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Copyright Š 2009

Collectible Soda Cans Special Features: The Cans of Coca-Cola by Dave Tanner First Edition

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be produced in any form, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in review, without permission in writing from the author/publisher.

ISBN 978-0-578-00817-2

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Table of Contents: Forward & Using this Guide - page 3 History of Soda Can Lids - page 5 Grading Samples - page 6 Coke Can History - page 7 Coca-Cola Cans from the U.S. - page 8 Fake Cans & Syrup Cans - page 17 Foreign Diamon Cans - page 19 Other Coca-Cola Brand Cans - page 23 Acknowledgements:

I would like to thank the following collectors for their input and contributions to this guide: Noam Wolff, Fred Dobbs, Bob Luciano, Mark Luijendijk, Andrew Samok and all of the other collectors who have helped in this process. In addition, I want to thank Tom Bates for permission to use the can identification system he originally developed for the ŠHandbook of Soda Cans, which was last printed in 1989.

Published by: Dave Tanner

For any questions, comments or corrections, please contact the author at: collectiblesodacans@comcast.net http://www.collectiblesodacans.com For more information on collecting soda cans, please visit the NATIONAL POP CAN COLLECTORS website at: http://www.canogram.com/NPCC.htm

In addition, the following websites also provide a great deal of information about our hobby: Noam Wolff -Special thanks for many images of rare cans found in this guide http://www.diamondcokecans.com/ The Museum of Beverage Containers at: http://gono.com/v-tours/sodacone/scone1.htm Lance Meade’s Can Connection Website at: http://www.canconnection.com/ ISBN: 978-0-578-00817-2 Printed in the United States

#2


FORWARD Welcome to the first published edition of Collectible Soda Cans Special Features. This 2009 edition, The Cans of Coca-Cola focuses on the known Coca-Cola cans beginning with the test cones of 1939 and continuing through the spiral design cans of the mid-1970’s. The past few years have been very exciting in the hobby of collectible soda cans. Collectible Soda Cans has certainly played a role in the evolution. I first self published Collectible Soda Cans in 2001 as a spiral bound guide of approximately 45 pages. By the first published edition in 2007, it grew to 225 pages in full color. While that edition is almost sold out, as of December 2008, another is planned to come out sometime in 2010. Another special feature in this Coca-Cola guide is the inclusion of most of the known test cans. Many of these are very, very rare and extremely desirable for the collector. Also, syrup cans and foreign diamond cans are included in their own sections. In addition, other brands produced by Coca-Cola have been included, along with a few of the known fake cone tops. A rarity rating system has also been included to help collectors recognize the cans that really are tough! I believe that getting collectors to talk about can rarity, even if they disagree with the cans I’ve identified, helps promote more cans to surface. This in turn will help to develop the rating system even more!

Rarity Rating Scale

R0 = 1 known example R1 = Known only as a dumper (outdoor can with rust & other problems) R2 = Very rarely seen in any condition R3 = Rarely seen in any condition R4 = Rarely seen on grade (clean with no problems) - Available as a dumper I’d like to thank you for your interest in Collectible Soda Cans and wish you the best of luck in your own pursuit of the elusive cans for your collection! With any homemade work, errors and typo’s are always possible. If you do find something that I missed or you have a can that you would like included in the next generation of this guide, please feel free to contact me at: collectiblesodacans@comcast.net or visit my website at: http://www.collectiblesodacans.com. You may also contact me in writing at: Dave Tanner; 3 David Drive; Simsbury, CT 06070 or please feel free to contact me by phone: (860) 651-3825.

Using this Guide: Cone Top, Flat Top or Pull Top

Identifying a cone top (shown at left) is relatively easy, with the exception of an occasional modern fake, produced after the can has left the factory and holding no collector value! The same can’t be said for many of the flat tops (FT) or pull tab (PT) cans (flat tops refer to cans that needed a church key or can opener to open). Over the years, there have been quite a few people reliding cans. Most put the correct lid on the can, but nonetheless, the can is not in its original state and as the saying goes, let the buyer beware! In addition, to make matters more confusing, many canners changed over to early PT’s in mid production of a generation. This does not neces#3


sarily mean one is rarer than another; due to the reliding issue, but it does mean there are collectors who will pay a premium for untouched original cans with lids containing original factory printing should it be available.

Dating:

The dates listed are best attempts to identify the year that production of the listed can generation began. Some generations had very short life spans while other stretched on and on, with many minor changes over the years. Please don’t consider these dates as indisputable fact. Many times, the best clues about the actual production time of a can have come from company information and magazine or newspaper ads! When an * appears next to the date, the date actually appears on the can.

