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COLLEGIAN The MAGAZINE of Brisbane Boys’ College

December 2016

A WIN FOR BROTHERHOOD

BBC secures the premiership win in GPS Track and Field after 74 years Also inside:

WORLD PREMIERE

RITES OF PASSAGE

IN HONOUR

A COLLEGIAN'S

THE FESTIVAL OF

A SPECIAL TRIBUTE

GOODBYE

LEAVING

TO NIC MACBEAN


COLLEGIAN I S S U E 2 D E C E M B E R 2016 UPFRONT

6

Headlines

A few words from the Headmaster Graeme McDonald

BBC NEWS

8

Travelling time History unfolds in a special time capsule reveal from 1991

9

Rewire

BBC hosts The Australian REWIRE Series with a focus on STEM in education

10 16 Young changemakers

Social enterprise One Quarter continues to raise awareness of domestic violence

13

Living faith

An insight into the work of our Interschool Christian Fellowship group

15 In class

Providing hands-on, practical experiences for boys

Green time vs screen time

Why mother nature is good for you and critical for young boys

22

The festival of leaving

A chain of events that signals the end and equally the beginning for our senior students

BBC ARTS

30 Why not

The mantra which makes all things possible

32 Published by Brisbane Boys’ College CRICOS Code 00491J Kensington Terrace, Toowong, Queensland 4066 T 07 3309 3571 F 07 3371 2679 W www.bbc.qld.edu.au A SCHOOL OF THE PRESBYTERIAN AND METHODIST SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION

Editor and Art Director Adele Graves Graphic Design Tracey Maree Contributors Natalie Claut, Chris Hartley, Jarrod Turner, Kelly Edwards, Helen Jackson Photography Michael Marston Cover Michael Griffiths. Photo by Michael Marston

Sound passing through time

A word from music great and thought leader, Richard Gill OAM

40

Creative twist

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory with a BBC twist


33

Making music A look at our comprehensive and dynamic music program COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


REGULAR ITEMS

52 77 Insight

The experts offer advice to navigate through the journey of parenthood

Flashback

"The Old Fox" Dave Magoffin

72 Snapshots

Scenes from the Spring Fashion Parade and other events in the College calendar

BBC SPORT

43

A win for brotherhood

CONNECT

The lead-up, the highlights, a track and field victory 74 years in the making

58 65

48

Remembering and paying tribute to friend, award-winning journalist and BBC Old Boy Nic MacBean

Captured

Sporting moments through the lens

49 Transfer of learning

Soccer and dance bring STEM into focus

In honour

60

Circle of friends Catching up with those who live beyond the cityscape and at the heart of our country

Long lunch

A highlight of the OCA events calendar

76

90 years strong

Former Headmaster Graham Thomson AM celebrates a special milestone with family and BBC friends


From the Editor ADELE GRAVES

“The only way to find your voice is to use it. It’s hardwired, built into you. Talk about the things you love.Your voice will follow.” – Austin Kleon What I love most about this edition of Collegian is the strong student voice that is carried throughout. From Jacob White’s Valedictorian speech, to Jack Sim’s humble focus on service, right through to Year 1s talking ‘pirate’, their words are chosen wisely, their voices are strong, insightful, often 'boy-ish', at times playful and most importantly uniquely their own. This edition naturally has a strong focus on our departing seniors, who will no doubt continue to find their voice and come to appreciate it for the valuable possession it is as they enter this next chapter of their lives. Thank you to all those who have shared their story this year, honoured their voice and in doing so offered us fresh, interesting and compelling perspectives. We hope you enjoy reading through this edition and have a wonderful holiday break.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


HEADLINES Graeme McDonald, Headmaster

A stellar year The boys are now on holidays and it is unusally quiet around the campus, which is in stark contrast to the constant hum of activity, which we witnessed throughout the year.

This year has been a remarkable one in so many ways. Academically we have recorded our best ever results on the QCS Test and the quality of our musical and dramatic performances has been simply outstanding. In the sporting world, our eight podium finishes (first, second or third) were a highlight and who could ever fully capture the emotion of the night of the GPS Track and Field Championship when we won for the first time in 74 years. As I write my message, I have just received the exciting news that we have been crowned Under 15 and Under 17 National Volleyball Champions - a fantastic finish to a sensational year. Schools are exciting places, but truly great schools are filled with men and women who inspire students, in our case, boys, to take on serious challenges and meet them head on. In the pages of this edition of Collegian, you will read uplifting stories, which provide ample evidence that BBC is an exceptional school. At BBC, every decision we make and every action we take is 'all about the boy'. Our rewards come when we see so many boys achieve personal bests and do things that help to create a better world; for example, our boys in One Quarter raising awareness among young males about the problem of domestic violence, or our boys in the Biology Student-Scientist Partnership Program, participating in ground-breaking scientific research. I am simply in awe of the talent and even more so of the dedication of our young men. 2016 was littered with special moments in time.

I think particularly of the legacy left to us by the Seniors of 2016. The amazing musical composition entitled A Collegian’s Goodbye, which had its world premiere at Speech Night was a wonderful tribute by Alexander Voltz to a school he loves. The virtuoso performance of Michael Gibson in playing The Cello Concerto in E Minor by Edward Elgar to win this year’s Concerto Competition was simply sensational, and the incredibly moving Valedictory address delivered by Jacob White showed a maturity way beyond his years. Finally, of course, we reflect on the amazing addresses at Speech Night by College Vice Captain, Hainian Yu, and College Captain, Dom Walton, which not only painted a beautiful portrait of this extraordinary year, but also showed the incredible humility of these wonderful ‘gentlemen of honour’. Their leadership of the College this year has been simply outstanding. Behind each of these success stories lies another story of a staff member, who has pushed the boundaries of expectations and inspired many young men to achieve at a level previously not thought possible. These are the unsung heroes and heroines of our great school and I salute them all. Our boys’ achievements are not overnight success stories; they are in fact the results of well-orchestrated strategic plans, which have taken years to develop and are then delivered with incredible passion. I consider it a rare privilege to be the leader of such an incredible team of educators.


BBC NEWS | 7

BBC NEWS 10 Young changemakers One Quarter officially launch their social enterprise

12 Fit for community

Jack Sims recognised by Order of Australia Association for his commitment to community

14 Riders unite

Brisbane to Gold Coast Cycle Challenge provides lasting memories for riders

16

Screen time vs green time Life lessons from mother nature COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


8 | BBC NEWS

TRAVELLING TIME Twenty-five years ago, on Thursday 31 October 1991, the then Head of Junior School, Max Brand, together with a group of boys gathered around to seal and set a capsule in a bid to capture time. Twenty-five years later, on Monday 31 October 2016, Max returned to the College to bring 1991 back to life. In a special ceremony, the plaque that landmarked the spot for all those years was removed and the contents of the capsule revealed to the delight of Years 2 and 3 students. According to Junior School Teacher Russel Bassingwaithe it provided a great end to the boys’ history unit. “They were fascinated by the whole experience,” said Russel. “As the screws were removed and the canister exposed it was as if we were part of a scene from Indiana Jones - minus the jewels and gold of course."

X

MARKS THE SPOT The capsule was originally set into the wall of the old Junior School Library which now forms part of the Middle School Precinct. The items were in immaculate condition and included a range of memorabilia from an old Record Book, The Collegian, through to photos, report cards and a peculiar object to any Gen Next – a VHS tape.

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BBC NEWS | 9

+ THINK TANK

The topic was further reported on in The Australian special report, Rewire. In his article Start Young and Prosper, managing partner of finance and operations at PwC Australia Tony Peake states the case for why early schooling matters. BBC was proud to host The Australian REWIRE Series in August - an exploration of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and the vital role it will play in securing Australia’s economic future. The College welcomed a special guest panel to discuss how schools, universities, governments, parents and business corporations can work together to develop, implement and sustain a longterm investment STEM. Panelists included THE HON LEEANNE ENOCH

Queensland Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy and Minister for Small Business

"We are on the right track then

IN OUR EMBRACE OF TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION — THE “IDEAS BOOM” — TO DELIVER THE NEXT AGE OF ECONOMIC PROSPERITY IN AUSTRALIA. BUT THIS TRANSITION SHOULD BEGIN WITH A FOCUS ON THE SKILLS WE’RE TEACHING OUR YOUTH.” “IN A WORLD THAT’S BECOMING INCREASINGLY COMPLEX, WHERE SUCCESS IS DRIVEN NOT ONLY BY WHAT YOU KNOW, BUT BY WHAT YOU CAN DO WITH WHAT YOU KNOW, IT’S MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER FOR AUSTRALIANS TO BE EQUIPPED WITH THE FUNDAMENTAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS REQUIRED TO SOLVE COMPLEX PROBLEMS.

DR SHANE ARNOTT

Director, Phantom Works – International Senior Technical Fellow Boeing Defense, Space and Security PROFESSOR RICHARD JOHN

Dean (Learning and Teaching), Griffith Sciences Group, Griffith University DAVID ROBERTSON

Executive Director of Independent Schools Queensland JULIE HARE

Higher Education Editor - The Australian

A group of Middle and Senior School students attended the STEMx Day held at the Brisbane Convention Centre in November. Featuring a number of interactive exhibitions and global speakers, boys were able to gain unique insights into events happening throughout our world today in the field of innovation. Speakers included Dr Philippe Brunet, Director of Copernicus, Space Policy and Defence, European Commission; Professor Stuart Phinn, Director of Australian Earth Observation Research Centre at the University of Queensland; and Charmain Campbell, Managing Director The Driven Business Edge to name just a few.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


10 | BBC NEWS

WHERE IT ALL

began...

One Quarter was born following the boys’ involvement in a workshop run by IMPACT Social Enterprise, a non-profit organisation based at the University of Queensland. The organisation aims to support and empower young people to create solutions for some of society’s most challenging and complex issues. The College was the first to participate in the school program in 2015 with Years 10, 11 and 12 students now provided with an opportunity to take part each year.

CRACKING THE CODE

THE ISSUE THAT KNOWS NO BOUNDARIES

BBC hosts regional robotics competition

In her keynote address, Justice McMurdo AC shared some alarming statistics that give insight into the extent of the issue.

More than 200 students converged on Brisbane Boys’ College in July to showcase their skills in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) as part of the RoboCup Junior Regional Competition. The event brought together young and aspiring engineers from across Brisbane, with students travelling to compete in the Robot Dance, Robot Rescue and Robot Soccer challenges. According to BBC’s Master in Charge of Robotics, Colin Noy, the competition brings STEM skills into focus with students required to draw on their knowledge in these areas to create robots which operate entirely autonomously. “Prior to the event students design, construct and program the robots specifically for each challenge,” said Mr Noy. “They can then make adjustments on the day as the competition progresses,” he said.

More than 40 BBC students took part in the event. To find out more about our Robotics program, see page 49.

The Women’s Legal service has received a 40 percent increase in calls for help in the last year alone

Every two minutes Australian police are called to a domestic violence incident

Every three hours a woman presents to hospital with a domestic violence injury

¼ of Australian children are determinately impacted by domestic violence

FRONTLINE SUPPORT Following the launch, One Quarter donated $1,031 to the Women’s Legal Service which provides free legal advice to women impacted by domestic violence.


BBC NEWS | 11

Young changemakers President of the Queensland Court of Appeal, the Honourable Justice Margaret McMurdo AC, paid a special visit to the College on 6 October to assist graduating students Spencer Hayward, Zach Hayward and Dhruv Goel with the official launch of their social enterprise, One Quarter. After learning of the boys’ endeavor, Justice McMurdo offered her support, delivering the keynote address at the event that attracted support from students, community organisations and social changemakers from across Brisbane. “I’m honoured to support this initiative driven by three very impressive young men who recognise the importance of raising awareness around this complex issue,” said Justice McMurdo. “Their desire to make a real difference within the community is admirable and I look forward to following their progress as they seek to build their social enterprise,” she said As patron of the Women’s Legal Service, Justice McMurdo stressed the importance of fostering mutual respect, equality and understanding of tolerance and celebration of difference within the next generation as a way of overcoming what has been termed an insidious problem that knows no boundaries. BBC Parent and Friends With Dignity representative Julia McKenna also spoke on the evening, alongside IMPACT’s Education Program Director Jarred Turner. “It’s extremely rewarding to see program participants continue to bring their ideas to life and contribute proactively to the wider community beyond the workshops,” said Jarred. Spencer hopes that One Quarter will assist in starting an important conversation among a critical audience – young men and women. “While providing regular donations to women’s services will have the largest and

most direct impact on the problem of domestic violence in terms of monetary support, we have to raise awareness among our peers,” Spencer said. “We believe the best and most effective way to end domestic violence is to ensure that it does not occur in the next generation,” he said. “It was great to see so many of our peers, from right across Brisbane and other young changemakers showing their support and joining us for our launch.” For BBC Headmaster Graeme McDonald, the initiative highlights the value of providing boys with opportunities to think about and help solve real world problems. “The boys are the true drivers behind this initiative. We are thrilled to support them in their endeavour and are immensely proud of the courage and tenacity they have shown and we hope they can continue their efforts as they look beyond the school gates,” said Graeme. “Our role as educators is to provide boys with opportunities to discover the world around them as a way of developing capabilities such as creativity, invention and problem-solving through to empathy, collaboration, social justice and equality,” he said. “We are incredibly lucky to have staff who continue to seek out new ways to engage boys in their learning and we owe a great deal of thanks to our Sustainability Officer, Dominic Piacun, for enabling students to participate in the social enterprise program over the last two years.”

