2020-2021 American Indian College Fund - Quick Fact Sheet

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2020–21

ANNUAL N REPORT Our Ancestors Are Our Strength


AUDITE D F I NANCI AL I NFO RMAT ION

OUR IM PACT 2020–21

T R ANSF OR MAT I V E AI D

T

H E L PI NG OUR ST UD E NT S AND T R I BAL COL L E GE S AND U N I V E RS I TI E S SUCCE E D T H R OUGH OUT T H E PAND E MI C

he American Indian College Fund invests in Native students and their communities through scholarships, student internships, student success initiatives, support for the 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), and more. We helped Native students and TCUs in the following ways in 2020-21.

STAT E M E NT O F ACT I VI T I E S Y E A R E N D E D JU NE 30, 2021

$

2020–21 Fiscal Year

$ 57,531,081 2,248,092 14,268,703 792,500 96,605

Gross special events revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Less cost of direct benefits to donors. . . . . . . . . . . . Net special events revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net assets released from restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . . Total support, revenue and gains. . . . . . . . . .

55,929 – 55,929 – 74,992,910

Expenses and Losses Program services expense Scholarships and grants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26,681,052 Public education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,521,003 Total program expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,202,055 Supporting services expense Administrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,541,929 Donor development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,331,795 Total supporting services expenses . . . . . . . . 8,873,724 Loss on uncollectable promises to give. . . . . . . . . . 55,603 Total expenses and losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39,131,382 Change in Net Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,861,528 Net Assets, Beginning of Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105,642,543 Net Assets, End of Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 141,504,071

3,681

Total Students Receiving Scholarships

Total Support, Revenue and Gains Contributions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contributed public service announcements . . . . . Net investment return. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Government assistance - PPP loan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Total Scholarships Distributed

2,959

Total Dollar Amount of Scholarships Awarded

$10,160,000

Total Other Direct Student Support Awarded

$5,348,000

First-Generation Scholars Served

58%

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Majors (Including Healthcare)

37%

Top Majors

Business Administration

Liberal Arts

Early Childhood Education

Total Dollar Amount of Scholarships and Direct Student Support Awarded Since 1989

$144,457,000

Total Student, Program, and Institutional Support Since 1989

$259,704,309

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

he pandemic had devastating consequences for Native scholars and tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). The challenges students and institutions faced were exacerbated by existing disproportionate poverty and food and housing insecurity. A decline in Native student college enrollment and persistence in Native communities could cause the loss of the next generation of teachers, doctors, nurses, scientists, entrepreneurs, artists, and leaders. The result would create economic instability and stagnant job growth. This would negatively impact health care, infrastructure, innovation, education, and more.

T

In response, the College Fund has provided more than $9 million in direct aid to Native students, 35 accredited TCUs and their 89 campuses, and TCU communities since the onset of the pandemic.

Fall 2020

Results

} Student Enrollment and Persistence Support at 35 TCUs • Financial aid and incentives to stay in school • Financial education • Early warning systems to prevent student dropout • Online tutoring software • GED funding • Money for hiring tutoring staff and tech assistants and for establishing help desks • Mental health services • Virtual counseling • Podcasts • Talking circles • Training for faculty and staff to recognize issues

From Fall 2020 to Spring 2021, tribal college and university (TCU) student persistence rose to 63 percent, higher than the three-year average of 59 percent, meaning more TCU students remained in school through 2020-21 than before the pandemic. This contrasted with the significant decline in enrollment and persistence of Native students at colleges and universities nationwide during the pandemic.

} IT Infrastructure Support for 20 TCUs • Hardware and software upgrades • Laptops • Wireless internet hotspots • Transmission towers to boost internet access for students in remote areas • Specialized equipment for students with physical or learning disabilities • Software applications to improve the online delivery of coursework and administrative and student support • Website redesigns • Virtual labs • Virtual campus tours and platforms for high school students • Funding for distancing and hygiene } Food and Personal Protection for 35 TCU Communities • Distributed food boxes, meals, vouchers, and TCU food bank support • Expanded support for 10 TCUs’ food sovereignty programs to gather and preserve traditional foods, to grow and preserve crops, to access wild and domestic meats, and to distribute food • Acquired food from Native businesses • Distributed $1 million of masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, and disinfectant to TCUs, tribes, and Native-serving organizations E DUCATI ON I S THE ANS WE R

In 2020-21, we evolved our pandemic response to meet Native scholars’ basic needs for college persistence and to strengthen the TCUs’ ability to adapt educational programming, tools, and resources to serve Native students and communities.