Zip Codes:

On July 1, 1963, the zip code began in the U.S. The placement of the zip code on soda cans was a little slow, but by the mid-1960’s, most companies had complied. This has created a unique specialty in the hobby as many collectors specialize in pre-zip code cans. This does not mean that every can without a zip code was made prior to 1964, as many canners simply ignored the change, some for more than 3-5 years. It does give a nice reference point for the hobby and brings about a very interesting rarity issue. There are quite a few can generations produced with and without zip codes, making the rarity issue a fairly complex one. One thing is for sure, pay attention to the zip code!

Values:

With any collectible, the actual value is only determined by the presence of a real person willing to pay the price. Soda cans are no different. With the advent of online auctions like eBay, it has become relatively easy for collectors to buy, sell and trade cans. Different areas of the country/world may also offer greater availability to can shows or even antique events. These factors as well as what appears to be a growing interest in the hobby appear to be driving prices significantly higher, particularly for older, rare cans. Please take the value ranges given in this guide as estimates, knowing that there must be a buyer to justify the value level suggested. All values are for cans in grade 1 condition. Strong 1+ cans may bring higher prices than shown. In addition, new finds of multiple high grade examples or the appearance of a case or two of rolled factory leftovers can significantly alter the pricing of almost any can.

Soda Cans In the Beginning...

What is known about the early history of soda cans is that it all started in 1938. There is some dispute about whether Clicquot Club or Dr. Phillips was the first can created, although the consensus sides with Cliquot Club due to the fact that the Dr. Phillips product was really a juice. Suffice it to say that neither was a big hit. The Clicquot Club cans had a hard time with the acid found in soda and tended to leak or even sometimes explode before they made it off the shelf. Coca-Cola almost became one of the earliest canners if they had actual put their 1939 Cone Top test cans into production. These test cans also have an interesting story, as there exists some evidence suggesting that they may have been used on airline flights! Whatever the case, there was definite an issue with taste. Canned soda did not have the same familiar flavor that bottled soda did. Most of the early soda canning was done in cone top cans, however, by the mid 1950’s all this would change. Flat top production, which required a church key to open, would become common place. One question that I hear being asked more and more often is what was the first flat top produced? By mid-1954, there were a lot of cans in production. For cans produced prior to the time, there are a few good candidates. One that may have an earlier production is the triangle based C &C cans found in both 10 and 12 ounce varieties. While little is known about these very rare flat tops, the cone top versions are thought to have come out as early as 1949. Hopefully as more discussion takes place more detailed research will uncover the truth.

#4


HISTORY OF EARLY SODA CAN LIDS

Although soda can companies tended to use whatever lids they had available at the time; lids do serve a valuable purpose in better estimating the date when a can was produced. At times, an earlier lid may be seen on a later can and some lids were used for many years, the specific lid present can reveal the earliest date a can could have been produced. The following lid examples should serve as a solid reference Silver flat top with 1/2 round pressure beads; Used until approximately 1962-1963. Replaced by sloped version.

Silver sloped pressure bead. Used from about 1963-1967. Inside of pressure bead is sloped, not rounded.

Gray sloped pressure bead. Used from about 1967 through the end of the steel cans. A 1/2 round bead is found until the late 1960’s.

1962-1963: Short lived; Referred to as a dogbone. Not often seen on soda cans, with the exception of Coca-Cola can C940-5.

1963 - 1967: Silver juice tab Sometimes seen on later steel non-carbonated cans. Fan tab version dates 1963-1965.

1965: Early pull-tab; Shortlived. Should be matched with silver round or sloped bottom. Found with “U” tab (no ring).

1965: Lift tab language dates to pre-1965. Lift ring introduced in 1965. Should be matched with silver sloped bottom.

1966: Another early pull-tab. Several versions exist. Should be matched with silver sloped bottom.

1966: Silver juice-tab. Several versions exist. Should be matched with silver sloped bottom.

1966: Found on many allaluminum cans from the mid1960’s. Found with rounded opening and plain face.

1966: Short-lived with small ring. Matched with sloped silver or gray 1/2 round or sloped bottom lids.

1966: Used through the end of the 1960’s. Matched with sloped silver or gray 1/2 round or sloped bottom lids.

1967: Gray juice-tab. Very common on late 1960’s cans. Used through the end of the steel cans. Paired with gray lid.

1967: Plain lid - found on cans of the late 1960’s. Also found with patent pending statement. Paired with gray lid.

1968: Very common lid seen on cans to the early 1970’s. Almost always paired with gray lid.

1968-1970’s: Very common through the end of the steel cans. Several variations exist. Paired with gray lid.

