ’10 and Carrie ’15. Tracey graduated from the College of William and Mary with a B.A. in 1982. She worked for Xerox Corporation until 2007 and held a number of positions including National Account Manager and District Manager. She is a past board member of the Commonwealth Parenting Center and an active member of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church. She is a past board member and chair of Prevent Child Abuse Virginia, past chair and board member of the Tuckahoe YMCA, past member of the steering committee for the YMCA of Greater Richmond’s capital campaign, current chair of the

Advancement Committee for Prevent Child Abuse America, board member of the Virginia Capital Trail and past member of the executive committee of the Parents’ Association at Collegiate. Brude Stoever and his wife Ann have two children at Collegiate, Helen ’18 and Brude ’21. Hill, their youngest, is three. Brude was the 2008–2009 Parent Annual Fund Chair. He is a graduate of The College of Charleston and is a Managing Director at Wells Fargo Advisors. Also on the Board this year are Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85, president of the Alumni Association, and Liza Andrews Richardson ’76, president of the Parents’ Association.

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Visitors on Campus Thanks to these distinguished guests who have shared their stories and talents with us…

Murray Fisher ’93 spoke at Upper School Assembly last September about his founding of the New York Harbor School, a maritime public high school in Brooklyn where students from diverse backgrounds take traditional high school courses along with classes that focus on maritime skills, environmental issues and policy and marine biology. The city recently committed to building a $30 million new campus on Governor’s Island in New York Harbor. After his talk, Murray had lunch with members of his extended family.

A student at our partner school Beijing New Oriental Foreign Language School of Yangzhou, China, joined us for first semester as a member of the junior class. She lived with the family of 10th Grader Anya Aboud and spent time with the family of Xin-yi Fergusson, our Lower School Chinese teacher (Ted ’12, Vivien ’14, Jane ’17). Shilin’s Cougar Pal was Leslie Davis. Thanks to Shilin for sharing her culture, especially her talent on the guzheng, with our Upper School students.

Students and faculty from two of our international partner schools – the Modern School in New Delhi and Carol Baur School in Mexico City – visited Collegiate in September. Eight students and two faculty chaperones came from the Modern School, and, while here, they enjoyed touring, attending classes, dining with their host families and performing (right) at an Upper School assembly. (In October, for the third year, four Collegiate students traveled to the Modern School to attend their Community Development and Leadership Summit.) Nineteen students and two faculty members from the Carol Baur School stayed with 8th Grade Spanish students’ families, toured Richmond and participated in campus activities. 10

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Collegiate’s first Ethics Bowl was held Oct. 8 and judges for the final match were Nate West (VUU Theology), John Douglass (TC Williams Law School Dean), Iuliana Gabara (UR International Education), Nancy Thomas (Retail Merchants Association), and Katherine Busser (Capital One, seen in photo talking with senior Lauren Cricchi). The Ethics Bowl, patterned after a combination of Battle of the Brains and a traditional debate, was the culminating activity for the first Senior Seminar unit of the year, Making Moral Choices. Teams competed by presenting a position in response to questions regarding real-world cases, ones that relate to the seminar’s theme for the year, “18 in America.” The judges scored the two finalist teams’ performance today, and Rhiannon Boyd, coordinator of the event, announced the winner – Team Melton, consisting of West Cuthbert, Jared Baum, Chloe Coates, Robert Richardson, Carson Stettinius, Hillary Zell, Carter Hunter and Sam Elliott. “It was a new way of thinking that we got to learn about,” says Jared. “Overall, it was a great experience.”

Native Omani Ahmed Al-Mukhaini, Independent Researcher in Inter-faith and Inter-civilization Dialogues, and Michael Bos, an American who lives in Oman and serves as the Director of Al Amana Centre, led a student symposium in the Upper School in October. Students from Steward, St. Christopher’s and St. Catherine’s participated along with our students. In small groups, the students addressed the question “If you developed a course on Islam for your school, what essential elements should it include?” Spring 2010

In October, Richmond resident and Holocaust survivor Alex Lebenstein spoke at Middle School Assembly and with the Middle School Mosaic Club about his experiences as a child in Haltern, Germany, in the concentration camps and on return visits to his hometown. We were sad to hear of his death in January, and we are grateful for the time that we had with him. 11


AROUND CAMPUS

In honor of Veterans Day, students at Upper School assembly had an opportunity to talk with Captain John Ring, executive officer (second in command) of the USS Nimitz, an aircraft carrier currently positioned off the coast of Afghanistan. Captain Ring is the uncle of senior Janie O’Connor and her sister, 10th Grader Katie. Janie and Katie are the daughters of Carolyn Morris O’Connor ’81. At assembly, Janie introduced her grandfather, Ret. Navy Captain Paul O’Connor (left), who told the students about the Nimitz and showed a short video explaining details of the ship (1,092 feet, two nuclear power plants, nearly 6,000 Naval officers aboard). Then Capt. O’Connor talked with his son-in-law (Janie’s uncle) Capt. Ring via telephone about the ship’s command and mission, and students had a chance to ask questions. It was an honor to have both Navy Captains with us on Veterans Day.

Hope Harris Foster, Broadway singer and actress and mother of 1st Grader Beckett Foster, performed with her local band The Hired Hands in January in the Estes Multipurpose Building in the Lower School. Her appreciative audience sang along and clapped to songs written especially for children – topics included good manners and buckling up in the car. 12

Each year Collegiate’s Whitfield Fund for Excellence in Writing makes it possible for a writer to visit the Upper School, and on Oct. 14 the generosity of Bryan and Maha Whitfield brought us author Blake Bailey, biographer of John Cheever. In a workshop with Upper School students, he discussed the role of point of view in Cheever’s fiction and led them through an exercise involving taking a short story passage and rewriting it from a different perspective. At Upper School assembly, he chronicled his progression from aspiring novelist to book reviewer to Spy magazine writer to teacher to, finally, biographer. He told his story with amusing anecdotes and much modesty, attributing many milestones to shear luck of being in the right place at the right time. Spark


Mexican Partner School Carol Baur Hosts Students

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group of eight sophomores, accompanied by Latin teacher Micheal Posey and history teacher Cathy Melton, attended the First Annual Youth Congress of the Americas in Mexico City on Nov. 18 and 19. The conference was held in the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs and co-sponsored by the Ministry and Collegiate’s partner school, the Carol Baur School of Mexico City. The students participated in conferences with students from Central and South America where they discussed global economic issues, human rights and the role of democracy in the world. “International learning opportunities always lend themselves to discovering other cultures, exploring the history and customs of the area and developing a new global prospective of how others live and work,” says Mr. Posey. “This trip to Mexico City to dialogue with schools from throughout the Americas was immensely insightful and allowed both Collegiate faculty mentors and students to experience the world. I think the best benefit of the two-day conference was the relationships our students formed with Carol Baur students. By the end of the trip, it was incredible to see how new friendships had been forged and how wonderfully well the two groups coalesced.”

senior french students visit quebec

TRAVELS: Mexico, India, New York, Quebec

Collegiate participants at the Primer Congreso de las Américas, the First Youth Congress of the Americas give a hearty “thumbs up” to their experience. The two-day conference was sponsored by the Carol Baur Foundation and held in Mexico City. Collegiate was the only school to attend from the United States. Front: Vince Saladino Back: Anya Aboud, Ted Fergusson, Amanda Cole, Carter Wilson and Kaitlin Letter Not pictured: Laura Davia, Hank Evans and Collegiate faculty members Micheal Posey and Cathy Melton

For five days and four nights, 17 senior French students traveled with teachers Val Siff and Sarah Morck Peavey ’01 to Quebec City. With a mandate of speaking French the entire time, the students toured the Palace Royale, Chateau Frontenac, the Ice Hotel and other landmarks, and they went dogsledding, snowshoeing, dancing, tobogganing and cross country skiing. On the trip were Jared Baum, Liza Crenshaw, Steffi Curl, Emma Damon, Olivia Farmer, Amy Matson, Emily Moore, Rachel Naurath, Caroline O’Donnell, Carol Prince, Lillian Rand, Ethan Roday, Marden Shelly, Robert Spratley, Britt Waddell, Parke Whitley and Katie Wiltshire.

Spring 2010

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Trip to India Offers Opportunities to Share Cultural Perspectives

J “The experience has been doubly enriching since I have made some very good friends from various countries at this summit, and it has opened up my mind about various issues and cultures I was totally unaware of before.” – Matthew Disler

uniors Matthew Disler, Caroline Thomas, Julia Greer and Steven Vranian as well as Upper/Middle School Head Librarian Allen Chamberlain and Dir. of Performing Arts Mike Boyd attended the Community Development and Leadership Summit at the Modern School in New Delhi last November. More than 70 students from 10 other countries attended the conference which combined speakers, panel discussions, student-teacher roundtables, community service, creative sessions, and cultural performances. They also spent two days sightseeing with expert guides from the history department at Modern School: in Agra, Agra Fort and Taj Mahal, and in Delhi, Qutab Minar and Humayun’s Tomb. Says Ms. Chamberlain, “We celebrated World Dignity Day by accepting that dignity should not depend on reproductive luck. It is an essential human value. We saw a stunning performance by one of India’s leading classical dancers, Ms. Sonal Mansingh. Community service day was spent at Cheshire Home and Blind School.” A key component of the CDLS is the impressive list of speakers who make time to address the students. The following is a partial list compiled by Ms. Chamberlain: Arun Maira (Chairman of Save the Children India) challenged us to think about whether we work for money or work for many. Gurcharan Das (noted author of India Unbound as well as a guest columnist for the Wall Street Journal, Time, and Financial Times) spoke

Juniors tour the Taj Mahal with trip chaperones Allen Chamberlain and Mike Boyd.

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about the need for ambition and self confidence to create national wealth, counseled us to know the difference between self interest and selfishness. Ms. Isher Ahluwalia (Chairperson, Board of Governors, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations) confronted us with the idea that markets only work for those who can pay for goods. Good governance occurs when resources for basic needs (good health, good education) are spread equitably. Each country must strive for economic wealth while realizing that hunger and disease do not see borders. Rajiv Kumar (Director and Chief Executive of the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations) assured the Summit that poverty is not inevitable nor is it unconquerable; poverty is the failure of institution, policies, and programs. His remarks convinced us that the indiginities of poverty are not only borne by the poor; we all feel the effects. William Bissell (Managing Director, FabIndia) spoke eloquently about how young leaders are inheriting a world of worn-out ideas. Among the important ones he insisted we discard are: using the GDP to measure economic development; the idea of a sovereign nation state; a quantitative education system; and the notion that a big army makes a country secure. Sitaram Yechury (Senior Member of the Communist Party of India) stunned the Summit with statistics: one billion people in the world are hungry. He thoughtfully lead us to consider that we produce enough food for everyone but it doesn’t reach those who need it the most. Even when it does reach the poorest, the price makes it unavailable. Food should never be a commodity; the free market has not been successful in leading the world to food security. In an article in one of Delhi’s daily newspapers, the Hindustan Times, Matthew Disler said, “The experience has been doubly enriching since I have made some very good friends from various countries at this summit, and it has opened up my mind about various issues and cultures I was totally unaware of before.” Mr. Boyd sums up the trip: “CDLS is a fantastic opportunity for our students to learn about other cultures and gain a true perspective on world issues. All of the educators, students and hosts were a real pleasure to interact with every day.”

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signed up for the New York trip in January because, like so many others, I love New York. I even own the t-shirt. However, the performing arts trip went above and beyond my expectations while presenting me with another view of New York. After a long, bonding train ride that was memorable in itself, we set out the next day to explore the city in groups. My group, lead by Mr. Shaffner and Mrs. Miller, then ventured to the Top of the Rock and the Radio City Music Hall tour. Needless to say, the view from the Top of the Rock was spectacular –we could see everywhere, even to Central Park, our next destination. Creating songs along the winding walkways, we ran into original New Yorkers also eager to perform. After cramming into an already full subway with a series of laughs and falls, we returned to our room persistent to head back out into the bright city. My group traded changing for the show for more time in the city, and our hasty decision earned us more singing through the streets as we trekked through the bright lights. We completed our adventurous night with “Billy Elliot,” a Broadway play that affected all of us emotionally through the young actors’ incredible ability to sing and dance. It was an original New York day – and we loved every minute of it. A night of meager sleep sent us back into the city with, somehow, just as much energy as before. We split into different groups, and I accompanied the artists, led by Ms. Anderson. After another delicious meal, we strolled around the waking streets, waiting for the stores to open. A successful but long shopping excursion had us racing with the rain as we headed to Joan Darling’s show, late and wet. Inevitably, the long day and little sleep caught up to us, and we finally surrendered to a rest at our hotel. Yet again, we challenged time after a spontaneous dinner stop in Soho, causing us to rush to our next show, Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Lost and laughing, we managed to find the diminutive theatre tucked into the wet streets. As with so many other spectacles in New York, it proved to be a hidden treasure, with a detailed theatre and hilarious show. Another sleepless night, and we approached our last day in the city that never sleeps. Sad and sleepy, we boarded the train for the trek home, finishing our bonding experience with sleep, food, and more songs.

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New York City Performing Arts Trip A Reflection by Kendall Berents ’12

Thespian Troupe members enjoy a Big Apple adventure.

Now, my “I  NY ” shirt holds a different meaning with a different view. For three days, we lived in the city, experiencing it night and day while refusing to slow down. With a short amount of time, we wanted to embrace the entire city and take full advantage of our ability to travel to New York through an influential performing arts trip. New York was original, it was exciting, it was memorable, it was bonding, it was spontaneous – it was serendipity. On the New York trip were Thespian Troupe members McKenzie Beaver, Kendall Berents, Mallory Blackwood, Alex Brady, Maddie Burfeind, Catherine Burns, Tyler Byrd, Margaret Clark, Amanda Cole, Kayla Cross, Leslie Davis, Anna French, Maggie Glasgow, Anne Stewart Lynde, Erinn O’Sullivan, Peyton Spivey, Carter Wilson, Meredith Wray, Woody Chapman, Drew Colletti, Taylor Daniels, Elliott Hartz, Matthew Hourigan, and Jamie Nicholas, accompanied by Upper School drama teacher Ted Shaffner, art teacher Pam Anderson and receptionist Julie Miller.

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Luncheon for Past Trustees and Faculty Former faculty, staff and trustees of Collegiate were invited to a luncheon on Oct. 2 at our Robins Campus. They toured the facilities, including Sam Newell Field and the Athletics Building, heard a school update from Head of School Keith Evans, and enjoyed catching up with friends and colleagues. Thanks to them for their years of service to the school.

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4 1. Sally Bagley and John Brennan 2. Phyllis Galanti, Joanne Christman, Jo Sullivan and Ann Spence 3. Jim Hickey and Bob Goodman 4. Susie Materne Benson ’62, Nancy Wheeler, Linda Smith, Jane Hall 5. Susie Materne Benson ’62 and Gwen Donohue 6. Jerry Hedges and Pasha Patterson

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13 7. John Moreau, Amanda Deep and Tony Ruffa 8. Annette Chapman, Weezie Vincent Wiltshire ’67 and Judy Baumgartner 9. Mary Nolde Foster ’40 and Anne Miller 10. Harry Shaia and Bobby Ukrop 11. Mark Hourigan and Al Stratford ’85 12. Sarah Kay ’75, Jack Kay and Ray Spence 13. Ned Fox, Tommy Pruitt ’71 and Mark Hourigan 14. Brenda Britten Mathews ’72 and Gail Smith 15. Charlie Wiltshire and Bob Livy

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Faculty & Staff Appointments

2009 – 2010

Upper School Rhiannon Boyd – Senior Seminar – BA in philosophy, Virginia Wesleyan College; MA in philosophy, Virginia Tech. Rhiannon has served as Adjunct Instructor of Philosophy at John Tyler Community College in Chesterfield County for over five years and has also taught for Germanna Community College in Fredericksburg. She is married to Collegiate’s Director of Performing Arts, Mike Boyd. Claiborne Buckingham ’05 – E.E. Ford Fellow: Upper School art – BA in art, Sewanee: The University of the South. Claiborne graduated from Sewanee last spring with distinction and honors with a concentration in digital arts and thesis work in painting and drawing. She also received the John McCrady Memorial Award for excellence in art. She is currently the head designer of a studentstarted art publication entitled eyeful that includes a variety of critical essays on exhibitions in cities ranging from Sewanee to Nashville, New York to Paris. She has taken summer courses at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Georgia in Cortona, Italy. Claiborne played varsity field hockey during her undergraduate career at Sewanee and has been recognized regionally and nationally for her successes. Claiborne is coaching field hockey, basketball, and soccer while being mentored by Upper School art teacher Pam Anderson. Peggy Chan – Upper School math – BA in economics, Columbia University; MS in Middle Childhood Education – Math Specialist, City University of New York at Brooklyn College. After working as a consultant for two years, Peggy became a high school mathematics teacher in her hometown of Brooklyn, NY. Charles Joscelyne – Upper School math – BS in mathematics and physics, Pennsylvania State University; MA in mathematics, Columbia University. After Columbia, Charles worked

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as a tutor, college instructor, mechanic, and software development manager on Wall Street before finding his true calling as a preparatory school teacher and coach. Now in his 20th year of independent school teaching, Charles comes to Collegiate having most recently taught mathematics at the University School in Hunting Valley, OH. Along with teaching math, Charles is working with the cross country and winter track teams.

Middle School Kathryn Feldmann – Middle School physical science – BS in biology, Roanoke College; MA in biology, The Citadel. Kathryn is a native of Roanoke and after receiving her undergraduate degree, taught chemistry and biology at the Roanoke Valley Governor’s School for one year before moving to Richmond and teaching biology in Henrico County for three years. She has also taught AP biology, chemistry, forensics, marine biology and bioethics at Ashley Hall in Charleston, SC and helped develop a summer science research program for girls. Jennifer Keiper – Middle School math – BS in Mass Communications, Emerson College, Teacher Certification Program, Kean University. After graduating college, Jennifer lived in New York City for 10 years working for various companies in the entertainment industry. Jennifer has taught math for nine years in New Jersey and Virginia. While working for Henrico Schools, she was department chair and staff development coordinator. Charlie Williams – Middle School intern/ assistant – BA in history with a minor in psychology, College of William and Mary. Charlie grew up in West Virginia and attended Episcopal High School prior to attending William and Mary. After college, he returned to EHS where he worked in the development office, served as an advisor, and coached lacrosse. Charlie has spent each of the last eight summers working as a counselor at Camp Virginia. Charlie is coaching cub soccer, cub basketball and cub lacrosse.

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AROUND CAMPUS Welcome, new faculty and staff – Front: Peggy Chan, US Math • Jennifer Keiper, MS Math • Kathryn Feldmann, MS Science • Katie Musick, LS, 3rd Grade • Claiborne Buckingham, US, EE Ford Fellow/Art • Rhiannon Boyd, US, Senior Seminar Back: Andy Harrison, Aladdin • Frank Gray, Aladdin • Charlie Williams, MS Intern, History, English • Chris Williams, Athletics • Charles Joscelyne, US Math Not Pictured: Lauren Brown, 4th Grade

Lower School Katie Musick – 3rd Grade – BA in English language and literature, University of Virginia; MA in childhood education, New York University. After receiving her undergraduate degree, Katie worked at The Martin Agency’s Richmond and New York offices as an account executive. She completed her graduate degree while living in New York, where she was a substitute teacher and a student teacher in the New York City public schools. Katie has spent the last three years teaching third grade in Hanover County. Lauren Brown – 4th Grade – BA in elementary education, University of Richmond. Lauren taught kindergarten in Chesterfield County before she became a kindergarten teacher at Collegiate from 1991–1996. She returned to Collegiate in 2008 and 2009 as a long-term 2nd Grade substitute. Lauren has been very involved in the community chairing the board of Commonwealth Parenting and serving on the Junior Board of Children’s Hospital.

Staff Jeff Massey – Strength and Conditioning Coach – BA in economics, University of TennesseeChattanooga. Originally from Birmingham, AL, Jeff served as head wrestling coach and strength and conditioning coach at St. Pius X in Atlanta

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for four years prior to his arrival at Collegiate. In addition to coaching Jeff also taught economics, international business, and marketing. Jeff’s coaching experience also involves stints at the University of Oklahoma, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga and Arkansas State University. For eight years he also worked in the medical device and pharmaceutical industries as a sales representative and consultant before returning to coaching full time in 2002. Chris Williams – Field and Equipment Coordinator – BSEd in physical education and fitness management, University of Memphis. Since 2001, Chris has been a regional sales representative with Riddell/All-American, working with colleges, schools and youth leagues in fitting, maintenance and sales of athletic equipment. Chris was head athletic equipment manager at the University of Memphis for 10 years. He worked NCAA and Conference USA men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, various NFL exhibition games and with the Tennessee Titans during the 1997 season. Chris worked at Houston Levee Golf Club in Collierville, TN offering clinics, providing instruction and managing staff. Chris has coached Collegiate’s girls cub basketball since 2007 and junior varsity golf since 2008. He is married to Lindy Williams, Associate Head of School.

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t was another outstanding fall for Collegiate’s varsity athletic teams. The Cougars won three state and two league titles, the boys’ squads took a one-point lead in the Prep League Director’s Cup standings into the winter, and a slew of athletes earned all-star acclaim. It was not so much championships, individual honors, or public recognition that made the season so meaningful, however. “Across the entire program, our kids demonstrated grit and determination,” said Head of School Keith Evans. “We have a number of kids who are really strong athletes, but we don’t have that many more great athletes than the other schools we play. “It boils down to the intangibles like persistence, playing through to the end, physical courage, and good sportsmanship. Those intangibles are what you want kids to take from the program.” What follows is a synopsis of each varsity team’s season and honorees with a statement by the head coach about the pinnacle, indeed the defining moment, of the season.

FALL ’09 SPORTS ROUNDUP

By Weldon Bradshaw

Collegiate quarterback winds up for a pass.

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Volleyball Varsity volleyball ended its season 19-8 overall, 7-1 in the LIS, LIS and state tournament semifinalist.

All-LIS Nicole Barr ’10, Linsey Kornblau ’11, Becky Massie ’10 LIS Coach of the Year Amanda Cowgill All-State Barr, Massie

Pinnacle of the Season Defeating Nansemond-Suffolk Academy 3-2 in the first round of the state tournament. The victory over the Saints, who had defeated Collegiate 3-0 during the regular season, was the Cougars’ first match after they were upset by St. Anne’s-Belfield in the semifinal round of the LIS tournament.

Christine Thexton and Emma Damon battle against their opponent with a fierce block, while Nicole Barr, Becky Massie and Linsey Kornblau defend the back-row.

Football Varsity football, State Champions for the 6th time in 7 years, ended its season 3-1 (second place) and 10-1 overall in the Prep League. All-Prep League Jake McGee ’10 (quarterback, defensive back) (co-player of the year), Ben Bruni ’10 (linebacker), Andrew Foster ’10 (offensive line), Russell Harper ’10 (wide receiver), Trei Kelley ’10 (wide receiver), Alex Newsome ’10 (wide receiver, punt returner), Lee Peaseley ’10 (defensive back), Peter Rossetti ’11 (offensive line) Prep League Sportsmanship Award for Football Collegiate All-State, first team Newsome (wide receiver), Harper (wide receiver), McGee (quarterback, defensive back), Bruni (linebacker), Rossetti (offensive line) All-State, second team Foster (offensive line), Kelley (wide

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receiver), Newsome (punt returner), Harper (kick returner) All-State, honorable mention Peaseley (cornerback) Richmond Times-Dispatch All-Metro, first team McGee (quarterback) T-D All-Metro Second Team Peaseley (defensive back)

Pinnacle of the Season Winning the state championship (48-28) against a very good Liberty Christian Academy team. “The boys wanted to win and played with great heart, emotion, and intensity,” Palyo said. “It was truly an outstanding team effort.”

