Page 1


The Class of 1927 Respectfully Dedicates This Book TO

William John Wilkinson Admired as a teacher respected as a gentleman and honored as a friend


Contents ./' D EDICATION EDITORIALS ADMINISTRATION C AMPUS F ACULTY M EN'S D IVISION WOMEN'S D IVISION FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES S OCIETIES STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS ATHLETICS PUBLICATIONS MUSIC AND DRAMATICS COLBY D AYS EXHIBITIONS C OMMENCEMENT N ECROLOGY LITERARY A DVERTISEMENTS


Editorials Another year ha pa ed, another clas is about to grad uate, and another ORACLE has been publi hed . The editorial board hone tly feel that this ORACLE represents its be t efforts, and is the be t O RACLE that has ever been published. The board has tried to profit by the mi takes of previous boards, and next year we hope that the board will profit by our mistakes and turn out a book superior to this one. The finest thing about the pa t year ha been the awakening of the Student Body. The Student Council ha functioned in the past year a it has never functioned before. It created rule to control the Fre hman Banquet, which had in the past been governed by unwritten and mo t unsatisfactory rules ; rule that were so uncertain as to re ult in unsati factory banquets for the past t hree years, and claim of victory by both sides. The present rules worked exceedingly well, and re ulted in having a definite and sati sfactory dec i ion this year. It al o took over the man­ agement of the I nterfraternity Basketball League, paid all the old debts of the league, and closed the season with all bill paid, and a small surplus. This was a noteworthy accomplishment when compared with the results of other years. Another determined, but un ucce sful attempt was made to reform the present evi l of fraternity rushing. Although the rule were not passed, five of the fraternities have sign i fied their intention to postpone pledging next fall until the third W edne day in October. The courage of the fraternities is to be commended and deserve ucce s. I f success does at­ tend their efforts the i nevitable result will be the abolition of the present cut-throat system, and it will be looked back upon as the most sign i ficant event of the past college year. Another reform the writer would l ike to ee would be the abolition of Freshman R ules, other than, perhaps, the wearing of the Freshman Cap. During one's freshman year friends are made regardless of fraternity, and the spirit i n the cla i s of the best. B ut after a squabble or two in sopho­ more class meetings, over real or i magined di crimination_ on the part of the members of one fraternity agai nst the freshman of a nother, we find this friendly spirit becoming a bitterly antagonist ic one. The bad spirit is not confined to the sophomore class, but spreads, and before college is hard ly under way we find one fraternity group suspiciously ho tile of another, and all over a few petty, foolish, childish rules. We can keep freshmen i n their places without resorting to foolish rules t hat the fresh­ men can hardly be blamed for breaking. The college as a whole ought to be able to impress upon freshmen their standing and place h ere. M ust we continue to have t hese rules because other c lasses had them before us ? If we feel the need of preserving triooition then let us keep Bloody Monday Night, but let us do away with those trouble b reeders, Freshman Rules and Sophomore Razoos. The pa t year ha not been overly successful i n athletics. In football a team with championshi p possibilities failed to get going until the final game agai nst Bates. Some stars will be lost to the team, but better breaks should re ult in a State Championshi p next year. Hockey was more suc­ ce sful than ever before, although vve finished at the bottom . Once again Six


