American Indian College Fund - Annual Report - 2020-2021 - Our Ancestors Are Our Strength

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2020–21

ANNUAL N REPORT Our Ancestors Are Our Strength


O UR MI S S I O N

TABL E OF CONT E NT S

The American

How Your Donations Are Used: Fulfilling Our Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Indian College Fund invests in Native students and tribal college education to transform lives and communities.

Message from the President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Our Impact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4–5

Transformative Aid: Helping Our Students and Tribal Colleges and Universities Succeed Throughout the Pandemic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6–7

Where Our Students Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8–9

Student Programs Create Employment Paths and Leadership Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 – 12

Student Ambassadors: The Next Generation of Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13 – 17

Focus on Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18 – 21

American Indian College Fund Supporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22 – 25

Bequests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2020–21 Governing Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Audited Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

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HOW YOUR DONATIONS ARE USED

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

F UL F I L L I N G OU R MI SSI O N*

74%**

21%*

Scholarships, Programs, Fundraising and Public Education

we serve, but we also use those traditions of respect, community, and support to survive and adapt to continue to support the communities that are counting on us.

5%*

In Native communities, we move forward together, helping each other to overcome obstacles and to persist. It is why our tribal communities are still here today despite our country’s history. This past year we knew we had to work harder than ever to get Native students into college and to keep them there until graduation. According to 2021 U.S. Census Bureau figures, 15 percent of American Indian and Alaska Natives aged 25 and older have a college degree, compared to 32.1 percent of non-Native people, less than half. And because the pandemic made attending college even more difficult for our students, Fall 2020 enrollment statistics showed that Native American first-year student enrollment was down by 23 percent in 2020 as compared to 2019 (with a 13 percent decline in first-year student enrollment overall, and an 11 percent drop in first-year student enrollment at TCUs).

General Administration

* Percentages are a five-year average of functional expense.

** Includes COVID aid. Does not include donated advertising.

We kicked our work into higher gear—providing scholarships, coaching students, and offering leadership training and cultural and language immersion programs. We also offered advocacy training for issues that impact education.

OUR COMMI TME NT TO YOU: For more than 30 years, the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) has been committed to transparency and accountability while serving our students, tribal colleges, and communities. We consistently receive top ratings from independent charity evaluators. • We earned the “Best in America Seal of Excellence” from the Independent Charities of America. Of the one million charities operating in the United States, fewer than 2,000 organizations have been awarded this seal. • The College Fund meets the Standards for Charity Accountability of the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. • The College Fund received a Gold Seal of Transparency from Guidestar. • The College Fund consistently receives high ratings from Charity Navigator. For more ratings and information, please visit collegefund.org/aboutus.

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remember in early 2020 when I first heard a virus was identified in our country’s coastal cities. I was impressed by how quickly everyone responded, with the only certainty being the virus was not only serious, but could also be deadly. Tribes, tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), and Native students showed their resilience and perseverance by responding in ways that protected the health of their most vulnerable citizens, elders, and children. Despite that resilience and their protective actions, Tribes were among the most devastated populations. This experience impacted our students and their education. Yet, despite the many challenges that our faculty, staff, students, and communities faced, we were able to transition, survive, and adapt thanks to the strong foundations that we rely upon, passed on to us by our elders and ancestors. Here at the American Indian College Fund, a Native-led non-profit organization, we not only value the traditions and beliefs of the people

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2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

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Our work is more important than ever for the physical, mental, financial, and cultural health of our communities. Education produces teachers, health-care professionals, scientists, business people, and service workers who serve our communities in good times and in tough times. We witnessed the death of too many of our spiritual and cultural elders due to the pandemic, creating an even greater need to educate our students for leadership roles. We are preparing them through education and training programs, giving them the skills and confidence to succeed as servant leaders in their communities. We have not stopped. Today we are continuing our work at the American Indian College Fund with renewed hope. Our students tell us they want to make a difference today in the lives of their families and communities. With the unwavering support of our partners and allies, we are making that happen. This annual report is a testament to the legacy, love, and hope our ancestors held for their people and their future—and the amazing work we can do when we do it together.

Cheryl Crazy Bull (Sicangu Lakota) President and CEO, American Indian College Fund

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OUR IMPACT 2020–21

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he American Indian College Fund invests in Native students and their communities through scholarships, student internships, student success initiatives, support for the 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), and more. We helped Native students and TCUs in the following ways in 2020-21.

$ Total Scholarships Distributed

3,681

Total Students Receiving Scholarships

2,959

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Majors (Including Healthcare)

37%

Top Majors

Business Administration

Liberal Arts

Total Dollar Amount of Scholarships Awarded

$10,160,000

Early Childhood Education

Total Other Direct Student Support Awarded

$5,348,000

Our Scholars Attended

239 Colleges in 38 States.

58%

Total Dollar Amount of Scholarships and Direct Student Support Awarded Since 1989

$144,457,000

First-Generation Scholars Served

Total Student, Program, and Institutional Support Since 1989

$259,704,309

Our scholars attended colleges and universities in these states.

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2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

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TRANSFORMATIVE AID H E L PI NG OU R ST U DE NT S AND TRIBA L COLLEGES A N D UN IVERSI T I E S S U CC E E D T H ROU GHOU T T HE PA N DEM IC

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he pandemic had devastating consequences for Native scholars and tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). The challenges students and institutions faced were exacerbated by existing disproportionate poverty and food and housing insecurity. A decline in Native student college enrollment and persistence in Native communities could cause the loss of the next generation of teachers, doctors, nurses, scientists, entrepreneurs, artists, and leaders. The result would create economic instability and stagnant job growth. This would negatively impact health care, infrastructure, innovation, education, and more.

In response, the College Fund has provided more than $9 million in direct aid to Native students, 35 accredited TCUs and their 89 campuses, and TCU communities since the onset of the pandemic. In 2020-21, we evolved our pandemic response to meet Native scholars’ basic needs for college persistence and to strengthen the TCUs’ ability to adapt educational programming, tools, and resources to serve Native students and communities.

Fall 2020 } Student Enrollment and Persistence Support at 35 TCUs • Financial aid and incentives to stay in school • Financial education • Early warning systems to prevent student dropout • Online tutoring software • GED funding • Money for hiring tutoring staff and tech assistants and for establishing help desks • Mental health services • Virtual counseling • Podcasts • Talking circles • Training for faculty and staff to recognize issues

} IT Infrastructure Support for 20 TCUs • Hardware and software upgrades • Laptops • Wireless internet hotspots • Transmission towers to boost internet access for students in remote areas • Specialized equipment for students with physical or learning disabilities • Software applications to improve the online delivery of coursework and administrative and student support • Website redesigns • Virtual labs • Virtual campus tours and platforms for high school students • Funding for distancing and hygiene } Food and Personal Protection for 35 TCU Communities • Distributed food boxes, meals, vouchers, and TCU food bank support • Expanded support for 10 TCUs’ food sovereignty programs to gather and preserve traditional foods, to grow and preserve crops, to access wild and domestic meats, and to distribute food • Acquired food from Native businesses • Distributed $1 million of masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, and disinfectant to TCUs, tribes, and Native-serving organizations

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2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

Results

Spring 2021 to Present

From Fall 2020 to Spring 2021, tribal college and university (TCU) student persistence rose to 63 percent, higher than the three-year average of 59 percent, meaning more TCU students remained in school through 2020-21 than before the pandemic. This contrasted with the significant decline in enrollment and persistence of Native students at colleges and universities nationwide during the pandemic.