T-D All-Metro Honorable Mention Newsome (wide receiver), Harper (wide receiver), Foster (offensive line), Bruni (linebacker), Rossetti (offensive line), Kelley (wide receiver) State Co-Coach of the Year/ Richmond Touchdown Club Group A/AA/ Prep School Coach of the Year Mark Palyo

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Boys’ Cross Country Varsity boys’ cross country ended its season 3rd in Prep League and 3rd in the state.

Pinnacle of the Season A courageous performance in the state meet on a challenging, rain-saturated 5K course at Woodberry Forest. On a cold, rainy, windy day, every Collegiate runner who had competed at Woodberry before ran a personal best time. The guys peaked at the right moment and delivered their best when the stakes were highest.

All-Prep League Cabell Willis ’10, Scott Newton ’12, David Allen ’10, Logan McCann ’10 All-State Willis, Newton, Allen First team All-Metro Willis

First-team All-Metro performer pushes toward the finish line.

Girls’ Cross Country Varsity girls’ cross country ended its season 2nd in the LIS and 5th in the state.

All-LIS Julia Sroba ’11 (LIS champion), Jennie Sroba ’13, Maggie Cuthbert ’12, Gray Little ’13 All-State Julia Sroba All-Metro, second team Julia Sroba

Pinnacle of the Season A very strong performance at the LIS meet at Fork Union. A month earlier at the STAB Invitational, a very strong St. Catherine’s team defeated the Cougars soundly while averaging 1:32 faster through the 5 scoring positions. This time, Collegiate, led by Julia Sroba’s firstplace finish, closed to within 24 seconds per scoring runner. LIS champ outkicks a Midlothian student in an early-season meet on the Robins Campus.

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AROUND CAMPUS Varsity hockey players celebrate their big state victory.

Field Hockey Varsity field hockey ended its season 20-3 overall, LIS and State Champion.

All-LIS Carter Hunter ’10, Katie Mastropieri ’10, Janie O’Connor ’10, Hillary Zell ’10 LIS Coach of the Year Karen Doxey All-State Zell (state player of the year), O’Connor, Mastropieri All-State Tournament Hunter, Taylor Thomas ’10, Zell (MVP) T-D All-Metro, first team Zell (T-D Player of the Year), Mastropieri, O’Connor, Thomas T-D All-Metro, second team Hunter, Margaret Williams ’10

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Pinnacle of the Season The state championship game, a 3-1 victory over St. Catherine’s, the team which the Cougars defeated 2-1 in overtime a week earlier in the LIS tournament finals but which had defeated them twice during the regular season. In the state finals, the Saints took a 1-0 lead with 21:18 remaining in the first half. At 8:31, the Cougars drew even when Hunter scored off a penalty corner. At 2:57, Margaret Williams ’10 scored off an assist from Courtney Chase ’10. Katie Mastropieri’s second-half goal off a pass from Megan McGhee ’11 put the game away.

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Soccer Varsity soccer ended its season 12-2-5 overall, 11-2-3 in the Prep League, Prep League Champion, Ranked 3rd in final state poll and state tournament runnerup. All-Prep League Andrew Elliott ’11 (league player of the year), Michael Howard ’12, Colscon Wiley ’11 All-State Howard (state player of the year), Elliott

Pinnacle of the Season The state championship game although the Cougars lost on penalty kicks to Episcopal, which has a two-year unbeaten streak. “We competed with all the passion you could ever ask of a team,” said Coach Charlie Blair. “Every player, whether he was on the field or not that night, prepared for that contest with unselfish commitment. It was a great group to work with, and it showed that night.” A sophomore slips past his defender.

Tennis Varsity tennis ended its season 17-2 overall, League of Independent Schools and State Champion. LIS tournament: Collegiate won the LIS championship.

All-LIS Tori Bos ’10, Connor Brewer ’13, Hannah Carl ’11, Erin Anderson ’11, Frankie O’Neill ’13 LIS Champions Brewer (#2 singles, #2 doubles), Carl (#5 singles, #3 doubles), Anderson (#2 doubles), O’Neill (#3 doubles) LIS Coach of the Year Karin Whitt All-State Brewer, Anderson, Anne Paige Lansinger ’10

Pinnacle of the Season Defeating St. Catherine’s 7-2 on Sept. 22 to set the stage for the excellence the team achieved in November. On that day, the Cougars, who had not beaten the Saints for two years, won 3 singles matches 10-8. “It really made the team believe they could win,” said Whitt. “It gave them the boost of confidence they needed.” Collegiate went on to win its first LIS and state title since 2006.

The varsity girls tennis team claimed both LIS and State championships thanks to talent and a positive vibe.

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Starting in November, just before Thanksgiving, the sights and sounds of costumes heading home to be ironed and songs being rehearsed can be found throughout the school. Holiday celebrations are a hallmark of the Collegiate experience. These photos may spark memories of your days here … some things really don’t change.

Holidays on Campus

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1. Kindergartners sang carols and told the Christmas story in their sweet voices. 2. The Wizard of Oz was this year’s Brunch theme as the girls in the class of ’11 honored the senior girls and entertained all girls in grades 5-12. (Special appearance by Bon Qui Qui). 3. Girls in grades 5-12 presented another beautiful Christmas Pageant at All Saint’s Church on Dec. 7, 8. 4. Physics teacher Mike Pagel and accompanists sang “Ion My Love,” “Newton’s Laws of Motion Always Rule” and “Radon the Bright-Eyed Physicist” at the Feast of Juul attended by senior boys and Upper School faculty. 5. 4th Graders entertained family and friends with hand bells and seasonal songs in the Estes Multipurpose Building. 6. Boys in grades 5-12 attend and participate in a traditional Lessons & Carols service at Second Baptist Church. 5th Graders sing and boys in each grade read lessons. 7. 3rd Graders performed a pageant with music at their annual Concert of Carols at River Road Presbyterian Church. A student carried the star. 8. Helen Markiewicz, Upper School learning specialist and parent of a 2nd Grader showed 2nd Graders some of Hanukkah’s traditions including the lighting of the menorah.

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FULL CIRCLE How alumni find inspiration in their years at Collegiate and use that passion to make a difference with another generation here and on the job elsewhere


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s of this year, nearly 7,000 students have attended Collegiate School since its founding in 1915. Thousands of alums are scattered widely all over the globe, and we are working in hundreds of fields, as professors, politicians, programmers, physicians, priests, painters. How did they land in occupations that they are passionate about and excel in? In many cases, it all started here, and for quite a few alums, it continues right here on campus. For decades, alumni have been telling us that while they were students at Collegiate they were inspired by a class or teacher to pursue a particular profession. Recently, we emailed alums and asked them to tell us more about that initial spark. While many of them are using their expertise to make a difference around the world, more than 60 alums are employed on campus, giving back to a place they love – teaching, coaching and staffing administrative positions. Some of them are working alongside former mentors who are now colleagues. Alumni also come back to campus to volunteer, serve on the Board of Trustees, Alumni Association or Parents’ Association, or speak to students. They attend campus-planning meetings, help out with Village Green Fair, visit classes, carpool students to community service sites, work on the annual auction and sell drinks at football games. They pitch in because they love this place and care about its future. No matter what the reason, alums find ways to thank Collegiate and honor their time here. Here are a few of their stories…

Motivated by Mentors

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y senior year I was all set to compete for a Prep League Doubles Title in tennis when near the end of the season I had arguably one of my worst moments as an athlete. I lost my cool, my emotions and my temper on the court and eventually lost the match. I let my doubles partner down, my team, my school and embarrassed my coach. At the time I thought it wasn’t my fault, but thought otherwise. my coach John sat me down later that week and suspended me for the rest of the season and also for the Prep League Tournament for my actions. I was lacking good judgment, sportsmanship on and off the court while representing Collegiate, and the mere fact I wouldn’t come clean on my behavior. Needless to say, I was angry, hu rt and resentful for the decision that John made that spring of 1984.

John Moreau

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It wasn’t until after I graduated that I realized the impact that John Moreau had on my life as and athlete and as a person. You know, the old saying “What goes around, comes around” is so true. In 1990–91 I was an assistant coach for John on the varsity girls softball team. But in 1996 I had the opportunity to be the head varsity boys and girls tennis coach which I still do today as an assistant. The team I once was booted from, I became the head coach of. A lot of my teachers and coaches instilled good habits, organizational skills and discipline that I continue to use today. Most of all, John Moreau reminded me what sportsmanship is all about. Every new season with the boys and girls team I tell my story all over again. For the players I have coached for five years they just smile and finish the story for the younger players. The greatest gift any coach can get, other than championships, is the gift of Sportsmanship and that is what our boys and girls team have earned from the other coaches around the league. Sportsmanship is paramount to success at any level at Collegiate, and it is more evident with the tennis program that I have been associated with since 1996. I am re-living that dream, going back in time and making a difference in a young person’s life, like a Collegiate coach of mine did in my life. Coaching at Collegiate is about building relationships, watching talented athletes grow and develop into leaders on and off the court. I am not a better tennis player because of John Moreau, but I am a better coach and person because of John. As my young son told me at Cougar Quest this past summer, “Daddy, our gym teacher says he knows you and says hello; his name was Papa John.” What goes around comes around. – Wes Atiyeh ’84, Long & Foster Realtors

Tennis coach Wes Atiyeh ’84 celebrates with his winning team last fall.

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hinking back, I have always had an interest in how the infrastructure we use daily comes to be. I remember in 5th Grade, learning how pyramids were built and watching the construction of the Hershey Center for the Arts. In 6th Grade, when the building was complete and we had our first assembly in the theater, I remember looking up and seeing the catwalks and wondering why there were catwalks, and who got to use them, and how could I get up there? In Upper School a friend invited me to come with her to set crew, and I discovered my most loved after school activity: building things.

Sarah Deck ’00 stands atop one of her company’s current projects, the 35-story Allure Waikiki condos in Honolulu.

Julie Miller

was running the set crew at the time. Julie set clear expectations and everyone knew she was looking out for our best interests. That fostered an environment of learning and growing that kept us all coming back. Throughout the two years I worked in the theater, Julie encouraged me to try my hand at everything – not only lighting, sound, carpentry, reading plans, sketching details, and communicating ideas effectively, but also to the importance of being welcoming and supportive of newcomers, especially why and how to teach people newer to crew than myself the skills they need to be successful. Julie taught me not only the skills I needed to be a talented carpenter, she gave me confidence to pursue my passion for building. So when it came time to pick a field of engineering to study at Virginia Tech it should not have been to anyone’s surprise that I chose civil engineering. When asked why I chose civil engineering out of the 16 different fields of engineering Tech offers, my response is

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always: I love building things, and that’s what civil engineers get to do. Since exploring my interest at set crew in Upper School, doors have opened for many extraordinary opportunities. Because Julie always prioritized academics first, I entered college with enough AP credits to spend a semester interning in my field and still graduate in four calendar years. I interned for the Federal Highway Administration and on the Short Pump Town Center construction project, gaining nearly a year of “real” work experience. That helped me decide to pursue a master’s in civil engineering at Stanford University, where my studies connected me with many companies within my field. I was offered and accepted a position with my top-choice company, a design-build general contractor that pursues excellence in building and is known for innovation within the industry. With them I have worked on some amazing projects, including the renovation of Manele Bay Hotel on the island of Lanai, Hawaii, and the Waikiki Beach Walk and Embassy Suits Hotel and retail construction project in Honolulu. Most recently, I completed the Richmond Civic Center City Hall, Auditorium, and Plaza seismic upgrade and historic renovation in Richmond, CA and am currently starting a project to renovate historic housing on Hickam Air Force Base on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Being a part of the set crew was an avenue to learning carpentry work and learning how to build. I am grateful for that experience that Collegiate offered me. But Julie Miller walked down that avenue with me and many others, teaching us, inspiring us, believing in us and giving us the confidence to be excellent. – Sarah Deck ’00, civil engineer

Brian Justice (Upper School history) inspired me to be a teacher. I am a history/government teacher and varsity women’s soccer coach at Deep Run High School and have been there for six years. Mr. Justice was my teacher for a few different content areas but he was also my “Senior Mentor,” and I have a great deal of respect for him. I love the teaching profession, and I always have. His work with me at Collegiate solidified my love for education. – Emily Selbach Pierce ’00, high school history/government teacher and coach

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Micheal Posey, although I only had him in

(Upper School history) mind that is responsible for the majority of my academic success post-Collegiate, and is a tremendous influence on a daily basis in terms of how I try to conduct myself with students in and outside of the classroom. – Brent Cavedo ’05, Middle School Latin teacher in Spotsylvania County

The teacher who inspired me a lot in 1973 was

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Charlie Slick: he was the first and last teacher who told me that I worked too hard for his subject! But being a Belgian guy, I was very much interested in the American history and Charlie could tell about it in a fascinating manner. The other teacher who comes to my mind is our (I have the calculus teacher 1973 Torch that helps me with the correct spelling). Thanks to her, I was able to start my engineering studies back in Belgium. I still think a lot about my wonderful AFS year in 1973. I am still very grateful for the whole staff of Collegiate. It is a great school and, from what I read on the Internet and the information you still send to me, I can only conclude it is getting better every year.” – Francis Moeris (AFS student, 1973), engineering project manager

Jeannette Welsh

8th Grade, was always a good influence and was especially helpful during college when I turned to Latin as a major. There is no doubt in my

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Neil Weiser

For me, (Upper School history) and his excitement for fly fishing gave me a glimpse at a pursuit that I thought I might enjoy as well. What started out as the occasional extra-credit question on one of his exams (“What is a Rat Faced McDougall?,” for example was one question I remember) inspired me to learn more about the sport that has turned into a career for me. Of course, I thoroughly enjoyed his history classes as well and found them inspiring, too. – Jim Hickey ’89, partner/guide at WorldCast Anglers

David Colon

Charlie Blair (Head of Middle School), Brian Justice (Upper School history) and Skip Johns (coach) as major inspirations and influences in my decision to become a teacher and coach, and pursue my master’s degree in education. I am pretty confident I am going to stay in the teaching profession throughout the rest of my life, and they are people I try to model my teaching and coaching around. – Patrick Burke ’02, teacher and coach

Miss Moon was a significant inspiration to me. I will never forget that her encouragement allowed me to develop a lifelong love of writing. Miss Moon was a very demanding teacher in that she encouraged us to work hard on the essays we did in her classes. Perhaps, more importantly, she taught me that writing was really FUN. One of the key components of my many years as an institutional analyst on Wall Street was the ability to write a well-structured stock report that made a convincing case to buy or sell a stock. I do not think I would have had this skill, and loved the act of writing, without her. (And maybe she was also my inspiration for loving dark red fingernails!!!) – Lacy Shockley Letonoff ’64, banker

Miss Moon works with a student in the late 1960s.

Spring 2010

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FEATURE

As for inspirational teachers, I think those in the English department had the most influence. Regardless of the literature that we read during English class, all of my teachers emphasized the importance of writing. Twenty years on and I am still concerned about subject-verb agreement ), pronouns ( ), ( ), and effective vocabulary choice ( and paragraph structure ( ). I don’t always follow all the rules I learned, but I do know when my own writing style affords me the luxury of breaking them. In the business world, it is evident that most people did not have the benefit of a Collegiate education. – Jonathan Schneider ’89, consumer market researcher

Anita Grymes

Steve Mann Lewis Lawson John Coates John Jablonsky

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ollegiate undoubtedly instilled a lot in me that made me stay in the field of education and want to work with kids. I’ve never really veered off that path – I worked as the director of outreach for an Episcopal church for three years, received my master’s in social work from Columbia with a

focus on education, and now work for NCLR as the program coordinator for a curriculum development program for service-learning. My regular, day job is with a nonprofit called National Council of La Raza (www.nclr.org). We work to address issues that affect the Hispanic community in the United States. In their education department, I manage a pilot program that works in three Affiliated Charter schools to develop a service-learning curriculum for middle school students. We work with these students to create projects with a service focus that are directly related to what they’re learning in the classroom. It’s great experience in curriculum development and marrying concepts of social studies, writing, foreign language and community service for students. From taking Spanish, to being able to travel to Honduras (see below), to serving as one of those kindergarten teacher aids as a senior – all of those things were huge ways in which I learned how great it is to be an educator. Some influential teachers (Middle for me would have been School drama), (Middle School English), (Upper School English), (Upper School history), (Middle School humanities). When I was in the 9th Grade, I first traveled to Honduras on a service trip with St. James’s Episcopal Church. During subsequent years of high school, Collegiate gave me permission to miss some days of school to go on a trip that fell during a school week. I have been traveling to Honduras annually (and often 3-4 times a year) since then. I worked for an orphanage and taught English at a bilingual school – and spent each summer there from the summer I graduated from Collegiate to each summer in college and subsequently 3-4 times annually each year. It’s been a huge part of my life. I still lead trips of youth and adult volunteers to Honduras each summer. – Sarah DeCamps ’98, volunteer and service learning curriculum developer

Jenny Hundley Cheryl Smith Joanne Pratt David Mahler Kris Koebler

Sarah DeCamps ’98 talks with a child while on a service trip to Honduras.

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Lee Dickinson ’00 works the sound board at a Collegiate event.

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he oldest t-shirt I own is the shirt from my 6th grade class’s production of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. That was 15 years ago, a production in which I ran sound from a reel-to-reel player using a mirror and white leader tape to sync a “splash” sound to Augustus Gloop falling into the chocolate river. That was the beginning of working six solid years in Oates Theater learning as much as I could about set building, sound, and lighting. Thanks to my Collegiate education, I got in to NYU, Emerson, Northwestern, and others but I chose Virginia Tech for their combination of worldrenowned design professors and the availability of state-of-the art production technology to play with. When I got there, some of my professors asked how I had gotten such a head start on Theater, and I credited the amazing teachers I had at Collegiate – and , then the facilities manager and technical director, or the amazing opportunities they had given me. When I joined the work force and was trying to build a company, again people asked how, at 22, I seemed to already have a decade of professional experience: To this day, the Collegiate and Virginia Tech theaters are the most professional groups I’ve worked with, and the opportunities to learn, design, and teach while at each are absolutely second to no other schools. I know I’m right about the quality of both of the schools I attended, because another Tech graduate ( ) is now the Technical

Jenny Hundley

Jon Shelley

Spring 2010

Julie Miller

“My one and only reason for returning to Collegiate

FEATURE

Theater teacher at Collegiate, and Collegiate students continue to do work that blows away most colleges while Tech continues to do work that blows away most professional companies. After college, I formed my own small consulting company, Dickinson Design, working as a freelance technical director for other production companies. Now, after a merger that created Advanced Visual Production, with concert sound systems, truss and rigging systems, video screens and cameras, we’re in a new 5,000sf space. The new building includes offices, meeting space, two multimedia production studios, a soundstage, and enough space left over to store our ever-growing inventory of production equipment. While I haven’t seen as many productions as I would have liked, I still end up on the Collegiate campus several times a year, helping out with graduations, sport tournaments, and other events that need some extra sound or video help. I graduated 10 years ago, in 2000, but Collegiate still feels very much like home. I remember once speaking to a group of prospective kinder-garten parents about the opportunities that were granted to me at Collegiate. As I’ve moved forward in my career, the benefits of Collegiate’s strong education, diverse academic offerings, and expansive extracurricular support have remained clear to me. I’m especially grateful to Mrs. Hundly and Mrs. Miller as they started and supported me on the path to a job that I love, but there are dozens of other teachers from whom I’ve gotten essential skills and lessons. When I’m on campus I’m glad to see so many students taking advantage of their time at Collegiate, and I continue to be appreciative of mine. – Lee Dickinson ’00, technical director Alex Smith ’65 came back to campus in 1969 out of loyalty to Headmaster Mac Pitt, and he is still working here 41 years later.

Mr. Pitt

School as an employee in 1969 was because asked me. I would do anything for him – at school, at camp, in life.” – Alex Smith ’65, Vice President, Development

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FEATURE

NOTE : Upper School biology teacher Ann Griffin has been mentioned by numerous alums who discovered a love of that subject while taking her class. The following are excerpts from several emails we received about her impact on students.

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Arun Jesudian ’97 at work at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/ Columbia University Medical Center in New York City

’m sure I’m the 9,803,245,897th person to respond to this e-mail and say that is the most inspirational teacher I’ve ever had, but I couldn’t NOT respond and say that. … I had Mrs. Griffin for regular biology in 10th Grade (1992–1993) and again for AP Bio my senior year (1994– 1995). My AP bio class came up with the class motto of “AP Bio: it’s not a class ... it’s a lifestyle”, which we even had put on t-shirts that we all wore to take the AP exam … I graduated from Collegiate knowing without a doubt that I wanted to major in biology for no other reason than I’d loved that class. … I have credited Mrs. Griffin many times for having gotten me where I am today. I spent 13 years at Collegiate and 10 years in some sort of “school” or another after my graduation in 1995, and I can still say without reservation that Mrs. Griffin is the best teacher I have ever had. I absolutely adore her. – Dr. Pamela Herbert Minkler ’95, physician

Ann Griffin

I just wanted to let you know that on the topic of inspirational teachers, I was profoundly inspired

Ann Griffin

by to purse a career in medicine. … My passion for life sciences that began in her classroom has led me through a major in biology, medical school, residency, and now fellowship training in gastroenterology (digestive and liver disease) and liver transplant medicine. I truly love my job and have her to thank for that. I can think of at least seven classmates from my AP Biology class who went on to become physicians, and my guess is that they are as grateful to Mrs. Griffin as I am. – Dr. Arun Jesudian ’97, gastroenterologist

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Inspiring teachers – there were many at Collegiate, but sealed the deal for me that I wanted to go into biology and become a high school biology teacher myself. …The seeds of my interest were planted in 8th Grade with – she was tremendous, and then Mrs. Griffin continued where Mrs. Cocke left off. I still use very specific details from Mrs. Griffin’s AP Biology class, I tell stories about her class, and I do my best to inspire others the way she did all of us. What a terrific woman and phenomenal teacher! – Christie Dunnavant Reed ’89, high school biology teacher

Ann Griffin

Cocke

Dallas

Returning to Serve Many alums, perhaps inspired by a general good feeling about what they experienced while here or by a desire to make Collegiate a wonderful place for their own children who now attend, take time to serve on our Board of Trustees or the boards of our Parents’ and Alumni associations. Currently, Dr. Richard Bennett ’90, Michael Bland ’83, Meg Newell Gottwald ’74, Martha Estes Grover ’78 and Terrell Luck Harrigan ’77 are on our Board of Trustees. Liza Andrews Richardson ’76 is head of the Parents’ Association this year, and Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85 is president of the Alumni Association. See page 59 for lists of those who have been recognized with Distinguished Alumni and Alumni Service awards.

Back to Build In addition, alums can be found in meetings on campus helping build and plan for the future. Gray Pruitt ’69 (F.G. Pruitt, Inc.) Gray Stettinius ’79 (Tuckahoe Creek Construction) and Jeff Modisett ’78 (Conquest, Moncure & Dunn, Inc.) are all contractors who have helped build on our Robins Campus in Goochland. Pruitt, Inc. did all the preliminary site work for fields and buildings at Robins, and Tuckahoe Creek built the new baseball building, seating, dugouts, picnic pavilion, press tower and green monster. Pruitt also did the recent Memorial Hall renovation. Conquest, Moncure & Dunn constructed the Robins maintenance facility, Athletics Building and Tennis Center that recently opened. Says Gray Stettinius, “I was honored to be asked, and I enjoyed reconnecting. During the process, I saw a lot of familiar faces. Weldon Bradshaw’s cross country course runs right past the green monster so I had to coordinate with him on event days during construction … and, of course, Charlie McFall and Alex Smith were involved.” All were his coaches or teachers back in the day.


Returning to Teach

From Beijing where she is currently studying, Maggie Varland ’07 recently spoke with Lower School students who are taking Chinese. The conversation took place in Chinese.