we can find comfort in thinking of the fine prospect for the next year . Ba eball, t rack, and t e n n i are et to c o m e , but the prospects in a l l t h ree are bright, e pecially i n tennis with the entire team back. We hope that the u nfortunate fire at Coburn has not put the proc uring of a gymna i u m a few more ear di tant. It i a nece ity. If we a re to com pete w ith the other faine college , an adequate gymna ium i needed, and needed soon. The gymnasium, o cramped and inadequate, has been utilized as a laboratory ince the fire, and this ha served t o emphasize the g reat need of an u p-to-date and adequate gymnasiu m . There ha been rumor o f a Dean. It eem as if some of the d uties hould be lifted from the w i ll ing, b ut o erburdened shoulders of P resident Roberts. The college i large enough and really need a Dean. We hope t hat next year will ee thi rumor a fact. We a re glad that d u ring the pa t ear the Pre i dent aw fit to d o awa w it h the practice of St udent As i tant correcting papers in ome courses. It has re ulted in u nfai rnes and favoriti m in a few i n tances, a lthough the hone ty of mo t of t hese a i tant could not be que tioned. It has eemed a n unfair a r rangement for all t udent concerned, and the ORACLE wa glad t o ee Pre ident R obert take action i n thi matter. The pa t ear ha seen a decided tiffening of the chola tic standards of the college. We hope that the fac ulty will ee fit to continue the good work, and that i n the future w i ll make the entrance requirements more t rict, and thu elim inate at the er) beginning the m aj ority of the u nfit . We could not fini h without aying a few word about the g reat l oss Colby uff ered when Doctor Marquardt died. More t u dent , probably took c o u r e under him than under an other profe sor. He wa beloved by all, and his death wa a h ock to all of u . He wa faithful to the last , teaching almost t o t h e d a of h i death. Realizing that mention i n the editorial column i quite inadequate, another page ha been re er ed for a tribute by Doctor White, his c l o e t friend among the member of the fac ulty. In the final analy i w e are glad to find that the Student Body ha taken on a new lea e of life i n the pa t two ear . It m u st inevitably resu lt in a bette r and finer Colb . We h ope that the Student Body cont inue i n the p a t h it has taken the la t two ear . A we l ook forward i n t o the year to come it i not hard to i ualize Colb a a g reater l ittle college than e\ er.

APPRECIATION

The O RACLE wishes to thank P rofe or Rollins and Libb for their helpful aid and u gge tion . The ORACLE a ppreciate greatly the co-operation of the m erchants of Waterville and elsewhere who have ad erti ed in thi book. The E DITOR wi hes to thank the members of his board for thei r fine co-operation, and splendid work that made the ORACLE pos ible. ¡

even


Officers of the Corp ora ti on Presidmit Waterville

A RT H U R J E R E M I A H R O B E R T S , M . A . , LL.D.

Vice-Pres id ent and Ex-Officio Chairrnan Boa1·d of Trustees W i nthrop

H E R B E R T E L I J A H W A D S WO R T H , B . A .

Center

Secretary EDWIN

CAREY

WHITTEMORE,

Waterv i l l e

D.D.

Tre.asiirer Waterv i l l e

F R A N K BAILEY H U B B A RD

Board of Trustees Term Expires in

1927

GEO RGE CURTIS W I N G, LL.D. G E O R G E O T I S S M I T H , PH.D. DUDLEY PERKINS BAILEY, M.A. FRED MYRON PREBLE, D.D. R E X W I LD E R D O D G E , B . S . REUBEN WESLEY DUN N , M.A. C H A R L E S E DW I N G U R N E Y , B . A . * L E O N C L I F F O R D G U P T I LL, L L . B . * CARROLL NORMAN PE RKINS, LL.B.

Term Expires in

A u b u r n , M a ine W ashington, D. C. Everett, M ass. Ludlow , V t. Portland, M aine Watervil le, M a ine Portl an d, M aine Boston, M a ss. Watervil le, M a ine 1928

W OO D M A N B R A D B U R Y , D . D . N O R M A N L E S L I E B A S S E T T , LL. D . I R V I N G B E M I S M O W E R , D.D. L O U I S E H E LE N C O B U R N , LITT.D. F RA N K W I L L I A M PA D E L F O R D , D . D . C H A R L E S F R EDE R I C T A F T S E A V E R N S , B . A . * WARREN COFFIN PHI LBROOK, LL.D. * C H A R LES PUTNAM BARNES, LL.D.

Term Expires im

M a ss. M a ine M a ine M a ine M ass. Conn. M a ine M aine

1929

W I L LI A M C A M P B E L L C RA W FO R D , L . H . D . CHARLES EDSON OWEN, D.D. H A R T S T E I N W E N D E L L P A GE , M . D . H E RB E R T W A L T E R T R A F T O N , B . A . H E RB E R T ELIJ A H W A D S W O R T H , B . A . EDWIN CAREY W H I T T E M O R E , D.D. * A L B E R T F O S T E R D R U M MON D , B.A. * F R A N K W E N TW O R T H A L D E N , B.A .

Term Expires im

Newton Center, Augusta , Watervil l e , Skowhegan, Newton Center, H a rtford, Waterville, Houlton,

A l lston, Mass. W aterville, M a ine Worcester, M ass. Fort F a i rfiel d , M aine Winthrop Center, M aine W aterville, M a ine Watervi l le, M a ine New York City 1930

* R A N D A L L J U D S O N CO N DO N , L L . D . * FRANK HOWA R D E D MUN DS, LL.B.