} Support for Enrollment and Persistence for 33 TCUs • Incentives to support enrollment and persistence in workforce training and technical and academic degree areas • Computers • Internet access • Paid internships • Mental and emotional health support • Help desk and tutoring services • TCU faculty and staff training • Student engagement and intervention software • IT infrastructure • Distance learning adaptation and tools

63%

59%

} Ongoing Community and Food Security Support at TCUs Program ended September 2021. Reporting is ongoing.

Fall 2020 to Spring 2021 TCU Persistence

Fall 2020 to Spring 2021 TCU Persistence

All Emergency Aid Grantees

Three-Year Average, All TCUs

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WHERE OUR STUDENTS STUDY Tribal Colleges and Universities

33c 33b 33d

33 33e 33a

Alaska 1 Iḷisaġvik College, Barrow*

13 17

33f

12

18

15a

Arizona 2 Diné College, Tsaile* 2a Chinle 2b Crownpoint, New Mexico 2c Shiprock, New Mexico 2d Tuba City 2e Window Rock 3 Tohono O’odham Community College, Sells

16

14

15

27

24

10

25 25c 11 25a 25d 25b 28 26 26a 32 26b 30j 30d 31a 30i 30c 30 31 30f 30h 30a 30e 31b 30g 30b 19b 20a 20b 19a 19 20 20c

Kansas 4 Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence* Michigan 5 Bay Mills Community College, Brimley* 5a L’Anse 5b Manistee 5c Petoskey 5d Sault Ste. Marie 6 Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College, Baraga 6a L’Anse 7 Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Mount Pleasant

9

8 35 35a

6 5a 6a 35c 35b

5

5d

5c

34 34a

5b

7

4

2d

22b 2c 2 2a 22a 2e 2b 22

23

Nebraska 19 Little Priest Tribal College, Winnebago 19a HoChunk Village 19b Sioux City, Iowa 20 Nebraska Indian Community College, Macy 20a Niobrara 20b South Sioux City 20c Walthill

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St. Catherine University University of Minnesota University of Minnesota - Duluth University of Minnesota - Morris

Colorado Colorado Mesa University Colorado State University - Ft. Collins Fort Lewis College Regis University University of Colorado - Boulder University of Colorado - Denver|Anschutz Medical Campus

Nebraska Bellevue University Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing & Allied Health Northeast Community College University of Nebraska - Lincoln Wayne State College

Connecticut Quinnipiac University Yale University

21 29

Florida Keiser University - Naples 3

1

TCUs

TCU Satellite Campuses

Minnesota 8 Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College, Cloquet 9 Leech Lake Tribal College, Cass Lake 10 Red Lake Nation College, Red Lake 11 White Earth Tribal and Community College, Mahnomen Montana 12 Aaniiih Nakoda College, Harlem* 13 Blackfeet Community College, Browning* 14 Chief Dull Knife College, Lame Deer 15 Fort Peck Community College, Poplar 15a Wolf Point 16 Little Big Horn College, Crow Agency 17 Salish Kootenai College, Pablo** 18 Stone Child College, Box Elder*

Napa Valley College Otis College of Art and Design Palomar Community College Reedley College Sacramento City College Sacramento State University San Diego State University San Francisco State University Santa Rosa Junior College Sierra College Sonoma State University Stanford University University of California - Berkeley University of California - Davis University of California - Irvine University of California - Santa Cruz University of Redlands University of Southern California University of the Pacific West Hills College-Lemoore William Jessup University

Our scholars attended colleges and universities in these states.

Traditional Colleges and Universities New Mexico 21 Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe** 22 Navajo Technical University, Crownpoint** 22a Chinle, Arizona 22b Teec Nos Pos, Arizona 23 Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute, Albuquerque North Dakota 24 Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Ft. Totten 25 Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, New Town* 25a Mandaree 25b Parshall 25c Twin Buttes 25d White Shield

Sitting Bull College, Ft. Yates** 26a McLaughlin, South Dakota 26b Mobridge, South Dakota 27 Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt* 28 United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck* 26

Oklahoma 29 College of the Muscogee Nation, Okmulgee South Dakota 30 Oglala Lakota College, Kyle** 30a Allen 30b Batesland 30c Eagle Butte 30d Manderson

Martin 30f Oglala 30g Pine Ridge 30h Porcupine 30i Rapid City 30j Wanblee 31 Sinte Gleska University, Mission** 31a Lower Brule 31b Marty 32 Sisseton Wahpeton College, Sisseton 30e

Washington 33 Northwest Indian College, Bellingham* 33a Auburn 33b Kingston

La Conner 33d Olympia 33e Tulalip 33f Lapwai, Idaho 33c

Wisconsin 34 College of Menominee Nation, Keshena* 34a Green Bay 35 Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Hawyward** 35a Hertel 35b Lac du Flambeau 35c Washburn * TCUs offering bachelor’s degrees.

** TCUs offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

All TCUs listed offer certificate and associate degrees.

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

In addition to providing financial and programmatic support to 35 TCUs, the American Indian College Fund provides Native students with scholarships at traditional colleges and universities in 38 states. Alaska University of Alaska - Fairbanks Arizona Arizona State University Benedictine University - Mesa Coconino Community College Gateway Community College Grand Canyon University Northern Arizona University Scottsdale Community College University of Arizona Arkansas University of Arkansas - Fayetteville California Butte College California State University - Chico

California State University - Fresno California State University - Fullerton California State University - Los Angeles California State University - San Marcos California State University- Sacramento Centre College Cerro Coso Community College Clovis Community College College of the Desert College of the Redwoods Cosumnes River College Cuyamaca College Feather River Community College Golden Gate University Hollins University Humboldt State University Lake Tahoe Community College Los Angeles Mission College Mendocino College

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Hawaii University of Hawaii - Manoa

Mississippi University of Southern Mississippi Missouri Missouri University of Science & Technology Park University Montana Liberty University Montana State University - Billings Montana State University - Bozeman Montana State University - Northern University of Montana - Missoula University of Montana - Western University of Providence

Nevada College of Southern Nevada Truckee Meadows Community College University of Nevada - Las Vegas University of Nevada - Reno New Hampshire Southern New Hampshire University

Kansas Baker University Fort Hays State University University of Kansas

New Mexico Central New Mexico Community College Eastern New Mexico University - Portales New Mexico Highlands University New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology New Mexico State University - Las Cruces Northern New Mexico College Southwestern College University of New Mexico - Albuquerque University of New Mexico - Gallup Western New Mexico University