#5


GRADING SAMPLES

To better understand the general guidelines behind can grading, the follow- Grade 1+ (100-150%) ing pictures should be of help. Although even the most detailed pictures don’t tell the whole story, they can give you a solid reference point. Many cans do not show even wear all around. The face (s) of the cans are the most important areas to consider. A can with a 1- face and a grade 2- back may command a higher price than a more even grade 2 or 2+ can. Generally, off-grade soda cans do not bring the same comparative values as off-grade beer cans. Cans in 1- may bring 50-75% of the grade 1 value. Grade 2 cans may fall into the 10-40% range. Grade 3 cans are in the 5-10% range and grade 4 cans are in below 5%. Of course, the real values are determined by the buyer and seller at the time of the transaction. Generally, the highest grade an outdoor can may see is a grade 2. On rare occasions, a 2+ may be warranted. Grade 1 (100%)

Grade 1/1+ (100-120%) Very clean, minor scratches or other marks. May have a small spot or two. Lids are fairly clean with no major problems.

Grade 2+ (25-40%)

Grade 3 (5-10%)

Probably still an indoor or a barn can. Color is good. Obvious spotting or other smaller problem areas may be present. Back and seam may have more problems (dents, rust, scratches or fading).

May have significant problems, but face of can is still visible and writing is clear. Lids and seam may be weak and show rust. They may even be cleaned. Can is still solid overall. Still a decent dumper.

Grade 1- (50-75%) May have minor scratches or other blemishes present. Notice the scratch through the red diamond and some very light spotting.

Grade 2 (15-25%)

Grade 4 (<5%)

Notably small rust spots/ darker spotting and other problems may be present. Lids and seam may show signs of outdoor existence. Generally the highest grade of an outdoor can. Probably the lowest collectible grade. Uneven surfaces, fading, dents, rust & other visible problems. Wording may not be clear. Lids and seams may have significant problems. Note: This Lime Time is the finest known example.

Grade 2- (10-15%)

Grade 5 ($1-2)

No visible problems. Only the smallest marks or dings may be present. Seams, lids and all sides are clean.

Problems are more obvious. Notice spots in silver areas and blemishes in white background. Lids and seam may show discoloration or light rusting. Very light small areas of fading may be present

Even more obvious marking. Surface is not smooth to the touch. Minor holes may be present, but design is easily visible behind the wear. Generally considered a nice dumper.

Significant rust or wear through the design. Major holes, fading, and other problems. This can may fill a shelf space if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very, very rare, but even so, the can is of very little actual value. #6


COKE CAN HISTORY Although the idea for canning Coca-Cola began in the 1930's, culminating with the creation of a 16oz and a 32-oz cone top cans in 1939, no real progress was made until the 1950's. None of the three of these cone tops appear to have actually gone into production as the only known examples are found in museums. The first actual production can for Coke (C940-1) was a test market can which was produced out of the Hayward, CA plant for export to American Troops overseas in late 1955. A second can from the New Bedford Mass plant for export to the American troops in the Far East was produced in early 1956. The Hayward can is quite a bit more difficult to locate however. There is one tell tale identifier on these cans which separates them from the rest. On the side of the can above the seam, the sentence "Prepared for export only" exists. These are extremely tough cans to find. The other somewhat unique feature is in the lids that were used. The original experimental lids did not have any production information, but rather had very plain & somewhat familiar Coke logos. The primary reason for the test market being the military in the Far East was due to the question the Coke executives had about the taste of Coke in cans. It must have worked out well enough because later that year and in early 1956 a second test market can was attempted (C940-2). The only difference that can had from the first was the removal of the "Prepared for export only" indicator above the seam. The common ground indicator that these early test market cans had that none of the later cans showed was the "REG. U.S. PAT. OFF." line below the Coca-Cola in the large diamond. An additional test can produced in Alaska (C940-2B) with a slight design variation is also known. A very rare test can with a red diamond line found on the edge of the large diamond also exists (C940-2A). The first regular production Diamond can and all of the later Diamond with the bottle cans would have "TRADE MARK R" in its place. The success that other canners were having did force Coke to wake up and smell the syrup, so to speak, and they did introduce the first regular production can in 1960 (C940-3) to enter the national market. That final plain large diamond can is readily available in most grades although top grade examples may be a little more challenging to find. 1961 brought about the first real generation change in cans for Coke. They introduced the first bottle design within the diamond (C940-4). This can has a plain front with the content information found on the side of the can. The first example is the toughest to find, while the second and third generations are fairly common. The second-generation can is easily identified by the large â&#x20AC;&#x153;12oz.â&#x20AC;? labels found above and below the diamond (C940-5). The third and final change, which made it's first appearance in 1965, for the bottle design was again to remove the large 12 OZ indicators above and below the diamond and to replace them with a single, smaller line stating "Contents 12 FL OZS" which can be found at the base of the diamond (C940-6). The other important detail of the bottle design is that all three cans may be found with an earlier punch top which required a church key to open as well as with an early design of the pull-tab. Although the bottle design cans are much more common than the earlier plain diamond cans, they are nonetheless, still very desirable. 1966 saw the next generation change as Coke moved to the Harlequin design that is sometimes called the small diamond can. The first version is available as both a flat and a pull top, with the flat top being a much tougher find. The distinction between the first and second version of this can is made by the placement of the "Contents 12 FL OZS". The first version has it at the top (C940-7), while the second; available only as a pull-tab for the first time, shows it at the bottom (C940-8). The next version of this can made its appearance in late 1966 for approximately one month. It was Coke's first effort at using an all aluminum design. This can is easily distinguished from its predecessor due to the indented ridge at the top lid and the curved aluminum shape at the base with no true bottom lid. In addition, the All Aluminum statement is made on the bottom of the can (C940-9). A second and much more common all aluminum can quickly made its debut in 1967, but this time the all aluminum statement was on the side of the can (C940-10). This can is fairly common, although finding a very clean example with no problems is not easy due to the softness of the aluminum body. The harlequin designs remained in use until the next generation change took place in 1970 as coke moved to its spiral design. The first spiral design can (C940-11), a two panel dull red flap top - notice that the one content line lists "Carmel Colored" as the only item. This can was also available in metallic paint (C940-12) and is also found as an aluminum body (C940-12A). The second spiral design, released in 1971 had a shorter "Coke" on the side panel (C940-13), yet still only listed one content line. It is also available in dull red or metallic paint. An interesting aside for the Coke collector that must have every can, in 1966, Coke test marketed a 16-oz version of the harlequin design from its Portland, OR plant (C940-02). This is an extremely tough find and is considered a very rare and valuable can! The first larger scale production 16 oz can came out in 1971 and was a dull version of the first spiral design from above with one content line (C940-03). It is a very common can today. Another interesting can is the only domestic 10-oz Coca-Cola can, from Gretna, LA in 1976 (C940-04). It's a very rare can that could easily be mistaken for a Canadian can. Very few are known to exist. #7