Cincinnati, O hio New York City

Term Expires in 1931 * F R A N K L I N W I N S LOW J O H N S O N , L. H . D . * J O H N E D W A R D N E L S O N , B.A. • Elected by the Colby AJumni Association.

Eight

Yonkers, N. Y . A u gusta, M ai ne


Committees of the Trustees, 1926-1927 Standing Committees Acade niies M E SS RS. TRAFTO

, P R E B L E , M O W E R, G U P T I L L, B A R N E S, A N D M I S S OO B U R N

Buildi ngs a nd Gr<nmds M E S S R S . B A S S E T T , P E R K I N S A N D D R U M M ON D

Corr1r1nence<men t P R O F E S S O R L I B B Y, M E S S R S . B A S S E T T A N D P A D E L FORD, - P RO F E S S O R S P A R M E T E R, A SH C R A FT, A N D M A R R I N E R

Examin ing Committee M E S S R S . GUR

E Y, C RAW F O R D, P H I L B R O O K, A N D N E LS O N

Finance MES

RS. W I

G, B A I L E Y, DU H <m01路ary

N, A N D P E R K I N S

Deg路1路ees

M E S S R S . B A S S E T T, D O D G E , A N D J O H NS O N

T H E F A C U L T Y,

Ins tn.1 ction ex-officio a n d the COMM I T T E E 0 1 P R O F E S S O R S H I P S Investment

M E S S RS . R O B E R TS, M U R R A Y, A N D P E R K I N S

omination M E S S R S . S M I T H , B A S S E T T, A N D P A G E

Professo rsh ips M E S S R S . R O B E R T S,

R A W F O R D, D O D G E , B R A D B U RY, A N D O W E N P路rudential

M E S S R S . R O B E R T S, P E R K I

S, A N D D RU M M O N D

Scholarship A 1.d P R E S I D E N T R O B E R T S, P R O F E S S O R W H I T E A N D T H E D E A N O F W O M E N 'S D I V I S I O N

Special Committees A/!ummi Governing Conwnittee on A thletics M E S S R S . W A D S W O R T H , R O B E RT S , E D M U N D S, G U P T I L L, S E A V E R S, A N D D R U M M O N D

Join t C01r11mittee o n Academies M E S S R S . R O B E R T S, G U R N E Y, B R A DBU R Y, O W E N A N D W H I T T E M O R E New

Gymn,asium

M E S S RS . W A D S W O R T H, R O B E R T S, E D M U N D S, G U P T I L L, S E A V E R N S, A N D D R U M M O N D N in e


Graduate Organizations The General Alumni Association President,

H E R B E R T E. WA D S WO R TH , ' 9 2 , Wi nthrop

Secretmy,

E R N E S T C. M A R R I N E R, ' 1 3 ,

v

enter

aterville

The General Alumnae Association President,

FLORE

CE E. D U N

S creta1·y, H A R R I E T E A TO

, '96, Watervi l l e

R O G E R S , ex- ' 1 9 , Waterv i l l e

A R O O S TO O K CO L B Y CLU B A R O O S TO O K CO L B Y A L U M N A E A S S O C I A TI O A T L A N T I C S TA TE S C O L B Y A LU M NI A S S O C I ATI O N B A N G O R CO L B Y A L U M N A E A S S O CI A TI O N B O S TO N CO L B Y A L U MNA E A S S O CI A TI O N B O S TO N CO L B Y A L U M N I A S SO C IA TI O N C H I CA GO C O L B Y CLU B C O N N E CTICUT V A L L E Y CO L B Y A L U M

A E A S S O CI A TI O N

C O N N E CTI CU T V A L L E Y C O L B Y C L U B N E W YO R K CO L B Y A L U M N I A S S O CI A TI O N S O U TH K E N N E B E C CO L B Y A L U M N A E A S SO C I A TI O WATE R V I L L E CO L B Y A LU M N A E A S S O C IA TI O N W E S TE R N M A I N E CO L B Y A L U M N I A S S O C I A TI O N

Ten


CAMPUS


PRESIDEJNT ARTHUR

JEmEJMIAH

ROBERTS, M.A., L L . D .