Louisiana Fletcher Technical Community College Louisiana State University - Baton Rouge Nicholls State University University of Louisiana - Lafayette

New York Brown University Long Island University State University of New York - ESF SUNY at Albany

Maine Bowdoin College

North Carolina Campbell University North Carolina State University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Idaho University of Idaho Iowa Cornell College

Maryland Johns Hopkins University Massachusetts Bentley University Harvard University Michigan Central Michigan University Eastern Michigan University Lake Superior State University Michigan State University Northern Michigan University Oakland University University of Michigan - Ann Arbor Minnesota Augsburg College Bemidji State University Bethel University College of St. Scholastica Minnesota State University - Moorhead

North Dakota Bismarck State College Minot State University North Dakota State University United Tribes Technical College University of Mary University of North Dakota Ohio University of Akron Oklahoma Cameron University Northeastern State University Northern Oklahoma College Oklahoma Christian University Oklahoma City University Oklahoma State University Oklahoma City

Oklahoma State University - Okmulgee Oklahoma State University - Stillwater Seminole State College Southeastern Oklahoma State University Tulsa Community College University of Central Oklahoma University of Oklahoma Oregon Corban University Linfield College Oregon Health and Science University Oregon Institute of Technology Oregon State University Pacific University Portland State University Southern Oregon University University of Oregon Warner Pacific University Willamette University South Carolina Clemson University South Dakota Augustana University Black Hills State University Presentation College South Dakota School of Mines & Technology South Dakota State University University of Sioux Falls University of South Dakota Tennessee Middle Tennessee State University Texas Tarrant County College Texas A&M Corpus Christi Texas A&M University - College Station Texas Christian University Texas State University Texas Tech University University of Houston University of Mary Hardin - Baylor University of North Texas University of Texas at Austin University of Texas of the Permian Basin West Texas A&M University Utah Brigham Young University - Provo Dixie State University Independence University Lake Region State College University of Utah Western Governors University Washington Bellingham Technical College Central Washington University Eastern Washington University Lower Columbia College Seattle University Shoreline Community College University of Washington - Seattle Walla Walla University Washington State University - Pullman Washington State University - Spokane Western Washington University Yakima Valley Community College West Virginia Marshall University Wisconsin Northland College Saint Norbert College University of Wisconsin - Green Bay University of Wisconsin - Madison University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point

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STUDENT PROGRAMS

CRE ATE E MPLOY ME NT PATH S AND L E AD E RSH IP S KILLS

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he path to a rewarding career gives students the opportunity to explore skills, concepts, and even jobs that the classroom does not offer, impacting students’ personal and professional development. The American Indian College Fund, with a grant from the Strada Education Network, began work with select tribal colleges and universities to explore the many forms of experiential education. Thanks to additional funding from donors during the pandemic, the College Fund created a student professional development grant program to provide funding for internships, research, and student experience projects. Internships with employers help students gain practical skills and explore careers in a professional setting. Research projects enable students to develop and strengthen their research skills for future academic studies or employment. Student experiences allow students to complete certificate programs, attend career-related conferences and other experiential projects, and participate in the American Indian College Fund Student Ambassador program. Additional virtual events include professional development webinars, an internship fair, and graduate school fairs to help students create professional career portfolios. Career coaches encourage students to create a profile with the College Fund’s digital tools, CONNECT (for career readiness) and Focus 2 (for career exploration). High school students are also offered opportunities to create Focus 2 profiles.

50

1,500

participated in internships, research projects, and student experiences.

received additional career coaching services.

students

students

Jaci: Research and Software Skills Ignite Desire for More Learning

T

hanks to a research grant from the American Indian College Fund, Jaci (Cherokee Nation), an agriculture business and psychology major at Oklahoma State University, is conducting College Fund-supported research about her passion: livestock and marketing operations in agriculture. Jaci is learning about how crossbreeding through artificial insemination can impact the viability of stock in different geographic areas to create more marketable animals. She also used the College Fund grant to study graphic design technology and photography to market the agriculture industry and started her own marketing agency, Legacy Marketing. Jaci said agriculture and ranching are “not just cows, sows, and ploughs,” but are exciting careers that require a knowledge of science, business, marketing, and more. Tribal lands are often located in rural areas where farming and ranching are prevalent, and climate change will have an impact on the cattle

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2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

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industry. Jaci’s research will help her understand cattle breeds’ odds for survival, which breeds provide the best meat, and their impact on rangeland health. Thanks to the grant, Jaci said, “I've learned so much about the industry I'm passionate about and ultimately I've shaped a career for my future.”

Cattle on the Alabama ranch where Jaci conducted her research and internship.

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STUDENT PROGRAMS

CRE ATE E MPLOY ME NT PATH S AND L E AD E RSH IP S KILLS

STUDENT AMBASSADORS:

T H E N EX T GEN ERAT IO N OF L E A D E R S

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hen the American Indian College Fund launched its Student Ambassador program in 2015 to train students and alumni to represent the College Fund, it had no idea it was creating a leadership training program. But the skills students learn through their ambassador training and experience have made the program exactly that. Each year, applicants submit essays and videos to introduce themselves and their goals. After an interview process, the College Fund selects participants to join a cohort of student ambassadors for the upcoming academic year. Student ambassadors are trained as skilled College Fund representatives who serve as the face of the organization. They work with students,

supporters, and the public by organizing campus and virtual events, by speaking at fundraising events, and by raising awareness about the College Fund on social media and in media interviews. Ambassadors are trained to participate in press interviews, write articles on behalf of the College Fund, and advocate for their communities. Last year, ambassadors advocated for participation in the U.S. Census to ensure education funding for their communities and voter registration. The skills ambassadors learn prepare them for their careers, giving them confidence and expanding their personal access to greater professional and academic connections. They accomplish this while creating opportunity for their communities and awareness of the College Fund.

Student ambassadors participated in community outreach to encourage participation in the U.S. Census. Native communities have a greater reliance on federal funding because of treaty relationships with the U.S. government, making an accurate Census count important for education funding.

Carrie: Internship Provides Career Learning Experience

C

arrie (Cherokee Nation), a Full Circle Scholar and Institute of American Indian Arts graduate, was enrolled in San Diego State University’s film and media program when the pandemic struck.

Although Carrie quickly adapted to online coursework during her first year of graduate school, internship opportunities were scarce. When she heard the College Fund was seeking a student intern to work remotely, she immediately applied and joined the public education team. Carrie, who is an award-winning cinematographer, put her design and filmmaking skills to work creating media kits and website designs. She also created a promotional video about the College Fund’s internship program. Carrie enjoys creative, collaborative work. She found her online internship offered an opportunity for inventiveness virtually, while giving her the platform to help the College Fund connect to wider audiences. She said the experience was the perfect chance to work from the comfort of her home while helping other Native students.

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Remote internship opportunities are a win/win for students and the College Fund, giving greater numbers of students who cannot relocate valuable work and career learning experiences, while allowing the College Fund to employ talented TCU students.

