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EXTRA Collegian Monday, December 9, 2019 Volume 183 No.7

REPORTERS’ NOTEBOOK

The Voice of Los Angeles City College Since 1929

MEET THE REAL D.C. DOGS PAGE 6

FIND FELLOWSHIPS, INTERSHIPS, IN THE NATIONAL CAPITOL PAGE 7

L.A. City College Triumph Pg. 2

75 YEARS LATER

HOLOCAUST MUSEUM SHOWS THE HORRORS OF NAZI ATROCITIES DURING WWII

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Quid Pro Show Congress Sends Historic Message BY JAMES DUFFY V

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Photo by JAMES DUFFY V Cars approach the U.S. Capitol Building from Pennsylvania Avenue on Oct. 31, 2019. The House of Representatives voted to approve rules for presidential impeachment hearings that morning.

undreds of visitors swarmed the Capitol Building to witness the House vote on impeachment rules. Lines of people snaked around corridors and clogged metal detector checkpoints. L.A. Collegian staff traveled to Washington for a journalism convention at the end of October, amid a tumult brewing on Capitol Hill. Americans have been drawing battle lines since the last civil war. Watergate journalist Carl Bernstein visited L.A. City College in October. He said the country’s divisions in the Trump era are part of a prolonged “cold civil war.” On the morning we landed, Congressional lawmakers voted to proceed with the presidential impeachment hearing. After I dropped off my luggage, I grabbed the first cab to see the House impeachment vote in an hour. Legislators on both sides of the House had a lot to say. House Democrats allege the president bribed an ally for dirt on a political rival. Other Democrats say the president violated the Constitution’s emoluments clauses by profiting from his office. All 196 House Republicans, voted against the impeachment inquiry. They say a criminal investigation of the president is politically motivated. The House Gallery admits visitors in

groups of about 15. Capitol Police send each person through an airport-style body scanner. Two women from Italy waited next to me. They were not aware of the impeachment vote when they came. Many observers only stayed a few minutes to look around the room. By the time the group was admitted to the House, members already cast their vote to approve the impeachment hearing rules. Texas Representative Kevin Ghomert took the podium. “Some historian, I don’t remember who, said guns are only involved in the last phase of a civil war,” Ghomert said. He criticized the House Intelligence Committee, chaired by Rep. Adam Schiff, because of its confidential witness testimony. Ghomert repeatedly calling its members “gossip-mongers.” Audience members muffled their laughter. Signs posted around the House gallery say observers who disturb proceedings will be arrested. The last time I saw Schiff was November 2018 in Santa Ana. He arrived on a buss full of Democrats before a midterm election that brought the Democratic Party back to power in the House of Representatives. At a campaign rally, a labor leader said he looked forward to Schiff chairing the intelligence committee and slamming the gavel at president Trump’s associates. Schiff smiled. That was before a whis-

SEE “CAPITOL” PAGE 6


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Los Angeles City College Visual & Media Arts Department 855 N. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90029 323.953.4000 ext. 2832 losangeles.collegian@gmail.com Editor-in-Chief BEATRICE ALCALA JAILENE TRUJILLO Graphics Editor BEATRICE ALCALA Photographers BEATRICE ALCALA CHRIS AHN ALEX CORZO Copy Editor ANGELA JOHNSON

Online Editor JAMES DUFFY Reporters SARAH RAGSDALE, CHRIS AHN, JAMES DUFFY CHRIS AHN

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Photo by STAFF Staff and advisers celebrate this special occasion after receiving First Place Pinnacle Award on Nov 1, 2019. This is the first time the Collegian Times receives this prestigious trophy.

COLLEGIAN TIMES RISES ABOVE A NATIONAL FIELD BY CHRISTOPHER AHN

ditors, writers and artists got out of their seats and cheered for the magazine. This was the first Pinnacle award that the Collegian time received. This was an exciting time for them because this moment was a payoff to all their hard work. “The recognition we received in Washington D.C. comes after a semester of hard work with late nights and constant editing,” Szakacs said. “There were a lot of arguments and fights among the team, but it was okay at the end.” Szakacs and her team members spent restless nights trying to finish the race they have started. The staff members worked hard all semester to create this creative magazine and it won them the Pacemaker the following evening. This moment was breathtaking because this award is arguably the most prestigious award in college media. It is educationally equivalent to a Pulitzer prize. LACC President Mary Gallegher arrived at the Grand Hyatt Hotel to share this exciting experience. She seemed