The Beginning: In 1939, Coca-Cola experimented with the idea of Coke in cans. It is rumored that the two cone top cans at right were test marketed, the first two known specimens are in the Coca-Cola Museum in Atlanta. The 3rd example is from the Schmidt Coca-Cola Museum in Elizabethtown, KY.

R0 C940-C1 (16 oz) 1 Known Cone Top q Pre-zip 1939 Unknown

R0 C940-C1 32 oz - 1 Known Cone Top q Pre-zip 1939 Unknown

R0 C940-C1 32 oz - 1 Known Cone Top q Pre-zip 1939 Unknown

Face of C940-1 “Reg. U.S. Pat Off.” Flat Top q Pre-zip 1955

Reverse of C940-1 “Hayward CA” “For Export Only”

Reverse of C940-1 “New Bedford, MA” About 6mths later than Hayward can. “For Export Only” $300-350

C940-1 Top lid

C940-1 Bottom lid

$500+

#8


The Coca-Cola Export cans are also found as banks, mugs and air sealed display cans. Cans with original advertising lids add to the value.

C940-2 1st domestic test can â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reg. U.S. Pat Off.â&#x20AC;? q Flat Top - Pre-zip 1956 No Export Information $250-300

C940-2 Reverse

C940-2 Uncommon top lid

C940-2 Common lid

R2 C940-2A Test Can Thin red line inside diamond Flat Top q Pre-zip 1956 $500+

C940-2 Top lid

R3 C940-2B Alaska Test Can Flat Top q Pre-zip 1956 $300-350

Left side panel lists canner - Anchorage Cold Storage. Canner information is found on the lids of all other C940-2 cans. This can is found with the same lids used on the export cans. #9


C940-3 1st mass production can “Trade Mark R” q Flat Top - Pre-zip 1960 $150-175

C940-3 Reverse

C940-3 Top lid

C940-3 six pack case

C940-4 1st Diamond Bottle can Flat Top q Pre-zip 1961 $175-200

C940-4 Reverse

C940-4 Top lid

C940-5 Dull red paint Flat Top/Pull Top q Pre-zip 1963 $125-150

C940-5 Reverse #10


C940-5 Metallic red paint Flat Top/Pull Top q Pre-zip 1963 $125-150

C940-5 Top lid found on flat top.

C940-5 Typical top lid found on pull top. This lid is sometimes called a dogbone because of itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shape.

R0 C940-05 Test Can 7 oz - 1 known Flat Top q Pre-zip 1963 $2000+

C940-6 Metallic paint Flat Top/Pull Top q Pre-zip 1965 $175-200

C940-6 Reverse

C940-6 Typical early pull top lid found on this can.