CONNECTING WITH COMMUNITY

Following the launch, Spencer, Zach and Dhruv have spoken with a number of schools and connected with local leaders to help further strengthen their message. In addition to attending the Legal Profession White Ribbon Breakfast, where they were able to hear from ‘Our Watch’ Ambassador Tara Moss, the boys were also invited by Steven Miles MP and Shannon Fentiman MP to address Parliament. BBC Parent and Manager of the Research Support Network at the Emergency Medicine Foundation (EMF), Tegwen Howell, also reached out to the boys, inviting them to visit a ward in which many victims of domestic violence are cared for. She also recently delivered a presentation at one of the College’s Senior School assemblies, alongside social workers Susan Cox and Natalie Williams, to raise further awareness of the issue among all students.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


12 | BBC NEWS

Fit for community When students were asked to create a ‘word cloud’ about their peers, these are the words they used to describe graduating student and Order of Australia Association Secondary School Citizenship Award recipient Jack Sims: passionate, honourable, humble, joyful, smiley, strong, respectful, whole-hearted. Having commenced at the College in 2010, Jack’s list of achievements is impressive. Yet it’s his selfless attitude, kind-hearted nature and most notably his ability to connect with people from all walks of life that have earnt him the respect of students and staff alike. For someone of Jack’s age, his commitment to community is also a defining difference and his contributions were recognised when he received his prestigious award from the Governor of Queensland, His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC at Parliament House in September this year. According to Senior Housemaster Alan Cheel, it has been a privilege to teach and guide Jack. “Jack was an excellent scholar, possessing an analytical mind. He also contributed strongly to our co-curricular program - from cricket to water polo, rugby and swimming through to theatre, Jack heavily immersed himself in College life,” says Alan. “Throughout his time at school he demonstrated his enormous compassion for others by providing selfless service in so many areas within the College and the wider community,” he said. "His heart for those in improvished nations has seen him already undertake three short term service trips to Cambodia and Sri Lanka. “Whenever a volunteer was needed Jack would invariably be one of the first to offer his help and his willingness to go beyond the call of duty for someone in need has become legendary.” Prior to Jack graduating, Alan asked him to articulate what motivates him to proactively contribute.

been coordinating this small church based organisation for 20 years, and I asked him why he is so committed to serving others. He looked at me and simply said, “I have been so blessed in my life that I can’t help but want to serve, I find so much joy in loving people.” Reflecting on this, I realise this is the reason I serve and what motivates me to make a difference in the lives of others. I see service as a way to give back for the privilege I have been given in life. To me there is nothing more fulfilling than making somebody’s life a little bit better.

...we don’t serve for awards and accolades, we serve because we have hearts of compassion and love and we strive to make the world a better place.

What motivates you to make a commitment to engage in service activities? I recently took part in a trip into the city with a volunteer based organisation called Access Outreach Street Vans. It is a small not-for-profit organisation that feeds the homeless. I was speaking to the man who has

Why do you believe that serving others who are less fortunate than yourself is very worthwhile in terms of your own personal growth as a human being? Mahatma Ghandi once said, “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” This incredibly powerful sentence, I believe, sums up why service is so worthwhile. Service is a defining and fulfilling part of life which can help you to see that ‘you’ are not characterised by an identity or possessions, but defined by ability, compassion, connection and love. I challenge you to see the bigger picture and have hearts that are ready to serve.

Jack also provided one final note, which speaks beautifully to the very words his peers had used to describe him. "I would like to finish by saying, it is very special to be recognised for the work we do. However, we don’t serve for awards and accolades, we serve because we have hearts of compassion and love and we strive to make the world a better place.”


BBC NEWS | 13

LIVING FAITH

One of the challenges to students that arises out of the growth of their Christian faith is for them to consider how they can best put it into practice in a world that needs their compassion. For this reason, students within ISCF have been provided with a number of opportunities to serve those in need.

Interschool Christian Fellowship (ISCF) is a service club that encourages students to engage with their spirituality and explore their relationship with God. More than this, it provides those involved with an opportunity to bring to life their values and to show faith in action. In this edition of Collegian we feature the many initiatives and varied activities of the club. Reaching out with Access Outreach On a cold night in June, the ISCF Year 12 Connect group, accompanied by Alan Cheel, teamed up with Access Outreach to feed the hungry and support the homeless and marginalised on the streets of Brisbane. The group travelled to the charity's headquarters in Mansfield where the boys packed various food supplies into street vans. The first stop was a huge hostel for both females and males of all ages in Greenslopes. Although undoubtedly nervous to begin with, the boys served meals and made drinks for more than 30 people and discovered very quickly that many were simply seeking someone to talk to. The evening was extremely eye-opening for the boys and provided them with a strong sense of purpose and perspective.

A WORD FROM THE WALLABIES In front of 200 BBC boys, Wallabies Israel Folau and Sam Krevi, spoke of their faith and the role it has played in their sporting careers. CEO of Red Frogs Australia Andy Gourley guided the panel style discussion which explored how they came to join the Wallabies and the importance of their faith in carrying them through this journey. The pair, who gave credit to God for helping them reach their positions, captivated the audience. They answered many

questions, laughing at the idea they should pray for tries, and graciously posed for countless ‘selfies’ at the end of the session. For BBC Chaplain Graham Cole, the event provided boys with a valuable opportunity to listen to and ask questions of strong role models. “I have no doubt that their example of sportsmanship and their stories of faith will make a lasting impression on our boys,” said Graham.

MyKids This year, BBC ISCF has supported MyKids Australia, which continue to feed and educate some of the most disadvantaged children in the world. Through their partnership with Myanmar Vision International (MVI) BBC’s contributions are helping to build a new five story complex that will contain the new MVI Primary School along with a church and residential accommodation. COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


14 | BBC NEWS

JENGA Partnership

The true meaning of Christmas

Humbled by the founder of this charity, which visited the College in Term 1, ISCF students have chosen to support JENGA - a not-for-profit based in the small town of Mbale, Uganda who seeks to improve the quality of life for those living in disadvantaged communities. Through the sale of Entertainment Books and a fundraising BBQ, boys donated $1,100 to this incredible organisation.

In the true spirit of Christmas, students from across all three schools donated gifts for children in need to ensure they too can find joy this Christmas. We would like to thank all of our families who contributed to this special initiative run by the Wesley Mission as part of their Christmas Appeal.

Worldshare Sponsorchild For the past four years students in ISCF have had the privilege of sponsoring Kavira Ngwali, an 11 year old girl from the Democratic Republic of Congo. After the tragic passing of her father, Kavira lives with her mother and four siblings. Each week at the end of the ISCF meeting, boys can contribute to the sponsorship and the group has enjoyed learning of Kavira’s progress and seeing their donations help to transform lives.

Irene Gleeson Foundation BBC was honoured to welcome John Paul, Alfred, Romeo and Winne to the College in October for a special presentation in which they shared their experiences of life in Uganda. They spoke with deep appreciation about their relationship with God and how they have continued the work of Australian woman Irene Gleeson. Irene was known for her humanitarian work having built an orphanage as well as a school. Funds were raised by the students to support this ministry at this year’s ISCF Progressive Dinner held in October.

More than 90 students and staff participated in this year’s 40 Hour Famine raising $17,500 to assist with strengthening food security initiatives in Bangladesh.

RIDERS UNITE For the third consecutive year, students, staff, parents and old boys teamed together on 16 October to participate in the Brisbane to Gold Coast Cycle Challenge.

More than 70 riders took part in 2016 travelling 100km to help raise money for BBC’s Indigenous Education program. According to BBC staff and drivers of the initiative James Lennon and Kieran Hogan, the ride encapsulates the brotherhood that exists across the entire College. "It demonstrates our commitment, as a collective, to closing the gap in Australia and the ride itself has become somewhat of a tradition,” said James. “The spirit generated by the riders and especially the boys is remarkable and for many lads it represents a significant achievement with the experience providing lasting memories,” says Kieran. "Among the riders were boarders Mason Black and Troyson Marpoondin and both of these boys completed the ride in an exceptional time – a time that well and truly exceeded their own expectations,” he said. “It was also great to see riders Len Ikitau and Tony Raoren who have been involved from the very beginning take to the course again this year.”


BBC NEWS | 15

Following Pirate Day, boys were asked to complete one of two writing tasks, either a ‘wanted’ advertisement for a pirate or a letter home to mum and dad from Pirate School. Here’s what a few of our boys had to say.

IN CLASS: Diversity builds understanding We know that for learning to occur it must be memorable. Boys won’t always remember the facts and figures but they’ll always remember how something made them feel. To engage boys in their learning we provide a range of hands-on, practical and interactive learning experiences, delivered with a clear purpose in mind. And judging by the photos from these Junior School classes it appears that learning can in fact be fun.

WANTED!

Jolly Foot Lachy

Jolly Foot Lachy is the ugliest pirate on the seven seas. He smells like dead fish and has very hairy feet. Jolly Foot Lachy is wanted for stealing pirate ships! – Lachlan Clayton

Natural Disasters: In Year 6 boys experimented with shapes and strength as part of their

studies on earthquakes. A visit from engineer, Andrew King, saw them build a bridge from paper (pictured above) that could span the river, allow a boat to travel underneath, and support 500 grams.

Live History: Year 4 students were given a unique insight into the first steam engine as part of

their unit on the Industrial Revolution. BBC Boatman, parent and steam engine enthusiast, Steve McAlpine, partnered with his Year 4 son to demonstrate how the first engine operated and the benefits this brought to those living in the 1600s. According to teacher Gael Nicholson, no boys were tempted to gaze out the window for this lesson. “They were captivated and fascinated to see the miniature engine in full operation coupled with all of the authentic sounds and smells.” Boys were even able to witness how the engine could power a timber saw, which one boy described as “totally awesome.”

Arrr…Me Hearties: To celebrate the end of their Pirate unit - which saw boys study related

children’s literature, engage in several writing tasks and design maps in geography - our Year 1 boys dressed as pirates in September. The unit also aligned with this year’s interhouse public speaking competition with Year 1 students presenting a compelling case for why they should be allowed to join Captain Hook's crew. From making origami boats, tea-stained treasure maps through to a treasure hunt that took them from the sandpit to The Green to Mr Musson’s office, boys enjoyed a number of activities and spent the best part of the day talking all things pirate.

ARRR!

Dear Mum & Dad,

I’m having an excellent time at Pirate School. I love shooting cannons on the pirate ship and I love stealing treasure! Soon I will be the captain! – Hugo Easterbrook

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


16 | BBC FEATURE

let

NATURE be your

TEACHER William Wordsworth


FEATURE

Green time vs Screen time

Researchers have found that wilderness experiences can improve measures of wellbeing, self-concept and boost your mood while decreasing stress levels and anxiety. Whether it’s mowing the lawn, taking a walk in the park or heading out to a remote location for the weekend, spending time in the natural world is good for you. Beyond this, it’s a place where you can learn a lot about life – free from the distractions of our modern world and busy scheduled lives. In this edition of Collegian we take a look at our Outdoor Education program and share with you images captured at the Year 8 camp.

BBC FEATURE | 17

OUR YEAR 8 BOYS DIDN’T JUST VENTURE TO THE OUTDOORS, THEY TRAVELLED INTO THE ‘REAL’ WORLD. WITH THEIR PERSONAL BELONGINGS ON THEIR BACK AND THEIR MATES BY THEIR SIDE, BOYS LEFT BEHIND THE BUSY TOOWNG CAMPUS AND IMMERSED THEMSELVES COMPLETELY IN AN EXPLORATION OF THE SOMERSET REGION – THE PERFECT ENVIRONMENT TO CULTIVATE INDEPENDENCE AND CAMARADERIE.” – Virginia Mitchell, Outdoor Education Coordinator

YEAR 8 - INTERDEPENDENCE 2 TO 5 JUNE CAMP SOMERSET Located 1.5 hours north west of Brisbane, this accessible yet remote location provided a great stepping stone for boys as they progressed through the College’s sequential Outdoor Education program this year. Students spent 100 percent of their time outdoors, canoeing on the dam, exploring bush tracks, climbing rocky terrain and walking through the treetops on the high ropes course. As part of the experience boys also prepared and cooked their own meals on stoves and campfires.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


18 | BBC FEATURE

THE EXPERIENCE ENABLED US TO TAKE A LOOK AT OUR INNER SELVES TO REALISE WHO WE ARE AND WHO WE WANT TO BE. THESE MEMORIES WILL LAST A LIFETIME.

YEAR 9 - BUILDING CAPACITY 18 TO 22 JULY - UPPER TWEED VALLEY Year 9 students travelled to the stunning Upper Tweed Valley region in northern New South Wales to complete an expedition style journey. Boys took part in activities including bushwalking, paddling and biking between campsites, navigating their way along the planned route.

From a Year 9 student

UPON RETURNING FROM CAMP This trip was a real test for the students at the top of the Middle School, to really stand up and take responsibility for themselves, how they think and act. It offered a variety of activities to students that required them to practice real life skills such as resilience, independence, self-confidence and also teamwork. Activities included mountain biking, hiking, abseiling and climbing up Mt Warning not at sunrise, but for sunrise. We focused on fostering a growth mindset in order to step outside our comfort zone. These opportunities enabled us to embrace a positive mindset and unleash our individual hidden potential, to overcome challenges we never thought we could. Our goal was to build capacity individually and together. What I think most about now, reflecting on Outdoor Education, is the need to slow down and be present.

With the rapid growth of technology in our lives, people’s footsteps are becoming faster and faster. Social media, academics and sport completely fill every moment of a teenager’s time. Something has been taken away. I am looking forward to reading the letter I wrote as part of the experience. The letter to my future Year 10 self, will show me how mature I was or wasn’t, if I reached the dreams, challenged my dragons or if I made those decisions. This trip offered students opportunities to slow their footsteps down and take a look at the world around them, to disconnect from their mobile phones and social media. The experience enabled us to take a look at our inner selves to realise who we are and who we want to be. These memories will last a lifetime.