excited as she took pictures with the whole staff and held the awards. “The strength of the team is each player,” president Gallegher said. “The strength of each player is the team.” The magazine showcased many talents that Los Angeles City College students offered. Each component complimented each other and made the magazine readable and a successful magazine. “Within three years of creating a new journalism course to address Magazine Production, our talented students have won two major national awards thanks to strong writing, careful editing, creative ideas, excellent photography and innovative artwork,” said Vice-Chair of Media Arts Daniel Marlos. “I am so proud of the students who have grown immensely under the tutelage of their adviser, Professor Rhonda Guess.” The Collegian times additionally won two awards. Fifth place for “Best in Show Awards” for the featured magazine category, which ranked higher compared to Ink from Virginia Commonwealth University and Tusk from California State University, Fullerton. Sixth place for “Best in Show Awards” for the newspaper category from two-year college.

Faculty Adviser RHONDA GUESS


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Reporterʼs Notebook

Monday, December 9, 2019

WILL YOU TELL THEIR STORIES?

Photo Courtesy of the UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM (USHMM) WASHINGTON, D.C. This image shows the Allied Forces upon their arrival at the Nazi Concentration Camps that show the horrors of Hitler’s “Final Solution.”

U.S. TROOPS WITNESS WAR TOLL OF NAZI CAMPS BY SARAH RAGSDALE

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he 75th anniversary of the liberation of Germany Nazi concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz is approaching – Jan. 27, 2020 – and lately, I’ve been reflecting on what the Holocaust was. While in Washington D.C., celebrating our national nominated Magazine and student paper, The Collegian, I asked my new friend, and extraordinary photographer and designer, Beatrice, if she wanted to visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum with me. Our Lyft driver pulled up to the front entrance of the museum – and the realization hit me. I was finally visiting a museum I’ve wanted to go

to since I was a little girl. After walking through security, Beatrice and I noticed two men sitting at one of the front desks, talking with a group of students. Upon approaching, we learned that these men were Holocaust survivors and regular volunteers at the museum; Martin (Marty) Weiss and Joël Nommick. I remember the day I first learned about what the Holocaust was. At Springfield Lutheran Middle school in Springfield, MO, the subject was quickly brushed over in fifth grade. The name, “Hitler” was vaguely familiar, but I didn’t know who he was, or what he did. After school and still curious, I wanted to know what that seemingly heavy, hushed word meant: the ‘Holocaust.’ I googled it.

SEE “HOLOCAUST MUSEUM” PAGE 4

Images flooded my dad’s computer as I looked in horror... in tears. ‘How is this possible?’ My mind went into panic. I wanted to learn how something like that could have happened, why, and why it wasn’t stopped much sooner than it was. “Learn to depend on yourself,” Marty told me. “Not your parents, not your siblings. Yourself.” Marty was born on Jan. 28, 1929 in Polana, Czechoslavakia to Jacob and Golda Weiss. In 1939, Nazi Germany occupied Czechoslavakia and divided the country into sections of Nazi control and Hungarian control. When Marty’s hometown was put under Hungarian control, it was still subjugated to many of Hitler’s antisemitic and racist Nuremberg Laws.


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Monday, December 9, 2019 FROM “WILL YOU TELL THEIR STORIES” PAGE 3 Jews lost their equal rights. Remember the Children: Daniel’s Story, is a walkthrough tour simulation at the museum that shows how this happened in detail on the first floor. Jewish children were no longer allowed to attend public schools or universities, thousands of jewish men, including Martin’s two brothers, were drafted into slave labor battalions and sent to the Russian front. Remember Most Jewish the Children: businesses Daniel’s Story is were confiscated, a walk-through but Jacob Weiss, Marty’s exhibition on father, was the first floor able to retain his business of the museum license and that tells the earned money story of Daniel by illegally butchering and his family’s animals at experience of night and selling the life during the meat on the Holocaust. black market. The exhibition In 1940 to 1944, news portrays spread of a realistic eye witness accounts of environment mass killings that visitors can in Poland and Ukraine touch, listen to, made their and engage in way to Polana. Daniel’s story as Hundreds of it changes during thousands of Hungarian the Holocaust Jews, the in Nazi Germany Weiss family included, were between 1933 arrested and and 1945. deported to the Munkacs Ghetto in April,1944. After a two-month period, nearly 440,000 Jews were deported from Hungary to AuschwitzBirkenau –including Marty and his family. Marty, his brother Moshe, his sister Cilia, and their father Jacob and his two uncles were selected for slave labor. The rest of his family was killed upon arrival. Marty and his father, Jacob stayed at Auschwitz-Birkenau briefly and were transported to Melk, another concentration camp in Austria. Eventually, Marty was liberated by the United States Army on May 5, 1945. Marty has been volunteering at the United States Holocaust Museum since 1998. “Will you tell their stories?” A sign behind their desk read. “This museum