C940-6 Test Can Rare test ring tab

R2 C940-6A Test Can Raised lettering Pull Top q Pre-zip 1965 $500+

#11


R2 C940-6B Test Can Embossed Pull Top q Pre-zip 1965 $500+

R2 C940-6C Test Can Textured Pull Top q Pre-zip 1965 $500+

C940-6C Test Can Lift Tab

R2 C940-6D Test Can All Aluminum Pull Top q Pre-zip 1965 $500+

C940-7 Contents top Flat Top/Pull Top q Pre-zip 1966 $35-40

R2 C940-7A Passover wording Pull Top q Pre-zip 1966 $200-250

R1 C940-7B Passover wording Pull Top q Zip 1967 $200-250

C940-8 Zip code began 1967 Pull Top q Pre-zip/Zip 1966/67 $30-35

R2 C940-8A Test Can Textured Pull Top q Zip 1967 $350-400

#12


R0 C940-8B Test can Cardboard Pull Top q Zip 1967 $350-400

R0 C940-8C Test Can Mylar wrap Pull Top q Zip 1967 $350-400

R0 C940-8D Test Can Crimped Steel Pull Top q Zip 1967 $250-300

R0 C940-8E Test Can Embossed Pull Top q Zip 1967 $300-350

R2 C940-02 (16 oz test market can) Portland, OR Pull Top q Zip 1967 $500+

R3 C940-9 1st aluminum Coke can Very Short generation (1 month) q Pull Top - Zip 1966 $200-250

C940-9 1966 Magazine ad from Reynolds Packaging

C940-10 2nd aluminum style Pull Top q Zip 1967 $35-40

C940-10 six pack case

#13


C940 - Cardboard Beach Party in a Can Pull Top q 1968 $80-100

C940 - Cardboard Beach Party in a Can Reverse

R3 C940-Wave Test 1 Test Can Pull Top q Zip 1969 $100-125

R3 C940-Wave Test 2 Test Can Pull Top q Zip 1969 $100-125

R3 C940-Wave Test 3 Test Can Pull Top q Zip 1969 $100-125

C940-11 1st Spiral design - 2 panels (dull paint) Flat Top/Pull Top q Zip 1970 $5-7

C940-12 1st Spiral design - 2 panels (metalic paint) Flat Top/Pull Top q Zip 1970 $5-7

C940-12A 3 panel - All aluminum Pull Top (metalic paint) q Zip 1971 $7-9

C940-13 3 panels - 1 content line (dull or metalic) Flat Top/Pull Top q Zip 1971 #14 $3-5


C940-03 (16 oz) One content line Pull Top q Zip 1971 $2-3

C940-14 2 panels/3 content lines Pull Top q Zip 1971 $2-3

Spiral Promotional Offer Cans - 12oz Seven variaties exist Pull Top q Zip 1971-1973 $4-6

R2 Spiral Promotional Offer Cans 16oz - Two variaties exist Backpack & Airplane offers q Zip 1971-1973 $80-100

R2 C940-15 Test Can -Blue background Pull Top q Zip 1973 $100-125

R2 C940-15 A Test Can -Alum. - Blue background Pull Top q Zip 1973 $80-100

C940-16 dull or metalic 3 panels/4 or 5 content lines Pull Top q Zip 1975-1978 $3-4

R2 C940-16A Test Can - Aluminum - no crimp Pull Top q Zip 1975 $60-70

R2 C940-04 10 ounce can - Gretna, LA Pull Top q Zip 1976 #15 $125-150


R2 C940-Panel Test Can Test Can Pull Top q Zip 1970’s $80-100

R2 C940-Plastic Test Can Test Can Pull Top q Zip 1970’s $80-100

R2 C940-Test Can Test Can - White panels Pull Top q Zip 1970’s $80-100

R2 C940-Test Can Test Can - Clear Plastic Pull Top q Zip 1975 $50-60

C940-16.9 oz Test Can - Aluminum

R2 C940-Wave Test Can Test Can - Textured Pull Top q Zip 1980’s $60-70

R2 C940-Wave Test Can Test Can - Smooth Pull Top q Zip 1980’s $60-70

R2 C940-2 liter Test Can Test Can - Aluminum

q Zip 1970’s $15-20

q Zip 1980’s $60-70

C940-Contour Test Can Test Can - Contoured Pull Top q Zip March 1997 $2-3

#16


Fake Cans: These are some of the known fake Coca-Cola Cone Top Cans - These are artisitic creations produced after 2005. They are not rare and may and certainly not original cans. They commonly have screw on tops and flat bottoms although they are sometimes “made” over real cone tops to look old.