Check out Carrie’s student nationwide internship video on the College Fund’s YouTube channel at collegefund.org/Carrie.

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

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STUDENT AMBASSADORS:

TH E NE XT GE NE RATI ON OF L E AD E RS

down and went from thinking he would be fulfilling routine IT requests to keeping the tribal college functioning in an online learning environment. That was no easy feat. The digital divide still exists on Indian reservations, where, according to the Federal Communications Commission and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, 68 percent of people don’t have access to broadband.

Jacob wants to be a good role model for his son.

Jasmine–2018 Cohort

Jacob–2020 Cohort

he saying “if you want something done, ask a busy person” applies to Jasmine. A public administration major at the College of Menominee Nation, Jasmine (Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin) has amassed a lengthy list of honors and activities during her college years. Despite a heavy class schedule and her research work, Jasmine was undaunted by having to adapt quickly to online learning during the pandemic. She also demonstrated her commitment to her TCU community by organizing donations and deliveries of food, medicines, and other necessities.

acob (White Earth Ojibwe Tribe) says finding his path to college wasn't easy. A first-generation student, he faced challenges from the beginning, from deciding whether school would be a good choice for him when he still had to provide for his young family, to navigating the application process. After entering college, Jacob decided to take a break. With a young son, he says, “We want and need to provide for them right now and so [we] think college isn't an option.”

T

J

Jacob isn’t alone. More than 50 percent of tribal college scholars work fulltime or part-time to support their families while attending college. Of those, nearly 50 percent are the primary source of income for their families.

Jasmine also dedicated herself to writing projects, research, and applying for a fellowship with the Forge Project, an initiative created to support established and emerging Indigenous leaders in the land justice, education, and cultural fields with funding and a residency. Jasmine was one of four Native “movers and shakers” awarded a fellowship, and she will conduct environmental sustainability research and produce a podcast for her project.

Jacob was determined to finish his education and serve as a role model for his young son. He transferred to Bemidji State University after completing his associate degree in business at White Earth Tribal and Community College (WETCC) on his home reservation. During the pandemic, Jacob continued his studies online while working at a new job as an information technology coordinator at his alma mater, WETCC. He had started the position one day before Minnesota was locked During the fellowship, Jasmine will enjoy the opportunity to live in rotation with other fellows at the Forge Project property in the Hudson Valley of New York, which includes a living space, a studio, and an art gallery, where she will complete her work. Jasmine was also selected to participate in The Rising Voices Center for Indigenous and Earth Sciences workshop, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The program brings Indigenous and other scientific professionals, tribal and community leaders, environmental and communication experts, students, educators, and artists together from across the world. They will learn about extreme weather and climate events, climate variability, and climate change.

50% of TCU

scholars work full-time or part-time to support their families while attending college.

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

“Between my new job and my classes, I was going nonstop! It felt good, though, knowing I was helping other students, especially when I think of what it would mean if any of them had had to drop out. I know that things like those hotspots were the make-or-break for some of my classmates. It might seem small to some people, but it was huge for us.” He added, “We are a tight-knit community, and things like that impact all of us.” In addition to classes, work, and spending time with his family, Jacob served as a 2020-21 student ambassador; participated in online advocacy training to promote the U.S. Census and voter registration in his community; and was interviewed in a national podcast, “Rethinking History Through an Indigenous Lens,” to mark Native American Heritage Month in November of last year. Jacob was also one of four scholars selected for a leadership project through the 2020-21 Ford College Community Challenge (C3). The program, managed in partnership with the College Fund, promotes and funds student-led sustainable community development projects nationwide. Jacob’s project documented the fall and winter cultural traditions of his tribal nation to ensure they continue for future generations.

Nearly 50% of TCU scholars are the primary source of income for their families.

Jacob discussed how overlooking Native history contributes to inequity in higher education on Inclusivity Included, a national podcast.

Jasmine represented the College Fund in print and video interviews with The Nation, USA Today, and The Christian Science Monitor.

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Despite these obstacles Jacob found ways for faculty and staff to transition to online teaching, and helped students prepare and optimize their home computer equipment for remote studies. Knowing there was a huge risk that students might drop out of classes without access to proper equipment and broadband, Jacob traversed more than 200 miles, buying as many hotspots as he could to keep WETCC students online for their studies.

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STUDENT AMBASSADORS:

TH E NE XT GE NE RATI ON OF L E AD E RS

Jerald Red Buffalo–2021 Cohort

strangers to debate our past, present, and futures in the courtroom— strangers who held our sovereignty in their hands, knowing it means nothing to them but the world to us.”

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erald (Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate) was brought up in his culture and community by his grandparents, where he connected with his family and people through singing and dancing. When his grandparents passed on, he says he followed his parents' path into substance abuse. After receiving treatment, Jerald re-entered Sisseton Wahpeton College, changed his major to behavioral science, and looked for ways to serve his people struggling with similar issues. Jerald and his wife founded Piya Canku (Healing Road), a program to help those in recovery after treatment. “We wanted to focus on people fresh out of treatment because there is little help for those being discharged. There’s not a support system for people that want to continue with their sobriety,” Jerald said. To strengthen this support, they applied for a $5,000 grant from the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Health Board & Epidemiology Center to identify the leading causes of relapse on the Lake Traverse Reservation. This led to an opportunity with the American Indian Higher Education Consortium’s Aseto'ne Institute research program. The program is a multiinstitutional initiative designed to coordinate outreach, education, and mentoring services within the nation’s tribal colleges and universities. Jerald completed 50 hours of research curriculum with prestigious Native doctors and researchers. “I created a lot of good relationships and got to meet a lot of people that specialize in research. It’s really different researching in Native communities,” he said, noting that it is difficult to allow outside people in “because of how it [Western research] was conducted in the past.” Jerald was able to make far more progress working in his own community. “I had a lot more response. And of course, we retain our own data if we conduct it [research] ourselves. We can own it and we can do what we see fit with it.” Having completed his associate degree in behavioral science from Sisseton Wahpeton College, Jerald is now seeking a bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Minnesota at Morris, with the goal of completing a master’s degree in clinical psychology. He wants to continue to serve his people, do more research, and bring Indigenous methodologies to the next generation of Native mental health professionals. “After changing my life and regaining my confidence, I feel I am ready to apply my knowledge of our traditional spirituality along with this education to help others overcome what has been plaguing our people for decades.”

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2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

With the financial support of the College Fund and a Harvard Law degree, Samantha hopes to hold the school to its charter and to uplift Native people who continue to fight in court to protect their rights and lands. “A law degree from Harvard will mean more than just what I can achieve myself. It will mean helping design a future where tribal youth can imagine themselves at the university’s law school… a future where Native women and girls can see that they belong side by side with some of the nation’s brightest legal minds. It means a step towards healing for my community and inspiring generations to follow,” she said.

