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Brisbane Boys’ College. A New School of Thought. 1


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Knowledge-based learning is no longer enough. We need to teach children how to think. Not only to solve problems, but to recognise them in the first place. This is something we do every

day at BBC. We teach our boys to question the status quo and solve problems to make the world a better place. Our school is full of inquisitive, wellrounded boys. Boys who will grow up and

make a difference. Not just when they leave school. Now, at Brisbane Boys’ College. We know boys. We know how to harness their energy, curiosity and thirst for competition.

We call this:

‘A New School of Thought’. 3


Your son may tell you his favourite subject is jumping through ladders. Don’t tell him, but we’re actually teaching him Maths.

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A New School of Thought. 5


THE BBC MANIFESTO

We will bring out the best in you We will educate and enlighten you – not just teach you We will encourage and empower you – not just coach you We encourage you to discover what you’re good at We will help you find confidence by unearthing your talent We see you as a son of the world and the world will always be your playground We know you as the knight, crusader, viking, gladiator, or pirate you are We know you as the real person you are We understand the changing you We know boys, we speak boy We watch you grow and develop from child to man We guide your development into a good quality human being – a gentleman of honour We support you to grow strong in body, strong in character and big in heart We will watch you make mistakes, make robots, make music, make amends and make a difference We will inspire you, back you, nurture you, care for you and about you We will help you develop, evolve and find your special place in the world We know you’ll do well, we’ve watched you win We will watch you go forth with the confidence and capability to change the world.

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Not all schools are the same.

We want to be true to who we are.

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We don’t always hear our boys ask these questions aloud, but we know they’re often asking them in round-about ways. Schools don’t have to be purely theoretical. They can be places where students think about real-world problems and look for real-world solutions. This develops new capabilities and attributes – creativity, invention, problem-solving, imagination, empathy, collaboration, commitment to social justice and equality. It challenges boys to think not just about what they will do to succeed for themselves but what their role is in the world.

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Wesley Hospital Internship Program Presentations and conversations with Health Care leaders. Practical work with Brisbane surgeons and volunteer work during school holidays.

Here are just some of the activities we are already doing that support our philosophy.

Oxley Creek Catchment Association Regeneration of native plants; sustainability in curriculum; water testing as a science practical where data is fed back into OCCA’s regeneration plan (local council level). Rosies Food Van Students and staff take part in feeding the homeless in Brisbane. VET in Action Boys leading personal training for staff and gaining qualifications during the process. University Pathways Completing university courses whilst at school in Year 12.

Service Trips to Cambodia Building schools, teachers training teachers, donating IT equipment and uniforms. Small Business Training Training boys to be baristas to effectively run a small business in order to give back to Cambodia. Sporting Clinics Sporting clinics run in rural communities where Old Boys, current staff and students coach. Biology Symposium and Science Partnership Program Boys completing industry based research under the supervision of university professors.

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Music Every Day – Prep to Year 3 Boys have music every day and use their hands and voice, in turn improving their understanding of other subjects. Song lyrics are linked with curriculum units.

Robotics Australian Champions with opportunity to compete on the world stage. Amnesty International Encourage boys to discuss and produce white papers about world issues.


Play It Forward Collection of sporting equipment for Indigenous communities. Boys on scholarship program have collected and taken it back to their communities as a pay it forward initiative. Tech Crew We don’t just run a musical, we train boys to technically run the sound and lighting. Manhood Unplugged Etiquette training and a great sense of occasion. Rock Band Program and Recording Studio Boys working with industry professionals to release their original works. Professional bands also come to use BBC’s recording studio and BBC boys are part of the production team. Pop Songs with Pipes Pipe Band playing Thunderstruck and Avicii’s Wake Me Up at Speech Night.

Farm to Table Junior School students work with Grounds staff to create and utilise a herb garden and creation of a food market – boys gain understanding of produce, small business, sales, marketing, relationship building and agriculture. Spirit Committee Gain experience in promotions, AV productions, marketing strategy and theme concepts to define our identity for the given year for the student body.