Claiborne Buckingham ’05 (left) works with junior art students.

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think the most powerful and meaningful influence that a teacher can have on students occurs on a level beyond conscious realization. It is when that student stops for a moment and looks back trying to answer the question “how did I get here” that they realize the depth of the relationship experienced between a teacher and a student. How did I, Claiborne Buckingham, get back to high school? I would have never thought that the last four years spent growing away from Collegiate would ultimately bring me back to the place where I spent 13 years of my life. Retracing steps, year-by-year, decision-by-decision I finally had an “AHA” moment. Like a frying pan hitting me in the head, I realized that a certain teacher had continuously inspired me and led me into this direction without me even knowing it. Going into college, I never hesitated in knowing what my major was going to be. Thank you for giving me the confidence in knowing that art is a legitimate, substantial, and meaningful passion. Once the work started to be created, I couldn’t help but want to show it to , to let her know that I was doing it, to let her see how I had grown and developed. She held me accountable despite her absence in my everyday life. Not only has Pam shared with me her passion for art and being an artist she has also now shared her passion for teaching. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to realize that working with students is legitimate, substantial, and meaningful. – Claiborne Buckingham ’05, E.E. Ford Fellow 2009-2010, teaching art with mentor Pam Anderson

Pam Anderson

Marion McSweeney ’59 reads to Eileen Beane’s kindergarten class.

Spring 2010

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FEATURE

I LOVE being here! One of my favorite facets of Collegiate was the traditions. I love the traditions in our Kindergarten program and our Lower School...those things we do every day, every month, and every year. Songs we teach, prayers we say, events that children look forward to. These things give children a sense of community and help them feel they are on familiar ground. – Beth Anne Nelson Shelly ’83, Kindergarten teacher

I was definitely inspired to be a teacher by the great people here ... they showed me a lifestyle which I would love – working in a dynamic, academic environment, coaching, working with interesting people young and old. I remember spending a lot of time in Ann Griffin’s office, pretending to be studying biology but not really. And I remember Weldon Bradshaw taking me under his wing – learning the rules of grammar in class, following his love of writing in the paper, having him coach me for five seasons in XC and developing a lifetime love of running, and working with him on the basketball court as a player and a coach. These two and many others showed me the way. – Rives Fleming ’83, Middle School teacher Beth Anne Nelson Shelly ’83 reads to her kindergarten class.

Bob Lemire

In the ’80s, taught me both U.S and European history. Part of the way through my first year with him, I realized a paradox: he was both the hardest and best teacher I had ever had. That was about the time I decided I wanted to become a teacher. Eventually, I did, but I never thought I would land back at Collegiate. With my background in teaching history and students with learning disabilities, Collegiate was not in my sites. I was delighted when Collegiate gave me a chance to work here, setting high standards for students but looking for ways to teach to a variety of learning styles. – Lindsey Alvis Melvin ’88, Middle School Director of Academic Services

Betsy Robinson

was a nurse that I loved and admired and she was a great example to me. She urged me to apply when she retired, and I’ve been here 24 years. – Laura Hall ’68, Lower School nurse

Lower School Nurse Laura Hall ’68 hugs a 4th Grader.

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Robinson Coulson Pat Werrell Boyd Pennington

FEATURE

David Helen Mike Lisa

Derek Tuttle ’04 studied guitar with , instrumental music with and , jazz with , was in Voice Male for a year with , played in the pit orchestra, appeared in a couple of plays, etc., and is now back at Collegiate teaching guitar after graduating from Oberlin Conservatory. He has also composed original music for several of Jenny Hundley’s 8th Grade plays, for one Upper School production, and also for the ’09 Winter Party & Auction. He was in the 6th grade handbell choir with and now arranges traditional carols for my young handbell ringers. “He’s made the circle several times and just keeps looping back,” says his mother Connie Tuttle, Middle School music teacher.

Nancy Bain

Derek Tuttle ’04 gives a 4th Grader a guitar lesson at the Lower School.

Alumni Who are on Our Faculty, Staff and Coach Rosters These alums give back to Collegiate daily with their time and talents. Lindsey Alvis Melvin ’88 MS Chair of Academic Services

Mayme Donohue ’03 Basketball

Philip Janney ’99 Football

Robin Rison Ashworth ’85 Assistant to Athletic Directors

Wes Atiyeh ’84 Tennis

Jeff Dunnington ’01 MS History, Football, Basketball

Jennifer Robertson Wilkins ’92 Campaign & Events Manager

Steven Banks ’02 XC, Track

Trip Featherston ’87 MS Physical Education, Football, Basketball, Lacrosse

Brian Justice ’85 US History/Religion, Football, Basketball

Anne Bruce Baskerville Ahearn ’87 Alumni Director Emily Baskerville Oney ’89 LS 3rd Grade Tyler Beazley Kilpatrick ’81 LS Admission Receptionist Lynne Berkness ’78 Development Coordinator Carter Blair ’06 Soccer Michael Brost ’85 US History, Basketball, Golf Claiborne Buckingham ’05 Upper School Art (Ford Fellow), Field Hockey, Basketball

Kate Fleming Parthemos ’71 Cougar Shop Manager Rives Fleming ’83 MS Math/English, Basketball Hunter Fogg ’88 Lacrosse Mac Friddell ’02 Wrestling, Middle School Tutor Melanie Gorsline ’74 MS Art Ben Greenbaum ’65 US Science Noah Greenbaum ’03 Football, Baseball

Dr. Paul Caldwell ’88 Football team doctor

Laura Hall ’68 LS Nurse

Hank Carter ’77 Football chain gang

Steve Hart ’78 Director of Planned Giving, XC, Indoor Track, Track

Taylor Cary Kell ’87 MS/US Admission Assistant John Chewning ’68 US Math Anne Gray Cullen Siebert ’97 LS Reading Learning Specialist Toby Desch ’06 Football, Wrestling

Trygve Lee Garter ’66 MS Secretary Shep Lewis ’96 MS History, Football, Soccer, Lacrosse Amanda Little Surgner ’83 Director of Admission Alice McGuire Massie ’79 Visual Arts Department Chair Jennifer McGuire Brost ’91 MS Science, Field Hockey Gracie McGurn ’05 Development Assistant, XC, Track Sarah Morck Peavey ’01 US French, Field Hockey, Lacrosse Carl Nease ’87 Lacrosse Beth Anne Nelson Shelley ’83 LS Kindergarten Jenny Nuckols Ferry ’96 MS French

JV Hawthorne ’78 Football chain gang

Joey Nuckols ’02 Football, Basketball, Baseball

Missy Herod ’72 PE/Director of Student Activities (director of Christmas pageant)

Frances Owen Coleman ’92 LS Math Learning Specialist

Katie Hurst ’05 Field Hockey

Beverley Randolph Campbell ’92 LS 3rd Grade Margaret Randolph Pace ’90 Auction Coordinator

Holly Schmidt Fairlamb ’82 US French Ashley Seal ’00 Field Hockey Perry Shelly Gunn ’79 1st Grade Assistant Steve Sica ’01 Wrestling Andrew Slater ’96 Field & Equipment Coordinator, Football, Basketball, Baseball Coach Alex Smith ’65 Vice President- Development Walter Spence ’84 Lacrosse Martha Terrell ’68 Accounts Payable/Facilities Rental Ellen Thomen Clore ’70 LS Science Nancy Toms Breeden ’71 School Receptionist Rob Ukrop ’88 Soccer Alexandra Vogel Spitzer ’96 US Math Elizabeth Woodroof Cogar ’77 Director of Communications, Journalism, Torch advisor

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES Voices of Volunteers From Richmond to Haiti to Kenya and Uganda, alumni are finding ways to serve others – here, they share about their experiences…

Postcards from Haiti

Emily Nelson Maher, M.D. ’97 and a favorite patient in Haiti

“The patient’s hope and faith amazed me most of all. On several occasions, an entire tent of patients would randomly burst into song…often they sung spiritual hymns, but I even heard “Frère Jaques” coming from a tent one day. Most of these patients had lost a limb. All of these patients had lost several loved ones. None of them had homes or enough food or water, yet they all sang.” – Emily Nelson Maher, M.D. ’97, Haiti 36

Emily Nelson Maher, M.D. ’97

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travelled to Haiti 10 days after the earthquake with a group from Partners in Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. I am an anesthesiologist, and our group consisted of anesthesiogists, nurses, and surgeons. We worked in the University Hospital in Port au Prince. I provided sedation or general anesthesia for about 60 patients while there. Our team also provided post-operative care and pain control. We also attempted to set up an organized operating room. The conditions for the patients were truly horrific...all of the patients were crowded in hot tents, and there were not enough resources for them. The conditions outside of the hospital in the city of Port au Prince were even worse. There is not enough food or water. There is not proper trash disposal or shelter. There is a huge need in Haiti. I have done international work in Tanzania and the Dominican Republic, but these experiences did not prepare me for the suffering and devastation in Haiti. I thought about Miss Tanner, Mrs. Hickey, and Mrs. Siff while I was there. The patients were all Creole speaking. I had not used my French (which I learned at Collegiate) for 12 years, but enough of it came back to me to communicate with my patients. Thank goodness for all my French teachers at Collegiate! I was able to comfort my patients with the bits of French I remembered. Upon her return to the U.S., Emily wrote an essay about the experience. You can read it on the Alumni News page of our web site: www.collegiate-va.org.

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Holly Parker, R.N. ’92 reetings from Port au Prince General Hospital (HUEH), Haiti! I have been fortunate enough to spend three weeks here with IMC – International Medical Corps – as a volunteer Emergency Response Nurse / Pediatric Nurse Practitioner in the only functioning ER in the city. We are currently operating out of tents which have been erected and grouped into “wards” by various NGOs ... these tents sit on the grounds of the original hospital whose structures were either damaged or have simply been avoided by the population who remain too frightened by the looming threat of another aftershock to enter into buildings. The Haitian medical community continues to filter back to work slowly, but as we remind ourselves: they, too, are victims ... some have no roofs over their heads and have families to support. When their salaries are not flowing, how can we expect them to return to shift work at General Hospital? So in these tents we work. Dayshift is wrought with ambient temperatures of 106 degrees and imposing crowds as the wounded continue to pour through the doors for casting and dressings. Nightshift brings cooler breezes and rats who took over the perimeters of the tents, while those Haitians whose chronic medical issues had been neglected present to us in acute distress alongside trauma victims who are slung forth out of pick-up beds and rushed inside for emergent treatment. But I mostly take care of the kids. I function in a rudimentary pediatric ER, run on one or two dilapidated stretchers – sometimes with the support of Haitian or American pediatric staff, sometimes just solo. All I can do is try to use what little resources we have to keep the sick ones alive and accept that some would not make it until the morning. There is zero pediatric ICU capacity in Haiti at baseline, let alone in disaster mode. I have worked in developing world and in a trauma center for over eight years and I have never witnessed illness and death on a scale close to what I’ve seen over these last couple weeks. And to think we arrived a full two weeks after the quake.... That being said, what I have experienced in despair and sadness was more than overpowered by the tremendous spirit, resilience, and gratefulness on the part of our Haitian patients. Considering what these people have endured since this earthquake, that they can STILL manage to laugh, joke

Spring 2010

Holly Parker ’92 helps out in Haiti. and sing along to Beyonce with me at 3:00AM in a make-shift hospital tent, stands as a testament to the Haitian peoples’ ever powerful spirit. I have been touched and inspired time and again by my patients here, and it has truly helped me and my fellow volunteers persevere through our job to provide care to the people of Port au Prince and support to our Haitian medical counterparts. I encourage everyone to follow Haitian relief efforts on the news and on the web – donate where you can and keep Haiti in your hearts, as she displays an unparalleled strength and will remain in need of assistance and caring for a very long time to come. Mesi anpil a tout moun! *I am happy to answer questions / provide suggestions for donating. Feel free to email me at nurseparker@gmail.com.

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Assisting in Africa

Michael Armstrong ’81 and his daughter volunteered at a missionary hospital in Kenya and also toured the wilder side of Africa.

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ven as a board-certified facial plastic surgeon, I do not routinely see or treat cleft lip and cleft palate in my hometown practice. These severely disfiguring congenital anomalies are routinely treated at an early age by our plastic surgery colleagues and academic medical institutions. However, in other parts of the world, access to plastic surgical care is not available. Patients will live with severe congenital deformities without treatment unless surgeons have the courage to step up. Fourteen years ago, Jim Wade, a general otolaryngologist from the rural town of Abington, Va., had the courage to travel to Africa to address the burden of cleft lip and cleft palate. With the guidance of colleagues in facial plastic surgery and a confident faith that his mission would succeed, he has developed a program which now evaluates and treats approximately 300 patients per year during three two-week trips to the missionary hospital at Kijabe, Kenya. I consider myself most blessed to have served on the 2009 ENT cleft lip/palate team to Kijabe. The experience was reminiscent of residency. I was a little uncertain but excited about the opportunity to discuss each upcoming case with more experienced physicians. We had three well-equipped operating rooms in a small pediatric hospital which was not entirely dissimilar to an American ambulatory surgery center, except for the 40-50 people sleeping in one room at night and the unreliable electrical service. Although we had steady work the first week, we had more patients than we could treat the second week, after we initiated a telephone appointment reminder policy. It was somewhat ironic that, despite significant poverty, most families had access to mobile telephones. In two weeks we evaluated 102 patients and operated on 82. Patients ranged in age from 10 weeks to 46 years. The majority of the patients were many years beyond the ordinary time for correction of these defects and some were too ill for surgery or were malnourished from the inability to chew and swallow appropriately. All of those treated appeared to heal well and were discharged without any significant complications.

Spring 2010

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Michael Armstrong ’81 and Meredith Armstrong ’11: Father-Daughter Trip to Kenya My daughter Meredith (Collegiate class of 2011) accompanied me to Africa. The teenagers were instrumental in helping coordinate patient care outside of the operating rooms. They kept the children entertained in the days of waiting before surgery. They assisted in the recovery room, providing oxygen and supporting the airway. When the lights went out, they held the flashlights. They returned the children to their parents after surgery. They prepared the discharge medications, along with instructions and a small gift bag. During the weekends, we had the opportunity to see the beauty of the African countryside including the diversity of animals in their natural habitat. We climbed the summit of nearby Mount Longonot, an active volcano, and circled the rim of the crater before hurrying down at nightfall. The next day, we visited Crescent Island, the setting for the movie “Out of Africa.” Touring on foot, we saw herds of wildebeest, gazelles, zebras and giraffes. We spent two nights at Lake Nakuru, where jeep safaris took us to see rhinos, lions, hyenas, giraffes, diverse herds of antelopes and millions of pink flamingos. Returning to Nairobi, we toured the animal orphanage, where we were allowed into to pet adult cheetahs and lions.

“While our weekend touring the game park was the most interesting experience of my life, the interactions with the Africans was what remained with me after the trip. Their appreciation of our help and kindness towards people who for the most part didn’t understand their language and knew nothing about their culture is something I will never forget.” – Meredith Armstrong ’11

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Julia Peppiatt ’04

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ush hour had arrived in Can Tho, Vietnam, and Julia Peppiatt was negotiating her bicycle through the teeming streets of the farming capital of the Mekong Delta. The 2004 Collegiate graduate was easy to spot despite the curb-to-curb congestion. She was the only blonde in the city of 300,000 about 4 hours southwest of Ho Chi Minh City, and her mere appearance screamed Westerner loudly and clearly. A local pedaled up beside her. “Hello, what’s your name?” he asked. “Would you practice English with me?” Julia, who earned an A.B in

From Vietnam to Uganda

Students Skyped with Julia Peppiatt ’04 during Senior Seminar. politics from Princeton in 2008, just smiled. It was a scene that repeated itself many times this past year during her stint as an English teacher at Can Tho University. “Whenever that happened, I thought, ‘Really! Do you really want to practice your English right now?’” said Julia, who worked in Vietnam under the auspices of the Princeton in Asia Program. “I mainly taught conversational English,” she explained. “They’d had textbook English since high school but little or no interaction with native speakers. Having a native speaker work with them was a new experience and sometimes challenging. There was a lot of trial and error involved.” “I had very little knowledge of my students’ skill level,” she said. “It was frustrating at times. You have to learn to slow down when you talk. In the western world, we’re taught to be proactive

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students: raise your hand when you know an answer, ask for help when you’re confused. In Vietnam, there’s a huge concern with saving face. If I explained something and students didn’t understand, they wouldn’t necessarily let me know. It takes practice and experience, but you pick up on their cues.” During her year in Vietnam, Julia also comanaged a program with the Hoi Pu Thieu and Buu Tri Pagota orphanages that began in 2005 under the guidance of Dan White, a teaching fellow for Princeton in Asia. The aim was to bring in Can Tho University students to teach English and computer skills, visit with the children, hold monthly game nights, and serve as positive role models. So what possessed a 23-year-old woman to leave the comforts of home to venture to the other side of the planet? A sense of adventure, certainly. A level of fearlessness, of course, and a willingness to adjust to new, vastly different surroundings. A commitment to serve, definitely. “I’ve always wanted to work in some sort of international realm,” Julia said. “Getting experience living in another part of the world was necessary. This was my chance to live in a developing world as a member of a developing community, not as an outsider looking in.” Which brings us to the latest chapter in her life. Since mid-August, Julia has worked as a communications officer for the International Rescue Committee. She’s based in Kampala, the capital of Uganda. It’s another year-long tour of duty and one which she anticipated with great excitement. “I do everything from mundane inter-office memos to reporting from the field what they’re doing to help the refugees from a 20-year civil war that began in 1986 and ended with a cease-fire in 2006,” said Julia, who studied African politics in Cape Town, South Africa, during the fall of her junior year in college. When her time in East Africa ends, Julia will return to the United States and, she hopes, work on the domestic side of an international organization for a couple of years before heading to graduate school. “I’ve been very lucky my whole life,” she said. “I’ve gotten a great education. I’m in a position to give back, and I feel strongly about presenting the best face of America to the world. “There’s no better way to do that than having an American presence in other countries, giving the best and brightest of ideas to those who need them the most.” – Weldon Bradshaw This story first appeared in Weldon Bradshaw’s Reflections column that features a new story every Friday on our web site: collegiate-va.org/reflections.

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Alumni Association Community Service – Join us!

On one trip to Westview, Collegiate alums explored animal habitats, enjoyed teambuilding activities, and participated in a fun, interactive lesson about the food chain.

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ave you ever wished you could get involved at Collegiate, but feel pulled by fiscal responsibilities, family commitments, time constraints, and even other charitable ties? Your Alumni Board understands, and that’s why we are excited about this new opportunity for Collegiate School alumni – a chance to get involved and give back on behalf of Collegiate, but in the name of serving others. Collegiate’s Alumni Board is proposing a unique opportunity for alums to reach out and give back to our community. We are recruiting alums who are interested in community service projects sponsored by Collegiate School. We also hope to pair alumni and current Collegiate students in service project endeavors, as Collegiate graduates and students experience together the value of volunteering. Collegiate has a longstanding tradition of instilling the importance of caring and sharing. Today, Collegiate’s emphasis on altruism is marked by its extensive service curriculum requirements and programs reaching from Kindergarten – 12th grade, such as Freshman Service Week, sandwich making and the Lower School Stone Soup projects which support Freedom House, and Open Gym time for autistic children. Now, the Alumni Board is hoping to support this emphasis as we extend our own talents and time to charitable interests. Already, several alums have volunteered alongside current Upper School students in a service experience called Westview Explorers. Organized by Blue Sky Fund, this program offers science curriculum in an outdoor classroom.

Spring 2010

Each month, our students spend one Saturday at Westview on the James with third graders from Chimborazo and Oak Grove-Belle Meade Elementary Schools. As with the alums who participated in the Westview Explorers program, you may find serving the broader community through Collegiate the perfect way to match a passion for a particular service directive with your passion for Collegiate School. And as is often the case with giving, a service initiative will spread goodwill not only to those in need, but also back to our school. Current Collegiate students will benefit from mentoring by Collegiate graduates. Collegiate alums may reconnect their ties to the school in a meaningful way, and Collegiate’s already generous standing in the community will be strengthened by its tangible outreach. How much time you give will be completely up to you. Service opportunities will vary during the year. Right now, we are hoping to gauge the level of interest and compile a list of alumni who want to be part of this exciting and important effort. Contact us by emailing Alumni Director Anne Bruce Ahearn at aahearn@collegiate-va.org if you are interested in learning more about how you can get involved. Thank you! Your Alumni Board Service Committee Sara Maynard Sommers ’80, Co-Chair Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85, Co-Chair Betsy Hart Lecky ’68 Pem Boinest Hall ’75 Mason Chapman ’84 Billy Tunner ’86 Haley Coulbourn Ottley ’87 Beth Vetrovec Smith ’90 Armistead Edmunds Henderer ’90 David Wilkins ’94 Alice Collins Fruth ’97 Ted Lansing ’98

P.S. Look for information to come about an event next fall… all alums will have an opportunity to join us in Memorial Hall cafeteria for another exciting service event. We’ll make sandwiches together with Collegiate students for Freedom House, a local homeless shelter and service partner with Collegiate, and listen to firsthand accounts from Collegiate students who have given their time to serve others. Be on the lookout for this memorable event!

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

1

2

Homecoming & Reunion Weekend On Saturday, Sept. 26, Collegiate families and friends came out to support the Cougars…

4

3 1. Kindergarten teacher Robby Turner entertains children of alumni before the game. 2. Jeff Graeber and Eric Doherty, both ’79, enjoy the pre-game Alumni Cookout. 3. Hunter White ’85 and his daughter picnic on the hill. 4. Bryce Jewett ’64 and daughter Jennifer Jewett Ruth ’90 (with Parker) chat with Gail Smith. 5. The crowd goes wild as the Cougars advance on St. Albans. Final score: Cougars 42, St. Albans 35.

5

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES 6

7

9 6. Ben Greenbaum ’65 (right) announces the game with help from John Coates. 7. Lewis Little ’00, Blake Smith ’00, Drew Wiltshire ’99, and James Casler ’99 watch the game from the sidelines. 8. Quarterback Jake McGee ’10 runs the ball. 9. Escorted by Homecoming King Jake McGee ’10, Katie Mastropieri ’10 is crowned Homecoming Queen at halftime.

8

Spring 2010

43


Alumni Soccer Game homecoming & reunion weekend

1

Twenty-one alums who once played soccer at Collegiate returned on Homecoming Day morning for another game on the home field. Some have continued to play club soccer while others rarely kick the ball, but all enjoyed the chance to visit with each other and coaches Charlie Blair and Bill Rider.

2 1. Richard Thalhimer ’79 and Alex Smith ’65, Vice President– Development, watch the game from the sidelines. 2. First row: Scott Ruth ’91, Eric Meyers ’91, Vince Dalton ’75, Scott Word ’79, Heather Hallberg ’04, Kito Pruitt ’97, Peyton Jenkins ’00, Kevin McFadden ’05, Reed Blair ’04. Second row: Jay Jamison ’89, Scott Whipple ’95, Gray Stettinius ’79, Shep Lewis ’96, Kyle Smalkowski ’09, John McLarin ’79, Lee Hallberg ’01, Bryan Crosby ’01, Scott Adams ’97, Greg Midis ’79, Kevin Martingayle ’85, Jeff Ukrop ’92, Charlie Blair, Bill Rider.

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES 3

4

5

6

3. Eric Meyers ’91 blasts a shot past Kyle Smalkowski ’09. 4. Vince Dalton ’75 easily competed with younger alums thanks to his club soccer play. 5. Former Virginia Tech player Heather Hallberg ’04, who scored several goals in the alumni game including one with a dramatic head shot, chats with one of her former coaches, Bill Rider. 6. Home from France where he trained last year with a French soccer club, Kevin McFadden ’05 gets a ball back in play. 7. Jay Jamison ’89 prepares to school defender Kito Pruitt ’97.