is not an answer. It is a question,” this quote from Elie Weisel, visible on a wall on the first floor. Weisel was a Romanian-born American professor, political activist, Nobel Laureate, author of the Night trilogy, among other books and Holocaust survivor. Weisel passed away in 2016. He was 88 years old. Weisel’s words are prominently displayed throughout the museum, asking those to bear witness for the dead and for the living. On the first floor, I was handed an identification card, telling the story of a real person who lived during the Holocaust. Later, I would learn whether or not this person survived. My card read Margit Morawetz. She survived and fled to the United States in 1941. From the first floor, Beatrice and I rode an elevator to the third. The self-guided museum offers a chronological narrative of the Holocaust. They portray this through photographs, historical artifacts, and film footage. There are also personal objects and eyewitness testimonies of survivors in each room. The third floor shows the rise of the Nazi party in Germany in 1933 –1939. The invasion of Poland and the Nuremberg Race Laws are explored along with Kristallnacht and the Voyage of the St. Louis. The second floor examines the “Final Solution” from 1940 to 1945. It shows the evolution of the Nazi party toward the Jews from forcing them to move into Ghettos to mass murder in killings fields and gas chambers. There are also photos of deportations of Jews to camps and testimonies from Auschwitz. On the final floor, called ‘The Last Chapter,” the liberation of the Nazi camps and the Allied victory over Nazi Germany in 1945 is shared along with the rescue, resistance efforts and the aftermath of the Holocaust. Visitors can also walk through the Hall of Remembrance, a solemn place designed for public ceremonies and reflection. The walls are in a circular layout around an eternal flame and are inscribed with the names of concentration and death camps. Around the entire room, candles are lit under the camp names. Walking toward the exit, a memoriam caught my eye: “Stephen Tyrone Johns. Oct.4, 1969 –June 10, 2009.” I stopped walking and read on. “While protecting visitors and colleagues, Special Police Officer Stephen Tyrone Johns was fatally shot on June 10, 2009 by an avowed antisemite, Holocaust denier, and racist. Officer John’s outgoing personality and generous spirit endeared him to all who entered this museum, which was created to confront the very hate that took his life. His sacrifice shall never be forgotten.”

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LIFEIN THE

GHETTO DURING NAZI OCCUPATION

P.1 Image with Daniel’s bed: Nazi regime forces family of boy named Daniel to move into Lodz Ghetto in Poland. Daniel’s bed stands next to the family’s hiding place and Daniel’s diary pages hang from the wall. Quote “Dear Diary,” he begins, “this is our secret hiding

place! We hide a radio in here. It’s also very dangerous but it is the only way to get news of the war from outside the ghetto. Can you imagine my father crawling in to listen?” P.2 Image with sink & kitchen area: A diary entry from Daniel hangs above the small


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THIS MUSEUM IS NOT AN ANSWER. IT IS A QUESTION.” -Elie Weisel Photos 1-5 by BEATRICE ALCALA Photo 6-8 Courtesy of the UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM (USHMM) WASHINGTON, D.C.

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stove in the kitchen area in the Lodz Ghetto. P.3,4,5 Dolly and Luggage images Daniel and his family pack a few personal belongings to take to the ghetto in Lodz. “Dear Diary,” an excerpt from Daniel’s diary nearby says. “They ruined our store! Nothing is safe or

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us anymore. Everything is gone – my school, our home, our store, our happy life. What will happen to us?” P.6 Holocaust victims suffered from starvation, disease and brutality. According to ImperialWarMuseums.org, the first intake

of food was fatal for many Holocaust survivors. The prisoners were “too weak from starvation to digest it. For the survivors of the Nazi camps, the road to recovery would be long and painful.” P. 7 Image with men with tattoos: Holocaust survivors show their number tattoos.

Incoming prisoners received camp serial numbers from the S.S. authorities. Only prisoners selected for work received serial numbers; prisoners sent directly to the gas chambers were not registered and did not receive tattoos. P. 8 Ghetto rules listed.