Ju l i a n D a n iel Taylor, M . A . , L L . D . Taylor Professor o f the Latin La.ngu:i.gc n.nd Literature

A n ton M a rquardt, P h . D . , Prof s�ar o f the Grrma'»

( K iel ) *

La.nguage and Literature

C l a rence H ayward Wh ite, M . A . Professor o f t he Greek

Language

and

Literature Seer tary to the Faculty

George Fre::m a n P a rmenter, P h . D . , S c. D . Merrill

Professor o f

Chemistry

Webster Chester, M . A . Professor o f Biology

T h o m a s Bryce A s hcraft, P h . D . Professor o f Mathematics

•Died, Jan:iary 24, 1927.

ineteen


H e rbert Carlyle Libby, B . A . , Litt . D . Prof ssor o f Public Sveaking

athan iel E r nest Wheeler, M . Sc. Professor

. H arry E d wards, B . P . E

of

Physics

.

Professor of Physical Education

E rnest Cu mmin gs M a rriner, B . A . Professor o f Bibliogravhy

••

...

Curtis H ugh Mo r row, M .A . Professor o f Econoniics and Sociology

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Carl Jefferson Weber, M . A . ( O xon . )

,' ,.

Professor o f English

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W i l l i a m J o h n W i l kinson, P h . D . Prof ssor o f History

E d w a r d H e n ry Perkins, P h . D . Professor o f Geology

He nry E me rson T refethen, M . A . Associate Profe!!sor o f Astronomy

E ucl i d . H el ie , M . A . Associate Professor o f French

E d w a r d J oseph Colgan, M . A. Associate

Professor of

Eclucalion

Lester F r a n k Weeks, M . A . Assistant Professor o f Chemistry

Twenty-01ie


Winthrop H a mor Stanley, B . A . As.�islant Professor o f Physics

Fl orence E l izabeth Dunn, M . A . Assistant

Prof ssor o f English

Cecil A ugustus Rol l i n s, M . A .

A Bi.slant Professor o f English

Herbert Lee Newm a n , B . D . Ass-istant Professor o f Religious Educalio11 and Director of Religious

Activities

Thomas Mo rgan G r i ffiths, M . A . Assitsant Professor o f History

E rma Vyra Reynol ds, B . A . Dean o f Women

Twenty-two


Corinne B. V a n

orman

lnstr1u:tor in H ygi e n e a n d Physical Education

E verett F i s k Strong, B . A . 111structor

i n Roma nee Languages

R u therford John Gettens, B . S . In�tructor

i n Chemistry

Lowell Q u i nton H a yne , B . A . h1structor

i n Phi lo ophy

H ow a r d Phelps Kel sey, B . S . I=tructor

i n E•1glish

A rt h u r Galen E ustis, M . B . A . h1s·truclor

i n B11-Sincss Administration

Twenty-th1·ee


Matthew Whiting Ro a, B . A . Instructor i n English

Ph i 1ip Morri son

Richa rdson, B . S .

Instructor i n Mathematics

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Theodore Dodge Clark, B . A .

hislructor i n Biology

ďż˝ George

Bur rage V i les, Ph . D . Instructor i n German

Frederick Gardiner Fassett, B . A . Assistant i n Journalism

Joseph Coburn Smith, M . A . Assistant i n History

Twe1ity-f onr


Other College Officers M alco 1m B e m i s M ower, B . A .

Registrar

F r a n k Bai1ey H ubbard

Treasur r

�t ·� ,

E d w a rd C i l 1ey Roundy

Alhl lie Coach

�J.

.

.

�!" M ichael J a me s R y a n

Athletic Coach

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Twenty-five


H a r r i son A very S m i th Cashier

Sarah Waterworth P a rtrick House Manag r a n d Dietitian

E d ith H u n t Childs Secretary to t h e President

Doris J u l i a Tozi e r , B . A . Assistant Librarian

Twenty-six


" .. "� .s


S E N I O R CLASS OFFIC E RS ULMONT C LEAL C OWING

President

C LARENCE E MERY, J R .