Samantha–2021 Cohort

S

amantha (Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah), a descendant of a long line of Native women leaders, was awarded the secondever American Indian Law School Scholarship to attend Harvard Law School. She joined the incoming class of 2021. The scholarship covers tuition and all costs of attendance for the three-year course of study, and is open to American Indian or Alaska Natives who are enrolled tribal members or lineal descendants of enrolled parents or grandparents.

Samantha jumped into helping the College Fund create public awareness about the scholarship and Native access to higher education. She was interviewed by the Boston Globe and the Associated Press and appeared on “The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell Show” on MSNBC. Publicity helps Native students learn about education opportunities and see Native role models. It also creates greater visibility for Native people and the College Fund. Samantha said she sees her public awareness work as part of her role to “hold the door open” for Native students aspiring to go to college and to achieve their dreams.

Samantha is a former American Indian College Fund Full Circle Scholar who graduated in 2018 from Dartmouth College. Her winning essay for the scholarship detailed Harvard University and its relationship with her tribal nation. “Harvard’s past is tied to my community, but I hope to weave our futures together as well.” Harvard University was established in 1636 in part for the “education of Indian youth.” The first Native graduate was a member of the Wampanoag Tribal community, yet centuries later, no Wampanoag person has graduated from the law school. In addition, Harvard Law School did not open its doors to women until 1950. Samantha’s mother, Cheryl Andrews-Maltais, is the Tribal Chairwoman of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah. Samantha’s mother and her father, Daniel Maltais, raised her in Wampanoag culture and traditions. A member of the Wolf Clan, Samantha said the matriarchs in her family have fought for the rights of her tribal people since contact, yet added, “None before me had the opportunity to fight with a legal education behind them. For generations, they were forced to rely on Samantha discussed her scholarship and its importance to her and Native people on MSNBC's "The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell" program.

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FOCUS ON NURSING

Salish Kootenai College Becomes First Tribal College Offering Four-Year Registered Nursing Degree

R

egistered nurses (RNs) are in high demand, particularly in Native communities, which often have shortages of medical facilities and health-care personnel. Registered nurses also serve as the first line of care for chronically ill patients, which is particularly important because Native people suffer from chronic diseases at higher rates than non-Natives. In 2020-21, Salish Kootenai College (SKC) became the first tribal college to offer a four-year registered nursing degree program. It welcomed its first student cohort last fall, kicking off The World Health Organization’s Year of the Nurse and honoring the 200th birth anniversary of Florence Nightingale. Lisa Harmon, Ph.D., RN, and Certified Nurse Educator (CNE), led the development of SKC’s nursing program prior to her retirement as the chairwoman of the nursing program. Dr. Harmon, a veteran nurse of 44 years, will continue work at SKC as a program consultant to Kristine Hilton, who now serves as the director of the nursing program. SKC’s direct-admit cohort program has clinical spots for every student who will go through the program together, helping each other and building friendships and a professional network along the way. In addition, cultural competency is woven into instruction at SKC. Every core learning outcome focuses on understanding what culture looks like from the health-care lens. The curriculum explores Western medicine (which students must know to work in mainstream health care institutions) and Native ways (to help graduates provide culturally congruent nursing care, which medical literature shows gives patients better health outcomes). Dr. Harrmon said, “It is crucial to provide community experiences in which the Native student feels a sense of belonging—valued, valuable, included. It is the foundation from which they gain confidence to flourish. We have had several community partners actually call us now, inquiring about our Native students and graduates as the need is realized that cultural competence is an essential element if we are ever to mitigate social injustice”.

Dr. Lisa Harmon , Ph.D., RN, and CNE, poses in the lab with a synthetic cadaver, which is culturally appropriate for use with Native students. Many Indigenous cultures have strict traditions concerning the departed.

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2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

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FOCUS ON NURSING

Michelle: Proves Hard Work Makes Dreams Come True at Any Age

Brittney: Balances Motherhood and Nursing to Achieve Her Dream

H

B

aving completed her first year of nursing courses with honors at Salish Kootenai College (SKC) during the pandemic, Michelle (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) is proving that success begets success—and students can achieve their dreams at any age. A non-traditional student who dreamed of being a nurse from the time she was young, Michelle was named an American Indian College Fund 2020-21 Student of the Year. The honor came with a scholarship from the American Indian College Fund courtesy of the Adolph Coors Foundation. Michelle married young and gave up her dreams, dropping out of college in 1992. After surviving years of abuse, she found her way back to SKC a year before the four-year nursing program launched. When she heard about the new program, she applied with the encouragement from the then-program chairwoman, Dr. Lisa Harmon, and passed the nursing entrance exam with flying colors. Now entering her second year, Michelle is just as dedicated to her dream of becoming a nurse practitioner as she was on her first day of college. She acknowledges the program wasn’t always easy, but Michelle’s hard work that first year helped pave the way for the next three years of the program, earning her a three-year Indian Health Service (IHS) scholarship. After graduating, she will work for three years for IHS, giving her not only a great start to her nursing career but also the opportunity to serve Native people.

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rittney (Blackfeet), a mother of two children, had just given birth to her daughter while completing her prerequisites for the nursing program at Blackfeet Community College. Completing her bachelor’s degree in nursing had long been her dream, but she said she was so consumed by motherhood and helping to care for her sister’s three children that she missed the application deadline to transfer into the four-year program at Salish Kootenai College (SKC).

Michelle shared, “This last year has been tough going to nursing school during a pandemic. It takes a lot of strength and dedication to surpass such challenges, and yet I did it. It has shown me that hard work pays off and keeping your dreams in sight makes a huge difference on the days that you feel like it is too much. You truly can do what you set out to do. Just remember giving up isn’t an option.”

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

Undaunted, she reached out to the program director and shared how passionately she wanted to become a nurse. The director called Brittney to interview her for the program. A week later she received an admissions packet, applied, and was admitted. From that moment Brittney knew if she wanted something badly enough, she had to work hard and never give up to achieve it. She is a recipient of a United Health Foundation (UHF) Tribal Scholarship from the American Indian College Fund. The UHF program is geared to increase the number of American Indian and Alaska Native healthcare graduates who work as primary care physicians, nurses, physician assistants, mental and behavioral health specialists, dentists, and pharmacists.

E DUCATI ON I S THE ANS WE R

Brittney finished her most recent year at SKC with honors. After graduating, she plans to serve her community on her home reservation as a registered nurse. Brittney said prevention can help solve a lot of her community’s health problems. “I want to implement strategies regarding substance abuse disorders, drug addiction, historical trauma counseling, and the co-morbidities of Native people."

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AMERICAN INDIAN COLLEGE FUND SUPPORTERS

T

he following generous individuals, corporations, and foundations have helped support Native higher education through their gifts to the American Indian College Fund.

$500,000+

$100,000–$499,999

$50,000–$99,999

$25,000–$49,999

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation H

1st Tribal Lending

Anonymous

Adolph Coors Foundation

Anonymous (2)

American Endowment Foundation

The Androne Family Fund

AT&T Foundation

Anonymous (3)

The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. H

Arizona Public Service

Anonymous Foundation Administered By Edward G. McAnaney

Lilly Endowment, Inc. H

Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc.

Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies H OJ and Mary Christine Harvey Educational Foundation

Bezos Family Foundation H The Coca-Cola Foundation

Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians H

Ron Conway

The Wilke Family Foundation H

Costco Wholesale Dollar General Literacy Foundation Earth and Humanity Foundation ECMC Foundation H Calvin Pardee Erdman FedEx Corporation Foley Family Revocable Trust Ford Motor Company Fund & Community Services Genentech Foundation Heising-Simons Foundation Katharine Scallan Scholarship Trust Kresge Foundation Lumina Foundation for Education Priscilla Seibert McDougal H NBCUniversal NorthLakes Community Clinic Northwest Area Foundation The Peierls Foundation, Inc.

Argosy Foundation ARIA Foundation Richard J. Barber The Benevity Community Impact Fund Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Birch Kimberly S. Blanchard Charter Communications, Inc. Doris Antun Revocable Trust F. Bowie and Helen Duncan Entangled Institute Virginia L. Fulton Carol E. Hall Evamaria Hawkins

Joseph and Teresa Canfora

Nike, Inc. Paul M. Angell Family Foundation The Roni Horn Foundation

The Spencer Foundation H

Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation

Eleonor Bindman and Eli Gottesdiener

Stewart and Kristen McDermet Meta Lilienthal Scholarship Fund Ray Schoenbaum Memorial Fund Monique M. Regard and Rick Duffy John and Maria Schell Mareke Schiller John and Nancy Shontz Mary Ellen Smith and Nancy Hannah

The Boeing Company Susan and James Bondarenko Marilyn W. Bottjer Brad Lemons Foundation Virginia Bradford The Bulova Stetson Fund Susan O. Bush Ruth Callard

Frank and Karen Timmons

Janel Anderberg Callon

CVS Health

Judith A. Titzel

Rosamond J. Campbell

David and Sarah Barnes Charitable Fund

Travois Incorporated

Elizabeth H. Carabillo

In honor of Frank H. Davison

US Bank

Thomas and Annette Carothers

The VF Foundation

Randolph and Aya Clark

Wayne and June Bills Family Foundation

Carolyn J. Cole

Paul W. Chase Ann Clark and Charles Kirkpatrick

Stephen J. Gilbert Gore Family Memorial Foundation GRID Alternatives Aart de Geus and Esther John Guideware Software Services Margaret C. Hawk Joel and Helena Hiltner The James M. Cox Foundation of Georgia, Inc. Jane Smith Turner Foundation Johnson Foundation of the Rockies The Kathryn B. McQuade Foundation H L. P. Brown Foundation The Leonard Slaman Trust George Stabler Loening Louis and Anne Abrons Foundation, Inc.

Dan and Elizabeth Whittemore William S. Lifschutz Grant Williams Wolfpack Partnership LP

Jeffrey M. Conklin Mark Christopher Cooke The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas Jean A. Coyne

$10,000–$24,999 ACT, Inc.

Darby Foundation

Amaturo Family Foundation, Inc. AMB Foundation Amergent Anonymous (13) The Armstrong Foundation Association on American Indian Affairs Theodore E. Atz Edwin Azen George Baetjer William Baerg Bank of America Charitable Gift Fund Joanne Berghold

The Defense Against Thought Control Foundation, Inc. Dennis and Phyllis Washington Foundation Julia DeVlieg Robert M. Donner Diana Dundore James R. Dunn Dr. Bernadine J. Duran Edward & Verna Gerbic Family Foundation

Sigrid E. Elenga and C. Stephen Smyth Enerplus Ernst & Young Foundation Matching Gifts Program ExxonMobil Matching Gift Program Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Susan and Eric Friedenberg Sandra and R. Neil Fuller John J. Garand Charles and Laura Garland Hugh and Shirley Garnett John J. Garrett, M.D. Gerald B. Shreiber Foundation Grace S. Shaw-Kennedy Foundation Margaret G. Gralenski Caryl L. Hadler Don Hagerman Lucile Hamlin William F. Harrison Helen Roberti Charitable Trust The High Rock Foundation Houston Family Foundation Impact Assets Isa-Maria and David Shoolman Family Foundation Philip D. Jackson Stephen and Karen Jackson James and Sarah Rollins Family of Trusts The Jana Foundation, Inc. Mike and Ann Johnson Elizabeth Jones and Roberta Johnson

Amy Kaufman Yoko Kawachino Karen M. Kehoe Jill Kirshner Bill and Ildiko Knott Fred Korn Neil Kreitman Patrick Kulesa Leibowitz and Greenway Family Charitable Foundation George H. Leon, Jr. Mabel Y. Hughes Charitable Trust Macy's Maria Malyugina McDonald's Corporation McVay Foundation Dr. Richard Lee Meehan, D.D.S. George and Priscilla Meredith Jill Frost Merke MetLife Foundation MGM Resorts International Michael W. Fisher Foundation, Inc. Laurie Michaels Bette Midler and Martin von Haselberg Sonia and D. James Miller Morgan Stanley Foundation Anthony and Susan Morris Nancy Allison Perkins Foundation The Nathan P. Jacobs Foundation Susan Nelson-Benway Helen K. Ogura Sandra K. Orange

Julie Kant

Constance W. Packard

Miriam Kartch-Hughes

Richard Palmer

El Pomar Foundation H A star (H) by the donor’s name indicates this donor has created a pathway to Native student success through a multi-year commitment. A flame ( ) by the donor’s name indicates this donor is a confirmed member of our Circle of Vision Society and has included the American Indian College Fund in their estate plans.

The Walt Disney Company 2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

Commonwealth Charitable Fund

Kristine B. Crandall

Walmart Foundation

22

The Blanton Family

Sarah Bushong-Weeks

David Fitzpatrick

Ramona Kohrs

Teresa McCann and Eric Jensen

Target Corporation

Joseph and Sophia Abeles Foundation, Inc. Marjorie L. Keely

Lawrence Berman and Rhea Rubin

Suggs Family Foundation

Paul and Judith Carmichael

Hugh and Jane Ferguson Foundation

Robert Sparks

W.K. Kellogg Foundation H

Katherine Cameron and Richard Vaccaro

JCDRP Family Foundation

Solon E. Summerfield Foundation, Inc.

UPS Foundation

Barbara J. Brown

Entergy Corporation

Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company

United Health Foundation H

Jo Anne B. Balling

Indian Motorcycles

Anna Simons Jordan H

Tribal Alliance Partners

Cushman D. Anthony, Esq.