7

Spring 2010

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

1

2

Oyster Roast homecoming & reunion weekend Thanks again to Sue and Tad Thompson ’66 for hosting us at Tuckahoe Plantation for another fun evening with friends. 3

4

5

6

7

1. Marshall Schutt ’98, Katherine Schutt, Michelle Kahn Logan ’98, Tayloe Moore ’98 2. Dan Gilbert, Carol Turlington Gilbert ’85, Michele Adams Mulligan ’83, John Mulligan 3. Dave Smith, Beth Vetrovec Smith ’90, Jennifer Keiper and Brian Keiper 4. Muffy Zimmer Greenbaum ’04, Peyton Cheely ’04, Dr. Linda Rouse, Lizzie Gehr ’04 5. Sandy Myers, Johnny Myers ’82, Barbara Crosby, Rob Crosby ’83, Robin Rison Ashworth ’85 6. Aaron Revere, Molly Brent Revere ’94, David Wilkins ’94, Jennifer Robertson Wilkins ’92, Whitney Montague Mathews ’95, Andy Mathews ’94 7. Joe Blackburn ’99, Hayes Blackburn, Drew Wiltshire ’99, Kelly Wiltshire

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES 8

9

10

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Spring 2010

8. Scott Whipple ’95, Allison Lancaster, Keith Whipple ’98, Cabell Whipple 9. Elizabeth Downey ’04, Peyton Thompson Wilson ’04, Palen Powelson ’04, Meredith Newcomb ’04 10. Susan Heiner Steadman ’71, Bob Steadman, Cabell Smith Longan ’71, Bill Longan 11. Monika Woods, Rohan Hazra ’84, Leslie Crouch Mandrgoc ’84, Tim Taylor ’84, Laura Dudley Dyke ’84, Sarah Paxton ’84, Mary Williams Hagan ’84 12. Braxton Pollard, Anne McDaniel Pollard ’88, Peter McDaniel ’84, Lisa McDaniel, Mimi McDaniel Ziletti ’82, David Ziletti 13. Debbie Hurst, Liz Costin Nixon ’02, Jeanne Nuara ’02 14. Grant Steadman ’04, Marshall Waller ’04, Patrick Dolan ’04, Ryan Enright ’04, Carter Keeney ’04, Michael Oden ’04

14

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

1

2

Reunion Annual Gathering at the ‘21’ club in New York City, Feb. 5, 2010

3

4

In spite of a winter storm that was burying the east coast in snow, more than 100 alums who live in the New York area ventured out to the ‘21’ Club to see old Collegiate friends.

5 1. Arun Jesudian ’97, Allison Jesudian and Christian Thompson Henderson ’97 2. Ginny Stevens Purcell ’68, Caroline Cutchins, Don Thompson and Riker Purcell 3. Chris Bier, Christina Sweeney ’03, Aaron Novak, Carolyn McCandlish ’03 and Alexandra Squire ’03 4. Virginia Lawson ’97 and Charley Scher ’83 5. Roger Hailes, Murray Fisher, David Wilkins and David Romhilt (all ’94)

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9

8

6. Rachel Everett, Will Wiltshire and Sarah Corcoran (all ’92) 7. Don Crow, Mil NormanRisch, Anne Riker Purcell ’01 and David Powell 8. Jessica Longo, Sarah Harrison, Ryan Mostrom and Devon Kelley (all ’05) 9. Kate Robertson ’05, Ry Marchant ’71 and Head of School Keith Evans 10. Emilie Evans, Gail Smith, Elliott Harrigan and Moore McMahon ’74 11. Gregg Berman ’80, Joseph DePalo, Sarah Ramsey DePalo ’91 and Jon Scher ’80 12. William Byrd ’02 and Rishi Pahuja ’04

10

11

Spring 2010

12

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Young Alumni Get Together

2

1

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Richmond area alumni who are recent Collegiate graduates were invited to get together on Oct. 22 at City Limit. The turn out was great and lots of catching up took place in the restaurant’s casual atmosphere. We hope to see you there next time!

5

7

4

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8

1. James Casler and Drew Wiltshire, both ’99 2. Liz Costin Nixon ’02, Talley King ’02, Lauren Siff ’02, Lewis Lawson and Lucy Moore ’01 3. Lizzy Kitces, Sara Hairfield, Burch Hazelgrove, Claiborne Buckingham, Katie Hurst, Ashley Davis and Mary Beth Neal, all ’05 4. Sara Montgomery and Tayloe Moore, both ’98 5. Meredith Hurst ’02, Joanna Parker ’03 and Brad Jones ’03 6. Blair Northen ’04, Jeffrey Gottwald ’02 and Ryan Schilling ’02 7. Mayme Beth Donohue ’03, Ambler Shuford ’02 and Lauren Siff ’02 8. Weldon Bradshaw, Patrick Bisceglia ’05 and Will Bruch ’05

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1935

Juliet Florance Sally Barnes Link

1940

Frances Richardson Alba Margaret Mengel Grubb Gaie Spratley Lloyd Margaret Woodward McNeil Janet Brooks Rueger

1945

Edith Bigger Coleman Sara Bowker Dozier Nita Jonas Schroeder Donna Hodges White

1955

1970

Betty Gayle Atkins Gray Fitzgerald Eubank Herman Candler Grigsby Kevin Patrick Kelly Diane Sharon Kirkland Geoffrey Mann James Rudd Mercer Frank Middleton Bryan Allan Miller Michele Nix Ana Isabel Ossenbach William Jeffrey Stafford

1990

Jennifer McMillan Conner Sally Lim Millard Magee Matthew Marlowe David Tepper Tanu Trehan Chris Wilson

1995

Berkeley Smith Butler John Edmonds Richard Morrison Paige Suttenfield Kambiz Yaghmai

Laura Bonavia Melanie Ann Gibrall Claire Gutierrez Bridgett Jaestedt Howard Grayson Johnson Ville Aleksi Kallioniemi Patrick Ofuatey-Kodjoe Jason Sarayba Christopher Sievers Stacey Ann Stephens

1980

2000

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Where Are You?

To the Classes ending in 0 and 5! This is your reunion year, and we do not have addresses for these classmates. Please contact Anne Bruce Ahearn at aahearn@collegiate-va.org if you know where they are!!

Shirley Pilkington Rollings

1960

Melissa McCabe Ashley Boyer Mills

1965

Jeri Lee Hoge Suzanne Currie Humphries Julie Greene Jones Anne Jones Logan Frederick Lowden Meredith Masselin Morris Paul Murphy Stephen Vaughan Lu Ellen Margaret Wehrli Lee Weinstock

Spring 2010

David Webster Barnes Gitte Engel-Andraasen Elizabeth Dare Eubank Neil Styers Griffin Deborah Ramsey Jones Tracy Hazel Levine David Shannon Kent Smith Lawrence Wilder Suzanne Clair Young

Sean Allen Ryan Allen Coughter Aidan Patrick Feore Reid Alexander Parmelee Peter Francis Rosanelli Nathaniel Everett Terry Daniel Peter Weinbaum Gareth Allerston Whitlow

1985

Leigh Baird Hall Janet Jarman Edward Moore Kathryn Lachenauer Robinson John Henderson Shires Timothy Stone

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

1

Pageant Lunch & Rehearsal Alumnae from the Town School and Mooreland Road campuses enjoyed catching up in the choral room of the Hershey Center on Dec. 4. Following lunch, they attended the Christmas Pageant dress rehearsal at All Saints Church. 2

4

3 1. Alumnae dined on delicious holiday treats made by Missy Falls Mauck ’84. 2. Deane Hotchkiss Mountcastle ’59 and daughter Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85 3. Helen Tanner ’49 and Peggy Tilghman Bothwell ’59 4. Jane Finegan Boinest and Betty Shewmake Johannessen, both ’50 5. Brenda Britten Mathews ’72, former science teacher Margaret Daniel and Julia Shannon ’72

5

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES 6

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8 6. Kathleen Coleman Thomas ’81, Jody Hughes ’81, Lou Ann Bell Bradley ’81 and Lauren Deep Henley ’83 7. Susie Materne Benson, Anne Hunter Larus Roe, and Rossie Reed Fisher, all ’62 8. Liz Broaddus Scioscia ’90 and former French teacher Christianne Rimbault 9. Margot Deck ’59, Carolyn Levey Winks ’78 and Nancy Archbell Bain 10. Elsie Ellerson Morris ’54, Lucy Correll ’67 and Kaki Nelson

9

10

Spring 2010

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Chips Off the Old Cougar Block

This past fall we welcomed the following legacies of Collegiate alumni...

Riley Bowling······················· 3rd···································································································· Cindy Nott Bowling ’89 Reese Bowling ····················· 5th···································································································· Cindy Nott Bowling ’89 Jones Brackett······················ K····································································································· Callie Lacy Brackett ’95 Sheehan Bradshaw·············· K············································································································ Chad Bradshaw ’92 Patrick Brennan··················· K·············································································································· Chris Brennan ’84 Marnie Brennan··················· 5th············································································································ Chris Brennan ’84 Alexandra Brownstein········· K·········································································································· Andy Brownstein ’85 William Bullock···················· K················································································································· Boyd Bullock ’85 Katie Burford······················· K················································································································· Reid Burford ’88 Hugh Cafritz························· K···························································· Diane Long Cafritz ’88, Anne Hirschler Long ’62, Elizabeth Whitlock Hirschler ’32 (deceased) Evans Campbell··················· K·············································································································· Sean Campbell ’84 Mason Chapman·················· K··········································································································· Mason Chapman ’84 Reid Coleman······················· K·························································· Frances Owen Coleman ’92 and Clay Coleman ’89 Sebastian Condyles·············· K··············································································································· Nick Condyles ’77 Will Conrad·························· K··································· Whitney Smith Conrad ’93 and Scott Conrad ’93, Dan Smith ’68 Lillie Bea Cope····················· K····································································································· Bea Leachman Cope ’93 Charlie Cuttino···················· K····························································· Libbie Crane Cuttino ’89 and David Cuttino ’90, Libbie Thompson Crane ’50 (deceased) Zach Darling························· K·················································································································· Ross Darling ’84 Emily Deskevich·················· K······························································································· Janet Collins Deskevich ’88 Olivia Fairlamb···················· K····························································· Holly Schmidt Fairlamb ’82 and Bo Fairlamb ’73 Owen Fallon························· K···················································································································· John Fallon ’85 Natalie Ford························· K········································································································· Lauren Diehl Ford ’92 Jack Garrett························· 8th····························································································· John Garrett ’75 (deceased) Riley Gilbert························· K······························································································· Carol Turlington Gilbert ’85 Jack Glagola························· K················································································································· Mike Glagola ’88 Elizabeth Hagan·················· K··································································································· Mary Williams Hagan ’84 Alice Hallock························ K································································································· Sarah Johnson Hallock ’85 Jack Henry··························· K··················································································································· Mike Henry ’84 Jack Hill······························· K··································································································· Catherine Crooks Hill ’85 Syd Jamison························· K·················································································································· Jay Jamison ’89 Harper Jones························ K······················································································································ Ben Jones ’92 Sarah Kennon······················ K····················································································· Bobbie Lee Norris Sutherland ’54 Georgia Kulp························ K···················································································································· Chris Kulp ’84 Gray Little···························· 9th·················································································································· Lloyd Little ’76 Ella McDaniel······················· K································································································· Cara Koonce McDaniel ’90 Christian Miller··················· K····································································································Beth Christian Miller ’80 Ali Moore······························ 9th··················································································································· Rud Moore ’76 Will Pace······························· K····························································································· Margaret Randolph Pace ’90 Anne Collier Phillips············ K···················································································································Trip Phillips ’93 Sheldon Reed························ 3rd················································································································· Wilson Reed ’91 Kate Riopelle························ K················································································································Brian Riopelle ’80 Maggie Rohr························· K··············································································································· Lin Luck Rohr ’93 Scotty Ruth··························· K··································································· Jennifer Jewett Ruth ’90 and Scott Ruth ’91, Gay Montague Jewett ’65 (deceased), Bryce Jewett ’64 Harry Shaia·························· K····················································································································· Chip Shaia ’85 Hank Shield·························· K··················································································································Henry Shield ’91 Charlotte Smith··················· K····································································································· Beth Vetrovec Smith ’90 Ellie Smith···························· K····················································································································· Jody Smith ’86 Dabney Spraker··················· K··············································································································· David Spraker ’89 Lucy Storey··························· K···················· Mollie Heilig Storey ’92 and Scott Storey ’92, Anne Dobbins Brasfield ’65 Tucker Walker······················ K························································· Sarah Morris Walker ’86, Elsie Ellerson Morris ’54 Robert Westermann············· K························································································ Townsend Ross Westermann ’88 Jonnie Williams···················· K · ·········································································································· Jonnie Williams ’95 John Woodfin························ K·················································································································· Jack Woodfin ’87 John Wootton························ K··········································································································· Madison Wootton ’89 Lacey Word··························· K····················································································································· Scott Word ’79

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Kindergartners

1. Front: Jack Glagola, Reid Coleman, Jonnie Williams Back: Lilly Bea Cope, Emily Deskevich, William Bullock, John Wootton, Sebastian Condyles, Will Conrad 2. Lucy Storey, Lacey Word, Sarah Kennon, Mason Chapman 3. Front: Jack Hill, Jack Henry, Riley Gilbert, Hugh Cafritz Back: Evans Campbell, Alexandra Brownstein, Tucker Walker, Sheehan Bradshaw, Maggie Rohr, Jones Brackett 4. Ella McDaniel 5. Anne Collier Phillips 6. Harper Jones, John Woodfin, Robert Westermann 7. Front: Zach Darling Back: Georgia Kulp, Elizabeth Hagan, Patrick Brennan, Hank Shield, Katie Burford 8. Front: Kate Riopelle, Olivia Fairlamb, Syd Jamison Back: Natalie Ford, Ellie Smith, Christian Miller, Owen Fallon, Charlotte Smith

Spring 2010

Upper School

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Lower School

Middle School

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Call for Nominations Athletic Hall of Fame ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME MEMBERS Individuals Mary Fry Fritch ’28 Ann Lee Saunders Brown ’36 Rosa Hodges McLaughlin ’36 Katherine Chewning Crane ’46 Alice Lewis Flower ’49 Nancy Sadler George ’65 Leroy Vaughan ’66 Sanford Boisseau ’68 Ray Easterling ’68 Janet Grubbs ’69 Boodie Wiltshire McGurn ’71 Behle Schaaf ’72 Robbie Perkins ’73 Frank Jones ’77 Robert Wrenn ’77

John Owen Gwathmey ’80 David Murphy ’80 David Shannon ’82 Chris Tate ’83 Beth Curry ’84 Lisa Coleman ’84 Lee Moreau ’85 Antoinette Lucas ’87 Craig Scott ’87 Rob Ukrop ’88 Wortie Ferrell ’88 Ta’ Bingham Frias ’94 Andrew Slater ’96 Courtney Owen Mattes ’97 Joey Rackley ’99

Coaches Bill Chambers Gwen Donohue Jim Hickey

Petey Jacobs (posthumously) Grover Jones (posthumously)

T

his fall, the Collegiate Alumni Association will induct a new class of coaches, players and teams into the Collegiate School Athletic Hall of Fame. These inductees will be selected from current and past nominations! Please take a moment to think about the outstanding athletes, coaches or teams you remember from your days at Collegiate and send in your nomination! We need your help to be sure we honor the BEST of the best. The more nominations a person or team receives, the more likely they will be strongly considered, so don’t assume someone else has done it! (But, if you have already nominated someone in the past who has NOT yet been selected to the Athletic Hall of Fame, you do NOT need to nominate that person again; a second nomination from you will not count twice.) The purpose of the Athletic Hall of Fame is to “honor and perpetuate the memory of those individuals who, through fair play, have brought recognition, honors, distinction and excellence to Collegiate School and its interscholastic athletic programs.” Alumni/ae are eligible beginning five years after they have graduated from Collegiate. Coaches are not eligible until they have retired from Collegiate.

Athletic Hall of Fame Committee Members

Supporters Mr. Malcolm U. Pitt, Jr.

Coach John Moreau

Teams 1959 “A” Field Hockey Team 1963 Varsity Football Team 1969 – 1970 Boys’ Varsity Basketball Team 1970 Varsity Football Team 1982 Varsity Football Team

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1986 Varsity Field Hockey Team 1987 Boys’ Varsity Lacrosse Team 1988 Girls’ Varsity Tennis Team 1989 – 1990 Girls’ Varsity Basketball Team 1990 Boys’ Varsity Soccer Team

Hylah Boyd Ballowe ’90, Chair Boodie Wiltshire McGurn ’71 Beth Watlington Marchant ’72 Lewis Little ’73 Gray Stettinius ’79 Sarge Reynolds ’80 Alex Cecil ’83 Michelle Deal Lewis ’89

Matthew Goodwin ’90 Stephen Spraker ’92 Mollie Heilig Storey ’92 Charlie T. Fonville ’93 Kristan Schaaf ’97 James Casler ’99 Ned Rider ’04

Athletic Hall of Fame Advisory Committee Michael Brost ’85, Coach Karen Doxey, Co-Director of Athletics

Alex Smith, Vice President – Development Anne Bruce Ahearn, Alumni Director

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Any new nominations you would like to make should be sent via the attached form to: Anne Bruce Ahearn Alumni Director Collegiate School 103 North Mooreland Rd Richmond, VA 23229

You may also nominate an individual via email: aahearn@collegiate-va.org or via fax 804.741.9128 The more information you can give us regarding the alum’s athletic career at Collegiate, the better!

Athletic Hall of Fame Nominations Name of Nominee(s)

Class year

Reason for your nomination (including any exact information you have about their Collegiate School athletic achievements)

Your name Your phone number

Class year

Your email

Questions? Call Anne Bruce at 804.741.9766.

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Nominees Sought for Distinguished Alumni Awards

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e need your help! Since 1975, the Collegiate Alumni Association has presented two Alumni awards at Upper School graduation in June: The Award for Outstanding Service, and The Distinguished Alumni Award. These awards tout the recipients as role models not only for our graduating seniors, but for the entire Collegiate community. Please take a moment and send us your nominations by filling out the attached form or by emailing aahearn@collegiate-va.org.

The Award for Outstanding Service recognizes an alum who has generously and loyally used his or her talents and energies in a direct way to benefit Collegiate. The Distinguished Alumni Award is given to a Collegiate graduate who has distinguished him or herself in a particular field or endeavor.

1. Distinguished Alumni Recipient Ned Powell ’66 with Alumni Association President Beth Vetrovec Smith ’90 at Commencement 2. Outstanding Service Recipient Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85 with family – mother Deane Hotchkiss Mountcastle ’59, husband Chris, and sons

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Distinguished Alumni Award for Service or Distinction in their Field

Service, Con’t.

Distinguished, Con’t.

2002

Brenda Britten Mathews ’72

2003

Franklin Bain Heiner ’66

1998

Stanley F. Druckenmiller ’71 Investment Strategist

1975

Mary Ross Scott Reed ’25

2004

Katie Cabell Belk Taylor ’71

1976

Jane Bell Grinnan Gladding ’25

2005

Martha Fleming Moore ’75

1999

Eugene W. Hickok, Jr. ’68 Education

1979

Elizabeth Boinest Conner ’41

2006

Beth Watlington Marchant ’72 &

1980

Bryce D. Jewett, Jr. ’64

2000

Antoinette Marshall Lucas ’87 Athlete

1982

Carmen Pettus LeCompte ’43

2007

T. Gaylon Layfield III ’69

2001

Steve Kelley ’77 Syndicated Cartoonist

1982

Alex Smith ’65

2008

W. David Gorsline Jr. ’76

1985

Carolyn Moore McCue, M.D. ’33

2009

Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85

2002

Martha Hill Newell ’39 Playwright

1987

Malcolm U. Pitt

2003

Anne Louise Coleman ’76 Doctor (Ophthalmology)

2004

David Allen Schools ’83 Musician

2005

Eric Cantor ’81 Politician

2006

Nancy Meyers Marsiglia ’71 Community Volunteer/Leader

2007

Rohan Hazra ’84 Doctor (Pediatric AIDS/Research)

2008

CDR R. Gordon Fogg USN ’82 Navy pilot / Military

2009

Edward A. Powell Jr. ’66 United Service Organization (USO)

Award for Outstanding Alumni Service 1991

Helen M. Tanner ’49

1992

H. Pettus LeCompte ’71

1993

Thomas Earl Pruitt ’71

1994

Sandra Davis King ’66

1995

Mary Stuart Cruickshank ’51

1996

Anne Day Friddell ’71

1997

Gay Montague Jewett ’65

1998

Cristy Conner Jarvis ’68

1999

Lindsay Burn Wortham ’69

2000

Ann Rowland Beauchamp ’75

2001

William “Brother” Scott ’71

2010

Ry Marchant ’71

Distinguished Alumni Award 1991

Martha Clark Goss ’67 Businesswoman

1992

Ann Cottrell Free ’34 Author

1993

John Charles Wood ’70 Doctor

1994

Joellyn T. Duesberry ’62 Artist

1995

Alice Reed McGuire ’55 Community Volunteer/Leader

1996

Gertrude Murrell Howland ’27 Archeologist

1997

Franklin Wood Kelly ’71 Curator

Collegiate School Distinguished Alumni Awards

Suggested names for the

Suggested names for the

Outstanding Alumni Service Award

Distinguished Alumni Award

Your Name

Email

Phone (home)

(work)

Spring 2010 2009

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Distinguished Alumni Awards – Past Recipients

59 33


BACK IN THE DAY

W

hen I was in the tenth grade in Collegiate’s Boys’ School (ca. 1961), Rick Wiltshire ’64 and I had science class with the famous Coach Grover Jones. Grover did not like Rick, and they did not always get along. Who knows when or where it started (when Rick got on Grover’s bad side), but it was something you didn’t want to do in the early days of this very small Boys’ School. It did not matter whether it was the classroom or the playing fields, Grover and Rick were oil and water. Rick was one of our outstanding athletes (football, basketball and baseball), and Grover probably did not think Rick worked hard enough in practice. Also, Rick was one of those unfortunate souls who were seemingly always in the wrong place at the wrong time. But somehow, he always landed on his feet. This story is about our science class which Grover taught to sophomore boys. All of us had a healthy respect for Grover, even bordering on fear at times. For those of you who do not remember Grover Jones, he was one of our “larger than life” characters from the beginning days of the Boys’ School. Grover was the first football coach, thus Grover Jones Field on our present day campus. He was a short, round, balding man, a star running back for University of Virginia in his day, jolly sometimes and grumpy other times. If Grover liked you, you were golden! If he did not, watch out! As mentioned before, Grover and Rick did not always get along. I will say Rick pushed the envelope at times with Grover. I remember Rick somehow being pressed against a hallway locker with Grover’s face one inch from Rick’s face. I ran and hid. Now to the meat of this story. In our science class, Grover gave us all a long-term science project to do and obviously turn in on time for a grade, an important semester science grade. The project was to collect area insects, pin them on a board and give a description. My, how I think we have come a long way academically at Collegiate. This assignment sounds more suitable for Lower School science. Regardless, most of us embraced the assignment and went hunting for weeks to find and pin the perfect specimen. But not Rick Wiltshire; Rick either forgot or postponed to the final day. Rick and I are friends, and Rick found me the morning of the project deadline in a panic…no bug collection! “Al, I’m toast with Grover.” (Rick always did and still does call me Al) “What do I do?” Well, I was never noted for being an academic resource for anyone in need. But I had an idea. I told Rick that I actually found some of my bugs caught in the front radiators

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By Alex Smith ’65

of cars. Just as I said that, Rick and I looked at the faculty and student parking lot (very few drove to school in those days) beside the old Boys’ School, now Middle School. This parking lot has been replaced by the Hershey Center. It was still before school so I helped Rick, and one by one we approached grills and radiators of mostly faculty cars to obtain a nicely killed but not a squished bug. In no time, Rick had his collection, and we gave the bugs some kind of description (Horsefly “a la DeSota”) and pinned them (pins courtesy of Elizabeth Collins, Boys’ School secretary) on some found cardboard. Rick had escaped disaster, and, with me, we handed our bug boards in that morning. Mine done over a two week search and Rick’s done over a 20-minute dash. What comes next is the final injustice for me. Rick was saved (as usual, if you know him like some of us do). I had helped him with my brilliant idea. And when the grades came out…Rick got a B- and I got a C. Grover commented on how unusual Rick’s bugs were. !@*!? End of Bug Story.