Fake 16 oz Cone Top

Fake 12 oz German Cone Top

Syrup Cans: These are not truly soda cans, but many “can” collectors persue them very aggressively. The early Coca-Cola syrup cans are very tough to find clean, especially the paper labels. Fake 12 oz Cone Top

Fake 12 oz Cone Top

R3 Face of C940-G1 1 Gallon Syrup Can - Cone Top “Trade Mark Reg. U.S. Pat Off.” q 1939* $300-350

R1 Face of C940-G1 (Paper label) 1 Gallon Syrup Can - Cone Top “Trade Mark Reg. U.S. Pat Off.” q 1939* $500+

R3 C940-G2 1 Gallon Syrup Can Paper Label Cone Top q 1939 $250-300

#17


R3 C940-G3 1 Gallon Syrup Can Paper Label Cone Top q 1950’s $150-175

R1 C940-G4 1 Gallon Syrup Can - Blue Paper Label Cone Top q 1950’s $400-450

R3 C940-G4 1 Gallon Syrup Can - Green Paper Label Cone Top q 1950’s $150-175

R3 C940-G5 1 Gallon Syrup Can Paper Label Cone Top q 1950’s $150-175

R3 C940-G6 Export gallon Flat Top q 1950’s $125-150

C940-G7 Very common gallon Flat Top q 1970’s $10-12

C940-G8 Rare Export Gallon Flat Top q 1970’s $50-60

C940-G9

R2 C940-5G1 5 Gallon Container

q 1980’s $25-30

q 1930’s $250-300

#18


Foreign Diamond Cans: All of the following cans are considerable more rare than their American counterparts with the exception of the Canadian 10 oz large diamond can. Clean cans with original list may bring higher prices than listed.

R1 C940-1 Australia 13 oz Flat Top q 1960’s $500+

C940-2 Australia 13 oz Flat Top/Pull Tab q 1960’s $60-75

C940-2 Australia Bottom lid found on pull top

R3 C940-1 Canada 12 oz Flat Top q 1960’s $300-350

R4 C940-2 Canada 12 oz Flat Top q 1960’s $500+

C940-2 Canada Top lid

C940-01 Canada 10 oz - Metallic Flat Top q 1960’s $175-200

C940-01 Canada 10 oz - Dull Red Flat Top q 1960’s $175-200

#19


C940-01 Canada Top lid

C940-03 Canada 10 oz Flat Top/Pull Top q 1960’s $50-60

R2 C940-1 England Small lettering Flat Top q 1960’s $300-350

R2 C940-2 England 2 variations of side lettering size Flat Top q 1960’s $200-250

C940-2 England Large Lettering on seam

C940-2 England Top lid from Large Lettering can

C940-2 England Small Lettering on seam

R2 C940-3 England Airline Can 5.5 imperial ounces Flat Top q 1960’s $500+

C940-3 England Top lid #20


R3 C940-4 England 11.5 oz Flat Top q 1960’s $150-175

C940-4 England Top lid

R0 C940-4A England 11.5 oz Pull Top q 1960’s $200-225

R3 C940-5 England Airline Can 5.5 ounce Flat Top q 1967 $300-350

C940-5 England Top lid

R2 C940-1 France Possibly from Belgium Flat Top q 1960’s $500+

R2 C940-1 Germany 35.5 cl Dull Red Flat Top q 1960’s $200-250

C940-1 Germany Seam

R3 C940-2 Germany 35.5 cl Metallic Red Pull Top q 1960’s $200-250

#21


C940-2 Germany Seam

C940-2 Germany Bottom lid from pull top

R3 C940-2 Germany 35.5 cl Dull Red Pull Top q 1960’s $200-250

C940-2 Germany Seam

R2 C940-1 Japan 250 ml Flat Top q 1960’s $1000+

C940-2 Japan 250 ml Flat Top q 1960’s $200-250

C940-2 Japan Bottom lid from pull top

R0 C940-1 Puerto Rico 10 oz

R0 C940-1 Venezuela 340 ml

q 1960’s $500+

q 1960’s $500+

#22


Other brands of Soda Cans produced under the Coca-Cola product name Domestic & Foreign

R2 B740-C1 Butler, PA Bottoms Up - CT Pre-zip 1953 q Root Beer $500+

R0 B740-0 Bottoms Up - FT Pre-zip 1954 q Root Beer $1000+

1G - B740-C2 Butler, PA Bottoms Up - CT Pre-zip 1951 q Flavor on cap $80-100

B740-0 Top lid for previous can No other flavors are known at this time

R2 B740-C1 Butler, PA Bottoms Up - CT Pre-zip 1953 q Ginger Ale $1000+

R0 B740-C1 Butler, PA Bottoms Up - CT Pre-zip 1953 q Imitation Grape $1000+

R2 B740-C1 Butler, PA Bottoms Up - CT Pre-zip 1953 q Orange $300-350

R0 B740-1

R4 1G - F80-1

R4 1G - F80-1

Bottoms Up - FT Pre-zip 1954 q Ginger Ale $1000+

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960 q Ginger Ale $250-300

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960 q Imitation Grape $250-300