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Monday, December 9, 2019

FROM “CONGRESS” PAGE 1

Photo Courtesy of BIG BEN’S FAMOUS CHILI Ben’s famous chili arrives on top of a Ben’s juicy burger with fries and is a real filler. This combo will set you back about $13.

BEN’S CHILI BOWL LAYS IT ON THICK Great Portions, Richer History Nourishes D.C. Community Over 60 Years BY JAMES DUFFY V Ben’s Chili Bowl serves devoted patrons chili smokes – chili sauce-slathered grilled hotdogs that snap when bitten. The packed restaurant also served as an iconic D.C. hangout for 61 years — a common ground in the once-segregated city. President Barack Obama ate there. The World Series-winning Washington Nationals opened a Ben’s in their stadium. Something in the chili sauce is causing a lot of buzz. Ben’s Chili Bowl was one of the few businesses to stay open during the riots following Martin Luther King’s murder in 1968. Cities across the country with large black populations rioted. Whole blocks of U Street, the center of the D.C’s African American culture since the 1920s burned. But the rioters didn’t touch Ben’s. Civil rights activist Stokely Carmichael contacted Ben and Virginia Ali to tell them their restaurant should remain open during the riot. He said the popular restaurant could hold the divided city together. “It’s a different community now,” said Virginia Ali, a co-founder of Ben’s. “Someone just brought this in because they remember U Street. I was 19.” The 85-year-old holds up a large poster with photos of herself and her late husband Ben. Soon after they met, Ben Ali told his wife his dream was make himself self-sufficient by opening a restaurant.

“I like it here now,” Ali said. “It’s busy; an awful lot of educated young people have moved in. Now remember, we became a ghetto for 20 years.” After the ‘68 riots, Ali said she hoped her community would rebuild. Successive decades brought further tragedy to the black neighborhoods of D.C. Ali said she recalls the heroin and crack epidemics ravaged the city where she was proud to open her restaurant in 1958. “We were a very prominent but segregated African American community, when I was very young,” Ali said. “And we were self-sufficient. Howard University was in walking distance. The Howard Theatre was built before the Apollo in New York. I believe we are the only city with a African American family owned and operated commercial bank for 85 years.” Ali still greets customers and travellers in her restaurant. He chose to open a dog shop because hamburger stands already operated in the area. Ben Ali covered his smokes in a chili sauce recipe handed down to him. Ali said she was new to business ownership at the time. “I didn’t know nothing about it,” Ali said. “But OK; I’m game, I’m ready.” A city history project archived stories from Ben’s Chili bowl last month. Ben’s stories are saved along with those of Jazz legends. Duke Ellington who performed in the Lincoln Theatre on U Street in the 1920s.. The restaurant has six locations operating around Washington D.C. including at Nats Park and FedEx Field.

tle-blower exposed Trump’s Ukraine shakedown. Economist magazine Washington Bureau Chief James Astill also attended the rally. He published an article following the election, “The New American Civil War.” “Once the new Congress forms in January, Trump and his scandal-tainted administration will for the first time be subject to congressional oversight,” Astill wrote. He hedged his article’s title. “Compared to the momentous arguments of the civil rights era, today’s rows over border walls and whatever foolish thing Trump last said, seem trivial. Unlike in the 1850s, America does not seem to be headed for an actual civil war.” No day goes by in the capital city without some lawmaker bemoaning partisan strife. Whether real or imagined, rumors of war portend the deepening moral and psychological chasm between those clinging to the president and everyone else. Their defeat is necessary, for national progress on healthcare, civil rights and averting climate catastrophe. Supporters of progress should welcome the storm. No synthesis comes without both a thesis and antithesis. The next day we visited the White House. In the span of an hour, Collegian staff witnessed three political arguments shouted in LaFayette Square across from the White House. Two arguments were directed at Philipos Melaku-Bello, who sits in a tent across from the White House. Melaku-Bello participates in peace vigil outside the White House continued by other for 38 years. He witnessed successive administrations come and go. He likes that president Barack Obama’s staff distributed bottled water to him. He dislikes that president Trump’s people turned off the water fountains in LaFayette Square. Melaku-Bello covered his tent in different protest signs: Nuclear weapons, Kurdish genocide and human rights were outlined in colorful markers. Seven miles in each direction if I was to post all the signs I would need to post on human rights violations alone,” Melaku-Bello said. “Human rights.” He answered questions about his signs. A family of three decked out in MAGA hats looked on while their 8-year-old son questioned him. “You’re a disgrace to our country,” the boy shouted at Melaku-Bello as he walked away. His parents looked on with grins. Domestic conflict is routine in the Trump era. Political violence occurs with more regularity. Field trip groups of high school and middle schoolers brought many students wearing Trump paraphernalia. Some mocked the president’s protestors. Trump supporters also sported their MAGA gear on Capitol Hill. “They’re not the patriots they once were…,” Ghomert said, referring to the whistleblowers. “They are gossip mongers.” The temperature in D.C. dropped 20 degrees on Nov. 1. Grey clouds hung over the capitol. Schiff closed the first day of the impeachment hearings by complementing both parties’ members who listened. They acted calmly, for now. “Thank you for behaving in a civil way,” Schiff said. When you walk down the steps of the gallery after several searches and invasive scans, the House Chamber is quiet and unimpressive. Old busts of Roman lawmakers decorate the ceiling. The tile in the hallway is decorated in puke green and jaundice yellows, and politicians who seem unreal on CNN, are feet away and may smile at you. Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar and Ayanna Prestly were feet away. They came to give farewell hugs to Los Angeles Rep. Katie Hill. Hill resigned when her affair with a senior staffer was exposed and her ex-husband was leaking their sext messages to the press. The squad was almost alone in the hall listening to Hill. “So today, as my last vote, I voted on impeachment proceedings,” Hill said. “Not just because of corruption, obstruction of justice or gross misconduct, but because of the deepest abuse of power, including the abuse of power over women.”