Vice-President

M AYNARD W ARREN M AXWELL

Secreta1¡y-Treasurer

Senior Class Roll Frank Thomas Adams Carl A lbert Anderson J oseph Reuel Anderson Rowland Everett Baird Frederick E l wood Baker Alvarus Frank Bennett J ames Francis Berry William Nelson Blake Stanley Crocker. B rown James C u hing B rudno William P reston Cadwallader John E dward Candelet, 2nd Lawrence H erbert C lark Kenneth Russell Copp Ulmont Cleal Cowing Carl Harris Crummett R a l ph Henry D e O rsay Charles Henry Eaton, Jr. Warren Frank E d munds Clarence E mery, Jr. Theodore P rescott E mery Leonard Rossie Finnemore

H oulton E ast Pepperell, Mass. Lisbon Falls W est S pringfi el d , Mass. Portland Abbott Jeffersonville, Vt. Caribou Hyde Park, M ass. Newburyport, Mass. Waterville Providence, R. I . Caribou Skowhegan West S pringfield , Mass. Waterville Waterville M o rris Plains, N . J . New York, N . Y. E l ls wort h E l ls wort h L im estone Twl}1'1,ty-1i-ine


Ralph Thomas Flahive Roland Sidney Fotter Perley Clifford Fullerton Barrett Gardner Getchell Bassford Case Getchell Willis E rwin Herbert Alan Jewett Hilton E dgar Ru sell Howland Herbert Crawford Jenkins Claes Evan Johnson J ustin Oley Joh nson John Douglas Johnston Archer Jordan, J r. Alphon e William Lawson Mau rice Will iam Lord William . Alexander Macomber Waldo Lincoln Mac Pherson Vincent Parnell Mathers Maynard Warren Maxwell George Louis M ittelsdorf Thomas Francis Monaghan John Atwood Nelson Lester Raymond Nesbitt Darrold Edgar Nickerson Thomas Francis O'Donnell Albert Upham Peacock Greeley Chapman Pierce William Edward Pierce, Jr. Lester Powley Ralph Francis Prescott Marion Norton Rhoades Clyde E lwood Riley Karl Maynard Rood Lawrence Augustus Roy Arthur Garvin Sanderson Leonel Lucien Saucier Perry Foster Shibles John Irvine Smart Theodore GreP.nleaf Smart Gwyeth Thorndike Smith Richard Phineas Staunton Raymond Sullivan Frank Clement Taylor Horace True Trefethen Fred Levi Turner Almon Rodney Warren Joseph Leonard Washington Robert Malcolm Waugh

Thirty

Methuen, Mass. Waterville Fort Fairfield Needham, Ma . Needham, Ma . Franconia, N. H . Watervi l le We t Springfield, Mas . Upper Glouce ter Norwood , Mass. Fai rfield Norwood, Ma . Auburn Caribou North Va alboro Fall River, Ma . Abi ngton, Mass. New Haven, Con n . South China West Orange, N . J . Gardiner Augusta Revere, Ma s. Belfast N orwood, Ma . Providence, R. I . Oakland Lynn, Mass. Hinckley Pleasantvi lle, N. Y. Belfast B ridgton Hanover, N. H. Waterville E ssex J u nction, Vt. Waterville Thorndike Maxfield Maxfield Washington, D. C . Maplewood, N . J . Hinckley Winthrop Waterville Somerville Portland B rooklyn, N. Y. Sangerville


Senior C lass History Another act i n the h i story of Colby near its close. With o ur grad u­ ation the c u rtain d rops forever u pon the fourth scene i n the u ndergraduate l i fe of the c las of 1927. The story of our share in the pageant of the B lu e and Gray i w e l l known tQI everyone, and yet, l et us r e a d the synopsis t hrough once again i n order to refresh our memories before we ·c um, in the n ext few page , t o the detai l 0£ the action of the pla . F i r t, there wa that Freshman scene when we were i nitiated as Colby men, the la rgest entering c lass up to that time. Then, also, the football champion hip wa won, and we held our succes ful, t hough poorly t i med, banq uet . Then came the Sophomore scene when we, ourselves, as urned the role of priest of P i C h i . That wa the year of the Sophomore Declama­ tion, the U p ilon Beta Initiation, the Sophomore Shuffle, and the first trial of the one year athletic rule. But it was i n the J u n io r scene that our talent really began t o develop w it h the organization of Powder and Wig and Pi Gamma Mu, the J u n ior P rom, the Junior Exhibition, and the Junior Cla Day exercise . In the fourt h , or Senior Scene, we t ook over the acti e cont rol of the campus orga n izations-e pecially of the St udent Council a n d the variou college publicat ions. Then came Commencement, ·ch e fi rst under the new week-end plan, with its conti nual rush of activitie from the Senior Hop t o the Graduation exercises. Thus, briefly can we think of it a l l aga i n . O u r a c t i n the d rama o f Colby is completed. Our member ha e h ad lead i ng roles i n t h e scholastic, athletic, religiou , forensic, d ramatic, a n d m u s ical part o f i t s production. N ow there remains only the work of the critics-a n d that will be found c h ronicled, i n t h e years to c ome, on the page 0 £ o u r n e� spapers and magazines. Our cast d isbands. Remembering Mother Colby's training, we now go t o the g reater play. W e h ave strutted our l ittle h o u r here upon the tage of Colby's campus. As you read the e pages which record the story of 1 927,. decide for yourself, as we take t h e curtain call of o u r graduation, whether Macbeth would have called u s poor players.