F80-1 Top lid for previous can

F80-2

F80-2

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1961 q Ginger Ale $50-60

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1961 q Lemon Lime $50-60

F80-2A

R2 F80-2A

Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1962 q Orange $45-50

Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1962 q Strawberry $125-150

R3 F80-5

R4 1G - F80-1 San Francisco, CA Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960 q Lemon Lime $250-300

R4 1G - F80-1

R4 1G - F80-1

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960 q Orange $250-300

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960 q Root Beer $250-300

F80-2

F80-2A

F80-2A

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1961 q Orange $50-60

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1962 q Imit. Black Cherry $45-50

Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1962 q Imit. Grape $45-50

F80-16

F80-16 Brooklyn, NY Fanta - PT Pre-zip/Zip - 1964 q Orange $25-30

F80-16A

R1 F80-10

R2 F80-10

Fanta - PT Pre-zip/Zip - 1964 q Root Beer $25-30

Fanta Low Calorie - PT Pre-zip - 1964 q Grapefruit $300-350

Fanta Low Calorie - PT Pre-zip - 1964 q LemonLime $300-350

Fanta - PT Pre-zip/Zip - 1964 q Imitation Grape $25-30

F80-2A Top lid for previous can Other flavors may show corresponding flavor lids

Fanta - FT/PT Zip 1964 q Club Soda #23 $45-50


R3 F80-5

F80-5

F80-5

F80-5

R3 F80-5

F80-5

Fanta - FT/PT Zip 1964 q Red Cream $45-50

Fanta - FT/PT Zip 1964 q Ginger Ale $35-40

Fanta - FT/PT Zip 1964 q Imitation Grape $15-20

Fanta - FT/PT Zip 1964 q Orange $15-20

Fanta - FT/PT Zip 1964 q Quinnine Water $45-50

Fanta - FT/PT Zip 1964 q Root Beer $35-40

R2 F80-5A All Aluminum Fanta - PT Zip 1964 q Imitation Grape $80-100

R2 F80-5A All Aluminum Fanta - PT Zip 1964 q Root Beer $80-100

R2 F80-10

R3 F80-01 (16 oz)

R3 F80-01 (16 oz)

R3 F80-01 (16 oz)

Fanta - PT Zip 1964 Cyc q Lemon Lime $250-300

Fanta - PT Zip 1974 q Red Cream $25-30

Fanta - PT Zip 1974 q Grape $25-30

Fanta - PT Zip 1974 q Orange $25-30

R3 F80-01 (16 oz)

F80-G1 Syrup Gallon Fanta Zip 1970’s q Cs,GA,Gs,Os,Rb $40-50

F80-G2 Syrup Gallon Fanta Zip 1980’s q Os,Rb $40-50

R1 F80-1 Australia 13 oz Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Lemonade $100-125

R2 F80-1 Australia 13 oz Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $100-125

F80-1 Australia Top lid for previous can

R1 F80-1 Canada 12 oz Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1960’s q Strawberry $200-250

R3 F80-01 Canada

R0 F80-01 Canada

Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1960’s q Ga,Gs,Os,Rb $50-60

Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $80-100

R3 F80-4 England 11.5 oz Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $50-60

R3 F80-1 Germany 35 cl Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Lemonade $80-100

F80-1 Germany Top lid for previous can. Similar lid found on the following can.

R3 F80-1 Germany 35 cl Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $80-100

R3 F80-2 Germany 35 cl Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $50-60

R3 F80-3 Germany 35 cl Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $50-60

F80-3 Germany Bottom lid for previous can

R0 F80-1 Japan 350 ml Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $100-125

F80-1 Japan Top lid for previous can

Fanta - PT Zip 1974 q Root Beer $25-30

#24


R0 F80-1 Japan 250 ml Fanta - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Orange $100-125

1G - F600-1 Fresca - PT Pre-zip/Zip 1966 Cyc q Citrus $30-35

F600-1 Top lid for previous can

1G - F600-3 Fresca - FT/PT Pre-zip 1966 Cyc q Citrus $30-35

R2 F600-1A All Aluminum Fresca - PT Zip 1966 Cyc q Citrus $80-100

Fresca - PT Zip 1967 Cyc q Citrus $5-7

F600-6B All Alum. / Flat or Met Fresca - PT Zip 1970 q Citrus $5-7

R3 F600-01 Canada 10 oz Fresca - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Citrus $60-70