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Washington, D.C. Fellowships and Internships COMPILED BY ANGELA JOHNSON Eben Tisdale Public Policy Fellowship Award Amount: $8,695 Eligibility: Open to students from any college or university (including international students) in their junior or senior year or enrolled in a graduate program. The Eben Tisdale Fellowship offers outstanding opportunities for students to learn about high-tech public policy issues with hands-on experience in Washington, D.C. The Fellowship provides a full scholarship of $8,695 to attend the Business + Government Relations program as well as a $1,000 stipend. Through the Business + Government Relations D.C. Summer Program, Tisdale Fellows will be placed with a high-tech company, firm or trade association, take two classes worth six credits from George Mason University, and live in furnished apartments on George Washington University’s downtown campus. Fellows will also attend weekly issues seminar lunches hosted by Tisdale sponsors, as well as briefings at institutions such as the U.S. Capitol, Department of State, World Bank and Federal Reserve. For additional information visit: https:// tfas.org/programs/us-programs/tisdale-

fellowship/ The William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fellowship for Minority Students Award Amount: $2,000-$4,000 Eligibility: Open to both undergraduate and graduate students of color, based on academic excellence and need. The Aspen Institute Program on Philanthropy and Social Innovation (PSI) in Washington, D.C. offers the William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fellowship to one student three times annually. The Hearst Fellow serves as an intern with PSI in the Washington, D.C. office of the Aspen Institute. Grants are made to exceptional minority students with a keen interest in pursuing a career in social justice or community involvement. Through this fellowship, PSI seeks to introduce a diverse group of students to issues and challenges affecting philanthropy, social enterprise, nonprofit organizations, and other actors in the social sector. Recipients may arrange with their colleges or universities to receive academic credit for this experience. For additional information visit: https:// www.aspeninstitute.org/programs/ program-on-philanthropy-and-socialinnovation-psi/william-randolph-

Monday, December 9, 2019

hearst-endowed-fellowship-forminority-students/ National Safety Council Government Affairs Internship Award Amount: $15.00 per hour (1020 hours per week) Duration: Winter 2020 Eligibility: Open to currently enrolled students who are majoring in English, Communications, Political Science, Transportation Safety. Government Affairs Interns work with a small team of dedicated professionals to directly impact priority

issues including the opioid epidemic, autonomous vehicles, distracted driving, teen driving safety and workplace safety. Interns are assigned critical tasks and will get to see their work in action. The National Safety Council is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to save lives by preventing injuries and deaths at work, on the road, in homes and communities through leadership, research, education and advocacy. For additional information, visit: https:// www.paycomonline.net/v4/ats/web. php/jobs/

Columbia Scholastic Press Association Gold Circle Individual Awards, 2019 Students won from among 7,187 news and magazine entries in 86 categories across the United States.

Go to the head of the Class! Enroll in Journalism 101: Mondays and Wednesdays 11:10 a.m. - 12:35 p.m. Journalism 217 Publication Laboratory (TBA) Journalism 218 Practical Editing (TBA) Journalism 220 Magazine Production, Wednesdays, 4 - 9:25 p.m.