20 | BBC FEATURE


BBC FEATURE | 21

Looking

inward

While the activities which students participate in appeal to the tactile nature of boys, the program places a greater emphasis on the ‘why’, with students allocated time for reflection and a formal debrief held to enable boys to recognise the learning that has occurred as a result of their experience.

w

YEAR 10 - JOURNEYING 10 TO 22 OCTOBER UPPER CLARENCE RIVER HELD OVER TWO WEEKS ACROSS TWO SEPARATE GROUPS

Building on the foundation formed in previous years, the culminating Year 10 program saw students embark on a five-day expedition style journey in the Upper Clarence River region. The experience focused specifically on developing each boy’s social and emotional competence. The challenging program also enabled boys to demonstrate their leadership capacity and deepen their relationship with the natural world. According to Outdoor Education Coordinator Virginia Mitchell lifelong memories were created. "Year 10s returned safely from the river rapids and ridges of the wilderness. Staff of the College were suitably impressed to see our boys flexing the muscle of resilience, unearthing hidden leadership capacities in tricky navigation or the ridges and rapids. Together they have overcome significant challenges, supported each other, shared responsibility and success. These unique experiences should stand them in good stead, as they enter the final two years at the College. I'm sure the memories made will ring true for many years to come."

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


22 | BBC FEATURE

THE

festival OF

LEAVING

I

T’S BEEN TERMED THE ‘FESTIVAL OF LEAVING’ - A CHAIN OF EVENTS AND IMPORTANT RITES OF PASSAGE THAT SIGNAL THE END AND EQUALLY THE BEGINNING. A TIME WHICH SEES ALL PARTIES – BE IT STUDENTS, PARENTS, STAFF - EXPERIENCE THOSE CONFLICTING YET STRANGELY CONGRUENT EMOTIONS THAT POINT TO CHANGE – IT’S SAD AND IT’S SWEET. IN THE PAGES THAT FOLLOW WE CAPTURE THE TRUE ESSENCE OF WHAT IT MEANS TO LEAVE AND ARRIVE.


BBC FEATURE | 23

"WE WATCH YOU GROW AND DEVELOP FROM CHILD TO MAN"

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


24 | BBC NEWS

1 FINAL ASSEMBLY On Wednesday 2 November, the senior class of 2016 was officially welcomed to the Old Collegians’ Association at their final assembly. For the second consecutive year, the assembly was live streamed, allowing family members, staff and old boys to share in this significant moment in time. Students were joined by a number of old collegians for a celebratory BBQ on Miskin Oval following the event.

"WE GUIDE YOUR DEVELOPMENT INTO A GOOD QUALITY HUMAN BEING - A GENTLEMAN OF HONOUR"


BBC FEATURE | 25

"WE WILL HELP YOU DEVELOP, EVOLVE AND FIND YOUR SPECIAL PLACE IN THE WORLD"

2 SPEECH NIGHT

The second of four events, Speech Night provides an opportunity for the College to recognise the exceptional achievements of all students across the academic and co-curricular domain. It represents the last formal day of classes and the start of exams.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


26 | BBC FEATURE 1

2

3 VALEDICTORY DINNER Exams are done and the true celebrations begin. Valedictory Dinner sees Year 12 families come together to share in an evening of reflection and tradition. King George Square turned green for this year’s event, with the dinner held in the beautiful City Hall.

"DON'T BE THE NEXT ANYONE. 3

UNITY IN DIVERSITY THE WORDS BELOW, SPOKEN BY THIS YEAR’S VALEDICTORIAN JACOB WHITE, NEED VERY LITTLE INTRODUCTION, EXCEPT TO SAY THAT THEY WERE DELIVERED WITH ABSOLUTE AUTHENTICITY; THE TYPE OF HONESTY THAT HAS THE CAPACITY TO CONNECT AND MOVE EVERYONE IN THE ROOM. Plato once said that, “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” Well, tonight, Headmaster, staff, special guests, ladies, gentlemen and men of the College, I’m your fool. Because, as Valedictorian for 2016 I have to say something, and that something is farewell - in fact, valedictorian is Latin for “farewell sayer”; but, more than that, I really wanted to have something to say tonight, to be able to share something that would resonate with everyone. So before we get to goodbyes, I hope you’ll indulge me as in the spirit of students everywhere, but particularly Dhruv Goel, I procrastinate for a while, and look at exactly what it is we’re farewelling tonight. Over my five years at BBC it has been a privilege to get to know each of the young men sitting here tonight. The thing that has continued to astound me, is that no two of them are the same, not even the Ciereszkos. We all have our own skills, passions, dreams, strengths and weaknesses. Our BBC journeys have begun in different times and places, and taken vastly dissimilar paths to this point; yet, whether you’re the Dux of the College like Alex Thomis, a robotics champion like Shanker, Rafay, Dante,

1

BE THE FIRST YOU!"

Naysan or Tim, or a Rugby fiend like Sean or Len, some things are universal: you’re a 'gentlemen of honour' and a student of BBC, and you’ll always be our brother. Because, no matter how much we differ from one another, we are bound together by a culture of mateship and respect. When we stand together at Chandler, QSAC, College Hall, Miskin or Oakman we stand as one. BBC thrives on this diversity and all of our lives are richer for having had our paths converge with such an assortment of talented and passionate people. This philosophy of unity from diversity has led us to incredible success this year and I could spend hours listing all of our achievements, but I won’t, because tonight I want to focus on something different. We all too often fixate on the big moments in life: crossing the finish line, getting back your test results, performing at the concert or standing on the podium. Yet in reality, these memorable moments are the products of millions of forgotten ones. They are the result of hours of hard work, often unrecognised, and of unsung sacrifices. So tonight, I’d like to spend some time remembering these little moments. Whether it be Mr Maksoud

BBC THRIVES ON THIS DIVERSITY AND ALL OF OUR LIVES ARE RICHER FOR HAVING HAD OUR PATHS CONVERGE WITH SUCH AN ASSORTMENT OF TALENTED AND PASSIONATE PEOPLE. 4


BBC FEATURE | 27 7

WE ALL TOO OFTEN FIXATE ON THE BIG MOMENTS IN LIFE: CROSSING THE FINISH LINE, GETTING BACK YOUR TEST RESULTS, PERFORMING AT THE CONCERT OR STANDING ON THE PODIUM. YET IN REALITY, THESE MEMORABLE MOMENTS ARE THE PRODUCTS OF MILLIONS OF FORGOTTEN ONES. 5

that Robert Eldridge could be the next Thomas Edison, or that Jack Clayton could be the next Gary Ablett (I mean, there have already been two of them). Yet, to each of you I say the following: don’t be. Don’t be the next anyone. Be the first you! Although we may be inspired by the exploits of others, in the end we must carve our own path in life. We each bring something unique to the world and to the people around us, and we can only limit ourselves by trying to be someone we’re not. 6

always giving you a pat on the back when he sees you, your mentor from way back in Year 8 bothering to learn your name, your housemaster taking the time each day to see how you’re going, or your mate always being there for a bit of light banter, these actions seem insignificant on their own, but in the end our lives are the sums of these small, quiet, forgotten moments. As such, tonight, it would be remiss of us not to recognise those who have, through their constant dedication and determination, in all of these forgotten moments, allowed us to excel. To the teachers, who have supported, guided and inspired both in and out of the classroom; staff, who have worked tirelessly behind the scenes to facilitate and organise all of the goings on this year; and the parents, whose sacrifices and accomplishments are too numerous to list, we sincerely thank you. The impact you have all had on our lives is something we certainly won’t forget. After tomorrow, our stories, our tracks in life, brought together over the past years, will diverge again. I cannot wait to see what we as a cohort will achieve over the coming decades. My only piece of advice is this: I have no doubt that Haino could be the next Einstein, that Voltz could be the next Mozart,

So, what is it that we say goodbye to tonight? I mean, that was the whole point of this tangent after all. The answer is, I don’t know. BBC has meant something different to each of us. We’ve all had our own journey at the College and our own moments, big and small. I won’t pretend to know what those are for everyone here. Only you can really know that. What I do know, however, is what we won’t be saying goodbye to. Tomorrow morning, when I stand as a student of BBC for the last time, I’ll pause and take one final look around at the College; but I won’t see the pool; I’ll see Alexei leading the chants at Chandler with more passion than I thought any human being could muster. I won’t see College Hall; I’ll hear Michael Gibson on his cello, filling the air with melodies I couldn’t dream of, and Dom Walton, standing in front of his brothers, with tears in his eyes proclaiming proudly that he was willing to hurt for the College; I won’t see Miskin; I’ll hear Ollie Fitzpatrick belting out war cry after war cry until he can hardly speak. You see, although we farewell many things tonight, our memories will never leave us.

8

IMAGES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Cellist, Michael Gibson Ollie Fitzpatrick as BBC Highlander L-R Hugh and William Ciereszko 2016 Leaders Portrait, Jacob White Dom Walton giving his all for the College at the GPS Track and Field Championships 6. Alexei Gantimuroff First XI Football team member in action 7. Len Ikitau running onto the field for the Rugby First XV squad 8. Dux of the College, Alexander Thomis

So tomorrow morning, before you depart, take a look around, because there’s so much there to see. And then, the only thing left to do, will be to say farewell.

THANK YOU.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


28 | BBC FEATURE

4 THE LAST DAY Breakfast, guard of honour, chapel, pool. It’s quite the send-off and emotions often run high.

"WE WILL WATCH YOU GO FORTH WITH THE CONFIDENCE AND CAPABILITY TO CHANGE THE WORLD."

5


BBCNEWS ARTS | 29 BBC

BBC ARTS

30 A mantra for music

George Bernard Shaw once said, You see things and say, why? But I dream things and say why not.

31 Great in the making

What ended in a standing ovation started with a simple conversation for Music Captain Alexander Voltz.

39 Wall to wall

Navigating through time and space; an insight into the way of the artist.

40 Creative twist

BBC's youngest performers bring a classic to life.

33

Making Music

A snapshot of all things music at BBC COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


30 | BBC ARTS

WHY NOT

BEYOND THE INSPIRATION WHICH FLOODS THE WALLS, IT’S THE SLIGHTLY OFF CHORD, FOLLOWED BY A BEAUTIFUL HARMONY THAT MAKES YOU FEEL IN AWE WHEN YOU WALK THROUGH THE CORRIDORS OF COLLEGE HALL. THE SOUND IS INSTANTLY RECOGNISABLE – IT’S THE SOUND OF MUSIC BEING LEARNT, MADE, ENJOYED.

THOSE WITHIN BBC’S MUSIC PROGRAM – TEACHERS, TUTORS, BOYS – ARE WITHOUT DOUBT A DEDICATED BUNCH, YET IT’S THIS YEAR’S MANTRA OF ‘WHY NOT?’ THAT HAS SEEN MUSIC, AS A COLLECTIVE, SET NEW GOALS AND REACH NEW HEIGHTS. IN 2016 ALONE BBC ENSEMBLES HAVE PERFORMED AT COUNTLESS EVENTS, STUDENTS HAVE RECEIVED NUMEROUS ACCOLADES AND THOUGHT LEADERS HAVE TAKEN TO THE COLLEGE HALL STAGE TO SHARE THEIR WISDOM AND PERFORM WITH STUDENTS. DESPITE THE BUSYNESS OF IT ALL, IT APPEARS TO UNFOLD EFFORTLESSLY AND WITH JOY.

, y a s d n a s g in h t e e s You

'Why?'

But I dream things and I say,

IN THIS EDITION WE BRING ALL OF THE INNER WORKINGS OF BBC’S MUSIC PROGRAM – WELL FOR THIS SEMESTER ANYWAY – INTO SIGHT.

' ? t o n y h 'W GEORGE BERNARD SHAW


BBC ARTS | 31

Alexander: “Mr Kotzas, I’d like to compose a massed item for Speech Night.”

Theo: “Sure, ok.”

along the lines of eight Alexander: “I was thinking minutes, what do you think?”

nutes?” Theo: “What about five mi

ake it six.” m ll I’ , k O “ : r e d n a Alex

Great in the making What ended with a standing ovation, started with a simple conversation some six months ago between Year 12 student and Captain of Music, Alexander Voltz and BBC’s Head of Performance Music, Theo Kotzas. And that's how Alexander rolls. His ability to compose has long been recognised, yet how he managed to imagine, create and bring together such a complex, dynamic and mature massed item within five weeks – written for BBC’s Orchestra, Massed Choir, Bagpipes and Snare – remains a beautiful mystery. He developed the piece with no input from staff and those in attendance at Speech Night were lucky enough to experience the world premiere of his piece - A Collegian's Goodbye. We interviewed Alex to find out more. What inspired you to write the piece? The plan had always been to write something for Speech Night and get as many people involved as possible. Speech Night is a fantastic opportunity for BBC Music in that it puts a whole bunch of people who wouldn’t normally go out to a concert in a situation where they don’t have a choice but to experience the music! We really wanted to capitalise on that fact for this year and show everyone just what we can do.

How long did it take to create - were there many evolutions involved or did your original vision remain intact? I started thinking about a massed item roughly sixth months ago. I knew the opening theme then, too. It just came to me one afternoon, as most things often do to people. Nonetheless, I didn’t start writing anything down until early September. We only had about five weeks to rehearse the whole thing. Thankfully, the boys are pretty amazing, so everything came together. That will probably be the last time I ever score anything for bagpipes though, that was a nightmare!

"Wow, something like this is possible. It is possible for 200 schoolboys to get up in less than two months and perform to such a high standard.”

What is the meaning behind it? When I first conceptualised the piece, I had to make some tough decisions. There was no point in writing something that, on the whole, wouldn’t really mean anything to anyone. For that reason, I thought it would make sense if I did a ‘mash-up’ of tunes that were quintessentially BBC. So I guess that was the meaning behind it: hopefully, it was music that most people could relate to. The piece was symbolic – almost personal – to me, too. Lots of the solo parts were deliberately written for arguably the most important people in my life.

What did you enjoy most about the process? It’s one thing to compose something but it’s another to actually hear it played. Unfortunately, most people who write music aren’t fortunate enough to ever hear it performed by a real orchestra. I’ve been incredibly lucky in that regard. BBC Music has supported me from day one and it’s only through them that the Speech Night dream was made a reality.