School Program Collaboration Senior Science teacher working with Junior School teacher – drawing on expertise to make Science more relevant to young students. Student Improvement Using data to continually monitor each individual’s progress; one to one counselling to discuss career opportunities and ensuring boys stay on their chosen path to reach their full potential; balancing boys’ lives; planning and goal setting.

Country Service Trips Stocktaking, identification of historical items, recording data, visit to a feed lot to understand the cattle industry. Mentoring Old Boys mentoring current students to open up career paths and networking opportunities. Whole School Music Teaching boys to be heard, not just to sing. Teaching boys to use their voice – beyond a war cry or hymn. Outdoor Education Boys working as a team, in uncomfortable situations and extending themselves outside of their comfort zone. Parent Partnership Program Linking parenting, education and student development into a single holistic program. Write History Students working together with Vintage Collegians to write BBC’s history.

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The Brisbane Boys’ College New School of Thought brings many benefits: • Helps boys discover who they are • Developing boys’ minds to be forward thinking • Delivering to boys real-world experience with a view to further education and the workforce • Thought leadership and vision for boys’ education • An opportunity for students, teachers and departments to work together to solve big issues • Active learning for our boys hands-on, practical, interactive, and with a clear purpose • Inspires the boys to work hard and want to learn • Enables boys to explore their passion and purpose in life

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Unlike most boys, Thomas knows bananas are a type of herb. And that they do not only grow in the bottom of schoolbags.

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A New School of Thought. 17


IN THE BEGINNING

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A New School of Thought. Old school values.

Our school was founded in 1902 by Mr Arthur Rudd, who had a vision of moulding boys to be worthy leaders and good citizens. In 1901, Mr Rudd embarked on a ship bound for Brisbane with a law degree and very little money. He was slightly eccentric, somewhat adventurous, and educationally ahead of his time. He decided to start his own school. He named his new venture Clayfield College, and commenced classes at ‘Knockarda’ with just four students.

At the start of the 20th Century, the country was facing unknown challenges. Rudd was flexible enough to meet these challenges, address the individuality of each of his students and cultivate a sense of Christian morality and gentlemanly behaviour as the hallmark of his new school, Brisbane Boys’ College. Rudd believed that education was the key to human progress and in the more than 100 years since our school’s foundation, a host of educators with flair and commitment have carried out the important task of moulding young men into gentlemen of honour.

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First boarders are accepted.

1909 1902

1916

1940

1945-6

Founded by A.W. Rudd, the College opens its doors at ‘Knockarda’ with four students.

The rowing club opens with 35 members at Breakfast Creek.

1918

Clayfield College is bought by the PMSA* and renamed Brisbane Boys’ College. Nine students fall whilst serving in World War I.

Graeme Wilson becomes the first Old Collegian to be awarded a Rhodes Scholarship. The College Pipe Band is formed.

1942

Air-raid shelters are constructed at BBC. Most GPS interschool sports are suspended.

Mr Hamilton is the only staff member to remain at BBC throughout WWII. 85 Old Collegians fall during the war. Gordon Donaldson becomes BBC’s second Rhodes Scholar.

1947-8

1973

1978

1980

1982

Mr G.E. Thomson is appointed Headmaster with 671 students. The Junior Library is opened by A.J. Birtles.

BBC purchases its first computer, a Tandy TRS 800.

Four new Houses are created to cater for increased enrolments Flynn, Hamilton, McKenzie and Wheller.

Dr T.R. McKenzie starts as new Headmaster and is credited with raising morale following the war. Hugh Dunn becomes BBC’s third Rhodes Scholar.

John Wylie, Dux of the College in 1978, is named BBC’s fourth Rhodes Scholar.

BBC’s Junior School caters for Prep to Year 3 boys. The College is now Prep to Year 12.

2007 1995

BBC’s fifth Rhodes Scholar is Michael Huggins.

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1997

Headmaster Mr M. Norris starts at BBC, with 1443 boys. Students are able to study university subjects whilst at school.

*Presbyterian and Methodist Schools Association

2001-02

Current Headmaster Mr G.E. McDonald starts at BBC and the College celebrates 100 years.


The Old Collegians’ Association is established. The first son of an Old Collegian is enrolled in 1927.