A Bug Story...

Grover Jones points the way to a proper dissection. Rick Wiltshire Facts • Retired President of Home Beneficial • Class of ’63 Athletic Hall of Fame • Father of Richard Wiltshire ’97, Drew Wiltshire ’99, and Anne Wiltshire ’03

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Amy Gilman Remke ’78 and Anne Gail Gilman Jennings ’88 The Helen Baker Society’s Own Sister Act

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ollegiate has been an integral part of my family for three generations. My mother drove carpool thirteen miles each way to Collegiate for twenty-three years. My uncle was in the first boys graduating class that started in eighth grade and went all the way through. For me, the question is why wouldn’t I continue to support my school? When I wrote my will, I was living out of state without children. Because Collegiate had given me wonderful preparation for college and life beyond, I created my planned gift to express my gratitude and to keep my family’s tradition alive. As I think back on my time at Collegiate, I remember in particular positive relationships with teachers Nancy Pace Goodykoontz, Christiane Rimbault, and Ann Griffin. Amy Gilman Remke ’78

Sisters Amy Gilman Remke ’78 (left) and Anne Gail Gilman Jennings ’88.

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ollegiate School is a blend of the past and the present. We have many current students with multigenerational ties, and each year brings new families and students embarking on their Collegiate journey. Faculty, students, alumni and others are enriched by this variety of backgrounds and experiences. Amy Gilman Remke ’78 and Anne Gail Gilman Jennings ’88 are two sisters whose loyalty to Collegiate springs from three generations of family ties. Their grandfather, Harwood Cochrane, served a sixteen-year span on our Board of Trustees, and their uncle, Jim Cochrane, joins them both as a Helen Baker Society member. Amy is a long-time resident of Nashville where she lives with her husband, Chris, and their two children, Matthew and Meredith. Anne Gail makes her home in Richmond with her husband, Gary. Anne Gail’s son, Justin, is a member of our Cougar Class of 2017. Here in Amy and Anne Gail’s words are their thoughts about Collegiate School and planned giving:

I

vividly remember my seventh grade math teacher, Betty Sue McKinley. She was the first teacher who really believed in me. I also fondly remember the late Dallas Cocke. In so many ways, Collegiate made a big difference in my life. It taught me to strive for excellence and to love learning. I was so well prepared for the demands of college. I actually moved home to Richmond from Washington, DC so my son, Justin, could attend Collegiate. Now I get to relive my Collegiate experience through him! I have chosen to include the school in my estate plan and to join the Helen Baker Society because I want to continue to see Collegiate making a positive impact on young people’s lives. The Society’s annual luncheons are great fun and help me keep up with alumni who are doing such interesting life’s work. Anne Gail Gilman Jennings ’88

For more information about bequests, charitable trusts, partial-interest gifts of real estate, IRA gifts, life insurance, or gift annuities, please contact: Stephen A. Hart, Esq. Director of Planned Giving Collegiate School 804.741.9713 / shart@collegiate-va.org

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1

2

Winter Party A Seussical Success!

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he Westin Hotel was the place to be on February 20th! The 2010 Winter Party and Auction was a salute to the incomparable legacy of Dr. Seuss, whose boundless imagination, characters and whimsy inspired a love of reading in children around the world. Enthusiastic celebrants bid high and often in support of the construction of an Academic Commons, which will include a new library on our Mooreland Campus. Karin and Al Stratford ’85 and Pam and Tom Roberts, this year’s Winter Party and Auction chairs, worked hard to create a night to remember. Just so you know…we did NOT serve “Green Eggs and Ham” for dinner! In keeping with fundraising for our new library and Academic Commons, this year’s adopted community cause was children’s literacy. Whitney Cardozo, a current parent and Vice President of Education for the Children’s Museum of Richmond, chaired a book drive. Through her efforts and the generosity of the Collegiate community, we collected 10,000 books that have been donated to four schools with whom we have established community service relationships: Oak Grove-Bellmeade Elementary School, William Byrd Community House, St. Andrews School and George Mason Elementary School. Dr. Seuss would be proud!

3 1. Laura West raises her bid card as Brink Brinkley ’76 (left) and Mark Hourigan look on. 2. The Grinch makes a special appearance. 3. Jim and Donna Moore enter through a balloon arch. 4. Our Cat in the Hat Ray Crouch greets guests at the Westin in a sporty red car.

4

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OPPOSITE PAGE: 5. Winter Party 2010 leadership – Co-chairs Al ’85 and Karin Stratford; Coordinator Jennifer Gorsline; Co-Chairs Pam and Tom Roberts. 6. Official auction dog handler Hunter White ’85 gets a kiss from Cindy Lou Who who later went home with the Grover family. 7. Head of School Keith Evans thanks the crowd for their support. 8. Cindy Maynard, Alumni Director Anne Bruce Baskerville Ahearn ’87, John Gary Maynard ’86 and Lisa Hourigan 9. Jack Morrison places a last-minute bid. 10. Scott and Whitney Cardozo, chair of the Winter Party book drive 11. Co-chair Al Stratford ’85 and auctioneer Mark Motley conduct the live auction. 12. Hunter White ’85 hands over Cindy Lou Who to new owner Martha Estes Grover ’79 as Mark Motley congratulates Chubby Grover on his new canine acquisition.

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES 5

7

6

8

9

10

11

12

continued on following page

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

1

2

3

4

6

5

7 1. Lee Christian ’69, Jenny Maraghy, Anne Mountcastle Rusbuldt ’85 and husband Chris 2. Beth and John O’Neill 3. Collegiate Board of Trustees Chair Mark Hourigan and Judy Pahren 4. Brude Stoever, Mark Hourigan and Michael Brost ’85 5. Libby Robertson and Michelle O’Donnell 6. Jay Moore and Crit Richardson ’75 7. Mark and Janet Walker; Chester and Vicky Sharpes 8. Sharon Handley, Corbin and John Neuner, and Lisa and John Moerner

8

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ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

Collegiate School Alumni, Families and Friends Join us at Sam Newell Field, Robins Campus for the

Ted Lowe (’84) Memorial Alumni Baseball Game Friday, May 7 12:00 Noon 12:00 Noon Registration and Lunch, Alumni Baseball Game 12:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

Naming of Home Team Dugout in Memory of Ted Lowe ’84 Varsity Baseball Game vs. St. Christopher’s

Ted Lowe displays fine form in an 8-0 victory over St. Christopher’s in 1984.

Sign up now. Email Alumni Director Anne Bruce Ahearn at aahearn@collegiate-va.org

Spring 2010

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CLASS NOTES 29

DIED: Marjorie Belvin Ruffin on November 30, 2009, at the age of 100. Mrs. Ruffin was the daughter of Lucille and John Allan Belvin, who was a founding member of the Country Club of Virginia. Mrs. Ruffin was married to her husband, Craige Ruffin, for 56 years until his death in 1992. She was a member of The Country Club of Virginia, The Women’s Club, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Virginia Historical Society, the Historic Richmond Foundation and the McDowell House. She is survived by her daughter, Marjorie Ruffin Cain of Leesburg, FL, two grandsons and several great-grandchildren.

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DIED: Anne Williams Lind on January 17, 2010. Mrs. Lind attended Bennington College in Vermont and was a talented artist and writer. She worked in the display and advertising department of Miller & Rhoads in Richmond before moving to New York City as an advertising copywriter for Macy’s. She worked for the American Red Cross in England in the ’40s and married Alexander Udny Lind, a Royal Navy Lieutenant. After the war they lived in Hong Kong

and Singapore, and then moved to Canada where she was an active member of St. Jude’s Anglican Church. She is survived by her daughter Plum Lind Johnson; her three sons Robin, Christopher and Victor; and nine grandchildren, Virginia, Jessica and Carter Johnson; Frankie Abralind ’96; Maria Lind Tribble ’98; and Emily, Aaron, Hannah and Nicholas Lind. Kate Lewis Wallace on November 22, 2009. Mrs. Wallace was predeceased by her husband, William A. Wallace, Jr., and is survived by her son, William A. Wallace III, a granddaughter, and two great grandsons. A lifelong resident of Richmond, Mrs. Wallace attended Hollins College, was a member of First Presbyterian Church, The Country Club of Virginia and the Tuckahoe Women’s Club.

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Nancy Creath Lewis wrote us a delightful note recently: “Until recently, I did not realize how strong a connection my family and I have with Collegiate. My brain must have been on vacation. “I graduated in the class of ’38 in the Town School. My mother, whose maiden was “Martha” Elizabeth Rose was a student at Miss Gussie

Daniel’s private school for young ladies. This school was a precursor to Collegiate. Mrs. Donald Regester (also deceased) was a student there. “At present, my daughter-in-law, Suzanne LaPrade Lewis, teaches in the Upper School. Suzanne’s grandmother graduated in the Town School in ’33. Her maiden name was Anne Page Walker. She married Dr. Edmund LaPrade. Their son, Carter LaPrade, was in our kindergarten before moving on to St. Christopher’s. “Oh yes! I taught the fours, fives and sixes for eight years at our Town School. “Suzanne LaPrade married my son J. Bolling Lewis III and they have two young children in the faculty child care program at Collegiate. My sister’s son William Russell Jones III was in our Town School kindergarten for three years as well as my first cousins Phyllis and Catherine Shelton who graduated before me. “As a P.S. of interest, Miss Augusta Daniel was a charter member of the Woman’s Club. Do wish I knew exactly where her school was located but I’m pretty sure it was downtown – 1st or 2nd street.”

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DIED: Mary Belt Blakeslee on August 16, 2009. She was predeceased by her husband, Arthur L. Blakeslee, III, and is survived by her sisters, Anne B. Norris and Priscilla Belt Webster ’63, and her three daughters, her son and three grandchildren. She was the daughter of Priscilla Scott Belt ’27. She was raised in Richmond and graduated from Hollins College. She and her family settled in Connecticut where she was active as a Girl Scout Troop Leader and a volunteer for the Hartford Hospital. She was heavily involved in her church and was a volunteer chairperson for the St. James’s Annual Antique Show and Tea Room. She was a member of the Board of the West Hartford YMCA.

48 Ladies of the Class of ’49 gathered for lunch at The Jefferson to celebrate their 60th reunion. Front: Helen Tanner, Peggy Duncan Stallings, Dootsie Call White Back: Carol Tanner Cover ’39 (her 70th reunion!), Charlotte E Ransone, Barbara Enslow Ransone and Barbara Amole Smith

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Grace Wallace Brown writes, “I was so proud of the percentage of contributors in our class: 73%! Way to go girls!”

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49

Loretta Powell Hill writes that she is still playing a lot of tennis and takes at least one cruise a year.

53

Nelda Wood Snyder writes that she is “still kickin’ and loving life in the woodlands, which we have put into a conservation easement. I always love hearing the continuing great achievements of Collegiate.”

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DIED: Patsy McClaslin Brooks on October 5, 2009. Patsy worked at Family and Children Services, was a member of Hermitage Country Club, served on the board at the Tuckahoe Women’s Club, and was a volunteer at the Virginia Museum. She was an active member of Dover Baptist Church and was a lay minister at the women’s prison in Goochland. She is survived by her husband, Paschal D. Brooks, Jr., and three children: Pat Brooks ’73, Ricky Brooks ’75, and Sarah Brooks Sprouse ’81. Katherine Huntley Galleher on January 6, 2010. Kate was a lifetime member of Grace and Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, attended Collegiate, graduated from Oldfields School and attended Mary Washington College. She was a member of the Junior League, Children’s Theater and The Woman’s Club. She was a member of the Board of Children’s Hospital and was a longtime tour guide in the City of Richmond. She is survived by her three sons and their families, Frank, Huntley and Wayne Galleher.

The Class of ’54 celebrated their 55th reunion at The Jefferson. Front: Carter Brenaman, Connie Booker Moe and Barbara Jenkins Roehrich Back: Marsha Taliaferro Gillis, Bobbie Norris Sutherland, Elsie Ellerson Morris, Joan Blankinship Neese and Betty Temple Downs

59 50th Reunion

The class of 1959 celebrated its 50th Reunion on Saturday, September 26, at a luncheon given by the school in a sunny room in Mr. Pitt’s former residence, and later at a dinner in the home of Peggy Tilghman Bothwell. In attendance at lunch were Peggy, Evaline Hensley Jones, Scottie Wall King, Jane Libby Luck, Marion Richardson McSweeney, Deane Hotchkiss Mountcastle, Jane Terrell Neer and Patsy Chewning Young, all from the Richmond area. Margot Deck came from near Chester and Connie Kennon Harriss from Powhatan County. Suzanne Welchons Day and Anne Summers Hanchey traveled from the “Northern Neck”– Weems and Lancaster, respectively. Making the longest trek were Archer Lee Hannah Smith, who drove up from Hilton Head, and Hazel Bethea Turner from Minneapolis.

We had nine for dinner: Peggy, Evaline, Margot, Jane Libby, Marion, Jane, Archer Lee, Hazel, and Jane Brothers Ludwig, who drove up from Kilmarnock. During the festivities, we took time to remember classmates who could not join us: Julia Prather Duggan, who was dealing with flooding issues in Atlanta; Ina Jones Hughs, who sent a delightful missive from Santa Fe, NM, where she serves as writer-in-residence at Ghost Ranch; Frances Bramble Sargent, who was very involved in the planning of the Governor’s Arts Awards which were to be given the day of our reunion; Sally Barns Sutherland, who was taking a long-awaited trip to the home of her partner whose family lives in Bermuda; and Catherine White Tucker who was attending the annual meeting of the Virginia Native Plant Society of which she is an active member.

The Class of ’59 enjoyed lunch in the conference room at Collegiate’s Business Office, formerly the Pitt family home. Later, they dined at Peggy Tilghman Bothwell’s home.

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CLASS NOTES

64 45th Reunion

While on campus to speak at Upper School assembly, Murray Fisher ’93 had lunch with family members: Emilee Carpenter, Ben Adamson ’98, Elisabeth Reed Carter ’50, Alice McGuire Massie ’79, Hunter McGuire, Alice Reed McGuire ’55, Sandy Fisher, Rossie Reed Fisher ’62, Murray, Scott Reed ’92, Jane Fisher ’89, Al Rider, Anna Reed, Philip Reed ’91 and Sara Reed. We received responses to the class survey from Mary Buford Bocock Hitz and Agnes Cutchins Clark, who both live in Charlottesville; Courtney Lawson Sjostrom, who lives in Maryland; and Nancy Birnie Tangredi, who lives in Miami and who has just recently retired. Margaret Patterson Withrow also responded to the survey and came to Virginia from her home in California last spring to see her sisters, but was unable to make a second trip in the same year. Margot reports that Sarah Robinson Quinn had her survey response “eaten” by the computer. We did not hear from Diane Britton ParkerCoyer, and we have lost touch with Betty Rives Smith Hudgins. If anyone has kept up with these ladies, please notify the alumni office or Evaline or Margot, who are trying to stay in touch with members of our class. Many of our classmates may still have family in the Richmond area, and we locals have agreed to continue to get together and already have had a lunch date in October. Please save a little time if you come to town and let one of us know so we can make a plan to meet. The entire class also wishes to express condolences to the family and friends of our dear classmate Champe Armstrong Edwards, who died May 31, 2008. – Submitted by Evaline Hensley Jones DIED: Champe Armstrong Edwards died May 31, 2008, after a brave struggle with bone cancer.

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Catherine Reinhardt Evans moved to Concord, NH, in August 2009. She accepted a position as principal with the Concord School District. She is enjoying the natural beauty of New Hampshire, along with the snow! DIED: Troy Welchons on November 3, 2009. He is survived by his sister Suzanne Welchons Day ’59 and her family.

On Saturday of reunion weekend, the girls of the class of ’64 gathered for lunch at the home of Lynn Bugg Pritchard. Hostesses and chefs were Lynn and Nan Ellen Williams Ritsch. In addition to enjoying the delicious shrimp salad lunch, we hugged, exclaimed how none of us had changed a bit in 45 years, reminisced, and caught up on each other’s present lives. Those in attendance were: (front row) Randy Pollard Gamble of Charleston, SC; Anne Thomas Hines; Kay Taylor Sheild of Newport News; Austin Tucker Sachs; (second row) Susan Baskerville Otteni of Concord, NC; Nan Ellen Williams Ritsch; Susan Farley Ferrell; Betsy Manson, Lynn Bugg Pritchard; Gay Goodwin Goldstone; Nancy Hungerford; and Margaret Ann Fultz Raddin. All are Richmond residents except where noted. – Submitted by Susan Baskerville Otteni Lacy Shockley Letonoff and her husband Victor live in Lewes, DE. Lacy is still loving being a portfolio manager for PNC Wealth Management. Her husband Victor was awarded a one-man show by the Delaware Division of the Arts for 2010. Betsy Manson is enjoying retirement and teaching knitting at the University of Richmond. She has a new puppy named Buttons and is helping her mom a lot who has just moved to Lakewood Manor. Courtney Goode Rogers retired from Fairfax County public schools and now works part time in teacher professional development, especially supporting K-12 teacher researchers.

Girls of ’64 gathered for lunch on reunion weekend. Front: Randy Pollard Gamble, Anne Thomas Hines, Kay Taylor Sheild, Austin Pritchard Sachs Back: Susan Baskerville Otteni of Concord, NC, Nan Ellen Williams Ritsch, Susan Farley Ferrell, Betsy Manson, Lynn Bugg Pritchard, Gay Goodwin Goldstone, Nancy Hungerford, and Margaret Ann Fultz Raddin

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66 Ali Davoud Wiltbank ’66 is serving in her fifth year at African Bible University in Kampala, Uganda where she is the campus medical advisor and her husband is a teacher. Here, she is with Mugerwa Jevasiyo, a 15-year-old patient who has had osteomyelitis and TB in his thigh bone. Says Ali, “He is very bright, way above average, and wants to be an engineer. I am looking for someone who is willing to spend $75 a month to educate him (he has a 4th grade education).” Virginia Tucker writes in to tell us that she spends May through October every year with her Canadian husband Denis in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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John and Fran Chalkley Robertson ’69 write, “Our oldest son Tommy ’01 is in law school at Elon University. Jamie ’04 graduated from JMU in May and works for the Washington Post and loves living in D.C.” DIED: Gay Montague Jewett on January 6, 2010. Gay attended Hollins College. She served First Presbyterian Church in Richmond in many capacities, including six years as a Deacon, six years as an Elder on the Church’s Session, chair of their 200th Anniversary Planning Committee, and she was the first female Clerk of Session in the church’s history. She worked at the Tuckahoe Women’s Club as the Club’s administrator for 16 years. She was a diligent, loyal volunteer for Collegiate, where she co-chaired “The Stuffed Cougar Too,” the Village Green Fair, the Auction, and served on the Board of Trustees as President of the Parent’s Association. Gay was the recipient of the 1997 Alumni Association’s Outstanding Service Award. Gay is survived by her husband of 40 years, Bryce D. Jewett Jr. ’64; her daughter Jennifer Jewett Ruth ’90 and son Bryce D. Jewett III ’93; her grandchildren Anne Mason ’19, Scotty ’22, Bayler and Parker Ruth; Madeline and Isabel Jewett; her

Spring 2010

Charlie Wood and his wife Joan just moved into a townhouse in Pasadena, CA, from which they can watch the Rose Parade. He wound down his firm’s business this year and is planning to turn his focus to his avocation – digital, audio and video – in 2010. He is still teaching one or two finance courses each quarter for UCLA Extension.

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DIED: Shearer Davis (Dave) Bowman on December 4, 2009. Dave attended the University of Virginia, where he received a BA in history and served as captain of the men’s soccer team, president of his fraternity, vice president of the College of Arts and Sciences, vice-chair of the Honor Committee, and was a member of the Imp Society, TILKA, the 13 Society, and the Seven Society. Dave was a college history teacher at Hampden-Sydney College, the University of Texas at Austin, Berea College and the University of Kentucky. He was ordained as an elder at First Presbyterian Church in Austin, served as a Board member of Planned Parenthood in Austin and Lexington, and was a member of the Board of Trustees at Lexington’s Sayre School. He is survived by his wife, Lee Willey of Memphis; their two children; and his siblings, Susan Bowman Reynolds ’61, Jane Bowman Fain ’74, and John Bowman ’74.

Friday night Oyster Roast at Tuckahoe Plantation. We all enjoyed the pleasant weather, great barbecue dinner and bluegrass music on the historic front lawn. On Saturday, Becky Jones, Betty Fisher, Gray Pruitt, Merri Ann Hunt, Susan Pastore and Frank Williams joined Melinda, Christi and Fran at Collegiate. We had lunch together under the alumni tent before the Homecoming game at the Grover Jones Football Field. We were glad to have this opportunity to visit together at Collegiate. We all felt that the time together was too short, however, and we hope to plan another gathering when more classmates will be able to attend and we can visit longer! – Submitted by Fran Chalkley Robertson

CLASS NOTES

brother David Montague ’66 and sister Mary Warren Montague Pinnell ’70. Her greatest joys were working in her garden and spending time with her family, especially at Virginia Beach with her children and grandchildren.

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Jim Hall has been living in Concord, MA, since 1988 with his wife Jane and their four children. He is proud to say that two of his children have returned to Virginia for college and love being in his home state! His son Elliott, a Marine, visited the Lower School last fall and the students continue to correspond with him while he serves in Afghanistan.

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Betty Ford Bryan’s daughter Laurie graduated in May with a PhD in biochemistry and is now a forensic scientist at the state crime lab in Louisiana. Her son is a sophomore at Cox High in Virginia Beach.

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It was nice to see all the classmates who were able to be here for our 40th Collegiate reunion. Pat Moss, Pam Williams, Melinda Vick Wilson, Gary and Christi White Barranger, and Johnny (’65) and Fran Chalkley Robertson had a fun time at the

Boodie Wiltshire McGurn ’71 was on the cover of Virginia Golfer last fall. Boodie is a former State Amateur Champion (’03) and two-time VSGA Senior Women’s Amateur champion (’04 and ’09).

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Joan Pruitt Buhrman wrote in to tell us that she attended a reading Hannah Huber ’99 did in December of a book called Home of the Brave. Hannah had a short story about the military published in this book. For each book that was bought that night, Hannah sent a copy to a member of the military. Joan said, “All in all, a proud night for all who attended.” Ellen Taylor Sisson writes, “I became an empty nester in September. My oldest Jack graduated Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude, from Dartmouth and has a job nearby. Mary is a junior at UNC Chapel Hill, and Frances has just started at the University of Richmond.”

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Lyn Graybill writes, “I am a Fulbright Scholar in Sierra Leone–Have you seen “Blood Diamond?” That was Sierra Leone during the war. I am teaching at Fourah Bay College (one of the oldest universities in sub Saharan Africa) and finishing a book about restorative justice approaches since the end of the war.”

74 35th Reunion

The Class of ’74 enjoyed a relaxed, casual evening at the home of Anne and Farrar Pace. Thirtyone alumni made it to the party, together with a number of spouses and significant others. We were delighted to have attendees from near and far. Several classmates made extra special efforts to attend. San Francisco resident Betsy Brinkley Munz came the greatest distance. Formerly “lost alum” Kim Iverson came from Ohio to attend her first reunion. Steve Shepherd arranged special transportation, and we were grateful that he did.