What did you enjoy most about the performance itself? The applause, of course! Haha, no, not the applause. I think I most enjoyed sitting back as I played and realising, 'Wow, something like this is possible. It is possible for 200 schoolboys to get up in less than two months and perform to such a high standard.' I might have written the piece but it was the boys who brought it to life. So, at the end of the day, I think it’s them who deserve the biggest congratulations.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


32 | BBC ARTS

I SAY, WE TEACH [MUSIC] BECAUSE IT’S GOOD. WE TEACH MUSIC BECAUSE IT’S UNIQUE. WHAT IT DOES TO THE SPIRIT, MIND, HEART AND SOUL OF A CHILD IS SPECIAL."

Sound passing through time A word from music great, Richard Gill OAM He’s one of Australia’s pre-eminent music educators and is widely admired for his conducting; yet it’s his advocacy for music and the arts that has seen Richard Gill OAM become a significant influencer and thought leader in the education space. Through his work, Richard has continued to mount the case for music as a must for children – and not just a select few but every child - if we are to grow imaginations and in doing so strengthen each child’s capacity for learning and challenge. BBC’s College Symphony was given the privilege of playing under Richard’s baton in July when he visited the College to deliver a number of workshops to music students and a presentation that explored the place of ‘The Arts’ in education. In this edition of Collegian we share with you some immensely powerful and thought-provoking insights from his address.

We lost out when we decided children should choose from one creative arts or one performing arts. This idea that you can do one art and tick a box is erroneous thinking. Music in particular functions on continuum. It’s not something you can pick up. Do I do the violin for one term and then viola the next. I believe music is the superior art – it’s at the top of three. The argument is this, music is in our DNA, we sang before we spoke. Between age two and four children are natural song makers. They gurgle and babble and look for patterns to repeat. When children are learning songs they are learning patterns. And the brain loves patterns. So now we get into this very difficult territory. Do we teach music because the brain loves patterns or do we teach it because it’s good? I say, we teach it because it’s good. We teach music because it’s unique. What it does to the spirit, mind, heart and soul of a child is special. Everything else is a bonus but people can see value more so when we say it’s about the brain.

The success of education depends on how teachers work with children. In this country teachers are not autonomous; they are bound by a very strange system of standardised testing. It’s pulling our country backwards and reducing it to a level of mediocrity. It doesn’t tell the teacher anything they don’t already know. It’s always alarming when you hear of teachers saying ‘today we are going to do literacy’ does that mean tomorrow we won’t be ‘learning literacy’? Literacy and numeracy are not disciplines or subjects. They are conditions or states. We become literate and numerate. No universal grade works to the individual mind. And what we are about in education is minds. Children’s minds. We want them to do two things when they come to school – to learn how to learn and learn how to think. If we can do that we can do a wonderful thing.

We learn music so we can go into the world of the abstract. That is the potency of music. Music is abstract, it doesn’t mean anything, it is not a language. It doesn’t describe. It reacts on an individual in different ways. I see music for its own sake. You’ll have a reaction or not. You’ll have a feeling or not. It will not be universal.


MAKING MUSIC JULY

17

BBC Music hosts a quartet from the Australian Chamber Orchestra (ACO) with a joint workshop and performance held with BBC’s College Strings.

18

BBC hosts the ACO again for its Brisbane String Workshop.

20 22

First round of the BBC Concerto Competition commences. The College’s inaugural Senior Music Workshop is held with great success.

Explore! A Grand Concert

BBC musicians gathered together on Friday 26 August for a memorable evening of music making for Explore! – A Grand Concert, performing to a full house in College Hall.

AUGUST

2

More than 40 students travel to Ipswich Grammar School to take part in the GPS Music Day of Excellence.

3

The Middle and Senior School Solo Championship winners are announced. Congratulations to Michael Gibson (Senior - Cello) and Andrew Namgung (Middle – Violin).

5

Fourteen performance groups bring the BBC campus to life for Open Evening. The BBC Pipe Band continues to assist our sporting teams to make an entrance as they pipe on our Firsts at home games their invitation to attend the 2018 Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo is also confirmed and excitement builds.

19

BBC’s intermediate ensembles perform at the annual Showcase Concert in College Hall, with Middle School Solo Championship winner Andrew Namgung delivering an amazing performance on the night.

22

Our youngest musicians perform in the Music Every Day Concert as part of the Music Every Day program which sees boys in Prep to Year 3 engage in music lessons every single day.

26

Explore! – A Grand Concert attracts a full house, with Concerto Competition winner Michael Gibson delivering a flawless performance on the Cello. The closing remarks delivered by 2016 Music Captain, Alexander Voltz, will be locked in the memories of those in attendance for years to come.


OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER Pipe Band experiences 3 Our success at the Scots PGC Pipe Band Competition, securing a number of trophies on the day. The BBC Music Support Group launches its commemorative book, featuring a collection of photos taken by BBC Cello Teacher and photographer Alex Jamieson. USA Music Tour preparations continue and excitement builds.

EARLY

OCT

4

10

BBC String students attend a workshop by American Violinist and Pedagogue Mr Jack Glatzer.

Success! The BBC Pipe Band is named Grade 4 Juvenile National Champions.

14

The ‘Sounds of Scotland’ ring from College Hall for the Pipe Band’s annual and landmark concert.

Year 12 student Michael Gibson (Cello) is one of three students selected as a 2016 Recitalist for the 40th National Youth Concerto Competition hosted by the Queensland Youth Orchestras (QYO); a highly acclaimed program for young string players up to 12 years of age. Michael represents BBC’s first QYO Recitalist.

17

Michael Gibson performs at the Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia (AHISA) conference showcasing our program to school leaders from across the country.

18

BBC holds its annual Junior School Gala Concert, which provides an opportunity for younger musicians to shine.

27

The last ‘official’ concert is held featuring those ensembles not involved in the Speech Night event.

BBC hosts two Recitalists and a Finalist performance from the National Youth Concerto Competition held by the Queensland Youth Orchestras.


Honouring the musical masters BBC’s College Strings joined with members from the Australian Chamber Orchestra to honour musical masters Mozart, Elgar and Tchaikovsky in a special performance. The experience provided a rare and unique opportunity for our boys to showcase their depth of skill and musical maturity.

NOVEMBER 3

College Strings, Symphonic Band, BBC Pipe Band, Camerata, BBC Singers and the College Symphony perform at the 115th Speech Night. The highly anticipated performance of Highland Cathedral did not disappoint with the Pipe Band also delivering a creative rendition of Don’t Stop Believing. Alexander Voltz’s massed composition, A Collegian's Goodbye, also made its world premiere and received a standing ovation.

6

BBC Collegians sing at St Paul’s as part of their Remembrance Day Service.

The thing about

music; it brings everyone together, and it keeps everyone together. Alexander Voltz, Music Captain


36 | BBC ARTS

MUSIC 2017 For any further concert information please contact music@bbc.qld.edu.au or phone 3309 3520.

TWILIGHT CONCERT 6.30pm – College Hall

8

MAR

MUSIC ACADEMY BBC played host to young musicians from across the country in July, with College Hall selected as the venue for the 2016 Australian Chamber Orchestra’s (ACO) National Academy. This is the first time the Academy has been held outside of Melbourne or Sydney. The program provides young musicians the opportunity to be challenged and inspired in a professional learning environment while working alongside ACO musicians and emerging artists. Joining visiting musicians were BBC’s Michael Gibson and Julius Lynch who were two of 28 selected to attend after a national audition process.

12 MAY

3.30pm – College Hall

BLAZING BANDS 5.00pm – College Hall

CONCERTO COMPETITION FINALS & MIDDLE SCHOOL SOLO CHAMPIONSHIP

2

AUG

5.30pm – College Hall

17 AUG

GRAND CONCERT 7.00pm – College Hall

6.30pm – College Hall

6.30pm – College Hall

AUG

OCT

JUNIOR GALA CONCERT

MUSIC SHOWCASE

25 13

BRASS WORKSHOP Brass students were fortunate to work with international cornet soloist and clinician, Harmon Vanhoorne. Harmon studied trumpet and cornet at the Lemmensinstute in Leuven, Belgium before joining the Trumpet Corps of the Royal Wind Band of the Belgium Guides in 2007, becoming the youngest musician to ever join the group. Since then he has gone on to win major awards as both a soloist and bandsman, including Best Soloist prizes at the 2012 International Brass Band Contest in Belgium and the 2015 New Zealand National Band Championships. Harmon is also a sponsored artist with Besson instruments. He performed for our budding instrumentalists in Year 5, amazing the boys with his virtuosic technique before working with some of the senior instrumentalists at the College. Students performed for Harmon before receiving invaluable feedback from this master musician.

TUTTI STRINGS

SOUNDS OF SCOTLAND 7.00pm – College Hall

17 OCT

26 OCT

FINALE CONCERT 6.30pm – College Hall

Please note tickets will only be required for the Grand Concert and Sounds of Scotland and will be advertised for booking on the BBC website.


BBC ARTS | 37

PIPING GOOD From playing alongside the esteemed André Rieu to performing in the European Championships to being crowned Grade 4 Australian Champions, BBC Pipers and Drummers have continued to make their mark on the world stage in 2016 - a reputation which can only expand as the band prepares to perform in the prestigious Edinburgh Military Tattoo in 2018. At BBC our spirit is our defining difference and our pipe band embodies it all. The tartan speaks of our origin, the drum line our heartbeat, the bagpipes our voice. Our iconic BBC Pipe Band entertains at every occasion and Sounds of Scotland represents its pinnacle annual event. It’s an opportunity to take center stage and that it did in 2016. Joining with other local pipe bands, Irish dancers and singers they encapsulated beautifully all there is to love about Scottish heritage and tradition in a jam-packed night of performance.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


38 | BBC ARTS

SCOTLAND TOUR In the wee hours of the morning on 14 June, 23 boys, two old boys and five staff prepared to board their plane bound for Glagsgow, Scotland. Beyond visiting the iconic Wallace Monument, Glasgow Transport Museum, Falkirk Wheel and touring Loch Ness, the trip saw the band play at Stirling and Edinburgh Castles and compete in the Lochore Pipe Band Competition and Helensburgh Pipe Band Competition, culminating with the annual European Championships in Forres. According to Pipe Major Angus Briggs, the opportunity to perform in the homeland of the pipes and drums is something that will stay with him for years to come. “Performing in Scotland, as Pipe Major, was definitely a highlight for me,” says Angus. “It was my second European Championships tour with the band. Leading it to performances at Stirling Castle, Edinburgh Castle and the Wallace Monument were all extremely moving experiences,” he said. “To then achieve seventh place at the European Championships in the Novice Juvenile A Division, and march alongside 140 other bands in the massed bands event in front of a 30,000 strong crowd was truly amazing. "

HELLO WORLD It’s not every day that you’re invited to perform at one of the most iconic, widely watched and what many have termed ‘the greatest show on earth’. Earlier this year, BBC was formally invited to attend the prestigious Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo in August 2018 where it will perform in the Massed Pipes and Drums.

+ PIPE BAND RESULTS

The tattoo enjoys a rich history and has been a complete sell out for the past 16 years. Televised on the British Broadcasting Corporation, the broadcast attracts around six million viewers in the United Kingdom and approximately 300 million people worldwide. The event runs over two weeks, with 25 shows entertaining more than a quarter of a million spectators.

First - Grade 4 Australian Champions Drum Major – Finalist, Izaak Dove

Australian Pipe Band Championships result

Held at Knox Grammar School, Sydney


BBC ARTS | 39

WALL TO WALL

Art goers enjoyed navigating through time and space to gain an insight into the way of the artist at this year’s show. Featuring the work of students from Prep to Year 12, the exhibition showcased each boy’s ability to express his ideas and thoughts using a variety of mediums and techniques. This year’s theme was designed to encourage viewers to change the way they see and navigate their world. COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


40 | BBC ARTS

Creative

twist

Whether you were born in the 70s, 80s, 90s or the millennials, the story of Charlie and The Chocolate Factory transcends generations and resonates with us all. On the second last day of school, BBC’s youngest performers brought this classic to life with a BBC twist. According to Junior School Teacher and Master in Charge of the program Shaun Thompson, the show was designed to provide an interactive and inclusive experience for audience members. “We didn’t want it to be a sit-down production, but rather a celebration of the expressive arts and the joy it brings to the lives of kids and adults alike,” said Shaun. “The boys were counting down the days to the performance and come the night before were nervous but excited. They absolutely love getting into character and they completely owned this transformation,” he said. “And when the gameshow music from The Price is Right sounded and those three little words were spoken – ‘come on down’ - teachers were prompted to look under their chairs to reveal their mystery bag and take to the stage too. “We also placed a glow stick under each of the boys’ chairs and when the lights went out the room exploded with colour. “Creativity knows no limits. Boys won’t always remember the facts we teach them; it’s the memories we help them to create which last and this production will, I’m sure, be one they store in the bank for years to come,” he said. The Expressive Arts Showcase brings together the skills learnt by boys involved in the program across the year. Each term students can opt to participate in Dance, Drama and Audio Visual units run under the guidance of BBC staff and industry professionals. In Term 4 boys had the privilege of working alongside gifted actor Matthew Caffoe, Dancer and Choreographer Moniquie Dolman and Audio Visual specialist Maeve McKenna. Thomas Cardiff was also lucky enough to work alongside singer and actor Naomi Price who is currently starring in the Rumour Has It performance at the Powerhouse. Naomi and Matthew worked closely with the BBC team to bring it all together – a massive task which took place within a single week.