T hirfly-one


F RA N K T H O M A S A D A M S , K � P "Hap"

" H e jests a t soars, t ha t neve 1· left a w<>und." R icker C l a ssical Institute, 1 9 2 1 ; C l a Nomin ating Committee 1; �l ass T rack 1, 2; Chem i try A i tant 2 ; De­ bating 3; Pi Kappa Delta; Band 3 , 4 ; Wh ite M u le 4; I nterfrate rn i ty Bowling 4; Kappa Phi Kappa President 4. Yes. here h e i ! A y o u n gster, a sc hool teacher, a n d a w o u l d - b e s c h o la r . "Hap" does enjoy fun. A k s o m e of h i brothers w h o h a v e e e n h i m e n t e r t h e h o u s e d i g u i ed a s a n i n mate from Aug u s ­ ta ( E a s t Side ) . Very f e w w o u l d b e a r , a s h e has, t h e h a r d s h i p s that t h ese a m u se m e n t s h a v e cau sed t o be v i s i ted upon t h e i r p e r ­ petrator. Fra n k a l s o h a s talent for a rt , a n d we hope some day to see h i m i n t h e fun n y paper. W e shall m i hi m i l i ng face a n d the h i larious tooting which he calls "sax·· m usic .

CARL A LBERT AN DERSON, � T

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"Andy"

Beauty, passing beauty ! sweetest swee t ! How oan'st t hau let me was t e nvy yonth in signs."

Pepperell H igh School , Pepperell , Mas . ; Footba l l Squad 2; O RACLE Board 2, 3; D r u i d s ; E p icurean; P resident; Chi E psilon Mu; In terfraternity Hockey 4 ; Manage r Vars ity Hockey 4; Wearer of t h e " C . " " A n d y " c a m e to Colby a very u n w i se a n d u n learned c h oo l bo y . H e . e t to w o r k a t o n c e a n d the c o u rses t h a t h e h a s m astered w o u l d m a k e a l e s s deter m i n ed m a n s h u dder. C h ee r f u l , f r i e n d l y a n d h u m o r ­ o u s , h e has made a g r e a t n u m b e r of friend d u ri n g b i s f o u r y e a r s a t Colby. W i t h h i s s t ro n g deter m in a t i o n a n d e v e n t e m p e ra m e n t b e i sure t o be s u cces s f u l i n b i s m e d i c a l career.

JOSEPH RUEL A

DERSON

"Jo"

"Sile nce is golden." L isbon High School ; Kappa P h i Kappa 4; Pi Gamma M u 4. One o f t h e m a n y u n a s s u m i n g chaps here a t Colby a n d yet a fi ne ra n k e r . He has taken all of the hard c o u rses and by being a c o n ­ s t a n t p l u gger has kept h i s s c h o l a r s h i p average h i g h . In t h e field of Sociology he i s best k n o w n and his a m b i t i o n s in that l i n e a r e of t h e h ig h es t . W e wish y o u luck "Jo" in the f u t u re, a s m u c h a s you have b a d in t h e past a n d even more.