FIRST PERSON EXPERIENCE (FIRST PLACE) Jason Piskopus, “Chingu, and What I Learned from HIM,” Collegian Times, LACC News writing Certificate of Merit: John Johns, “Get Your Hands Out of My Pocket,” Collegian Times, LACC News Page Design (FIRST PLACE) Beatrice Alcala, “Burning Man.” Collegian Times, LACC N12 Personality profile (SECOND PLACE) Sorina Szakacs, “Print Interrupted,” Collegian Times , LAAC

Certificate of Merit: Diana Campbell, “Jazz Treasure,” Collegian Times, LACC Single Subject Feature Package, Doubletruck (two-facing pages) (SECOND PLACE) Richard Martinez, “Ginger’s ‘Alien’ 40 Years of Fear and Satisfaction,” Collegian Times, LACC Personal opinion: Off-campus issues (THIRD PLACE) Naomi Johnson: “Coffee Shop Stirs Up Neighborhood,” Collegian Times, LACC General feature Certificate of Merit: Nick Moreland, “Punk’s Not Dead,” Collegian Times, LACC


Photos by CHRIS AHN

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Monday, December 9, 2019

Fresh from the sea Straight to the stomach Chewy and Fresh

Best Yukhae Ever!

MEETUP: THREE ASIAN CUISINES CONVERGE

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was just curious, not hungry. I wanted to know what D.C. had to offer. The receptionist at the Grand Hyatt Hotel gave me a list of Asian places to eat throughout Washington D.C. She recommended sushi, ramen and Korean barbeque across Chinatown, but I wanted to try something different. All these places were common in the Los Angeles region. I used Yelp to find this Asian eatery and I found street food. Kaliwa, the Michelin Star eatery in Washington D.C. jolted my taste buds and cultural experience on Nov. 1, 2019. Kaliwa offered various types of Asian food like Korean, Filipino and Thai. I did not expect this because I thought Kaliwa was a food stand, but it was a fancy sit down. I was skeptical of the food because the environment was too “elegant” for authentic taste and the chief was Irish. The restaurant was a bit loud, but the environment was dim and intimate. Jessica was the amazing Caucasian waitress who gave me an memorable experience. The menu was diverse and it was difficult for me to choose. “The Yuhkae is my favorite, ”Jessica said. “This is the

best thing on the menu.” This Yukhae is a dish that consists of raw meat with garlic, pear, pine nuts, gochujang and raw yolk. This was almost like a steak tartare. Gochujang is a red chili paste that is savory and sweet. I was confident that this dish was going to taste good because it is hard to mess up. I doubted her recommendation because she was Caucasian and I am Korean American. I trusted my instincts more than hers. However, I ordered what she recommended out of curiosity, but I ordered another dish too in case I did not like the food. I ordered Bibimbap, which was a rice dish that included ingredients like vegetables, meat and eggs. This dish is easy to make because it’s just a mixture of ingredients you might find at home. My food came out and I was ready to eat at this high end Asian eatery by the wharf in Washington DC. I took a bite of my bibimbap after I mixed it and it was disappointing. Even though the dish can be mixed with random ingredients, the dish was sour because of the pickles. They disappointed me with the dish I thought could not be ruined. My tastebuds were expecting another

disappointment with the other dish. Jessica brought me a pile of raw meat. The meat was on top of lettuce. The chef scattered slices of Korean pear rice, raw sesame seed and rice crackers throughout the dish. “How the heck am I going to eat it,” I thought to myself. “This looks so nice.” I asked Jessica how to eat this dish. She did and even taught me how to make it taste better. “You get the raw egg and mix it with the raw meat,” Jessica said. “Eat it with the rice crackers to give it the extra crunch and it will taste better.” Jessica went back to get a plate full of rice crackers. I mixed the raw egg yolk with the raw meat. This was a sign for a stomach ache, but I was eager to try it. I used rice cracker to scoop up the meat and put it in my mouth. It tasted like Korea. The texture was crunchy and chewy which was perfect for my palette. I am from Los Angeles, and there is good Korean food. This place tasted authentic. Kaliwa gave me an experience like no other. Not only was this eatery authentic, but a Caucasian waitress telling a Korean what is good Korean food and how to eat it. This saved me a trip to Korea to eat Yukhae.

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Reporters Notebook, Washington D.C.  

Reporters Notebook, Washington D.C.  

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