BBC ARTS | 41

There is no

life I know COMPARED WITH

PURE imagination willy WONKA

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


42 | BBC SPORT

BBC SPORTS 48 Captured - through the lens A sporting pictorial of BBC boys displaying their talents outside the classroom

49 Transfer of learning

Drones, droids and robots are a daily occurrence in our growing and flourishing robotics program

43

A win for brotherhood BBC claims victory at the 99th GPS Track and Field Championships


BBC SPORT | 43

In his final speech in the lead up to the highly anticipated Track and Field Championships, Dom Walton declared he didn’t mind if he finished last on the night, all he hoped for was to walk up to the blocks and see hundreds of his brothers on the edge of their seats so he too could experience that raw, intense emotion that drew him to the sport several years ago. Turns out Dom got to experience the best of both worlds this year, with BBC claiming victory at the 99th GPS Track and Field Championship. And as for those band of brothers, they were there in force, “Green,

White, Black, White, Green, White, Black” they roared.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


44 | BBC SPORT

THE LEAD-UP Track and Field and School Captain, Dom Walton, delivers a moving speech to his peers at assembly. Why do I do track and field? Why have I done hours of training, been through hours of pain, all to run around a red track for less than 50 seconds. See in reality, there is no sense to what an athlete does. So why? Well I want to start with a story. When I came to BBC in Year 5, I could not stand the thought of running. In fact, probably the most running I did in my early days was to the tuckshop. Running just did not make sense to me. So when did this mindset change? Well in 2014, I attended my first ever GPS Track and Field Championship as a supporter - a day which I still remember extremely well. It was about 6.15pm, the flood lights were shining bright, and a certain Year 12 student, Jonty Flottmann, took to the blocks for his final 100m race for the College.

I watched Jonty as he nervously jumped around the start line. I realised that all his years as an athlete at BBC had come down to this very moment. All I can say, is the next 10.7 seconds were something simply incredible. Slow off the blocks, Jonty was well and truly behind the pack from the get-go. You could see the desperation in his face as he knew he had to leave everything he had left on the track – because there was no tomorrow. To this very day – and some still don’t know how he did it – Jonty went from last to first in the final 30m of the race, and pipped second on the line by 0.08 of a second. Now the race itself was simply breathtaking, but the scenes that followed have replayed in my mind over and over again. Evidently emotional after being crowned GPS champion, Jonty ran over to the BBC supporters to acknowledge their support. All I will say is I saw groups of young men with tears in their eyes, shouting and cheering for their mate. It was as

if it meant more to the supporters, than Jonty himself. So why do I do track and field? Well imagine walking up to the blocks and seeing hundreds of your brothers on the edge of their seats. Imagine crouching down and realising that this is the last activity you will do in the Green, White and Black. Imagine knowing that eight years, eight years of BBC sport is done. See I don’t mind if I finish last on Friday night. All I could wish for is just one single boy in this room to say, “You know what, BBC is worth hurting for.” So that my friends, is why I chose track and field. And that my friends is why I will give everything I have on Friday night.


BBC SPORT | 45

That war cry On the day of the event, boys gathered in the amphitheatre to deliver the first of many war cry as athletes prepared to board the bus for QSAC.

THE HIGHLIGHTS Through the eyes of Director of Athletics (Track and Field, Cross Country), Russel Hansen Josh Russell joining the team, following his injury the Monday prior. Earlier in the term, Josh said to me one afternoon at training, “Sir, it’s amazing how things have changed - it’s really a bit hard to believe … these days we are ‘a chance to win’ - a little bit different to when I was Year 8!” (referring to 2013 - when BBC won just three events, including Josh's 13 Years 90m Hurdles). To see the tears in Josh’s eyes after the aggregate points were announced was very moving. Jake Somerville winning the 15 Years Discus. He too was quite emotional when he came back to the team area. As an Under 13 athlete, Jake was reserve for the Discus (by only a few centimetres). Sam Kovac had the spot and placed third. In 2015, Jake placed

second in the 14 Years Discus. This year, Jake has worked quietly yet relentlessly alongside another quiet achiever, coach Anthony Mathison. On the pupil free day, the Monday prior to the event, he arrived at UQ for 7.30am training, despite having already trained in the Corinda Pool with the WBAC squad. This typifies Jack: work, work and then more work. 16 and 15 Years age athletes competing in Open events. For a variety of reasons, we had a number of boys competing outside of their division in Open age events. The contributions of Joe Gilmour (Open Shot Put, fifth) Jono Forbes (Open High Jump, Sixth) Harry Briggs (Open 1500m, eigthth) and Michael Griffiths (Open Long Jump, second; Open 110m Hurdles, third; Open Discus, third; Open Triple Jump, third) were invaluable and what a truly spectacular sequence from 16 year old Michael. Dom Walton - what a leader! He cramped after the Open 100m, but recovered to run

both the Open 4x400m and 4x100m Relays. After Dom received the Sir John Goodwin Cup, he organised a war cry and presented the cup to Douglas Johnstone who will be retiring at the end of this year. I’m sure Doug will remember that moment forever. After finishing a gallant second to the Queensland champion in the 14 Years 800m, there was no way anyone or anything would get in the path of Pat ‘tough as old boots’ Thygesen in the 1500m. He promptly stepped on to the track, led from the front, broke the GPS record running 4:12.6, winning by over eight seconds. Ashley Moloney scored 72 points from six wins (100m, 110m Hurdles, 400m, Long Jump, High Jump, Triple Jump) a third place in the Javelin and a fifth place in the Shot Put in the 16 Years division. Ben Woodley, a Year 7 team man, competed ‘up’ in the 13 Years High Jump and Long Jump, placing third in both events. Doing this ‘for the team’ meant Ben forfeited the opportunity to compete in the 10-12 Years GPS carnival the previous day.

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46 | BBC SPORT

IN CLOSING Dom provides his final reflection It’s still surreal to think that we won the GPS Track and Field Championship this year. But it wasn’t just the victory itself, it was the manner in which we won. Leading from the very start of the day, all the way through to the very final event. We never looked like losing - but it certainly was eight hours of nerve-wracking anticipation. But why did it mean so much to us? For the seniors (both athletes and supporters), it was the last time that we could participate at a GPS event, after all these years in the Green, White and Black. For the school and the coaching staff, it was a moment that all of them had been waiting their entire careers for. And to the rest of the students, I feel it was a turning point in their schooling journey. The moment they realised why this school is such an incredible place. You only had to be there after the announcement to see the reaction of the entire BBC community. Boys, parents and staff all in tears after witnessing a moment of history that the College had waited 74 years for. I don’t think 2016 could have ended on a more unbelievable note. That night of 28 October 2016 will forever be the moment that the drought was broken!

JUNIOR CHAMPS Held the day prior, BBC also claimed victory in the 10 to 12 Years Track and Field Championship, with a total points score of 702. A true team event and test of each school’s depth, the competition was contested over 93 events in three age groups.


BBC SPORT | 47

FINAL TALLY (13 YEARS - OPEN) POSITION AGGREGATE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

BBC 434

BSHS 417

BGS 415

IGS 375

NC 358

GT 304

TSS 302.5

ACGS 291.50

TGS 270

ALL ROUNDERS (10 - 12 YEARS) POSITION AGGREGATE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

BBC 702

NC 697

BGS 594.50

ACGS 498

TSS 430

GT 418

TSS 400

IGS 285

BSHS 138.50*

10 YRS

11 YRS

12 YRS

13 YRS

14 YRS

15 YRS

16 YRS

OPEN

ALL AGE

153 points (third)

252 points (first)

297 points (first)

86 points (second)

78 points (second)

81 points (third)

94 points (first)

69 points (sixth)

17 points (third)

*represented in 12 years age group only.

BBC AGE GROUP POINTS AGE GROUP POINTS

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48 | BBC SPORT

Captured THROUGH THE LENS

GYMNASTICS: SAM DARNELL PRESSING TO A PERFECT SCORE AT THE RECENT GPS GYMNASTICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

BASKETBALL: BBC BASKETBALLERS WERE IN FULL FLIGHT AGAINST GREGORY TERRACE IN THE FINAL HOME GAME OF THE SEASON

CHESS: JADEN TEOW DEMONSTRATING HOURS OF CONCENTRATION TO BE AWARDED SECOND PLACE IN THE BRISBANE INDIVIDUAL CHESS CHAMPIONSHIPS FOR HIS DIVISION.

>

>

RUGBY: A SKY HIGH JACK KIBBLE SECURES THE LINEOUT BALL FOR THE FIRST XV AGAINST GRAMMAR

>

>

Outside of the classroom, our boys continue to pursue their interests with strength, character and commitment. Take a look through the lens at some of their moments – though not always great, they are special points in time, where the world will always be their playground.


BBC SPORT | 49

TRANSFER OF LEARNING Drones, droids and robots may have been the theme for National Science Week, but at BBC they’re a daily occurrence, thanks to a growing and flourishing robotics program.

TO CREATE A ROBOT

DESIGN

T EC HNOL OGY

PROGRA M M I NG

C OL L A BORAT I ON

M AT H S

S C I ENC E

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50 | BBC SPORT

Beyond providing boys with an opportunity to foster their creativity, invention, imagination and critical problem solving skills, robotics - a co-curricular offering at the College - brings together all areas of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) with boys required to draw on and meld together the knowledge they hold in these areas. Open to boys from Years 4 to 12, this year teams experienced success across the board in competition with 'LJ Stan' qualifying to represent Australia at the 2017 World Championships in Japan. In this edition of Collegian our boys, many of whom are operating at a tertiary level in the sport, provide insight into the process involved in creating a robot, exploring each stage - science, design, programming, mathematics, not to mention collaboration.

Science Science teaches the rudiments of machines, and basic electronics, both of which are required for design. Apart from the engineering principles required to construct the robot so that it is structurally sound, the students require knowledge of the components available and how to integrate them. To bring the robot to life, we have to design electronic circuits to connect all the components together. Circuit design involves designing printed circuit boards, or PCBs, which are boards that have places for all the components and wires to connect them. – James Yelland

Design Robotics requires the use of a range of technologies in the conceptualisation and design of the robots. The initial design stage is through the use of CAD (Computer Aided Design) programs such as Autodesk Autocad and Inventor. These programs allow us to plan and design the various aspects required for a successful robot in the Robocup competition. Typically, Autocad is used to design many aspects of the robot such as plates, and the locations of various components. These files are then imported into Inventor, which allows us to create three dimensional models of our designs. Inventor allows the rapid prototyping required during the

design stage as many ideas are put forward. Once the desired components and functions have been selected, a final model of the robot is designed. This then allows the teams to check for any clashes and overlaps in their design that they may have identified earlier in the design phase. The resulting design is then exported into various formats to allow the manufacture of the required items. Most teams make full use of the available technology such as 3D Printing and Computer Numeric Control (CNC) manufacturing to create the many parts required for their robots. – Cooper Richmond

Programming One of the core features of robotics is programming (coding) which is present in almost all technology today. A team that competes at RoboCup Junior is expected to construct and code a robot. Without software, a robot would never move, sense or detect its environment. Being a programmer is a challenging yet rewarding experience as it teaches problem solving and communication with others to find new solutions to problems. Becoming a proficient programmer in a software language is much like learning an actual language. – Thomas Fraser

Mathematics Mathematics is integral to robotics at BBC. Widely varying levels of maths are used throughout the design and programming components of creating an effective robot. During the design phase, relatively simple geometry formulae, such as those for area, volume and density, which are taught in Middle School, are then applied to calculate a weight estimate or to decide how much plate material should be ordered. Writing the software that powers the robots offers a plethora of opportunities to employ advanced mathematics. Often,


d in m r ou y ts le g in m m a r og Pr run free allowing lim. itless opportunities and idyeaous can do it. If you can think it,

BBC SPORT | 51

Thomas Fraser

the complexity of the maths used in the code is the differentiating factor between good robots and great robots. Soccer robots at BBC are designed to move in any direction without rotating, so that the robot always faces the goal. To calculate the speeds each of the three or four motors should be moving at, complex vector equations, eventually resolving in to relatively simple trigonometric equations, are used. – Sam Tudor

Collaboration It may not be a discipline, but teamwork, collaboration and the process of trial and error also plays a critical role in robotics. With so many different tasks and objectives needing to be completed before the robot can even move, it becomes very tedious organising who will do what job. By constructing parts lists, proposed circuit designs and time management sheets the boys in the robotics

program learn vital skills that can be directly applied to the ever-moving workplace today. The teamwork in each robotics group is crucial as it is like a machine. If you keep it well oiled, it will run smoothly however if you don’t, it will grind to a halt. The introduction of parts lists, budget organisation, coupled with a strong focus on time management skills has reduced the amount of time that students have had to work on the robots. By having a third job as team manager to oversee the jobs mentioned previously and act as a helping hand, we have found our efficiency, teamwork and results have increased dramatically. On top of the teamwork, boys learn all tiers of problem solving, from small code errors to large printed circuit designs. Because of the mateship at the Robotics club, every team helps each other by sharing past knowledge, skills and ideas to succeed and forge as one club. – William Plummer

+ COMPETITION RESULTS Robocup Junior Queensland Championships Second – Secondary Dance Third – Secondary Rescue First, Second, Third – Gen2 Soccer First – Lightweight Soccer Second – Open Soccier National Robocup Championships Third – Secondary Dance First – Secondary Rescue First and Third – Open Lightweight Soccer

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


52 | INSIGHT

INSIGHT   R E S EA R C H

 RESOURCES

53 Empowering children to use technology positively

  P E R S P E CT I VE

Access to global information can present challenges for parents but it's not all bad

55 Get connected

Putting parents in touch with resources

54

Memories Patterns and systems are at the core of creating memories


INSIGHT | 53

KIDSMATTER RESOURCE

EMPOWERING CHILDREN TO USE TECHNOLOGY POSITIVELY While technology provides children with access to global information, it also presents new challenges for parents. The following KidsMatter article explores the concept of developing digital intelligence in children and how these skills work to support a safe and enjoyable online experience.

The following have been identified as core skills children need to

KidsMatter is a national mental health initiative and BBC is an accredited KidsMatter School.

Cyberbullying management: the ability to detect situations of cyberbullying and handle them wisely.