The Class of ’69 40th reunion attendees had lunch together at the cookout before the Homecoming football game at school. It was heartwarming to see faculty members Julia Williams, Margaret Daniel, Helen Tanner ’49, Jim Hickey and his wife Kaye, Gwen Donohue, Weldon and Emily Bradshaw, Nancy Pace Goodykoontz, Lewis Lawson and Nancy Bain. We appreciate the efforts of reunion committee members, most notably Anne Cary Hall Allen, Anne Pace, David Williams, Margaret Reese Mertens, Tricia Bullock Branch, Adair Frayser Roper, Meg Newell Gottwald, Don Sledd and Helen Anderson Carter, plus Walker Jones, who created a Facebook page for us. Helen prepared marvelous collages of yearbook photos going back as far as kindergarten, and those images of us as children and teenagers brought wide smiles and stirred memories of childhood friends, long lost classmates, and forgotten events that were so central to our lives so long ago.

The highlight of the evening came when Walker Jones pulled out a Super 8 projector and screen and showed the wonderful movie he made our senior year, slightly condensed, with an updated soundtrack that employed an excellent rendition of “Both Sides Now” to acknowledge the passage of 35 years. At the end of this very special weekend quite a few of us were sad to be parting, but eagerly looking forward to our next reunion. And 5 years isn’t as long now as it was when we were teenagers, is it? – Submitted by Don Sledd Robin Jones Eddy says, “I still love living in Lexington and, in spite of the last two years, still really enjoying the real estate work. I see Lynn Spilman at Irvington, but miss all the other buds. Come visit!”

Harry ’71, Andrew ’05 and Michael ’01 Thalhimer posed for this photo in front of British West Indies Collegiate School while on vacation in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands. Perhaps an exchange program is in order?

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Anne Garnett, Joan Pruitt Buhrman, Molly Nichols Tashjian and Beth Watlington Marchant, all ’72, recently attended a Fountain Bookstore reading by Hannah Huber ’99 of her book Home of the Brave, a compilation of short stories about the military.

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CLASS NOTES The Class of ’74 celebrated their 35th reunion at the home of Farrar Pace and his wife Anne. DIED: Thomas Bassett (Tom) Hughes on February 9, 2010. Tom went to New England College in New Hampshire and then VCU. He was an active member of both the National and Virginia Chapters of the 8th Air Force Historical Society. He had a passion for fishing and worked as a painter for over 12 years for Willard Painting. He is survived by his wife, Jean Knaub Hughes, his brother, Mackey Hughes ’72, and his sisters, Toddy Hughes ’77 and Jody Hughes ’81.

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Michael Brown is living in Glastonbury, CT. He is currently VP of revenue management & business intelligence for TPG Hospitality, which owns and operates hotels across the United States.

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Laura Coleman Proctor writes from Birmingham, “My oldest son James just graduated from the University of Alabama in business... he has not found a job yet. Custis, my middle son, is a junior at W&L where he is majoring in history and economics. He loves being in Virginia but plans to come back to Alabama because there isn’t anything in the world that compares to Alabama football! Harrison, my youngest son, is a sophomore at Wake Forest where he is also majoring in history with a minor in religion. I am an empty nester, but I fill my time by substitute teaching, volunteering, spinning and playing tennis. Jim keeps me busy with all

Spring 2010

of his hobbies, too. My mother is 86 and living at Westminster Canterbury and all the other Coleman siblings are doing well.” Lisa Scott Drummond has moved back to the West End area of Richmond after 20 years. Her oldest son Daniel Schroeder ’04 got married this

past May. Lisa started her fifth year at the winter General Assembly Session as a legislative assistant with a member of the House of Delegates. Lisa writes, “Love the excitement, but I could make more money if they paid by the hour! I enjoy seeing on occasion Valerie Dillehay Hubbard, Jimmie Massie, Laura Lee Oxenham Viergever and Meade Spotts. (Hope I didn’t leave anybody out.) My younger son Lukas will graduate this year, but I don’t know where he’ll end up – because he wants to major in either stage comedy or marine biology and has pre-enlisted in the Marine Reserves (he did play varsity football) while in college – in case the Shakespeare stuff and riding with Shamu doesn’t work out. Anyone in Hollywood or NYC listening?! I could use some help here.” Debbie Simmons Rockwell writes “It’s been a rather interesting year for me. The bank I worked for was acquired by the FDIC and BB&T in August. I’ve just received my offer letter and am now a vice president/ financial center leader at the Hoover, AL office. There’s nothing like a failing bank to keep you up nights. This year, our daughter Ann Kathryn began attending The University of Alabama and is majoring in physics and math and wants to work for NASA. She’s had a great first year attending Alabama football games. Related to my work, I’m involved with the Hoover Area Chamber of Commerce as secretary on the board of directors. In 2007 and 2008, I was John Smithson ’84 stopped by campus recently with big brother Bill ’75 who has been serving in the Army in Afghanistan. voted board member of the year, and enjoy

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lifetime member of Temple Beth-El. He is survived by his wife Karin Epstein Fine, his son and daughter, his parents, sisters and a wide circle of nieces and nephews.

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Glenn Rhodes is now working with Mooers Volvo Richmond in the sales department.

79 30th Reunion Last fall, Brian Richardson ’77 (far left) spoke at Collegiate’s Helen Baker Society luncheon about his electric motorcyle racing. Collegiate friends who attended to hear him speak included Philip Hudgens, Nick Condyles, Drew Karo, Bill Reeves, Hank Carter, Frank Watkins, Trip Robins and Andy Wiley (all ’77 except for Mr. Reeves who taught in the Boys’ School back in the day). continuing involvement with the Hoover community. Hoover is a wonderful place to live and work. I and others from the bank enjoy working with The Foundry, a drug and alcohol recovery center on a regular basis. I feel so lucky to have my life and all the joys I get to experience. It’s been a very challenging year dealing with a changing work environment and our only child away at college, but life is good. I’ve enjoyed catching up with old classmates on Facebook and reconnecting. If we could only re-live our youth!” Lisa Stultz Moore writes, from Athens, GA, that her daughter Morgan graduated with honors from Sewanee in May and finished an internship at the

Georgia Capitol. Younger daughter Claire, 14, is an awesome athlete, and their three animals are doing well. Lisa continues to work for a reconstructive/ plastics surgeon and loves living in Athens. DIED: Henry S. Fine on August 25, 2009. Henry received his degree in Business Administration from VCU and was a financial representative with Northwestern Mutual, concentrating on “special needs planning.” He served on the board of the Autism Society of Central Virginia, and the board of the Richmond Forum. A graduate of Beth-El Schools, he was a

’79 was a good year – that was the motto for the 30th reunion gathering of the Class of ’79 and returning alums lived up to that and more! About 65 classmates attended Saturday’s party, with a crowd of more than 100 attending in all, to toast the past three decades. John McLarin and Scott Word spearheaded turnout, generating interest in the bash with a pre-party trivia quiz that highlighted fun facts about classmates, such as unique jobs, nonprofit work and the ’79ers many varied accomplishments. Chris Daly kindly hosted the throw-down at his home, escorting the last few party-goers out in the wee hours of the morning. No one wanted to leave this get-together that had a strong Richmond-area turnout but that also drew classmates from New Mexico, Florida, New York, Kansas, Colorado, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana. Martha Estes Grover, who had worked on the committee with Mary Lloyd Sinnott Parks to encourage returning alums to attend, capped off the night making plans for the next reunion. See you for the 35th! – Submitted by Page Boinest Melton

Chris Daly hosted the Class of ’79’s 30th reunion at his home.

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Brandon Fox was recently named managing editor of RHome magazine, which is published by Richmond Magazine. Previously, she worked as a freelance writer with a specialty in food–she wrote restaurant reviews and food related articles for Style Weekly and had her own food blog. Brandon and her husband Chris Arias have two daughters, Isabella Arias (14) and Miranda Arias (11), and two border collies. Jeff Gaylord says, “I am currently stationed at Fort Monroe as the deputy chief of staff, and our family has a home in Yorktown, VA. We have received notification of my selection to attend Army War College beginning summer 2010.” David MacMillan writes that he and his family have moved to Athens, GA. They are excited about football season and UGA games!

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Greg Vining is still with the insulin pump division of Roche Diagnostics Corporation, and was transferred to Kansas City, MO, from Richmond in February of 2009. He says, “I am enjoying life here in the Brookside neighborhood of Kansas City, and have joined the Country Club Plaza Rotary Club.”

84 25th Reunion

The Class of ’84 had two reunions within three weeks. The first was planned; the second, not so much. Our first, the one that was scheduled, was a blast. For our “South of the Border” party (really, just South of the James), it started with rain, lots and lots of it. That didn’t stop decoration-maven Susan

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THE LEGACY CONTINUES

CLASS NOTES

Rowland Williams writes that his son Rowdy is currently enrolled at Tuckahoe Middle School, and his daughter Jinx is in the fifth grade at Collegiate. Mary Carter Pettit Dabney reports, “I am currently working as the head nurse in juvenile detention, providing medical and nursing care to at-risk teens. After many years of substituting as the Middle/Upper School nurse at Collegiate, I decided to go back to full time nursing as an empty nester. I love my work, and I think my inspiration to pursue a career in nursing began with Mrs. Griffin’s freshman biology! Anne McCormack Jones writes, “Great time at the 30th reunion! Fun catching up with everyone!”

James T. Hatcher III ’80 A decade ago, James T. Hatcher III ’80 became president of Pleasants Hardware, Inc. Just 38 years old, he succeeded Jack Williams who had succeeded Hatcher’s father who had succeeded his grandfather who had succeeded Henry Pleasants, who founded the company in 1915. The 1980 Collegiate graduate, who began working weekends and summers in the stock room when he was 15, definitely had a tough act to follow. Though the company had become a wholly-owned subsidiary of C.F. Sauer Inc. in 1989, a move which allowed it to grow more quickly, he also had a tough task ahead. In 1999, Pleasants operated two stores, the familiar landmark at 2024 W. Broad near downtown Richmond and a newer venue in Short Pump, and had a long history of providing friendly, expert service to customers. Problem was, there were other small, locally owned hardware stores of long standing in Central Virginia, and the popularity of the giant national chains that threatened to drive the little guys out of business. “Back then, there were maybe two dozen different hardware stores, general merchants, and home supply companies in the Richmond area,” Hatcher said. “We realized that the only way to grow was through the smaller convenient-store channel rather than the ‘big box’ 100,000-square-foot plus megastores.” So one day Hatcher called his old friend Bob Wake, a 1981 Collegiate alumnus, former Cougar track teammate, Sigma Phi fraternity brother from the University of Virginia, and president of Tom Brown Hardware. “We’d researched the market to see where there was a large enough customer base to allow us to expand,” Hatcher continued, “and everywhere we looked, there was a Tom Brown. “Bob and I met for lunch one day, and I told him what we were thinking. He agreed with our assessment of the market that for success and growth, it was better for one company to do it well rather than fight it out and drain resources. We made an offer. They accepted. We had a deal put together in a couple of months.” Pleasants now has eight venues in the Richmond area and contract offices in Harrisonburg and Virginia Beach. Strategically located, each has roughly 10,000 square feet. “People are looking for an alternative shopping experience. We define that as knowledgeable staff, location, and ease of shopping. They’re the three legs on the stool. All are equally important. We want people to be able to get to us easily, find what they want, and get the help they need. It’s not much more complicated than that.” Hatcher rose through the company ranks. After his stint as a stock boy, he unloaded trucks in the warehouse. After college, he served as assistant store manager from 1984 –1986 and as purchasing manager from 1986 –1989. He helped open the Harrisonburg facility in 1989, stayed two years, and returned to Richmond in 1991 as vice-president. James Hatcher ’80 stands in front When his father retired in 1994 and the company was restructured, Hatcher became vice-president for administration of the main Pleasant’s Hardware store. overseeing finance and human resources. Five years later when Williams retired, he became president. A decade into his tenure, Hatcher approaches his job with the same joie de vivre that he did the first day. “I’m not the handiest guy in the world, so it’s not the hardware per se,” he said with a laugh. “It’s really several things. I love running a business, being ultimately responsible for what happens. I like the challenge of being in a competitive environment.” Hatcher can visit each of his stores and call virtually all 220 Pleasants employees by name. Likewise, the vast majority address him as James rather than Mr. Hatcher. “I feel fortunate to work in an industry that attracts good quality people,” said Hatcher, “and I feel fortunate to work in an organization with a long-standing reputation in the market. At the end of the day, our people are really our most valuable asset.” – Weldon Bradshaw This story first appeared in Weldon Bradshaw’s Reflections column that features a new story every Friday on our web site: collegiate-va.org/reflections.

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CLASS NOTES The Class of ’84 celebrated their 25th reunion at the home of Sarah Paxton and her husband Andy Thornton. Turbeville from sacrificing her newly coifed hair to get “Pedro” to stand at attention in the yard to greet everyone! The rain also brought some laughs… Reunion committee stalwarts Chris Kulp and Mason Chapman thought it would be nice to direct cars at the foot of the driveway. They abandoned that job quickly when a couple of classmates thought they were our “valet parking attendants” in their yellow slickers and umbrellas. The rain also brought the 111 people who attended that much closer together – literally – since we were all forced inside and under the eaves at the home of Sarah Paxton and husband Andy Thornton. Tim Taylor was kind enough to notice all the hard work Andy had done on the landscaping *wink*. The photographer showed up at 9:15-9:30 p.m. and was VERY grateful to have Missy Falls Mauck’s 1984 cheerleading megaphone to use to corral the troops. We gave “prizes” out right after that: • Most thoughtful survey responses to David Clary & Mary Stuart Cocke Battle • Best Match match (to their senior stats answers) to Sujit Mohanty (our current dentist was said to be Always Smiling with a future spouse of ‘Pearl Drops’) and Kathy Holland Diamond (whose weakness for carrot sticks and future husband of ‘Hubba Bubba’ still stand true). • Most Festive Attire went to Kevin Alvis for daring to wear impossibly red pants and to Mary Compton for daring to wear ... something daring. (with Beth Johns Whitman earning an honorable mention, as she wore a white t-shirt emblazoned with silver sparkly letters that read “From” on the

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front and “Gordon” on the back – a gift to her in the 2nd grade) • Most unexpected life experience since graduation went to Tim Taylor (hmmm... not really a Spark worthy event, terribly boring, uninteresting really… truly, it’s best not to mention it…) Each winner got a valuable Cougar shop prize (Kevin wore his green & gold tie with his red pants the rest of the night), and Mary Williams Hagan made them stunning personalized ‘certificates’ that we know are hanging in their hall bathrooms right now. Around 10:30 we gave in and allowed class celebrity Mike “Cleveland” Henry to sit and give autographs (we wanted his head to fit through the door on the way out, so we tried not to go overboard). Style had just featured Mike in that week’s issue, so, armed with Sharpies and excited about his show’s premiere the next night, he signed, and signed, and signed. Missy outdid herself on the food; Susan worked tirelessly to decorate – the house looked GREAT thanks to her; and Sarah scoured her memory banks (and her mother’s attic) to find treasures from our past. (Did your mother save YOUR 4th Grade Graduation program???) Over 75 classmates filled out our version of the reunion survey. Responses and memories were posted around the house, while a slide show of photos both past and present played throughout the night. As was the tradition when we graduated, you knew a party was over when Free Bird played… and this night proved no exception. Mason packed up the music, and Sarah kicked out the last

stragglers. The next morning, pictures were up on Facebook and emails were flying talking about how much fun the evening had been. The reunion committee immediately planned a follow up meeting to discuss our class gift: a gift in memory of our lost classmates: Sam Jarman, Karen Zappia, Paige Willhite Woolwine, and John Lower. At the time, we had no idea that reunion #2 was on the horizon. On Friday, October 17, John Maloney sent an email that our class had lost another friend: Ted Lowe passed away in San Francisco. Because our reunion email list was still in full force, the word spread quickly… and the response was overwhelming. Memories came flooding back ranging from Lower School antics to baseball prowess to mischief with girls to Ted’s amazing talent on the slopes and in the surf. Lisa Coleman started collating memories from her home in Bozeman. Classmates came back to Richmond again, to remember a friend. As a third of the class of 1984 sat at St. Mary’s church on Friday, October 23, and listened to his sister Anne (Lowe Thompson ’90) remember her brother, we realized we were having another reunion. The class of 1984 has always been close. We know how very precious life is. After Ted’s funeral, and after reading over 50 emails sent out to the entire class remembering Ted and talking about how special our class is, we’ve come to the decision that five years is too long between reunions. At Beth Curry’s suggestion, we’ve started our plans for our 26. See you guys next year… – Submitted by Sarah Paxton Lisa Coleman writes, “I’ve moved on from being

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Whit Andrews, a vice president and distinguished analyst in Gartner Research, can be heard occasionally on NPR talking about Google’s presence in China. Most recently, he talked to a Marketplace reporter on March 23 about Google’s potential pull-out of Beijing. Doug Corkran says, “Things are well in Northern Virginia. Daughters are currently in fifth, eighth, and tenth grade and always on the go. Busy time in the world of international trade. Travel in recent years includes Cairo and Rio de Janeiro.” Per Ewers, AFS exchange student, writes: “My family and I have moved to Hamburg this year, and we are enjoying it very much! I have two kids, Hugo, 7, and Isabel, 6, who are both named after hurricanes …we experienced Isabel in the States, which I hope not to go through again. I work for a German company within the field of oil and gas,

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where I am globally responsible for our major accounts, projects and markets. I keep in good touch with John Reed, Troy Arnold, Chris Hunter from Collegiate, apart from my family the Grinnans with whom I lived (Lelia ’84, Richard ’86 and Marty ’96). Collegiate will always have a very precious place in my heart, and I look forward hearing updates from others on the web...” Tom Spivey is now the US Lacrosse Youth Officials Committee representative for central Virginia as well as the boys’ lacrosse officials’ representative with the Richmond Chapter of US Lacrosse.

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Duncan Owen is a senior vice president for corporate banking for First Tennessee Bank. First Tennessee Bank is a subsidiary of Memphis based First Horizon National Corporation and has opened an office in Henrico County. Duncan will lead the Richmond team. Mary Catharine Ginn Kolbert was featured in the Richmond Times-Dispatch on Sept. 14, 2009, highlighting her career achievements and her new role as the executive director of the Senior Center. She was featured as an influential decision maker in the “People and Places” section. MARRIED: Elisabeth Arnold to Martin Jay Weiss in December 2007 in Zihuataneo, Mexico. They have a daughter, Jasmine Bella Weiss, who was born on September 19, 2009. The family resides in Los Angeles where Martin is a director and writer and Elisabeth is a professor at University of Southern California.

HOW TO REACH US

CLASS NOTES

a backcountry ranger in Yellowstone to being a stay-at-home mom with 5-year-old, Cache. In my spare time, I’m roaming the mountains as much as possible and managing three vacation rentals we own just outside of Yellowstone. Life is wonderful!” John Maloney is now working with Janney Montgomery Scott as vice president/wealth management. La Diff, owned by Sarah Paxton and her husband, Andy Thornton, was voted “Best Furniture Showroom” and “Best Store for Modern/ Contemporary Furniture” in Richmond Magazine’s Best and Worst issue of 2009. MARRIED: Alex Wright to Maaike Bouwmeester on Aug. 8, 2009. The ceremony was held at Linden Terrace, Fort Tryon Park, New York City. John Woodward served as the best man. BORN: Elya Brenner Zucker to Amy Brenner and Scott Zucker on Sept. 6, 2009. Elya joins big brother Nathaniel, who is 4 ½ years old. Amy, Scott, Nathaniel and Elya live in Park Slope, Brooklyn. DIED: Ted Lowe on October 14, 2009, in San Francisco. Ted is survived by his parents, Jim and Kay Tilghman Lowe ’53, his sister Anne Lowe Thompson ’90 and brother, Jim Lowe ’82. He graduated from the University of Richmond and was an outdoor enthusiast who enjoyed windsurfing, rock climbing and skiing.

Update Your Info & Write a Class note www.collegiate-va.org Sign in on any page. Your user name is your first name, last name and class year, as in janesmith79. Click on “login help” to receive a temporary password. Click on Profile to update your info. Call 800-522-1915 804-741-9766 E-Mail aahearn@collegiate-va.org Mail 103 North Mooreland Road Richmond, VA 23229 Be Our Fan on Facebook! Collegiate School Have an iPhone? Check out our free app iCougar.

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David Hart competed in the Beach 2 Battleship Iron Man Triathlon in Wilmington, NC, this past November. He writes, “I won 5th in the Male Masters division (40+) and was 23rd overall. Most importantly, I was 18 minutes faster than my previous 2004 Florida Ironman. The Beach 2 Battleship (B2B) Ironman was staged in Wilmington, NC. The Ironman distance is a 2.4 mile swim, followed by a 112 mile bike, and finally a marathon 26.2 mile run. It took me 10 hours and 12 minutes. It was an extremely hard and long day, but everything went pretty well. Getting to the finish line is a great feeling. I have been doing marathons since I got out of college and triathlons since 2002. CR Langhorne, Collegiate Class of ’84, was extremely helpful getting me started in triathlons when I

Quin Ferrell and Leighton Klevana, sons of ’87 classmates Will Ferrell and Leighton Klevana, play in the snow.

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had no idea what I was doing. Last year, CR even stopped during a race to give me some supplies when I had a flat tire. CR has successfully done Ironman Florida and Brazil. I also see Kate Lucas on the tri circuit. Kate and my wife, Ashley, have become friends as well. Deane Cheatham ’84 is another Cougar involved in triathlons. Deane also helps me put on the annual Hometown Waterboy and Waterkid, a run/swim/run even, at Burkwood Swim and Racquet Club every year on the first weekend in August. Coach Hickey has done the event numerous times and won his age group every time.” David says he also used to run into Craig Scott every year at the Sandman Triathlon in Virginia Beach until Craig moved to Texas.

Four generations of Hirschler/Long family have attended Collegiate: Hugh Cafritz ’22, Diane Long Cafritz ’88, Elizabeth Whitlock Hirschler ’32 (now deceased), and Anne Hirschler Long ’62.

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Fr. Gregory Gresko O.S.B. has been invited to be interviewed on the EWTN Live show concerning Consecration and Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. The show will be broadcast live on the evening of June 9, 2010. EWTN is available on satellite and you can also check it out at www.ewtn.com. Diane Long Cafritz’s oldest son Hugh is a Kindergartner at Collegiate. He is the 4th generation and 8th member of the Hirschler/Long family to attend Collegiate. Before Hugh, there was Elizabeth Whitlock Hirschler ’32 (deceased), Anne Hirschler Long ’62, Beth Hirschler Long ’60, Tracy Long ’86, Kay Long Martin ’87, Cindy Long ’88 and Diane.

Hugh Milmoe ’87 (far right) celebrated his 40th with Laura and Todd Baird ’87.

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Jonathan Schneider ’89 lives in Palm Beach Gardens, FL with wife Randee, daughter Morgan and son Alex.