1920

1924-25

BBC War Cry is composed after the College Rowing crew wins the Head of the River. A new boatshed at Breakfast Creek opens.

1931

BBC moves to Toowong with 193 students. Mr P.M. Hamilton is appointed Headmaster. He introduces the distinctive BBC boater and the House system.

The new Rudd Wing opens with Junior and Senior science facilities.

1963

1956

Mr A.J. Birtles begins as the new Headmaster with 515 students including 200 boarders.

1959

1972

The Pipe Band reforms after lapsing in 1945.

The new Philp House is officially opened after being destroyed by fire in 1970.

Old Collegian Keiran Perkins wins his first Olympic Gold Medal for the 1500 metre event.

1992 1983

1990

2008

2011

BBC wins the GPS Tennis premiership. The McKenzie Wing for science and teaching is opened.

Robert Mullins becomes BBC’s sixth Rhodes Scholar.

1993

New Headmaster Mr G.M. Cujes is appointed with 1095 boys at the College. BBC wins its 14th Head of the River.

The new College Hall is opened representing a premier cultural facility for students.

BBC becomes the first school in Australia to win the Princess Elizabeth Cup at the Henley Royal Regatta in England.

2014

The Middle School Precinct is officially opened. BBC reaches 1,560 students.

LOOKING FORWARD SINCE 1902 21


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SUCCESS HAS MANY FACES AT BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE. BBC Old Boys are leaders, scholars, judges, entrepreneurs, writers, performers, teachers, Olympians, philanthropists, farmers, pioneers, fathers and good citizens of the world.

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TO DEFINE OUR OWN SUCCESS, WE NEED TO KNOW WHY WE EXIST

Our purpose is more than just a description of what we do. It is the ultimate benefit that we as a school bring each and every day and which guides everything we do.

We asked ourselves what we do and why that is important in order to get to our ultimate purpose.

THIS IS WHAT WE DO

We provide a quality, well-rounded education for boys.

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WHY IS THAT IMPORTANT?

Because knowledge is power and resilience and passion drive independent thinking. WHY IS THAT IMPORTANT?

Innovative and interactive learning environments and stimulating challenges produce more independent and self-fulfilled thinkers. WHY IS THAT IMPORTANT?

The world is changing fast and we need to prepare boys for a future that is challenging and exciting. A world that they are ready for and in which they can play a significant role.

OUR PURPOSE To produce men who have the confidence and capability to change the world. 25


OUR BELIEFS Our beliefs shape how we uniquely think and act as a school.

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OUR FOCUS IS BOYS — EVERYTHING IS ABOUT THE BOY WE BELIEVE IN AN INCLUSIVE, CONNECTED COMMUNITY WITH AUTHENTIC RELATIONSHIPS WE BELIEVE IN GENTLEMEN OF HONOUR, INTEGRITY, AND IN PRODUCING GOOD HUMAN BEINGS WE BELIEVE IN THE CHRISTIAN ETHOS THAT UNDERPINS OUR CULTURE, TEACHINGS, AND THE DAY-TODAY LIFE OF THE COLLEGE WE BELIEVE IN HONOURING THE PAST AND CREATING THE FUTURE WE EXPECT MORE THAN YESTERDAY’S BEST WE’RE NOT AFRAID TO ASK MORE OF OUR BOYS 27


There are more interesting ways to teach boys Maths.

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A New School of Thought. 29


OUR SPIRIT At BBC, you can feel our spirit as you walk through the gates, sit in a classroom, attend a game, or watch a performance. WE ARE COURAGEOUS DEDICATED AND PASSIONATE BRAVE OF HEART VIBRANT AND GENEROUS

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Our Guiding P hilosophy

(This is the very heart of our College)

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What is needed to educate and develop boys for the world in which they’ll live? 32


If we are to educate boys and produce men who have the confidence and capability to change the world, these are some of the questions that we continually address and respond to: Q. What are the challenges for boys in the current education system and how do we overcome these?

Q. How do we meet boys’ needs and interests so that they engage enthusiastically in their learning?

Q. How do we address the gender gap between boys and girls and ensure the education process is working effectively for boys?