Harold L. Horstmann

Pendleton Woolen Mills

Strada Education Network H

Anonymous (4)

Elizabeth McGeachin McKee Foundation

The Roy Gene and Pamela Evans Foundation

Jennifer Stengaard Gross and Peter Stengaard

Angelina Merenda O'Bar Trust

Kathleen Davis MacFerran

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23


AMERICAN INDIAN COLLEGE FUND SUPPORTERS

The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation

Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program

Rowena Pecchenino

Virginia W. Hill Charitable Foundation

Ben Plucknett Charitable Trust Michael and Linda Purvis Susan Ramsdell Roger D. Reading Hilary and Steven Reis Maria and Arthur Richmond Rosalie J. Coe Weir Foundation Tia Rosengarten Rundgren Foundation Marjory H. Russell

Jason W. Bear

Andrew Dickey and Virginia Yohe

Donna L. Hirst

Paul Belo

Paul and Rachel Dirmeyer

Terry and Ann Marie Horner

Emily P. Berg

Marna Doucette and Steve Quessy

Michael and Dawn House

Henry and Rhoda Bernstein

William Downey

Anna Hrachovec

Black-Periman Foundation

Jack T. Doyle

Ashley Hubka

Mark and Deborah Blackman

G. Cameron Duncan

Lois and Glen Hurley

Delores Barr Weaver

Barbara M. Blount

East Bay Community Foundation

IBM Corporation

Paul J. Weissman

David and Barbara Boerner

Edward H. Kaplan Revocable Trust

The Jaeger Family

The Weissman Family Foundation, Inc.

Lorraine M. Bosche

Jean and Richard Ellestad

Peter Welles

Dr. Paula Botstein

Alice Ericsson

James C. Hormel Revocable Living Trust

In Memory of Anthony A. Welmas

Amanda W. Bowen

Esmond Nissim Foundation, Inc.

William and Theda White

Mary Braunagel-Brown and Sterling Brown

Carl and Julie Falk

Vladimir Jones Walter and Ursula Eberspacher Foundation

Elizabeth Ellen Sandager

Luke Whitesell and Catherine McLellan

Kenneth Sassen

William H. Donner Foundation, Inc.

Sylvain Brigant

Schlessman Family Foundation

Carolyn V. Wood

Bright Funds Foundation

Mark B. Schupack

John A. Wright

Brokaw Family Foundation

Ernest Seevers and Mary Perkins

Phillip A. Wright in Honor of Helen Wright and Marlene LaClair

Addison W. Brown

Sheila, Dave and Sherry Gold Foundation

Patricia Yingst

Ruth O. Sherer

Chapman Young III

Sidney Stern Memorial Trust

Karen A. Yust

The Siragusa Family Foundation Samantha E. Skove John and Catherine Smith Southern California Edison Calvin Spears Stax Inc. Janette Stevens Sysco Corporation Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. Martha Taylor TD Ameritrade Clearing Virginia Theo-Steelman and David Steelman Thomas C. and Lois L. Sando Foundation Tucker Charity Fund The Tzo'-Nah Fund

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Dr. Edward S. Breakell, M.D.

Bruna P. Brylawski Fay P. Bullitt Richard and Elizabeth Burns Stephen and Joanne Burns

$5,000–$9,999

Thomas and Carol Butler

Nicole Alger

Cristina Campbell

The Allison Foundation Alvin I. & Peggy S. Brown Family Charitable Foundation Amaltheia Foundation Amazon Smile Foundation Paul Anders Sam Anderson Anonymous (10) Amy Ariel and Liddy Rich Kristin K. Armstrong Jonathan Bass Helen and Dianne M. Batzkalll George and Linda Bauer The Beane Family Foundation

Canaday Family Charitable Trust Carol C. Johnson Charitable Foundation Ann Carr Benjamin and Pat Chapman R. Kingsbury Chase Peter Christen The Community Foundation of the Dan River Region

Judy S. Feldman Field Schulder Family Charitable Fund Richard Fink Michael and Linda Fisher Maureen W. Footer Naomi C. Franklin Friend Mario J. Gabelli Shayne C. Gad Jean F. Gadd Evelyn J. Gaines

Albert and Diane Kaneb Marybeth and Carl Kantner Claire J. Keyes Greg R. Kolb Daniel Gavin and Melanie Konradi Stanislav and Susan Krcmar John B. Lane, Ph.D. Shirley E. Leary Téa Leoni The Levy Foundation Daniel Lorber and Deborah Lagana-Lorber

Stefanie and Craig Miller Vivian Miller Minneapolis Foundation Rene and Leigh Ellen Moncion Morgan Stanley Gift Fund Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Global Impact Funding Trust, Inc. Ronald and Wanda Mourant Daniel J. Nalven Cathy Nason Charles Nearburg Judith R. Nelson John and Jane Niebler Norton Concrete Construction Joseph and Mary Nye O.C.F. Foundation Dianne O'Connell Oliver Family Fund John Onufrak William Oppenheimer Lida Orzeck

Chester and Debra Luby

Christopher Osgood

Robert and Connie Lurie

Robert A. Ouimette

Hazel and Lynn Gearheart

Lynn Stern and Jeremy Lang Family Foundation, Inc.

Aylin Ozgener and Richard Hethcox

Cameron Geddes

The M.L.E. Foundation, Inc.

Kendalle Getty

Stewart Macaulay

Beverly H. Goodman

Brian and Anne Mazar

Barbara T. Greenewalt

Carolyn and Stephen McCandless

Donita S. Gross

John F. McGowan

Joanne Guidi

Alexander McKiernan and Chloe Diegel

Brandon S. Gast Dr. Danelle S. Gavares

Frank and Judith Czeiner

Margaret W. Halleck

Mary R. Dahl

Page S. Hammond

Luke Davenport

Donna M. Hawxhurst

Nancy B. Davis

James and Kathryn Haymaker

Robert M. Davis

Helen J. and Thomas N. Urban Charitable Foundation

Daedalus Foundation, Inc.

Janet M. Junge

Kenneth Miller and Bethia Margoshes

Greg McKinley McLeod Family Katherine Meisenheimer Chester and Miriam Meyers Margaret A. Michalowski

Kerry and Mi-Lai Heubeck

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

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Paige Gillies Lisa G. Palser Paul and Anne Parker Edith Ann Pazmino Mary C. Peckham Randall and Pamela Penn Adrienne M. Pennings Warren and Ellavina Perkins Peter and Dorothy Lapp Foundation

Ellen M. Poss

Richard J. Street

Powwows.com

Christine Sage Suits

Joseph Rangel

Margery Sullivan

Elizabeth J. Rappaport

Dennis and Laureen Swing

Susan Reynolds

The Tan and Balladon Family Charitable Fund

Benjamin A. Rice The Richard and Karen Whitney Charitable Fund

Tides Foundation Don and Mary Troyer

Laurie A. Riebeling

Vincent Tseng and Geoffrey Mainland

Pauline Rippel

Sandra L. Tucker

Robert & A. Joyce Jones Foundation

Allen F. Turcke, M.D.