89 20th Reunion

The Class of ’89 had a fantastic turnout for our 20th reunion. Michelle Deal Lewis and her husband Ben hosted the party at their house on Sleepy Hollow Road. We had over 70 people join us for cocktails and great food from Qdoba. Glenn Laskin and Heather Robinson Laskin ’90 loaned us their extensive supply of festive party décor to use the night of the event. It was a sight to behold! Classmates came from many different locations to reconnect with old friends. Melanie Oettinger Brown came all the way from Chicago! It really was a night to remember. We missed those people who were unable to attend, but hope everyone will make it to our 25th! – Submitted by Emily Hilbert DuBose Richard Grossman is a partner in the Richmond-based lobbying firm, The Vectre Corporation. He was recently appointed to be a member of the Virginia Capital Trail Foundation Board, a non-profit organization supporting the develop-

ment of a world class bike trail between Richmond and Williamsburg. Will Johnson returned from his second tour in Iraq and relocated to Washington, DC. He was selected to serve as an Army Congressional Fellow and is currently enrolled in a master’s program at George Washington University. In January, he will be assigned to the Office of Representative John Spratt (SC). His wife Jessy and their son Davis (2) are having fun learning about their new city. Jonathan Schneider lives in Palm Beach Gardens, FL, with his wife Randee. They have two children-Morgan, 5, and Alex, 1. Jonathan continues to operate his qualitative market research business (www.squareoneresearch.com), but also is currently launching Road Holland, a new cycling apparel company for men and women. The garments feature the use of modern materials, bold and timeless designs, and flattering fits. For more information, visit www.roadholland.com. Jamie Shield’s legal search consultants firm PartnerJD was selected as a Top 8 “Companies to

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Bill Chappell, David Leshner, and Robert Owen recently traveled to Milwaukee, WI, where they had the great pleasure to pose with the “Bronzie Fonzie” in downtown Milwaukee. Ben Wingrove is living in Raleigh, NC, with his wife Flynt. He is the VP of sales for the ticketing company Etix, where he has been working for eight years. He recently opened a club in Richmond called the Hat Factory in Shockoe Slip. You can check it out at www.hatfactoryva.com, and he would love to help any Cougars with private parties!

MARRIED: Elizabeth Roach to Christopher Lutton on Oct. 16, 2009, in New Orleans, LA. BORN: Cooper Wesley Owen to Bob Owen and wife Laura on Aug. 22, 2009. Elizabeth Grace Womack to Elizabeth Robinson and Scott Womack on December 2, 2008.

CLASS NOTES

Watch” by the Venture Forum. Jamie was also featured in the Richmond Times-Dispatch in a “Startup Spotlight” column for his success as the company’s co-owner. PartnerJD supplies local Mary Brooks McCrystal, daughter of Fleming law firms with temporary Bottger McCrystal ’89 and lawyers to help with short husband Shawn, was born term litigation support Nov. 22, 2009. staffing. Jamie credits his recent success on burning lots of midnight oil, networking through Cougar connections, and building upon a solid reputation. Jamie was formerly a managing director with IFG. Jamie remains actively involved in Ducks Unlimited and enjoys spending time with his 2-year-old daughter Lilly. BORN: Mary Brooks to Fleming Bottger McCrystal and her husband Shawn on Nov. 22, 2009. Annabelle Boyd (Annie) Reed to Christie Dunnavant Reed and husband Brad on July 15, 2009. She joins Henry (8) and Katie (4).

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Peter Hopewell wrote in to tell us that “we are still in the Pacific Northwest, enjoying being home for a bit. Liz is working in the emergency room at St. Joseph’s in Tacoma, and finishing her master’s in nursing. When she graduates next year, she’ll be a nurse practitioner. Our daughter Erin is six and in kindergarten at St. Patrick’s with her brother, Jack. He’s enjoying the 4th grade, soccer, and playing the trumpet, and Erin is having fun in art and gymnastics. I’m still having fun playing soldier… even after 15 years, three combat tours, and seven different posts, it hasn’t lost the magic... yet!” Katie Remick Kurtz writes, “I have recently made the move back to the east coast with my husband, Paddy, and my two boys Remick and Berns after living in Telluride, Colorado for 14 years. We have settled in the town of Irvington in the Northern Neck of Virginia. We look forward to sailing instead of skiing! My husband works for Rappahannock Yachts, and I am still Josie Ashworth, daughter of in interior design. Pope Baskerville Ashworth Look us up if you’re in ’91 and husband Ryan, the neighborhood!” was born Dec. 3, 2009.

Sarah Hailes Easley ’89 and her business partner Beth Buccini were featured in the March 2010 issue of Town & Country magazine. They own the fashionable boutique Kirna Zabete, located in Soho (NYC) for the last 10 years. MARRIED: Hunter Butler to Adam E. Paterson on May 24, 2009. She still owns Blue Escapes, which was named “Best Villa Agent for the Caribbean” of 2009 by Conde Nast Traveler Magazine for the second year in a row. You can check out the article at www.concierge.com/cntraveler/articles. Sarah Ramsey to Joseph DePalo on Aug. 22, 2009 in Annapolis, MD. BORN: Josephine (Josie) Gaia Ashworth to Pope Baskerville Ashworth and her husband Ryan (aka Ash) on December 3, 2009.

Michelle Deal Lewis and her husband Ben hosted the Class of ’89’s 20th reunion party at their home.

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HELPING CHILDREN FACE GRIEF

Stephen Drake ’92 Dealing with the death of a loved one is the toughest challenge a child ever faces. Loss brings incalculable sadness. It can stress, debilitate and devastate even the most welladjusted young person. Coping in the moment, then moving on as a new reality unfolds can be a monumental task, for there is no timetable and often little predictability when one’s emotions are laid bare. Stephen Drake ’92 and his wife Allyson understand those painful facts of life, and in September 2008, after two-and-a-half years of planning, they launched the Full Circle Grief Center, whose mission is to offer support and counseling to bereaved children and provide creative ways for them to deal with their sorrow. “Allyson wanted to dedicate her life to tackling the overwhelming need to provide grief support for our community,” said Stephen, who has a B.S. in marketing from James Madison University and has worked for Capital One, Carmax, and Circuit City. “As she came up with the vision, I began to see it as my goal, my opportunity, to help out and make a difference.” A Richmond-based non-profit, Full Circle has developed partnerships with a host of local health-care organizations as well as numerous schools and churches. Since its inception, it has touched the lives of 103 children and young adults through its free-ofcharge “Hands On Healing” counseling sessions, all of which are conducted by licensed professionals. “We’re still building an infrastructure that can support the need for our services,” said Stephen. “We’re proud of the relationships we’ve build with organizations like Bon Secours who have helped us extend our reach into the community.” Allyson, a University of Virginia graduate who earned a master’s in counseling from Virginia Commonwealth University and worked seven years as an elementary school counselor in Henrico County, is the executive director of Full Circle. Stephen is the business director. “At first, I had trepidation,” Stephen said, “but as I’ve jumped into it, I can’t think of anything more rewarding than helping somebody through their darkest times. Allyson and I are committed to making this work.” One recent venture was the Jake MacNelly Classic, a whiffleball tournament honoring the 1990 Collegiate graduate who died Oct. 12, 1996, in a rock climbing accident. It was held Oct. 24 in his mother Rita’s back yard, long ago dubbed the Stephen ’92 and Allyson Drake founded Full Circle Grief Center. MacNelly Outdoor Arena and the site of many a pickup whiffleball, football, and basketball game in simpler times. On one level, it was a fund-raiser for Full Circle’s therapeutic arts and play programs. On another, it was an opportunity for many of MacNelly’s childhood friends to assemble for fun and recreation and rekindle memories of a witty, artistic, creative, dynamic, eternally upbeat guy who was also an inveterate sports fan. Though their task is formidable, the Drakes have high hopes for their organization and have planned virtually every detail, including the name, with meticulous care. “It actually has different meanings,” said Drake. “In a figurative sense, at the center of the circle is the person who needs support. There’s the concept of an unbroken circle of support if you’ve suffered a loss. And there’s the idea that you’ve come full circle, it’s a new life, and you’re moving forward and bringing yourself out of the darkness.” – Weldon Bradshaw

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Clay Hilbert is head of business development for Davenport & Co.’s asset management group; he is also CEO of 5Mississippi, a toy and game company he runs with a friend from his days at Wake Forest. Their most recent product is called Hookum, a home version of the Bimini ring game that many a tourist has played while on vacation in the Caribbean. Called “the addictive game of frenzied competition,” the game involves a very simple but tantalizingly difficult concept: players swing a ring hanging from a string, trying to land it on a hook fixed on a center post. Up to four people can play at a time. In a recent story posted on richmondbizsense.com, Clay said, “When it gets down to that last throw, you start to feel the pressure,” said Hilbert. “You always hear the roar at the end of the game, and to an inventor that is the highest award.” Check it out at playhookum.com. Nicole Kelleher-Linkonis will be completing her final year of radiology residency in June 2010. She is then planning to pursue a one year fellowship at MCV in breast imaging. By July 2011, she will have completed all her medical training and is looking forward to her career as a mammographer. She and her husband Rich have two daughters, Gabi (3) and Valentina (1). Molly Morgan says, “I am back home in Richmond after practicing veterinary medicine in Nashville for 5 years... and I am getting married this summer!” Preston Montague writes “Since 2006, I have owned/operated Preston Montague LLC, a custom home and remodeling company. Also, a huge ‘thank you’ to the many clients, friends and Collegiate alums who have helped me build a business during a recession ... your support means a great deal to me!” MARRIED: Tina Cosby to Tom Keegan in Montery, CA, on June 6, 2009. Estelle Perera ’92 served as a bridesmaid, and Tina’s father, Bob Cosby, Jr. ’68, gave her away. Tina and Tom spent their honeymoon riding their tandem bicycle 700 miles through the Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Campbell Berkeley to Yvonne Conde on Nov. 8, 2008. BORN: Isabel Montague Jewett to Bryce Jewett and Erin Smith Jewett ’94 on Aug. 18, 2009. Izzie joins big sister Maddie, 3. TWINS! Alexandra Susan and Elizabeth Pollard on Aug. 11, 2009, to Berkeley Pollard Darr and her husband William.

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Children of Betsy Schnell Livesay and Tovi Laughon Heffron, both ’90 – (front) Livi Heffron, Kate and Woody Livesay and (back) Fisher, Patrick and Thomas Heffron. fall. Many friends voted for him but, alas, he did not win the title. If he had won, GQ would have donated $10,000 to the charity of his choice – the New York Harbor School that he helped found in Brooklyn, NY.

94 15th Reunion

Despite the rainy weather, the class of 1994 had a great turnout and successful 15-year reunion. Catching up with each other and remembering the old days to the tunes of 1994 classics, fellow Cougars and their guests gathered at the home (aka: Taco Lounge) of Aaron and Molly Brent Revere over margaritas and tacos. In addition to the Richmond area alumni, many others traveled from all over

CLASS NOTES

the country to attend the event. Everyone left the night looking forward to getting together again in 5 years for their 20-year reunion. – Submitted by Sarah Cook Martin Stephanie Clough Becker wrote in to say, “We are loving having twins, Jackson (Jack) and Ellery (Ellie) were born April 15, 2008!” Astrid Liverman moved from Hawaii to Denver, CO, this past fall for a new job as the national register coordinator/preservation planning unit director at the Colorado Historical Society. Anya Schwender writes, “I returned from Morocco this summer and found the U.S.A. even better than I remembered it, so I decided to stay for a while. I’m living in Koreatown in Los Angeles (which still feels a bit like a foreign country) and teaching ESL at UCLA and at a local night school. I still frequent the Improv Olympic in Hollywood where Ashley Knaysi works and performs.” BORN: Franklin Grant Brewer (Frankie), on Aug. 24, 2009, to Caroline Thompson Brewer and husband Matthew. Madelyn Jennell Chewning to Craig Chewning and wife Erica on Sept. 28, 2009. Kendall May Korba to Casey Peery Korba and husband Tyler Korba on July 28, 2008. Isabel Montague Jewett to Erin Smith Jewett and Bryce Jewett ’92 on Aug. 18, 2009. Izzie joins big sister Maddie (3).

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BORN: Daisy Proctor Hawk on Nov. 18, 2009, to Polly Beth Proctor Hawk and her husband John.

Hunter Butler married Adam E. Paterson on May 24, 2009. William “Payne” to Matt Davidson and Carter Witt Davidson ’97 on July 3, 2009. The Davidsons are still living in Denver, CO.

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Murray Fisher was one of the five finalists in the GQ Magazine’s Better Men Better World Search last

Spring 2010

David Fonville ’92, Tim Hickey ’92, Rita MacNelly, Danny MacNelly ’92 and Craig Suro ’92 hold a check for funds raised in memory of Jake MacNelly for the Full Grief Circle Center founded by Stephen Drake ’92 and wife Allyson.

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CLASS NOTES Nicole Kelleher ’93, husband Richard Linkonis and daughters Gabriela and Valentina

Catherine Henley to Taylor Sowards on September 19, 2009, in La Jolla, CA. Cougars in the wedding included Catherine’s sister, Virginia Henley ’98, her brother Scott Henley ’05, and classmate Alison Schwab. Catherine and Taylor live in Carlsbad, CA. BORN: Samuel Thomas Slater on July 31, 2009, to Andrew Slater and Samantha. Sam joins big brothers Will and Jake. Grace Kinlaw Edmonds to Lee Garter Edmonds and husband Jason on Aug. 20, 2009. Clyde McGann Stoakley to Alyson Blanton Stoakley and her husband Michael on May 15, 2009. John Edwards Duggan (Jack) to Andy Duggan, his wife Sayward, and their dog Emmy on Dec. 3, 2009.

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Katherine DeLoyht Hark writes, “I am teaching voice lessons to middle and high schoolers as well as adult and professional singers and actors. I teach several Collegiate students who are involved in the music and theater programs.” Molly Lawson Childress says “still living in Richmond with my husband Cabell and enjoying life with our 3-year-old son Lawson and 1-yearold daughter Lilly. I work part time as a nurse at Henrico Doctor’s Hospital. Elizabeth Palmore lives in Atlanta and works in film production there. “I spent six years in San Francisco prior to relocating to the South in 2008. I went to graduate school in California and then worked at Pixar Animation Studios for three years.

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John Scott wrote in to tell us that he served on a lunch panel at the New York Stock Exchange this past October and also was a speaker at an engagement on closed-end funds in Atlanta this fall. He serves as the treasurer and membership chair for the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Business Council and is looking forward to a May 2010 opening. Tommy Werz wrote in to let us know that for the past three years he’s been living in Beverly Hills 90210 and is the manager of database systems at MySpace.com, which has one of the largest databases in the world (multi petabyte). MARRIED: Adam Watson to Stephanie Ring on June 27, 2009, in Hilton Head, SC. Cougars in the wedding included Patrick’s sister Lesley Watson ’00, Adam Norton ’96 and John Douglas ’96. Adam and Stephanie will be living in New York.

Class of ’93 Cougars at Catherine Carter Berkeley-Taylor ’93’s wedding included (front row) Marshall Bates Rigby, Kathryn Webb Heidt, Catherine, Rob Taylor, Manya Rosypal Saunders, Sarah Dabney Ransone, (back row) Sandra King Andrews, Amy Koonce Chestnut, Ben Heidt, Campbell Berkeley and Trip Ransone, husband of Sarah

Molly Brent Revere and husband Aaron hosted the Class of ’94’s 15th reunion.

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CLASS NOTES Franklin Grant Brewer was born August 24, 2009 to Caroline Thompson Brewer ’94 and husband Matthew. Here, big brother Christopher (almost 2 yrs.) holding little “Frankie” for the first time.

SERVING TOGETHER Three Collegiate alums are currently serving on the advisory board of Max’s Positive Vibe Café, located in

Tyler Charles ’96 married Elizabeth Parkins, April 25, 2009 in Richmond. Cougars in the wedding included Thomas Winston ’96, Adam Lawson ’96, Dr. Rob Ellis ’96, and Stafford Via ’96.

the Stratford Hills Shopping Center in Richmond. Sam Turner ’92, Katherine Thalhimer Adamson ’96 and Missy Seymour Wood ’96 are working with this non-profit organization dedicated to training and employing people with physical and cognitive disabilities. Sam, Katherine and Missy’s role on newly formed Advisory Board is to help get the word out about the restaurant, especially to a younger group of people. So, stop by for a delicious meal when you’re in the neighborhood!

Since I’ve been in Atlanta, I have worked on two feature films, “The Joneses” and “The Blind Side.” After I wrapped on “The Blind Side.” I started working on “Past Life,” which was an hour long episodic series for Fox. I was the Producer’s Assistant. It was an amazing experience and by far the best gig I’ve ever had. Unfortunately, Fox cancelled “Past Life.” I am currently the Assistant to the Executive Producer/Director of “Drop Dead Diva” on Lifetime. MARRIED: Brookie Purcell to Robert Babb on Sept. 19, 2009, at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Richmond. Anne Riker Purcell ’01 served as her sister’s maid of honor.

Spring 2010

Catherine Henley Sowards ’96 married Taylor Sowards on Sept. 19, 2009 in La Jolla, CA. BORN: Taylor Winn Thalhimer to Chas Thalhimer and his wife Lisa on July 16, 2009. William “Payne” Davidson to Carter Witt Davidson and Matt Davidson ’93 on July 3, 2009. The Davidsons are still living in Denver, CO. Olivia Marie Margaret Lenfantin to Elizabeth Minor Lenfantin and her husband Eric on Jan. 5, 2009. Elizabeth and her family live in Paris. Anne Curtis McNeer to Becky Davidson McNeer and her husband Andy on December 8, 2009.

DIED: Charlotte Channing Shilling on August 22, 2009. Charlotte is survived by her mother and father, Susanne Shilling and Alfred Shilling, her brother, Dr. Alfred Tanner Shilling, and her niece, nephew, aunt and cousins. She graduated from Hamilton College and was a freelance writer and editor.

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BORN: Jackson Coleman Garter on July 18, 2009, to Churchill Garter and his wife Alison. Jackson joins big brother Will. His grandmother, Trygve Lee Garter ’66 and aunt Lee Garter Edmonds ’96 are all very excited! Sulayman Khan Niazi (Rafae) on July 28, 2009, to Shazi Niazi and his wife Silvana. Theodosia Leah Herring (Dosia) to Ryland Waller Herring and her husband Will on May 13, 2009. Grace Ivy Page to Matt LePage and his wife Rebecca on Nov. 26, 2009. Matt is still living in Stamford, CT, and working for FactSet Research Systems.

Adam Watson ’96 and wife Stephanie were joined by several Cougars at their wedding last June in Hilton Head. Seen here are Grant Allen ’96, Lesley Watson ’00, Whit Douglas ’96, Stephanie Ring Watson, Adam Watson ’96, Jonathan Lanyi ’96, Adam Norton ’96, and Ryan Souders ’96.

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99 10th Reunion

The Class of 1999 had a very successful 10-year reunion. The party was held at BANK in downtown Richmond. Thankfully there was plenty of room because we had a great turnout! Alumni from as far as San Francisco showed up, and we all enjoyed catching up with old friends. – Submitted by Becky Nuara Helms Lucas Beirne is currently a first-year law student at the University of Virginia School of Law. He and his wife are living in Charlottesville. Mary Gordon Buckingham Brown and her husband Jay recently bought a house in Fredericksburg where she is working as a nurse practitioner in electrophysiology. Ashley Butler recently published a book of essays called Dear Sound of Footstep. Her work has also appeared in Ninth Letter, jubilat, Gulf Coast, Creative Nonfiction, and POOL. Ashley has her MFA

Andrew Duggan ’96 and wife Sayward (and dog Emmy) have a new son, John “Jack” Edwards Duggan, born on Dec. 3, 2010.

Bret Myers just finished his PhD at Drexel University and is now officially Dr. Bret Myers. He will be teaching at Kutzdown University in the fall as an associate professor. MARRIED: Virginia Henley to Scott Richard Edmiston on Nov. 28, 2009, at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church. Cougars attending the wedding included Catherine Henley Sowards ’96, Scott R. Henley ’05, Kathy Watkinson Ivins ’73, Lauren Deep Henley ’83, and Alison Kowalski Schwab ’96. Virginia is a cardiology nurse practitioner with Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists in Richmond. Scott and Virginia reside in Richmond.

Think you might have seen Adam Sledd ’96 dressed up like a caveman? It’s entirely possible. By day he works for Axcan Pharma, a specialty gastroenterology company, and is based out of Roanoke but covers portions of WV and KY, including UVA hospital and most points in between. However, he moonlights as a model and actor. “I’ve worked with Modelogic since 2005 and have done work with VirginiaTourism, Geico, a couple of independent movies, and multiple other commerical print work.” Here, a sample of his caveman work for Geico...

A ’97 “meet all the babies” celebration was held when Elizabeth Minor Lenfantin, who now lives in Paris, was in town. Left to right: Elizabeth Minor Lenfantin and daughter Olivia; John Gray and daughter Millie; Andy Harris and daughter Virginia; Leigh Tompkins Pace and son Tommya

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Meghan Gouldin is a student at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. Alden Ramsey has moved back to Richmond from California to open her own marriage, family and child therapy clinic.

where Patrick is in graduate school at Vanderbilt University. Heather Hartough to Todd Hersperger on May 9, 2009, at the Marriott Key Largo Resort in Key Largo, FL. Melissa Harris ’00 served as the maid of honor.

CLASS NOTES

from the University of Iowa and lives in Texas. MARRIED: Ashley Clevenger to Tung Trinh on July 18, 2009, at the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond. Lindsay Carter Gerstmyer Classmates in the wedding ’98 and husband Noah included Ellen Clore, Lauwelcomed their daughter ren Oing, Meg Thalhimer, Isabel Warren on Sept. Laura MacIvor Thompson 17, 2009. and Rebecca Nuara Helms. Ashley’s brother Gray Clevenger ’02 was a groomsman and a reader. Ashley and Tung are both teaching and live in Boston. William Lewis to Lisa Lewis on Sept. 19, 2009. Liza Jarvis to Hunter Scott on Aug. 8, 2009. The wedding took place at First Presbyterian Church in Richmond. Liza’s sisters Jenna Jarvis Atwood ’97 and Maria Jarvis ’02 served as the matron and maid of honor, respectfully. Others in the wedding included classmates Leah Batten, Camp Goodwin, Anne Taylor Drake Schaaf, Elaine McCandlish Dinos, Catherine Summerson Mealor, and Claire Gentil. Michael Jarvis ’06 was a groomsmen and Laura Martin ’02 was the soloist.

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Alyson Timlin ’97 and Alan O’Neil were married on August 1, 2009 at Dahlgren Chapel of the Sacred Heart at Georgetown University. Laura Rockefeller is currently working towards her MFA at The Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Academy for Classical Acting at George Washington University in Washington, DC. Courtney Tysinger is still working for SSC solutions and has moved to Tampa, FL. MARRIED: Patrick Boswell to Haley Amanda Clayton on June 13, 2009, at The Kiawah Island Club in Kiawah, SC. Patrick’s brothers Thomas Andy Boswell ’94 and Tim Boswell ’97 served as best men. Patrick and Haley live in Nashville

John Neal lives in Richmond and works in institutional sales for BB&T Capital Markets. MARRIED: Elizabeth LaGow to Gray McDermid on May 30, 2009, at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Williamsburg, VA. She is the daughter of Nan Glaser LaGow ’67. Elizabeth’s sister, Caroline LaGow ’04, was the maid of honor. Other Cougars in the wedding included bridesmaids Carter Judkins Greendyke and Anne Riker Purcell, both ’01. Martha Thomas ’01 was a reader and Courtney Fain ’01, was the soloist. Elizabeth is working for St. Christopher’s School. Hall Carter to Margaret Colleen McGrail on July 18, 2009, in Richmond, VA. Hall’s parents, Helen Anderson Carter and Willy Carter, are both the class of ’74, and his dad was the best man. His brother Clay Carter ’05 was a groomsman as well as Sam Gottwald ’02. Hall and Margaret are living in Charlottesville.

02

Pierce Buckingham is living in Aiken, SC, and working for Darley’s Stonerside Stable. “I am a barn foreman and rider. We are laying down the groundwork for one-year-old thoroughbred horses,

The Class of ’99 held their 10th reunion at BANK in downtown Richmond.