Engagement in the online world has risen significantly in the last few years. Experts are now predicting that, within the next 10 years, 90 percent of the population will be connected to the internet, and a large portion of this population is children. Connection to digital devices can have implications for children’s health and wellbeing, with data suggesting the age of engagement in the online world is increasingly getting younger and time spent on devices is increasing. Factors such as time spent online, type of digital content consumed and who children meet online all influence children’s overall development. Given this, it is important that educators, families and health and community professionals support children to develop skills which will assist in their safe online use. IT and digital media competence are important skills for children to develop, especially as we are now living in a world where these skills are needed in the workplace. A recent article in the World Economic Forum suggests that for children to have a safe and positive experience of digital media they need to develop digital intelligence (IQ). Eight key skills have been identified as making up a child’s digital IQ, with the development of these skills being supported through explicit teachings.

develop digital IQ:

Digital citizen identity: the ability to build and manage a healthy identity online and offline with integrity. Screen time management: the ability to manage one’s screen time, multitasking, and one’s engagement in online games and social media with self-control.

Cybersecurity management: the ability to protect one’s data by creating strong passwords and to manage various cyberattacks. Privacy management: the ability to handle with discretion all personal information shared online to protect one’s and others’ privacy. Critical thinking: the ability to distinguish between true and false information, good and harmful content, and trustworthy and questionable contacts online. Digital footprints: the ability to understand the nature of digital footprints and their real-life consequences and to manage them responsibly. Digital empathy: the ability to show empathy towards one’s own and others’ needs and feelings online. Families, educators and professionals need to ensure they are 'cyber savvy' in order to best support children’s safe engagement with the online world. Currently there is a gap in the way children and adults use technology. Further gaps exist in governance and policies, highlighting the need for families, educators, services and government to stay up to date with changes in the way children are connecting with the online world. Another important consideration is when a child should have their own device. This is a key area in which health and community professionals can support families, teachers and educators. In "How (and when) to introduce social media and mobiles to kids", psychologist Jocelyn Brewer states “It depends on a lot of different factors – for instance, whether their school has a

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


54 | INSIGHT

Memories

Michele Juratowitch is Director of Clearing Skies, providing counselling; advocacy in schools; a range of seminars for gifted students and for parents; professional development and consultancy in schools. Michele is co-author of Make a Twist: Curriculum Differentiation for Gifted Students and was awarded a Churchill Fellowship to investigate interventions and provisions for gifted students.

KIDSMATTER RESOURCE CONT... bring-your-own-device-situation”. Educating children on safe use can begin before they even have their own device, with adults communicating with children about appropriate online behaviour, and role-modelling the management of any potential issues that may arise. Supporting children to establish healthy digital habits early on has positive flow-on effects to their safe use of devices and engagement in the internet. Brewer also suggests it’s important to talk to children about how they will use their device. Implementing boundaries and clear expectations supports children to engage in positive ways. Talking to children about their intentions for use as well as setting time limits is also important. Finally Brewer says, “It’s about developmental appropriateness, and young people understanding the responsibility that comes with the platforms." Health and Community professionals can support families and educators with establishing children’s developmental readiness for owning a device and talk about ways to support children once they own a device.

The brain is an amazing and ever changing structure. Memory is one of the brain’s most extraordinary functions and has a critical role in enabling everyday learning and formal education. If we are to understand how memory functions, it is necessary to explore the neural processes involved in forming and retrieving memories and to consider the different types of memory that enable us to learn. The brain is both a novelty-seeking and a systematising structure. Focused attention is necessary in order for the brain to take in new information. Much like a heat seeking missile or a searchlight searching and focusing on a target, the brain is constantly scanning the internal and external environment for novel material. When new, different or exciting information, events or experiences are identified, the brain’s attention system ‘locks on’ to this; to gather information until sufficiently satiated or until something else claims attention. The brain can only focus on one thing at a time, although focus can change rapidly to direct attention to something else and we refer to this as ‘multi-tasking’. For students whose attention system is disabled, it is extremely difficult to maintain focus for a longer period of time as the brain continues to scan, settling only very briefly before returning to scan the environment for further novelty, resulting in a distraction of focus. In such situations, focus is increased when the subject of focus is personally interesting or optimally challenging. For memories to be formed, information must be gathered; separated into fragments; encoded; processed and sent for storage in different areas of the cortex. The way in which information is encoded is critical for memory formation. Encoding means the ways in which we sort bits of information, identify patterns and link it to other information that has already been placed within memory storage. The more complex or elaborate the encoding process, the more likely information will be remembered. Emotional arousal associated with information or experience creates greater cognitive awareness, helps the brain to attend and acts like a cognitive ‘glue’ to assist with memory storage. Novelty, emotional arousal, interest, relevance and meaning all contribute towards effective learning. In order to store and be able to retrieve memories, the brain must establish patterns and systems. Although the hippocampus is regarded as the memory region within the brain, recent neuroscience research indicates that bits of information are stored throughout the brain, especially across the cortex. This is why establishing linkages between bits of information is so important to learning. Students, who understand content, can establish relevance, identify patterns, systems, emphasise links and are engaged with learning, are best equipped to move data from short-term memory storage into long-term memory storage. Novelty, attention, emotional arousal and complex encoding systems combine to establish memories and assist in the later retrieval of information.


INSIGHT | 55

Get Connected

Putting parents in touch with resources

CSIRO

PARENTS’VOICE

Do-it-yourself science experiments for kids

parentsvoice.org.au Parents’ Voice is an online network of parents who are interested in improving the food and activity environments of Australian children. Formally known as The Parents’ Jury, Parents’ Voice was formed in 2004 and now represents thousands of Australian parents. The site includes useful resources covering topics such as how to create a healthy lunchbox, what you can do to encourage your children to be involved in the preparation of their food, through to navigating food

entertaining busy minds in the holidays.

labels and the importance of active play and regular physical activity.

csiro.au/en/Education/DIY-science Looking for an activity you can complete with your son at home this holidays? The CSIRO has developed a comprehensive list of DIY science experiments that will enable him to explore a variety of science concepts using simple ingredients found in the home. From maths to chemistry and earth and space, this site is perfect for

ESSENTIAL KIDS essentialkids.com.au Essential Kids is about providing inspiration, ideas and resources for parents and is part of Australia’s largest parenting community, connecting real mums and dads all over the country. From expert advice to lunchbox recipes the site provides a comprehensive resource for parents.

KidsMatter recommended read

How (and when) to introduce social media and mobiles to kids According to Essential Kids, when it comes to introducing social media establishing good habits early is the key. To read more visit www.essentialkids.com. au/life/technology/how-and-when-to-introduce-social-media-and-mobiles-to-kids20161030-gseazv.

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56 | CONNECT

CONNECT   O LD C O LLE G IAN S

 W H E R E AR E T H E Y N OW

57 Strengthening the tie A message from OCA President, Chris Hartley

58 From the Alumni Office

A message from Director of Alumni and Community, Jarrod Turner

60 Circle of friends

BBC heads west to catch up with those living in Outback Queensland

68 BBC launches Business Directory Connecting with the BBC network

70 Where are they now

Find out more about life beyond the gates for two old collegians

67

A Old challenge Boys' Day of extremes Crowds gather to celebrate Fook goes desert the Green, White, Black

  E VE N TS


CONNECT | 57

OCA PRESIDENT

CHRIS HARTLEY

Strengthening the tie As the end of year approaches, it is always fitting to reflect upon the achievements and efforts put in over the course of the 12 months passed. For the Old Collegians’ Association (OCA), 2016 has simply been another fantastic year. We offered a huge range of programs and events but inevitably there were a few highlights that stood out. The BBC Long Lunch hosted by the OCA was a raging success. In its second year, The Triffid in Newstead played host to more than 170 old boys who enjoyed the food, drink, service and company of many of its members. Without a doubt it has fast become the must-attend event on our calendar. Ten year reunions and Old Boys’ Day were also well attended, and those who got along to Miskin Oval were treated to enthralling matches of basketball and rugby with our First V and First XV recording a rousing win over Churchie. We also conducted a comprehensive survey of our membership to better understand the opinions, needs and ideas of old boys. A big thank you to all those who responded and with your efforts, we have already implemented a number of new strategies centred on our programs and communications to make sure we are serving you as best we can. The OCA mentoring initiative continues to grow from strength to strength, with recently-graduated old boys paired with Year 12 students to provide advice, guidance and fellowship as they transition from school boy to old boy. We had more than 50 partnerships and year-on-year this number is increasing. The Vintage Collegians (VC), led by John Stewart, and the Young Old Boys, spearheaded by Tom Law, were also in focus.

The VC’s enjoyed several luncheons, their weekly Tuesday meetings as well as the commencement of an archiving project to digitise the school’s history. The Young Old Boys were heavily involved in the mentoring program and also featured in the school’s Careers Conference. Their social events, in particular their evening at the Fox Hotel, was enjoyed and well attended. From an administration perspective, the OCA created a dedicated OCA LinkedIn page to further strengthen the connection. Early next year we hope to launch the BBC Business Directory, to provide members and those in the wider BBC community the opportunity to connect through their various commercial interests and increase their exposure to a wider audience. The OCA database was further refined and the OCA website is currently being refreshed. Financially, the OCA Executive committed to various strategies to firstly, solidify, and secondly, advance, our financial position. Twelve months into this and we are positively in a stronger position and heading further in the right direction, with several potential ideas for the coming year that will allow us the funding to improve our programs and events. So plenty has happened but there is plenty more planned for 2017. In closing, I would like to make very special mention of both the OCA Executive Committee and the BBC Alumni Office team, who coordinate the OCA’s efforts. In particular to Jarrod Turner, Director of Alumni and Community, and Kelly Edwards, Development and Events Coordinator, thank you for your tireless and selfless efforts every single day. Wishing you all a very special holiday season with your families and friends, and looking forward to catching up with you all in 2017.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


58 | CONNECT

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AND COMMUNITY

JARROD TURNER

From the Alumni Office As Chris Hartley (OCA President) mentioned, 2016 has been an extremely busy and successful year across the board. Programs, events and new initiatives have continued to develop and this has been made possible due to the hard work of a large number of volunteers. For all of your support and commitment to the school and the OCA – thank you. These volunteers have acted as reunion organisers, mentors, coaches and managers, presenters, supporters, chefs (on a BBQ) or refreshment distributors (at an OCA bar). Without everyone’s dedication, the past 12 months certainly would not have been possible. As you will see in the calendar of events, 2017 is set to be another busy year and we will be looking for even more people to put up their hands to assist in any way they can. Should you be in a position to do so, please contact the Alumni Office via Jarrod Turner, Director of Alumni and Community (jturner@bbc.qld.edu.au or 3309 3653) or Kelly Edwards, Development and Events Coordinator (kedwards@bbc.qld.edu.au or 3309 3513). If you wish to pop in and say hello, we are situated in College House, off Kensington Terrace next to the main driveway, between the hours of 8.30am and 4.30pm, Monday to Friday. Have a great Christmas and New Year and see you all in early 2017.

IN HONOUR

After many years of enduring a recurrent, major depressive illness, award winning journalist, BBC Old Boy and backyard cricketer Nic MacBean very sadly passed away in November last year. Although Nic’s passing is tragic, he left a wonderful legacy in that during his life he shared his story, reached out to others suffering with mental illness and made a remarkable difference to so many lives. In memory of Nic and in support of beyondblue, BBC was proud to host the inaugural Nic MacBean Cup cricket charity match on 1 December with BBC’s First XI facing a BBC Old Boy All Stars XI squad for a T20 challenge. The event, aimed at raising awareness of depression, anxiety and suicide especially among young men and sporting groups saw more than $20,000 raised for beyondblue. Joshua Langdon, Nic’s mate since childhood, organised the Cup and hopes it will become an annual event. “Nic was a knock-about kind of guy, very intelligent, really down to earth and he was extremely open about his depression. beyondblue was close to Nic’s heart and I think people saw it as an opportunity to be part of something good.”


CONNECT | 59

At the end of the day Joshua thanked everyone for their support on social media. “Brilliant day today! Thank you so much Brisbane Boys' College for everything, all of the volunteers and donors. Over $20k raised for #beyondblue as part of the inaugural Nic MacBean Cup. The All Stars got lucky this year, the BBC First XI weren't too far away.” Nic’s mum, Sue MacBean, said he had depression since 2008 but always found time to support friends and colleagues who were going through similar issues. “Nic valued life and lived it to the full while he was well, but his depression overwhelmed him. Even though he was struggling with his own depression he was an inspiration to other people with mental illness.” BBC Headmaster Graeme McDonald said staff and students were honoured to host the Cup. “Nic was a remarkable person and has made an indelible mark on our College from his time at school.

“His legacy highlights the role we all have to play in raising awareness around depression and anxiety and as educators, the importance of openly discussing mental health with students – particularly boys and young men.” Australian Bureau of Statistics figures revealed 3,027 Australians took their own lives in 2015 – that’s more than eight people a day. Of those people, 2,292 were men. beyondblue CEO Georgie Harman thanked Nic’s friends and family for sharing his story and putting a spotlight on mental health. “Talking about depression and anxiety particularly with young boys and men is vital because research has shown men are less likely to open up about their mental health. “The Nic MacBean Cup was a heartfelt tribute to Nic, but also an important reminder to us all about the importance of mental health awareness in our schools, sports clubs and workplaces.”

NIC WAS A KNOCK-ABOUT KIND OF GUY,VERY INTELLIGENT, REALLY DOWN TO EARTH AND HE WAS EXTREMELY OPEN ABOUT HIS DEPRESSION. BEYONDBLUE WAS CLOSE TO NIC’S HEART AND I THINK PEOPLE SAW IT AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO BE PART OF SOMETHING GOOD.