R3 OG - S1022-1 New York,NY Sparkling New - FT Pre-zip 1963 q Orange $300-350

F600-2A All-Aluminum Fresca - PT Zip 1968 Cyc q Citrus $20-25

R2 F600-4A Test Can

F600-4

Fresca - PT Zip 1969 q Citrus $50-60

Fresca - PT Zip 1969 q Citrus $2-4

F600-6 Flat & Metallic Fresca - PT Zip 1970 q Citrus $2-4

M780-G1 Syrup Gallon Mr. Pibb Zip 1970’s q Cherry $60-70

R3 1G - S140-1

1G - S140-1

R3 1G - S140-1

R3 1G - S140-1

Santiba - PT Zip 1974 q Club Soda $35-40

Santiba - PT Zip 1974 q Ginger Ale $2-3

Santiba - PT Zip 1974 q Mixer $35-40

Santiba - PT Zip 1974 q Quinine Water $35-40

S1022-1 Top lid for previous can

R2 1G - S1140-13

S1140-13 Top lid for previous can This is the actual first generation Sprite can. Note the small Sprite logo.

S1140-13 Top lid for previous can This is the actual second generation Sprite can. Note the large Sprite logo.

R2 S1140-14 Sprite - FT/PT Pre-zip 1963 q Citrus $275-300

R1 S1140-14A

S1140-14A Top lid for previous can

S1140-16 Common rolled Sprite - PT Pre-zip 1964 q Citrus $25-30

S1140-16 One possible top lid for previous can

S1140-16 One possible top lid for previous can

Sprite - FT/PT Pre-zip 1963 q Citrus $300-350

Sprite - FT Pre-zip 1961 q Citrus $500+

F600-2

S1140-14 Top lid for previous can

S1140-17 Sprite - PT Pre-zip 1964 q Citrus $20-25

#25


S1140-17 Sprite - PT Zip 1964 q Citrus $35-40

R3 S1140-17A All Aluminum Sprite - PT Zip 1967 q Citrus $50-60

S1140-G0 Very Rare Syrup Gallon Sprite Pre-zip 1960’s q Citrus $250-300

S1140-19 Sprite - PT Zip 1967 q Citrus $5-7

R3 S1140-2 All Aluminum Sprite - PT Zip 1968 q Citrus $40-45

R3 S1140-2A All Aluminum - Red Sprite - PT Zip 1969 q Citrus $35-40

R3 S1140-2A All Aluminum - Orange Sprite - PT Zip 1969 q Citrus $35-40

S1140-G1 Syrup Gallon Sprite Zip 1970’s q Citrus $100-125

S1140-G2 Syrup Gallon Sprite Zip 1980’s q Citrus $100-125

R0 S1140-1 Canada 12 oz Fanta - PT Pre-zip 1960’s q Citrus $300-350

R2 S1140-01 Canada 10 oz Sprite - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Citrus $80-100

R2 1G - T60-0 Small Tab Tab - FT Pre-zip1963 Cyc q Cola $250-275

T60-0 Top lid for previous can This is the actual first generation Tab can.

T60-1 Small Tab Tab - FT/PT Pre-zip1963 Cyc q Cola $100-125

T60-1

T60-1B Bottom lid of pull top example of previous can

T60-4 Mfg. info on can Tab - FT/PT Pre-zip/Zip1964 Cyc q Cola $50-60

R3 T60-8A All aluminum Tab - PT Zip 1969 q Cola $50-60

T60-G1 Rare Syrup Gallon Tab Zip 1970’s q Cola $200-225

Reverse

T60-5

T60-1 T60-1B Top lid for previous can. Lg. Tab-Mfg info on lid Note the large Tab - FT/PT Tab on the lid. Pre-zip 1963 Cyc q Cola $80-100

Tab - PT Zip 1967 Cyc q Cola $15-18

R2 T60-5A All Aluminum Tab - PT Zip 1967 Cyc q Cola $80-100

T60-5B Passover wording Tab - PT Zip 1967 Cyc q Cola $20-25

R1 T60-01 Canada 10 oz Tab - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Cola $100-125

R1 T60-02 Canada 10 oz Tab - FT Pre-zip 1960’s q Cola $80-100

R2 1G - V160-1 New York, NY Veep - FT Pre-zip 1961 q Lemon Lime $1000+

T60-1B Top lid of flat top example of previous can

T60-8 New in blue or black Tab - PT Zip 1968 q Cola $12-15

R2 V160-0 New York, NY Veep - FT Pre-zip 1961 q Lemon Lime #26 $1000+

The Cans of Coca-Cola 2009 - Collectible Soda Cans Special Edition  

The Collectible Soda Cans guide features the cans of Coca-Cola produced from 1939 to the test cans of the late 1980's. An invaluable resourc...

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