Spring 2021 to Present } Support for Enrollment and Persistence for 33 TCUs • Incentives to support enrollment and persistence in workforce training and technical and academic degree areas • Computers • Internet access • Paid internships • Mental and emotional health support • Help desk and tutoring services • TCU faculty and staff training • Student engagement and intervention software • IT infrastructure • Distance learning adaptation and tools } Ongoing Community and Food Security Support at TCUs Program ended September 2021. Reporting is ongoing.

63%

59%

Fall 2020 to Spring 2021 TCU Persistence

Fall 2020 to Spring 2021 TCU Persistence

All Emergency Aid Grantees

Three-Year Average, All TCUs


W H E R E O U R ST U DE NT S ST U DY 33c 33b 33d

33 33e 33a

13 17

33f

12

18

15a

16

27

15

14

24 10 25 25c 11 25a 25d 25b 28 26 26a 32 26b 30j 30d 31a 30i 30c 30 31 30f 30h 30a 30e 31b 30g 30b 19b 20a 20b 19a 19 20 20c

9

8 35 35a

6 5a 6a 35c 35b

5

5d

5c

34 34a

5b

7

4

2d

22b 2c 2 2a 22a 2e 2b 22

23

21 29

3

1

TCUs

TCU Satellite Campuses Our scholars attended both TCUs and mainstream colleges and universities in these states.

Tribal Colleges and Universities Alaska 1 Iḷisaġvik College, Barrow* Arizona 2 Diné College, Tsaile* 2a Chinle 2b Crownpoint, New Mexico 2c Shiprock, New Mexico 2d Tuba City 2e Window Rock 3 Tohono O’odham Community College, Sells Kansas 4 Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence* Michigan 5 Bay Mills Community College, Brimley* 5a L’Anse 5b Manistee 5c Petoskey 5d Sault Ste. Marie 6 Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College, Baraga 6a L’Anse

7

Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Mount Pleasant

Minnesota 8 Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College, Cloquet 9 Leech Lake Tribal College, Cass Lake 10 Red Lake Nation College, Red Lake 11 White Earth Tribal and Community College, Mahnomen Montana 12 Aaniiih Nakoda College, Harlem* 13 Blackfeet Community College, Browning* 14 Chief Dull Knife College, Lame Deer 15 Fort Peck Community College, Poplar 15a Wolf Point 16 Little Big Horn College, Crow Agency 17 Salish Kootenai College, Pablo** 18 Stone Child College, Box Elder* Nebraska 19 Little Priest Tribal College, Winnebago

HoChunk Village Sioux City, Iowa 20 Nebraska Indian Community College, Macy 20a Niobrara 20b South Sioux City 20c Walthill

Sitting Bull College, Ft. Yates** McLaughlin, South Dakota 26b Mobridge, South Dakota 27 Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt* 28 United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck*

New Mexico 21 Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe** 22 Navajo Technical University, Crownpoint** 22a Chinle, Arizona 22b Teec Nos Pos, Arizona 23 Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute, Albuquerque

Oklahoma 29 College of the Muscogee Nation, Okmulgee

19a

19b

North Dakota 24 Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Ft. Totten 25 Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, New Town* 25a Mandaree 25b Parshall 25c Twin Buttes 25d White Shield

26

26a

South Dakota 30 Oglala Lakota College, Kyle** 30a Allen 30b Batesland 30c Eagle Butte 30d Manderson 30e Martin 30f Oglala 30g Pine Ridge 30h Porcupine 30i Rapid City 30j Wanblee

Sinte Gleska University, Mission** Lower Brule 31b Marty 32 Sisseton Wahpeton College, Sisseton 31

31a

Washington 33 Northwest Indian College, Bellingham* 33a Auburn 33b Kingston 33c La Conner 33d Olympia 33e Tulalip 33f Lapwai, Idaho Wisconsin 34 College of Menominee Nation, Keshena* 34a Green Bay 35 Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Hawyward** 35a Hertel 35b Lac du Flambeau 35c Washburn * TCUs offering bachelor’s degrees.

** TCUs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

8333 Greenwood Boulevard Denver, Colorado 80221 collegefund.org

All TCUs listed offer certificate and associate degrees.