Robert R. McCormick Foundation

The U.S. Charitable Gift Trust

Mike and Nancy Robinson

Lenita van der Werff

Thomas Rock and Melissa Raphan

Wilma A. Wagner

Christopher W. Rogers

Stephen Waldman

Rona Neri Giving Fund

Keith Cowan and Linda Walsh

Andrew Rosenblum

Elizabeth F. Watts

Judith Royer

Donald A. Weber

Ruby Daybranch Revocable Trust

Wege Foundation

John and Frances Ruhe

Philip O. Wheatley

Jody and Eduardo Sanchez

Marisa D. Whitesell

Mark Schissel

Richard Wiebe

Susan and Robert Sciacca

William and Shelia Konar Foundation

Stephen F. Sewell

William J. Witchger

Smith Brandon International, Inc.

Naomi W. Wolf

Darlene and Jeffrey Spence

Mohamed Ziauddin

Sonja B. Sperlich

Rita Zowader

Lev Spiro and Melissa Rosenberg Mary Jane Spiro Richard and Jill Spitz Diana Stark and J. Stuart Francis Robert T. Stephen Judith Stone Hayes and Patricia Stover

Kenneth and Rebecca Phillips Stephen and Marilyn Pizer Mary Kay and Gene Poland Posel Foundation

A star (H) by the donor’s name indicates this donor has created a pathway to Native student success through a multi-year commitment. A flame ( ) by the donor’s name indicates this donor is a confirmed member of our Circle of Vision Society and has included the American Indian College Fund in their estate plans.

25


BEQUESTS

2020–21 GOVERNING BOARD OF TRUSTEES

T

B OAR D OF F I CE R S

he following generous supporters have left lasting legacies through their estate plans. Their generosity has ensured that American Indian and Alaska Native students will have the opportunity to pursue their dreams of a higher education and a career. We honor their memories here.

Chair: Leander “Russ” McDonald President, United Tribes Technical College 1st Vice Chair: Robert Bible President, College of the Muscogee Nation

Resource Development Chair: Cameron Geiger Member At Large: Michael Purvis Managing Director, The Blackstone Group

2nd Vice Chair: Sandra Boham President, Salish Kootenai College

B OAR D OF T R UST E E S

DeShawna Anderson, a business student at Little Big Horn College, poses with the 2020 Tribal College Blanket she designed. "The Courage to Bloom" is sold as part of the American Indian College Fund blanket line through Pendleton Woolen Mills.

Twyla Baker President, Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College

Lynn Dee Rapp President, Eagle Opportunity

Tom Brooks Vice President, External Affairs AT&T External Affairs

Charles “Monty” Roessel President, Diné College

Justin Guillory President, Northwest Indian College Richard E. Arnold

Jeannette Foster

Waud H. Kracke

Susan Jane Taylor Richardson

Mary Alice Avato

Michael Robert Gaudry

Mary G. Lang

Nancy Riesch

Gail Oberlin Bates

Georgiana Geerds

Raul Lede

Betty J. Roren

Carol Bayer

Dr. David M. Gipp

James Lichtenstein

Wallace F. Schad

Karen M. Beecher

Irene Gruthoff

Meilin Lin

Doris Scharpf

Olive K. Britt

Page Taylor Hardage

Lawrence C. Lynnworth

Sharon R. Scott

Ann Lee Saunders Brown

Daniel A. Harris

Ann L. Madden

Irma Scudder

Marjorie Bruce

Eleanore Anne Hire

Esther Marshick

Arnold L. Shafer

Elsie J. Buchwald

Lincoln Hudson

Angelina Merenda O’Bar

Leonard Slaman

Carol D. Christensen

Suzanne Johnson

Lynn Freeman Olson

Curt Strand

Barbara Clarke

Bernard Kastin

James F. O’Neill

Belinda Davis

Ernest Kazato

Michael Page

Joanne R. Devlin

Estate of J. Douglas and Fiona A. Knox

Carolyn B. Pledger

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I N M E M O RI A M

Dawson Her Many Horses Senior Vice President Wells Fargo Middle Market Banking Dan King President, Red Lake Nation College Cynthia Lindquist President, Cankdeska Cikana Community College Stefanie Miller President, Kellogg’s Away From Home Michael Oltrogge President, Nebraska Indian Community College Brenda Pipestem Supreme Court Appellate Justice for Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

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Ted Rollins Founding Partner & Executive Chairman Valeo Partners, LLC Carla Sineway President, Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College Denine Torr Executive Director, Dollar General Literacy Foundation and Senior Director, Corporate Community Initiatives Dollar General Corporation Meredi Vaughan CEO, Vladimir Jones David E. Yarlott, Jr. President, Little Big Horn College

Former 1st Vice Chair Robert Bible President, College of Muscogee Nation

The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) and its governing board of trustees remember Robert Bible, President of the College of Muscogee Nation (CMN). President Bible was a member of the board since 2016 and was re-elected to his second board term in 2019. He served on several committees, beginning as a member of the Nominating and Governance Committee, and served in several leadership positions, including as the Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee, the First Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees, and a member of the Executive Committee. President Bible was known throughout Indian Country for his selfless dedication to his students and community and for his outstanding contributions to American Indian higher education. Because of his exemplary and humble leadership and commitment to Indian Country and education, the College Fund named President Bible as its Tribal College and University Honoree of the Year in 2019. Bible was also a mentor, a coach, a father, a husband, a grandfather, and a friend. He is dearly missed.

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AUDITED FINANCIAL INFORMATION STATE M E NT O F ACT I VI T I E S YEA R EN DED JUN E 30, 2021 2020–21 Fiscal Year

This annual report is ©2021 by the American Indian College Fund. All rights reserved.

Total Support, Revenue and Gains Contributions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contributed public service announcements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net investment return. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Government assistance - PPP loan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

57,531,081 2,248,092 14,268,703 792,500 96,605

Gross special events revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Less cost of direct benefits to donors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net special events revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net assets released from restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total support, revenue and gains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

55,929 – 55,929 – 74,992,910

Expenses and Losses Program services expense Scholarships and grants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total program expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26,681,052 3,521,003 30,202,055

Supporting services expense Administrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Donor development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total supporting services expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,541,929 7,331,795 8,873,724

Loss on uncollectable promises to give. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total expenses and losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

55,603 39,131,382

Change in Net Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net Assets, Beginning of Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net Assets, End of Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $

35,861,528 105,642,543 141,504,071

Editor: Dina Horwedel Copy Editors: David Bledsoe, Jordan Cooper, Ted Downum, Liana Epstein, and Mackenzie Parker. Design and Layout: ThinAirCreative, Inc. Photo Credits: American Indian College Fund, Carrie Dada, Jaci Dix, Michelle LaRoque, Jacob MacArthur, Samantha Maltais, Jasmine Neosh, Brittney Racine, and Salish Kootenai College.

Kasha (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation) is an American Indian College Fund scholar, 2019 Student Ambassador, and a graduate of Nichols State University in Thibodoux, Louisiana. 28

2020–21 ANNUAL RE PORT

8333 Greenwood Boulevard Denver, Colorado 80221 collegefund.org


8333 Greenwood Boulevard Denver, Colorado 80221 collegefund.org