Q. How do we best provide a safe, nurturing, supportive environment where boys can be themselves and be happy?

Q. How do we celebrate boys being boys? Q. How do we instil confidence, self-regard and respect in our boys?

Q. How do we take the best from the world today while preparing boys for the world that awaits them?

Q. How do we develop the whole child to produce well-rounded gentlemen of honour?

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OUR BOYS TEACH US AS MUCH AS WE TEACH THEM These are some of the things we know from educating boys. BOYS NEED TO BE UNDERSTOOD Boys are bundles of energy - restless, constantly on the move, always looking for the next opportunity to have fun. We harness their energy, curiosity and thirst for competition and steer it towards active learning experiences. Competitive games and challenges, collective problem solving, hands-on projects with tangible end results, role-play and interactive learning. We use all these strategies and more to get boys actively involved in their own learning.

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WE NEED TO EXPAND OUR UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IT IS TO BE A BOY Boys come in all different guises and every boy needs to be understood and valued for who he is. He should be able to pursue his interests without judgment. We want to give boys the opportunity to appreciate what it is to be male at the same time as exploring the many positive definitions of masculinity. Strong male role models - fathers, older students, teachers, Old Boys and other significant males in their lives play an important part by providing inspiration and helping young boys understand how to become a good man.

BOYS ARE TRIBAL Boys learn from other boys. They love being part of a group, which is why we have Houses. And teams. And competitions. While peers are important to boys, so are the ‘elders’ in the tribe. This is why mentoring is so important to boys, because it taps into boys’ powerful need to look up to older males. Mentoring increases skills and confidence in both the mentor and the mentored. Mentoring helps boys to accept guidance and support while staying in the driver’s seat and deciding their own course of action.

IT’S ALL ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS Boys learn best from people they like. Respect, patience, humour, active listening and seeing things from their perspective are cornerstones of building successful relationships with boys. “Boys experience their teachers before they experience the lesson they teach” (Reichert & Hawley 2010, p. 191). A boy can sense when a teacher genuinely wants the best for him and, when that happens, the teacher can set high expectations. Reichert, M & Hawley, R 2010, Reaching Boys, Teaching Boys: Strategies that Work and Why, Jossey-Bass San Francisco.

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EXPECT GREAT THINGS Boys hate failure. It’s important to hold high expectations for boys and provide them with lots of encouragement and support. When a boy makes a poor decision, we need to be there to help him learn and move on from the mistake. LET BOYS WRITE THEIR OWN STORY There’s no such thing as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ literature. When it comes to literacy, boys should be encouraged to read material that appeals to them, from sports magazines to espionage, non-fiction, fantasy and sci-fi adventures. The same goes for writing. If a boy really wants to write about intergalactic space wars, because that’s what he really cares about, we give him the freedom to follow his imagination and express himself through writing.

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS TOO MANY OPPORTUNITIES Throwing opportunities at a boy helps him to find his innate talents and the interests and passions he wants to pursue. This in turn builds confidence and self-respect.

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RITES OF PASSAGE As boys experience different stages of development, they are constantly on the move physically, mentally and emotionally. They live for the moment and are firmly focused on having fun. Our ability to educate him depends on our ability to connect with him whilst he’s on the move. Rites of passage and providing new privileges and responsibilities as a boy moves through the stages gives him a sense of achievement as he grows into a young man.

TEACH BOYS TO THINK, ACT, AND MAKE A POSITIVE DIFFERENCE Facts and figures may be the rule, but teaching boys to think is the game. We can’t just give boys answers, we need to teach them to ask questions, explore possibilities and solve problems. Boys need to know they have the power as individuals to make a positive contribution to society today, as well as in the future.

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Of course we want to make our boys great people of tomorrow. Even better if they’re great people of today.

A New School of Thought.

We don’t just teach him to answer the question correctly. We teach him to ask the correct question.

A New School of Thought.

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We’ve had mobile devices to communicate with since 1902. 40


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There comes a time in every rightly-constructed boy’s life when he has a raging desire to go somewhere and dig for hidden treasure.

– Mark Twain

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A New School of Thought