Spring 2010

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CLASS NOTES

yearlings, to hopefully be great racehorses. It’s more like breaking and training. It’s fun and challenging.” Patrick Burke is attending graduate school at Harvard University to get his master’s degree in Leadership in Education. Mac Friddell has moved back to Richmond from Baltimore. He continues to tutor students in preparation for the SAT and ACT tests and is working with some Collegiate Middle School students on time management, study skills and general academic support. Michael Gottwald is living in New Orleans and producing an independent film telling the story of a sinking Cajun island in the Southeastern Louisiana bayou. Michael says, “The tale is fictional, but the issue is very real where we are filming: salt water intrusion, the leveeing of the Mississippi, and the rising tide due to global warming threaten these communities more every year.” MARRIED: Glen Baker to Rebekah Wood on Oct. 4, 2009. The wedding took place at Shady Grove United Methodist Church in Glen Allen, VA. Cougars in the wedding party were Anne Baker Bibee ’04 and Adam Baker ’07. Whit Congdon to Molly Hickerson ’03 on Aug. 1, 2009, in Richmond, VA. Lauralee Glasgow ’03 served as a bridesmaid; Whit’s father Jeffrey Congdon ’78 was the best man, and his brother Mark Congdon ’05 was a groomsman. Whit and Molly live in Richmond. Liz Costin to Andrew Nixon on Oct. 2, 2009. The ceremony took place at St. Bridget’s Church in Richmond. Cougars in the wedding party included: Jeannie Costin ’06, maid of honor; Sarah Nixon ’98, Katie Hurst ’05 and Caroline Gibson ’02 as bridesmaids; and Bo Hurst ’01, Jeff Gottwald ’02,

Sam Gottwald ’02, Matt Wimbish ’02, Neil Causey ’01, and Greg McGeorge ’01 as groomsmen. Talley King ’02 and Jeanne Nuara ’02 served as readers.

03

Patrick Boswell ’00 married Haley Amanda Clayton on June 13, 2009 in Kiawah, SC.

Harrison Jones received his master’s in teaching from the Curry School at UVA. He then taught at the Bryanston School in southwestern England. There, he was an English and Psychology teacher, a cross country and track coach, as well as an RA for the 8th Grade boys’ house. He is now living in Charlottesville, teaching 10th grade English at an inner city public school. Sarah Neal Batchelor, husband Tony and their son Michael (born Oct. 17, 2007) live at Smith Mountain Lake. Sarah graduated from Roanoke College in May 2009 and now works as an analyst for Metalsa, a metal manufacturing plant in Roanoke.

Hall Carter ’01 and Colleen McGrail Carter were married in Richmond on July 18, 2009.

Katy and Warren Hunter ’01 were married June 6, 2009 in Richmond.

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During Christmas break, Maria Benson, Middle School French and Spanish teacher, visited son Tristan ’02 in China where he is serving in the Peace Corps. They taught some classes together and explained to the students about holiday traditions.

Pierce Buckingham ’02 works as a barn foreman and rider for Darley’s Stonerside Stable, an Aiken, SC thoroughbred horse farm. Lea Peck writes, “I am currently living near the Fan in Richmond and pursuing a master’s degree in occupational therapy from VCU. I will graduate next December after six months of clinical fieldwork starting in June. Last May, I went to Ghana, West Africa, with my program to study child development and the disability culture in a developing country. I hope to return this year with a friend who is from Ghana and whose parents still live there. My golden retriever Mollie is a nationally registered therapy dog, and we regularly visit hospitals and healthcare facilities around Richmond. Mike (Bud) Petit is living in Chicago and working for Groupon, an internet advertising company. “It’s the perennial deal of the day website. Pretty rocking and a lot of fun,” he says. MARRIED: Elizabeth Broadbent to Allan Conrad Cruickshanks on Aug. 15, 2009, in Richmond, VA. Fellow Cougars in the wedding party included matron of honor Blair Breeden Burnett ’96, cousin of the bride; as well as Kimberly Bailey ’03, Nitya Moothathu ’04 and Elizabeth’s mother Mary Anna Toms Broadbent ’66. Elizabeth and Allan live in Richmond.

Spring 2010

CLASS NOTES

Molly Hickerson to Whit Congdon ’02 on Aug. 1, 2009, in Richmond, VA. Lauralee Glasgow ’03 served as a bridesmaid; Whit’s father Jeffrey Congdon ’78 was the best man, and his brother Mark Congdon ’05 was a groomsman. Whit and Molly live in Richmond.

04 5th Reunion

The class of ’04 had a great time celebrating our 5th reunion this fall! With a great turnout we had fun catching up with classmates and friends at Curbside Cafe in the Fan. We missed those who couldn’t attend, and hope they make it to our 10th! It was great to hear where everyone is and what they are doing, while remembering some of our favorite Collegiate memories. Thanks to everyone who came! – Submitted by Elizabeth Downey Ben Emerson graduated from Georgia Tech in May 2009 with highest honors in aerospace engineering. He is in graduate school at Georgia Tech this year and is doing research in their world renowned combustion lab. Adriaan Follansbee works at a non-profit women’s center in El Paso, TX. She lives in a border town between El Paso, TX, and Juarez, Mexico. She was a Latin American studies major at Oberlin and is fluent in Spanish. Her father, teacher Pete Follansbee, attributes her Collegiate Honduras trips as having a lasting impact on her. Jessica Lane is an account director for Peach New Media, a fast-growing web-based knowledge community communications company. She develops and hosts webinars, webcasts and podcasts for national associations promoting continuing education. Cesalie Stepney graduated from Brown in 2008 and from the Harvard M. Ed. graduate program in 2009. MARRIED: Anne Baker to Winston Bibee on Aug. 29, 2009, at Second Baptist Church in Richmond. Cougars in the wedding party were ’04 classmates Priya Vasa, Jessica Lane, Elizabeth Downey, Meredith Newbill and Julie Spahn, who all served as bridesmaids. Adam Baker ’07 and Glen Baker ’02 served as groomsmen, and Sam Roberts ’18 and Luke Roberts ’19 were the program attendants. Rachel Harris to Oscar Contreras on March 8, 2008. Rachel and Oscar welcomed daughter Elena in January 2009.

Back in Richmond, Mac Friddell ’02 is working with students at Collegiate and doing SAT/ACT tutoring. Here, he goes over an assignment with an 8th Grader.

Liz Costin and Andrew Nixon, both ’02, were married Oct. 2, 2009.

Laura Martin ’02 is the driver of the fashion designer Cynthia Rowley’s Mobile Fashion Unit, a traveling trunk show of her women’s clothing.

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Rebecca Byrd Musser is the program manager for the Arts Council of the Valley in Harrisonburg, VA. The Arts Council of the Valley is a non profit art agency that promotes both the performing and visual arts in the Harrisonburg/Rockingham area. She also serves as the director of the re-granting program where the council distributes money for educational and developmental purposes. Gracie McGurn, Kate Robertson, Jessica Longo and Meredith Judkins rang in 2010 together in New York. Stephie Swisher spent the fall semester at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. She is now working in Hurghada, Egypt, on a private yacht. MARRIED: Ben Schewel to Keri Daniel on June 20, 2009, at Isle of Hope, GA. Laura Schewel ’02 was a reader. Cougars at the wedding of Molly Hickerson ’03 and Whit Congdon ’02 included Jamie Bokinsky ’05, Paul Lee ’01, Will Allen ’03, Lauralee Glasgow ’03, Whit and Molly, Stuart Farrell ’03, Meg Ruehling ’03, Joanna Parker ’03, and Mark Congdon ’05.

05

Catherine Anderson writes, “After graduating magna cum laude from William and Mary in May with a B.A. in English, I got a job as the assistant social secretary at the British Embassy in Washington, DC. The job consists of making preparations for (and attending the majority of) the events held at the British Ambassador’s Residence. I help organize events from small breakfasts and teas to

large receptions for the press and foreign dignitaries. I have been lucky enough to meet and chat with so many fascinating people, including Tony Blair, Dame Helen Mirren, Sir Ian McKellen, Andrea Mitchell, Alan Greenspan, Henry Kissinger and Colin Powell. (My favorite guest so far has been Azar Nafisi, the woman who wrote the book that inspired my senior speech at Collegiate.) Anyway, I absolutely love what I am doing, and Collegiate definitely was a big step in getting here.”

In her job as Assistant Social Secretary at the British Embassy in Washington, DC, Catherine Anderson ’05 has met and talked with many interesting people including the actress Dame Helen Mirren.

The Class of ’04 celebrated their very first reunion – their 5th – at Curbside Cafe in the Fan.

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Michael Jarvis is a senior at UNC Chapel Hill and was voted the lacrosse team captain for this season. (He’ll be playing against classmate Mikey Thompson who is captain of the UVA lacrosse team). After graduating in May he is moving to New York to work. Becky Lane now resides in Manhattan. She is an associate editor for Jigsaw Productions, a widely acclaimed, long form documentary filmmaking company. She has an apartment at 54th and 7th Ave. and is loving every minute of life in NYC. Becky graduated with honors in three years with a BA in film and television production and a minor in Italian at NYU’s Tisch School.

07

Lindsay Haw wrote in to let us know, “I am currently a junior at the University of South Carolina and a current member of the sorority Zeta Tau Alpha. Every year, we hold a philanthropy event called ‘Save Lids to Save Lives.’ We compete with the Zetas from Clemson University to see who can collect the most pink Yoplait yogurt lids. Our philanthropy is Breast Cancer Education and Awareness, and every lid collected donates 10 cents to the Susan G. Komen foundation, so this is a very important event for us. Because of this reason, I always look to the Cougars to help me out! For the past two years Collegiate has done a tremendous job in collecting lids, and this year has been no exception. From the help of the students (K-12), the faculty, and all of the staff, Collegiate has collected and sent me a total of 528 lids! This is AMAZING, and on behalf of my sorority, I cannot express how much it means to all of us. This disease is horrible, and hopefully we are one step closer in finding a cure to end it forever. Thanks to you all, we beat the Clemson Zetas, and ended up collecting over 10,000 lids to give to the Susan G. Komen foundation. Thanks again to everyone who participated, and I cannot wait for next year!” Ryan Smoot has recently moved to Naples, FL, to finish his undergrad education and gain acceptance to medical school in the state of Florida. His ultimate goal is to become a psychiatrist. As far as leisure, Ryan has had an opportunity to tour with his best friend’s band, Grammy-nominated Lamb of God, to many shows in Los Angeles, San Diego, New York, the Carolinas, as well as Virginia. Ryan recently attended two nights of

Spring 2010

On the High Seas

CLASS NOTES

06

Stephie Swisher ’05 This winter Stephie Swisher wrote to tell us of her latest adventure. I’ve been trying to break into freelance travel writing/ photography this past semester, and I plan to give myself at least two years to work my way around the world before I come back to the states. I was at the University of Richmond, but when my last semester rolled around, I realized I wasn’t ready to start a career or go to graduate school just yet, so I decided to do an extra semester abroad in Cape Town, South Africa to bump my psychology minor up to a major and take a few classes in travel writing. While I was in Cape Town, I took a Competent Crew sailing course on the waterfront, and really enjoyed it. I heard of a website called findacrew.com, and posted a profile looking for sailboat delivery jobs. I thought it would at least help me with a free way to travel from continent to continent, and then I started looking into teaching English abroad. By chance, I came across a posting for a megayacht in Hurghada, Egypt on the Red Sea, so I contacted the owner with my resume. We negotiated a monthly salary, and I bought a ticket up to Cairo once I finished classes at the University of Cape Town. My parents were really apprehensive about their only daughter traveling to the Middle East on her own and finding a job online, but we researched the family on Linkedin.com, Google, Facebook, etc. The owner is an investment banker who worked in Abu Dhabi, and both his uncle and grandfather were prime ministers of Egypt, so that put my family at ease. I arrived in Cairo on Dec. 8, and am now living in their villa until the wedding at the end of the month, and then I will head down to Hurghada. I will live in another villa in Hurghada, which is very close to the harbor. I’m going to take care of the interior of the yacht, cook if needed, and pretty much act as a hotel staff. There is a captain and two other crew members who live in the harbor, too, and some of the staff I have met in Cairo, such as the chef, travel there as well when the family come to scuba dive and sail. The family is very nice and there is a daughter here my age who treats me like a sister. I have some down time now since everyone is buzzing about the wedding, so I’ve been sightseeing in Cairo and contacting editors about my travel stories. I’ve also studied abroad in Brisbane, Australia and Venice, Italy already so I have a good head start on my world circumvention and a lot of material to write about. –Stephie Swisher

Stephie Swisher toured the pyramids outside Cairo before setting sail.

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CLASS NOTES Fourteen alums returned to campus Jan. 6 to participate in a college panel for Upper School students and, later that night, for parents. They spoke about various issues related to the academic and social aspects of college life and making the transition from high school. Thanks to the following graduates for their time – Hallie Newbill and Emily Melson (class of ’06); George Bokinsky, Cary Campbell, Chris Curl, Heather Garson, Sarah Lisk, Zac Moon, Matthew Richardson, Steffi Ross, Cara Tuttle (all class of ’07); and Jack Biscelgia, Ian Hartz, Josh Lee, Angelica Foreman and Julia Megson (class of ’08). Metallica and Lamb of God at the famous Madison Square Garden on behalf of Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett.

09

Harrison Roday is spending his freshman spring semester with William & Mary’s Washington Program. He explains, “Each semester has an aca-

demic theme. This semester’s theme is International Politics in Economic Hard Times. I will be taking two classes, both taught by W&M professor T.J Cheng. The other component of this is the internship. I will be working with the Center for American Progress with their Economic Policy team. CAP is a highly respected center left (although sometimes center right) think tank with staff from the Reagan and Clinton Administrations.”

Claire Gentil ’06 and Whitney Chase ’07 caught up at the Pinning Ceremony for the University of Virginia School of Nursing. Other Cougars currently enrolled at the nursing program are Ellen Munson ’06, Christina Gray ’06, Alex Modisett ’08, and Annie Piland ’08.

Grayson Cobb ’08 began hiking the Appalachian Trail since last August. In March, he reported that “after several arctic temperature nights (-16 degrees) I abandoned the trail at 1350 miles. I hope to complete the trail at some point in the next few years.”

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This spring former 2006 classmates and lacrosse teammates Michael Jarvis and Mikey Thompson found themselves on opposite sides of the field, leading UNC and UVA, respectively. Both were named captains of their teams. Says Michael, “As far as what it’s like.. Being a captain at UNC is probably the most proud accomplishment of my life. Having my teammates choose me as a leader of some of the best lacrosse players in the country is something I think about everyday. I am 100% sure it is a direct result of coming from a high school athletic program like Collegiate’s, where you are surrounded by coaches who understand the importance of leadership coming from the players and holding people accountable for everything they do, on and off the field. Coach Stanley and Coach McFall are some of the best mentors I have ever been around. “As for Mikey being captain, I could have told you the day he signed with UVA he would one day be a leader of their program. He is one of the best teammates I have ever had, and friend more importantly.”

Spark


Our condolences are offered to these Collegiate families. Frederick Wharton Bauder, father of Page Bauder ’76, died on October 27, 2009. Ellen Rose Brown, mother of Anne Harrison Rose Alferink ’72, Samuel Rutherfoord Rose II and James Garland Rose Jr.; and grandmother of John and Ellen Reichner, and Katherine, Caroline, Margaret and Sarah Rose ’11, died on January 26, 2010. Murriel F. Cawthon, mother of Heather Cawthon Deane ’85 and grandmother of Jordan Deane and Caleigh Deane ’20, died on October 7, 2009. Linwood H. Clark, Jr., husband of Donnetta Devine Clark ’51, died November 28, 2008. Meriwether Allen Condyles, mother of Nick Condyles ’77 and Michael Condyles ’80, and grandmother of Katie, Allen ’17 and Sebastian Condyles ’22, died October 24, 2009. Natalie Neblett Congdon, mother of Susan Congdon Terry ’73, John Congdon ’75 and Jeff Congdon ’78, died January 6, 2010. Mary H. Denson, mother of Deborah Denson, Tom Denson ’78, and Bob Denson ’80, died on September 23, 2009. Laurie Klindworth Dudley, mother of Lee Dudley ’80, Marion Dudley Halladay ’81 and Laura Dudley Dyke ’84, died November 24, 2009. Katherine Dabney Fields, mother of Jennifer Green Brand ’91 and Elizabeth Dabney Fields ’11, died on October 18, 2009. Dr. Merritt W. Foster, Jr, husband of Mary Nolde Foster ’40, and father of Merritt Foster ’69, died on October 15, 2009. Richard Holden Guilford, father of Pam Guilford Redd ’72 and Anne Guilford Rheins ’75, and grandfather to Walker Redd ’07 and Chappell Redd ’11, died on December 9, 2009. Allan McAlpin Heyward, father of Wayne Heyward ’82, Allan McAlpin Heyward, Jr, Virginia Randolph Heyward, and Roberta Guerard Heyward Perkins, died November 16, 2009. Dr. Robert Oscar Hudgens, father of Kent Hudgens ’73 and Phil Hudgens ’77, died January 16, 2010. Mary Jane Ritchie Johann, mother of Kathy Johann Woodard and Bruce Johann Muller-Thym (both ’67) and Jane Johann Gresham ’75, died October 26, 2009.

Spring 2010

Clarke L. Jones Jr., father of Clarke Jones III ’66, Bing Jones ’70, Kevin Jones ’74, and Beth Jones Malone ’76, and grandfather of Matthew Jones ’99 and Ethan Jones ’01, died January 5, 2010. Jane Langhorne Martin, mother of John Martin ’78 and Linda Martin Geho ’82, died January 14, 2010. Agnes Weeks Kirkmyer Muhleman, mother of Don Muhleman ’68 and Kirk Muhleman ’73, died November 15, 2009. Frank Jones, father of Page Jones Allen ’73, Brad Jones ’75, Frank Jones ’77, Jean Jones Hogan ’78, and Ben Jones ’92, died July 25, 2009. Marine Aleshire Modisett, mother of Cindy Modisett Milbergs ’64, Shirley Modisett Hubard ’66, Jeff Modisett ’78 and grandmother of Jeff Modisett Jr. ’07, Alexandra Modisett ’08 and Burke Modisett ’11, died July 28, 2009. Madame Marcia Horner Powell, mother of Sarah Powell Prior ’69, Morris Horner Powell, John Powell ’72, and renowned French teacher at Collegiate School, died September 30, 2009. Dr. John Curtis Rasmussen, Jr, brother of Bill Rasmussen ’64 and son of former Collegiate teacher Dena Lee Stith Rasmussen, died June 30, 2009. Roberta Lee Rivers, mother of Chris Rivers ’92, died October 3, 2009. Robert Smith, father of Nancy Gayle Smith ’78 and Robert Smith III, died December 30, 2009. Leah Fleet Waller, mother of Leah Waller Golden and Taylor Waller ’71, and grandmother of Catherine Fleet Golden, John Rudolph Golden, Taylor Waller ’02, Ryland Waller Herring ’98, and Marshall Waller ’04, died October 7, 2009. William A. Walton, Jr., father of Billy Walton ’72, Wendy Walton Ward ’74, died March 18, 2009. Douglas Dabney Watkinson, mother of Kathy Watkinson Ivins ’73 and Sally Watkinson ’75, died January 24, 2010. Wyndham Robertson White III, husband of Lloyd (Dootsie) Call White ’49, died May 22, 2009.

ALUMNI Marjorie Belvin Ruffin ’29 Anne Williams Lind ’33 Kate Lewis Wallace ’33 Mary Belt Blakeslee ’47 Patsy McCaslin Brooks ’54 Katherine Huntley Galleher ’54 Penny Armstrong Edwards ’59 Troy Welchons ’63 Gay Montague Jewett ’65 Dave Bowman ’67 Tom Hughes ’74 Henry Fine ’77 Ted Lowe ’84 Charlotte Shilling ’97

CLASS NOTES

OBITUARIES

HOW TO REACH US Update Your Info & Write a Class note www.collegiate-va.org Sign in on any page. Your user name is your first name, last name and class year, as in janesmith79. Click on “login help” to receive a temporary password. Click on Profile to update your info. Call 800-522-1915 804-741-9766 E-Mail aahearn@collegiate-va.org Mail 103 North Mooreland Road Richmond, VA 23229 Be Our Fan on Facebook! Collegiate School Follow Us on Twitter @collegiaterva Have an iPhone? Download our new iCougar app for free, sign in (same as login above) and check calendars, directory and athletic scores and schedules

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MYSTERY PHOTO UP, UP AND AWAY There are a few clues as to when and what this picture is about, but who are these happy, smiling little people? Email your info to ecogar@collegiate-va.org.

MYSTERY SOLVED! The notes came in from far and wide to unanimously identify last issue’s Mystery Photo as depicting a tradition that exists only in our memories (no more Key Club, no more sweetheart). Calling the photo “just way too easy,” George Whitley ’71 wrote in to say, “Bryce Powell ’69 and Greg Williams ’69 are tapping Frannie Simpson Powell ’69 to be the sweetheart of the Key Club, circa 1968 or so.” Tina Gianoulis ’70 said the same but added, “I was never sure what the Key Club did – except that they had a yule log tradition where they sat up all night at school while the log burned – an occasion for a few pranks that shall remain shrouded in mystery.” Best of all was a note from Bryson Powell ’98: “I haven’t seen that picture in a long time, but it’s my father Bryce Powell crowning my mother Frances Simpson as Key Club sweetheart. Ironically, they never dated at Collegiate, it wasn’t until college that sparks ignited. Greg Williams is the other man. Great choice!!” Thanks to all others who took the time to put in their two cents’ worth – Bob Ramsey ’69, Linda Carr Corbin ’69, Ginna Zell ’70, Molly Nichols Tashjian ‘71, former Collegiate parent Linda Staples and even a St. Catherine’s grad, Debbie Dunlap ’70.

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Spark


PARTING SHOT

By Alex Smith ’65

A Tribute to Marcia Powell (Derek Jeter, someone is watching you!)

T

his past fall, long time Collegiate School French teacher Marcia Powell passed on at the age of 92. She was still very mentally (as you would expect) sharp, but her body, worn down by life, just could not keep her going anymore. This was the lady who often walked to work 4.5 miles one way, hiked the French Alps each summer and in her 80’s would climb the steps at the Diamond in Richmond to see a baseball game. Let me take you back to the ‘60s. I first met “Madame” Powell when I was in the boys’ school in the 10th grade. She scared me to death. The sight of her and her strict demeanor had a lot to do with me choosing Spanish over French. She was a slightin-build woman, grayish hair tied back in a bun, and rimless eyeglasses with a determined look. In short, you did not mess around with Madame Powell. When I returned to Collegiate in 1969 as an employee, one of the first faculty members to greet me and take me in was Madame Powell. This was the beginning of a lasting friendship. Sure, she was strict and spoke her mind, but I respected her intelligence and sense of right. In her retirement, I kept up with her by taking her to Richmond Braves baseball games. She was a real baseball fan actually I say she was a student of the Spring 2010

game. Well into her 80’s we climbed all of the steps to our seats (she liked the 3rd base line) and watched every pitch. We did not leave until the final out, regardless of the score! She loved baseball whether in person or on T.V. She followed the Yankees, Boston, Baltimore and the Braves knowing the details on many of the players. Towards the end of her life, I visited one day after she had had a bad fall. Of course, we talked baseball. A player she admired for all the right reasons was Derek Jeter, captain of the Yankees and a most excellent shortstop. Jeter is known for his sportsmanship and good behavior on and off the field. No steroids, no cheating – just a pure baseball player. At this time, there was a lot of investigation in Washington, DC with players’ conduct past and present (McGwire, Bonds and Clemens). Her last words to me as I was leaving her room were, “I think Derek is a Powell taught many Cougars the correct way to say good one, and he’d better stay Madame “un, deux, trois!” that way.” Classic, vintage Powell…Derek, someone is watching you.


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Taylor Dabney

As We Liked It...

The cast of As You Like It by William Shakespeare, on the stage of Oates Theater in the Hershey Center for the Arts – the play was presented for three nights in April by the Collegiate Players.

Spark Spring 2010  

A magazine for alumni and friends of Collegiate School, Richmond, Va.

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