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60 | CONNECT

CIRCLE of FRIENDS

SITUATED 900KM WEST OF BRISBANE IN OUTBACK QUEENSLAND, BLACKALL IS KNOWN FOR ITS FRIENDLY NATURE AND RICH HISTORY. IT’S ALSO HOME TO MANY BBC FAMILIES AND FRIENDS – THOSE WHO LIVE BEYOND THE CITYSCAPE AND AT THE HEART OF OUR COUNTRY.


CONNECT | 61

When arriving in town, you’re greeted by Richard Moffatt’s Circle of Friends, a metal sculpture commissioned in 2007 as part of the Blackall Heartland Festival and representative of the people that make up the Barcoo River community. Its name signifies perfectly what took place at BBC’s recent community function – a wide circle of friends, who despite living in the region don’t get to see each other nearly as often as they should, getting together for a good chat and a relaxed catch-up. Held in November at the Acacia Motor Inn (originally opened in 1998 by BBC Old Boy George Wheelhouse (1954) and then Mayor of Blackall before being taken over by ‘Ozzie’), 30 people attended the event, some travelling hundreds of kilometres to do so.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


62 | CONNECT “It was fantastic to see everyone and in some instances, meet them in person for the first time and we greatly appreciate those who travelled quite a distance to make it,” said BBC’s Director of Alumni and Community Jarrod Turner. “Beyond providing us with an opportunity to catch up with those living in regional Australia and overseas, we’ve found that our community events also bring those living in these areas together – an occurrence that many report doesn’t always happen despite living in close proximity to each other,” he said. “We were fortunate to visit the Hardie and Lloyd families at their properties during our stay. We thoroughly enjoyed it and thank them for their incredible hospitality.”

“BEYOND PROVIDING US WITH AN OPPORTUNITY TO CATCH UP WITH THOSE LIVING IN REGIONAL AUSTRALIA AND OVERSEAS, WE’VE FOUND THAT OUR COMMUNITY EVENTS ALSO BRING THOSE LIVING IN THESE AREAS TOGETHER – AN OCCURRENCE THAT MANY REPORT DOESN’T ALWAYS HAPPEN DESPITE LIVING IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO EACH OTHER.


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Meet the Lloyds South of Blackall you’ll find Lorne, a 40,000 acre cattle property and home to Kerry and Martin (1974-1977) Lloyd. The family has a long-standing connection with BBC with Kerry and Martin’s youngest son Nathan, joining the boarding house this year, following in the footsteps of his brothers, Alastair (2002), Adam (2006) and Craig (2006). Prior to attending BBC, all four boys were educated through Longreach School of Distance Education - a service Kerry continues to be actively involved with today as the VISE coordinator, a role that sees her organise retired teachers to visit various properties to provide mum with a break from the classroom. Adam started his electrical service apprenticeship and is now an autoelectrician with Volvo at their pre-delivery plant in Brisbane. With the help of School Counsellor, David Ogilvie, Craig started a school-based apprenticeship with Drake Trailers where he continues to work today. Chef of the family, Alastair also performed a school-based apprenticeship while at BBC, working in the boarding house kitchen under Catering Manager, Michael Smith. Lorne was originally run by Martin’s father Trevor (1943-1948), who now lives ‘up the range’ with his wife Eunice in Toowoomba. Martin’s brother Jeff (1980) lives what locals would consider just down the road at Jedburgh - their 170,000 acre property south west of Yaraka - with wife Anne-Maree. Their son Jake, who after graduating from BBC in 2014, continues to work on the family property. Jeff grew up in the Blackall district, working on the family property Cootabinya (100km south of town) alongside his father and BBC Old Collegian Don (19441948), who at the young age of 84 continues to manage the property in addition to Etonvale. And if there weren’t enough BBC connections, Kerry’s brother Glenn Jinks also attended the College as a boarder from 1978-1980. It was wonderful to have Kerry, Martin, Don, Jeff, Anne-Maree and Jake all in attendance at the Blackall community function.

Meet the Hardies South-east of Blackall, 70 odd kilometres out of town, you’ll find Dumfries, a cattle station consisting of 32,700 acres freehold and up until recently home to BBC past parents, David Hardie and wife Lindy. The pair bought the property 20 years ago, and during that time completely transformed the homestead into what can only be described as an ‘oasis’, with its beautiful green garden sitting in complete contrast to its surrounds. Thanks to the tireless efforts of the Hardies the garden has withstood drought, won awards and was the inspiration for Lindy’s most recent book Beyond the Dust. The property was recently featured on Landline - a story that signifies new beginnings for the Hardies, with David and Lindy set to move into town early next year. Sons, Andrew and Ian also live in the region, having returned after boarding at BBC in 1997 and 1999 respectively. Andrew has spent much of his time in recent years working on the property while Ian has focused on his business, Barcoo Plumbing, which services businesses and families throughout the entire region.

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2017 JANUARY 3

G R A N D P A R E N T, S O N AND GRANDSONS

JULY

UNIVERSITY O R I E N TAT I O N Our Young Old Boys provide hints and tips on how to transition to university life

1

FEBRUARY

10

SINGAPORE REUNION A chance for those living in this popular overseas destination and business hub to get together

APRIL 24

8

BBC LONG LUNCH

26

C H R I S T M A S I N J U LY

Keep an eye out for tickets to secure your spot at this premier event

MARCH

An opportunity for grandparents, sons and grandsons to enjoy a spot of cricket

27

21

AUGUST 3

BBC OPEN EVENING

25

DECADE REUNIONS

26

O L D B OY S ' D AY

A N Z A C D AY The College pays tribute to those old collegians who paid the ultimate sacrifice

F O U N D E R ' S D AY A celebration of our rich heritage and founder Mr Arthur Rudd

Hosted by the Vintage Collegians in Mount Mee

SYDNEY REUNION

BBC community members are invited to join us for this special event

Old Boys' Weekend commences with '07, '97, '87, '77, '67 and '57 reunions

Catch-up with old friends and see our Rugby First XV and Basketball First V in action

Sydney-siders get ready to catch-up

15 T O O W O O M B A L U N C H E O N Hosted by the Vintage Collegians the luncheon represents the first official catch up for this group for the year

MAY 6

OCTOBER

YOUNG OLD BOYS' EVENT

20

G O L F D AY Bringing the BBC community together on the golf course

The first official catch-up for the OCA's youngest members

NOVEMBER 1 27 H O N G K O N G

YEAR 12 FINAL A S S E M B LY A special assembly to recognise the crossover from student to old boy

BBC visits the land of skyscrapers

10

GOLD COAST LUNCHEON This luncheon represents the second catch up for BBC's Vintage Collegians group

24

OLD BOYS' AND PARTNERS LUNCHEON A Christmas luncheon hosted by the Vintage Collegians


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BBC LONG LUNCH Friday 12 August The Triffid is known for bringing some of the best international, national and local acts to Brisbane; in August it brought together a slightly different, yet equally diverse line up, with more than 170 old boys and BBC community members converging on the iconic landmark for this year’s Long Lunch. Sponsored by Crestone Wealth Management and Ray White Sherwood - thanks to Old Collegians Alex Persley (2000) and Cameron Crouch (2002) - with support from Butch Walker (2002) from Gillespie Organic, Scott Hutchinson (1976) representing The Triffid, TJ Peabody (1978) and his team from Nantucket Kitchen and Bar, Mitch Allen (2007) from Northside Party Hire, Rupert McCall OAM as MC and BBC Parent Ted Walton from Belle Property Paddington as Auctioneer, the event was deemed a resounding success. Auction and raffle item contributors included Roger Gould (1974), Phillip Yeatman (2015), Grant Rynne (2000) on behalf of Rynne Capital Management, Rupert McCall, Kingsley Caesar from Champion Sports Displays, Cabassi and Co Artissan Butchers and Vinny Bassi (2010) on behalf of Cabal and Co and the Alliance Hotel. In true BBC spirit, Michael Wilkins (1994) kindly donated his $1,500 Triffid voucher raffle prize to the bar after the function while Marc Conias (1988) generously donated his auction item (a signed and framed Roger Gould Wallabies touring blazer) back to the College for the whole community to enjoy.

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OLD BOYS REUNITE Six reunions took place on Friday 26 August as the precursor to Old Boys’ Day. Held across four different venues including the BBC Boarders’ Dining Hall (1956), Indooroopilly Golf Club (1966), Regatta Hotel (1976, 1986 and 2006) and the West Toowong Bowls Club (1996), the events brought together more than 300 old boys from across the decades.


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OLD BOYS' DAY Saturday 27 August

There's a certain buzz in the air when you step onto the grounds for Old Boys' Day each year and 2016 was no different. The day commenced with College tours and ended with victory for both the Rugby and Basketball First teams. A number of guests remained on-site to watch the Bledisloe Cup live from the big screens in College Hall as the Wallabies battled it out against the All Blacks.

FIRST TEAM RESULTS Basketball - BBC 84 d ACGS 82 Rugby - BBC 32 d ACGS 14

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Feature article Festival of Leaving on page 22 details the Year 12 Final assembly that saw students cross over to old collegians.

BRIBANE BOYS' COLLEGE BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BBC launches Business Directory The BBC community holds a wealth of knowledge and expertise. Connect with the BBC network via our Business Directory to promote your business or search for a product or service. Visit www.oldcollegians.com.au to find out more.

ADVERTISE WITH US Free three month trail When considering how to promote your business, consider the power of word of mouth marketing – studies show consumers are 92 percent more likely to trust peers over advertising when it comes to purchasing decisions. Advertising in the BBC Business directory can create new opportunities, generate referrals for your business and open the door to a new customer base.

Free 3 Month membership $150 for a standard one year membership


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HUTCHIES BBC GOLF DAY

This year’s Hutchies BBC Golf Day was a swinging success with 27 teams and 108 players battling it out for the 2016 trophy at the Indooroopilly Golf Club. The event raised more than $12,000 for the Old Collegians’ Bursary and Tennis Support Group. The bursary works to ensure BBC families stay BBC families for life by providing those who may be facing difficult circumstances with the opportunity to attend the College.

Congratulations to the following teams: WINNERS CDI Lawyers 2 (53 1/3) Phil McDonald, Brett Holdway, Chris Morris and Simon Collin RUNNERS UP The Repeated Winners (54) Tim Newham, Angus Cowan, Chris Humphrey and Brett McGrath LONGEST DRIVE Brandon Gregory

STRAIGHTEST DRIVE Peter Thomas BEST OLD BOYS TEAM CDI Lawyers 2 (53 1/3) Phil McDonald, Brett Holdway, Chris Morris and Simon Collin NEAREST THE PINS Blue 5 – David Storer (hole-in-one) Blue 7 – Mitch Grimmer Gold 4 – Chris Humphrey Gold 8 – Mitchell Gregory

The Alumni Office thanks the following event sponsors for their support: Hutchinson Builders • BBC • Sci-Fleet Motors • Somerville House Novotel Twin Waters Resort • MSI Taylor Business Services • Green Options PPS - Tailored Furniture Solutions • Protection Advice Pty Ltd • Brisbane Private Hospital COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


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CLASS OF '61 On Friday 16 September, 24 members of the Senior Class of 1961 met at The Greek Club in West End to celebrate 55 years since leaving BBC.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW

Following a fantastic night reminiscing, a smaller group attended a College Tour on the Saturday with Jarrod Turner, BBC’s Director of Alumni and Community and Kelly Edwards, Development and Events Coordinator. On Sunday many of those who attended the reunion on the Friday night were accompanied by their partners to Paul White’s residence for a casual luncheon to end what was a successful weekend. The OCA would like to acknowledge Victor Feros, Paul White and Malcolm Murchison for their assistance in bringing the weekend together.

ROSS BAYNES (1975 – 1980) Years at BBC Five. House Wesley. Where do you live? Darwin, Northern Territory. Have you travelled? Yes, took a year off in 2009 and saw a fair part of the world. Family status? I am living with my wonderful partner. Current occupation? For the last six years I have worked for Northern Territory Airports as the Director, Property. Previous occupation/s? Lend Lease, Macquarie Bank and Lipman. Did you study after BBC? Law Degree from Bond University. Biggest achievement since leaving BBC? Perhaps that’s better left for others to judge. What do you aspire to do in the future? More travel would be nice. Favourite pastimes/hobbies? Catching up with friends. What do you do on a day-off? Reading a newspaper from cover to cover. Also love to cook and make dishes from scratch (not sure I am good at it though). What is playing on your iPod right now? I know they have made music after the 80s but I don’t understand why. Favourite holiday destination? A hammock on a secluded beach with a glass of bubbles. Fondest memory of BBC? Lifelong friendships formed. Favourite teacher/s? Graham Thomson.


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DAVE BULLER (1984-1985) Years at BBC Five. House Rudd. Where do you live? Port Moresby, PNG. Have you travelled? I have lived in various locations including Afghanistan, Canada, Antarctica and PNG. Travel locations include SE Asia, US, Europe, Tahiti, Timor-Leste and Fiji. I have also travelled all over Australia (many Aussies forget to do this). Family status? Married to wife Tarni and I have a son (Kyl – 14 years) and daughter (Taylor – 10 years). Kyl aspires to board at BBC in the near future. Current occupation? Australian Army Officer. Have spent close to 30 years serving in Defence. Currently a colonel serving as the Head of Australian Defence Staff (or Defence Attache) to PNG. Previous occupation/s? I completed some part time work prior to enrolment at Royal Military College (RMC) Duntroon in 1988. Did you study after BBC? I started Aeronautical Engineering at RMIT but did not finish before joining RMC. Various tertiary studies and part-time courses completed, including a Masters in Management. Biggest achievement since leaving BBC? The Army has given me many opportunities and life-experiences so this is a hard question to answer. I would say being the 2011 Station Leader at Australia’s Casey Station in Antarctica (a non-military role) was a most humbling and surreal experience. But I am also the father of two fantastic children and husband to a loving wife: one should never discount achievements with family – particularly when setting up for a successful future.

What do you aspire to do in the future? Continue to travel and broaden my life experience whilst embracing new situations. Favourite pastimes/hobbies? Fitness, photography, socialising and electronic gadgets. What do you do on a day-off? Certainly not work! A day off is a day off. What is playing on your iPod right now? 90s music, Triple J compilations or chill. Favourite holiday destination? Paris or Fort Lauderdale (US). Fondest memory of BBC? Friendship and mischief… and my boater!

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SPRING FASHION PARADE FRIDAY 9 SEPTEMBER – HILLSTONE, ST LUCIA Just when you thought the event couldn’t get any bigger, the Spring Fashion Parade reached new heights this year attracting the highest number of attendees in its history and raising a record $24,690. A special cheque presentation was held later in the year with the money donated to The Hope Foundation, social enterprise One Quarter and YES Arusha. The event was again made possible thanks to its generous local sponsors.


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GRANDPARENTS AND FRIENDS' DAY 15 SEPTEMBER - JUNIOR SCHOOL GREEN Junior School students were able to share in a special day with their grandparents and extended family and friends at this year’s event. Guests were entertained on the day by the Junior Band, Acton Strings, Colla Voce with the Public Speaking Champion, Liam O’Higgins also delivering an address.

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YEAR 12 MOTHER'S FAREWELL LUNCHEON 17 NOVEMBER - BOARDER'S DINING HALL Year 12 mothers gathered together the morning of Valedictory Dinner to acknowledge and celebrate the end of an era. The annual event provides an opportunity for reflection with School Captain Dom Walton, thanking mothers on behalf of the entire cohort for their significant contributions and support over the years.


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MIDDLE SCHOOL AWARDS CEREMONY 30 NOVEMBER - COLLEGE HALL This year’s Middle School Awards Ceremony celebrated academic, co-curricular, leadership and service excellence with recipients of the various prizes demonstrating their tenacity, focus and consistency. Seven special awards were announced on the morning including Middle School Sportsman of the Year (The Kevin Ronald Keyworth Memorial Shield) to Patrick Thygesen; Middle School Interhouse Shield awarded to Flynn House; Leadership and Citizenship Award (a Gift from the BBC Parents and Friends Association) to Taehwan Kim; Rev WC Radcliffe Memorial Encouragement Prize to Lachlan Cooley; Dux of Year 7 to Matthew Cranitch; Dux of Year 8 to Ethan Lo and Dux of the Middle School (The Stanley George Brown Prize) to Benjamin Arya.

JAMES MATTHEWS AND JAMIE HYNDS

Milestones

WEDDINGS

18 June Andrew Galloway (2003) and Jennifer Triebe 20 August Hamish Grey (2005) and Jelena Rakic 1 October James Matthews (2006) and Jamie Hynds

VALE Hugh Gresham (1951-1952) passed in Feburary 2016 Bruce Newell (1943-1948) passed in October 2015 Lane Haggett (1992-1999) passed in October 2015 Blair Hunt (1948-1953) passed in September 2015 Kenneth Binnie (1958-1962) passed in September 2015 James ‘Jim’ Cunningham (1944-1949) passed in September 2015 David Chee (1972-1975) passed in August 2015 Noel Davidson (1934-1937) passed in August 2015

SHARE YOUR COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT In each edition of Collegian, we include a number of community announcements including births, weddings and the vale as part of our Milestone section. If you have an announcement you would like to share with us, relating to either yourself or a fellow old boy, please inform BBC’s Alumni Office via oca@bbc.qld.edu.au

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


90 Years Strong More than 160 guests gathered together on Thursday 24 November to celebrate the 90th birthday of revered former Headmaster, Mr Graham Thomson AM. To celebrate this significant milestone and to honour his achievements a special service was held in College Hall where old boys David Moffatt (1978), Chris Beech (1974) and son Ross Thomson (1976) shared their memories. True to form, Graham delivered a truly stellar address as he recounted various stories to an amused crowd. The celebration provided guests with a unique opportunity to pay tribute to a man who has impacted so many lives over his decades as a coach, master, headmaster and mentor.


FLASHBACK Helen Jackson, Archivist

"THE OLD FOX" DAVE MAGOFFIN

In 1953, the newspaper headlines read Rulers of the River. The unprepossessing hero who helped create this BBC legacy was Dave Magoffin. By reading the Brisbane River and understanding the psychology of his rowers, the ‘Old Fox’ managed rowing combinations to peak and to win on the day, which resulted in BBC claiming the coveted Head of the River title 14 times in 25 years. IMAGE TOP: 1961 TEAM AND COACH, DAVE MAGOFFIN IMAGE ABOVE: (L-R) DR JOHN DREWE AND JACK HUTCHINSON AT DAVE MAGOFFIN’S GRAVE MAY 2001. THE THREE OARS REPRESENT BBC, TOOWONG AND MOSMAN ROWING CLUBS. IMAGE NEXT PAGE: 20022003 FIRST AND SECOND CREWS HONOURING DAVE MAGOFFIN AT THE BLACKHEATH GRAVE SITE.

Due to ill health, Dave retired to the Megalong Valley in the Blue Mountains at the conclusion of the 1971 season. BBC gained the name of the rowing school of Brisbane under Dave Magoffin’s coaching. This man of diminutive stature, who spoke with a stutter was loved and held in high regard by the rowing fraternity. Dave was admired not only for his rowing knowledge and expertise but for the sage life advice he offered his rowers in helping to mould a winning crew. Therefore, it was a shock to find the acclaimed coaching champion in a pauper’s grave. While in Sydney attending the 2000 Olympics, Jack Hutchinson, President of the Toowong Rowing Club and Dr John Drewe

went in search of their esteemed coach’s grave. Regrettably, they found no headstone or marker in the Blackheath Cemetery, Blue Mountains. With knowledge acquired from the local Council, John Drewe (1957) located the unmarked site: plot number 45 in row three in the Anglican section. Dave Magoffin had rowed and coached at the Mosman Rowing Club until 1952 before moving to Brisbane, where he successfully coached both BBC and Toowong Rowing Club members. All three clubs were asked for contributions. However, it was the BBC rowing community that responded quickly and generously to John Drewe’s appeal to donate $50.00 per person to provide Dave with a fitting memorial.


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HE MADE MEN OUT OF BOYS: HE MADE US BELIEVE WE COULD DO THINGS WE MAY NEVER HAVE OTHERWISE ACCOMPLISHED; AND HE NOT ONLY ENCOURAGED THE PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE…HE SHOWED US HOW TO ACHIEVE THAT.” On 19 May, 2001, a group of approximately 20 former rowers and partners gathered at Magoffin’s graveside. They erected a tripod made of an oar from each of the three clubs, appropriate words were said, a toast was drunk and the headstone was unveiled. It read:

David O Magoffin 20.11.1904 -12.6.1973 “The Old Fox” A gifted and loved rowing coach This memorial was erected in 2001 By those who remember From Brisbane Boys' College Mosman Rowing Club Toowong Rowing Club Coaches Jack Hutchinson and Ben Young, beneficiaries of the Magoffin legacy, believed in inspiring and fostering the traditions in the next generation. Accordingly, the 2002 and

2003 First and Second crews visited Dave’s Blackheath graveside and paid their respects. Accompanying the crews was Richard Bell, Captain of Boats (1972), and a current rowing coach. Absorbing the legacy was Richard’s son, Tom Bell, Captain of Boats (2003). To the sounds of the piper, two training singlets were respectfully placed on the granite covering, acknowledging the transference of culture. This well-known rowing story is being rewritten as the archives has been the recipient of Dr John Drewe’s original material relating to his search for the grave and his quest to raise the necessary funds to suitably honour Dave. The folder contains a cemetery map, photos, correspondence and Dave’s death certificate naming Rockhampton as his place of birth, a Queenslander! The acquired working correspondence is similar to Dave, honest and with a sense of goal achieved. However, the donor’s letters are far more insightful, portraying a revered and empathetic character, summed up by Graham Kerrison (1956), who wrote, “He made men out

of boys: he made us believe we could do things we may never have otherwise accomplished; and he not only encouraged the pursuit of excellence…he showed us how to achieve that.” Dave Magoffin was appreciative of these accolades and in his resignation letter used similar sentiments along with the often quoted, “Dave, for a single man you have a tremendous number of splendid sons.” As Ian Leslie (1962) explained to Mike Coleman for his 2012 QWeekend article, “Dave was devoted to the school, he never married. He lived with his mother in a little unit on Sylvan Road at Toowong. He had his job, his mother and rowing. That was his life.” Amongst the papers is an answer to the circumstances relating to the unmarked grave. It was clarified by the fact that Dave’s brother, after identifying the body, died before the monumental details had been finalised. Fortunately, this unseemly situation has been rectified by those ‘gallant sons’ who remember.


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A CONTRIBUTOR’S LETTER

Dave had a great influence on my life in many ways and I know he had a similar influence on my contemporaries. It was not until I left school that his influence became apparent. To understand this influence one has to undertand Dave’s qualities… Humility Dave was a very humble man despite his success in the rowing field, yet universally respected as a person and revered as a rowing coach. He was always very polite and I cannot recall him ever denigrating anyone. These qualities were the prime reason that everyone respected him. I also recall his stoic persistence in the face of interference in his coaching from staff and parents. Others may have reacted with a huff. He always took it in his stride, never complained yet maintained his standards in what I saw as recognition of the legitimate need for others to contribute. When he was instructing rowers he avoided harsh criticism instead using similes and examples to draw the best out of all of us. Selected his crews based on ability Dave was steadfast in his determination to select the person based on ability and character and resisted the selection of, for example the most popular candidate, which often resulted in considerable pressure and anger directed towards him. Because of the level of respect in which he was held, Dave had wide access to sources of information regarding a person’s character and he also refused to select anyone who smoked. From this I learnt to look beyond a person’s façade to their character, as it is character that sustains. Also it was the main reason why I and many others never took up smoking, which was very fashionable in those days. Total clarity of objective Not for Dave the interim glories, just the Head of the River and from that I learnt that if you want to achieve you need to be clear in your goals and stick with them. I will never forget in 1962 when we had not won a race all year, and Brisbane Grammar had been winning consistently in regattas, thumping everyone. They had even cooked a victory celebration cake and iced in a place for the cup. On the day BBC won the Head of the River with a then record and I understand still a record margin of 3.5 lengths. One of the crew (Ian Robertson) rowed himself to a semiconscious state – character! I think it was then that the Grammar coach coined a popular nickname for Dave as the “Fox”. He openly admitted that he did not understand how Dave did it. I believe how Dave did it was to apply integrity, value character, have a clear focus and show a humble respect for all his fellows, even us boys. It was the culture that was generated from the application of these values that brought the successes.

Year

Crew

1943-45

Due to the war the Head of the River titles were unofficial, however BBC made a clean sweep of all events for both of the Magoffin years,1944-45 and likewise 1946-7

1944

David Nimmo (stroke), Donald Loosemore (3), Edgar Sneyd (2), Bruce Junner (bow) and Eddie Whelan (cox)

1945

David Nimmo (stroke), Bruce Junner (3), Harold Hall (2), Bryant Richards (bow) and Eddie Whelan (cox)

1946

Jonathan Cameron (stroke), Neal Holland (3), Bruce Newell (2), Gavin Boyd (bow) and Val Trevethan (cox)

1947

Noel Wilson (stroke), Bruce Newell (3), Keith Mann (2), Anthony Wood (bow) and James Cameron (cox)

1949

Alan Moore (stroke), Henry Smith (3), James Byth (2), James Slater (bow) and John Fisher (cox)

1950

Alan Moore (stroke), Alexander Moore (3), David Simpson (2), James Slater (bow) and Donald McLeod (cox)

1951

BBC Laurie Stubbings (stroke), George Byth (3), Jim Cameron (2), Ian Thomson (bow) and Donald McLeod (cox)

1952

David Cameron (stroke), Jim Cameron (2), Jonathan Shannon (3), Laurie Stubbings (bow) and Richard Bray (cox)

1955

The year GPS moved from Fours to Eights

1956

John Adam (stroke), Bruce Clark (7), Ian Cook (6), Ian Mayes (5), Roderick Bodman (4), Russell Philp (3), Graham Kerrison (2), John Wilson (bow) and Ted Egerton (cox)

1957

John Adam (stroke), John Wilson (7), Russell Philp (6), Ian Mayes (5), Eric Thomson (4), Darryl Blunck (3), Ian Sinnamon (2), John Drewe (bow) and Ian McDougall (cox)

1961

John Lyndon (stroke), Bruce Carlyle (7), Paul White (6), Chris Bartlett (5), David Hood (4), Donald Hall (3), Brian Perkins (2), David Job (bow) and Peter Cribb (cox)

1962

Doug Adam (stroke), Ian Jamieson (7), Ian Leslie (6), Stuart Allan (5), Ian Robertson (4), Jim Blackburne (3), David Alexander (2), David Simpson (bow) and Stephen Hood (cox)

1965

Peter Meyer (stroke), Edgar Smith (7), Sonatane Tupou (6), Charlie Clarke (5), David Brown (4), John Willers (3), David Gold (2), David Svendsen (bow) and Paul Haggarty (cox)

1965

BBC /BGS tied in new race record 5 minutes 42.5 seconds. Previous record 5 minutes 58 seconds

1966

Peter Meyer (stroke), David Brown (7), Paul Loder (6), Charlie Clarke (5), Rod Townsend (4), David Matley (3), Warren Jenkins (2), Jeff Lingham (bow) and Stephen Odgers (cox)

1968

David Moore (stroke), Robert Nixon (7), Craig Morley (6), Anthony Hart (5), Jon Svendsen (4), David Jamieson (3), John Woodward (2), John Brown (bow) and Stephen Odgers (cox)

I look forward to being able to visit a grave that gives proper tribute to this outstanding man. J Ian Jamieson (Jumbo 1956-62) 28 January, 2001

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2016


Collegian Magazine - December 2016  

The magazine of Brisbane Boys' College