T hfrty-two


R O W L A N D E V E R E TT B A I R D ,

Z-¥

" R o l l ie " West S p ringfi e l d H igh School , M a s s. ; Echo B o a r d 1 , 2, 3 ; B a n d 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; G lee C l u b 2 , 3, 4 ; Secretary of P ress Cl ub 3 ; F irst P rize in S o p homore D ec l a m ation ; Second P r izes in Good wins 1 , 2 ; T h ir d , 3 ; F irst P r ize in J u nior E x h ib itio n ; F ir s t P r ize in H a l l owel ls 2 ; Second in M ur­ ray P r ize Debate 2 ; J u n io r C l ass O ration ; C o llege P l a y 3 ; P o w de r a n d W i g , M ystics, Student A s sist a n t i n De­ p a r t ment of E c o n o m ic s a n d S o c iol ogy. W h e n e v e r any o r g a n i z a t i o n requires a spea k e r , Rowla n d i s al­ w a y s i t s fi rst c hoice. W h ether the talk which he i s asked to give be h u m o r o u s , patriotic or e d u cational. h e i s a lw a y s ready with words which fit the a u d i ence a n d the occa s i o n . His r ea d y wit a n d b r i lliant m ci n d make h i s powerful speeche- i m p ressive and interesting. Al­ t ho u g h s m all i n s t a t u r e a n d handicapped b y a m a s s o f c u r l y h a i r , h i s j a u n t y stride m a rk s h i m a s a m a n of p u rp o s e . He i i n e v ery s e n e of the word a congenial a n d p o l i s hed gentle m a n .

F R E D E R I C K ELWO

D B A K E R , AT a

" F re d d ie"

"The pen is ?nightier tha n the s w01·d and t herein lies his g rea tn ess." Dee ring H igh School, P ortla n d , M a ine ; C ross-Country, 1 ; Relay, 1, 2, 3 , 4 ; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4 ; I n terfraternity Track, 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Debating Society, 2 ; A s sociate E d ito1', White Mule, 2; A ssociate E d itor ORACLE, 3 ; S po rting E d itor Echo, 3 ; E d itor-in - C h ief, 4 ; P r e s ident Colby Press C l ub 4 ; S e n io r Co u n c il , 4 ; Senio r N ominating C o m m ittee, 4 ; C h a ir m a n Sen io r C l a s s Gift C o m m ittee, 4 ; Wearer of the " C . " "Fred d i e " t h r i v e s on work a n d gi ves h i b e t to whatever h e t u r n s h i s hand. H i s efforts a Editor o f t h e Echo have been cre>wned with s u ccess. His writ i ng have been frank and to the point. Here is a m a n that abhon submi sion and the weak spirit. Courage a n d i n itia­ tive are b is key words and we prophe y not h i n g but success and pros­ perity for such a m a n .

A LV A R U S F R A N K B E N N E T T , K � P " M ike"

"Your he1·0 s h ould b e tall."

A bbott H igh School ; Ech o B o a r d , 1 , 2 ; A ssociate E d itor of ORACLE, 3; B a seba l l , 3 , 4 ; I nterfraternity B asketbal l , 3 , 4 ; I nterfraternity B o w l ing. 4 ; Kappa P h i K a p p a ; P i G a m m a M u ; C o l b y P ress C l ub, V ice-President, 4 .

"Often

T h e o l d saying h a s i t , t h e cockloft is e m p t y i n those whom nature has bui l t many storie high." Not s o i n this c a s e, however, for " M i k e" a n d h i s line a r e p ro v e r b i a l . H e o n c e q u oted B ro w n i n g i n h i s M a t h final-and p a s sed tho c o u r s e ! W h i l e i n col lege h e h a s m a n a g ed t o fi n d t i m e to participate i n athletics a n d w r i t e f o r t h e Echo a n d as well as t o g e t i n s o m e of the hardest c o u rses . " M i k e" is the e s s e n c e of g e n tl e n e s s and k i n d li n e s s; h i s q u i c k wit a n d w h i m s ic a l h u m o r o p e n m a n y doors to h i m : h i s ready s y mpathy a n d u n b iaged v i e w s e n d e a r h i m to his many frien d s . W i th p ri d e a n d r e a l a ff e c t i o n w e b i d h i m "Good-b y e!"

ORACLE,

"A's"

T hfrty-th ree


JA M E S F R A N C I S B E R R Y , AT 0 "Jim"

"Every

man

is a volume if you know how to

· a d him."

God d a r d Seminary, Barre, Vt.; C u sh ing Academ y ; C ross­ Country Squad ; Track, 1, 2'; I n te rfrate rn i ty T rack 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Interfraternity H ockey; Assistant Cheerleader, 3 ; Commencement Usher.

Our smiling "Jim" has conquered the difficultie of being a -pe­ cial ·tudent and is now ready to enter the wide world and find his place in it. ..Jim .. is a dandy good., fellow and has a cheerful smile for every occasion. When "Wool is entertaininJ?, come prepared for laughter. His characteristic "Oh, Boy" was always a ignal o( good humor and gayety. "Jim" is till a bit bashful, but seems to have conquered that handicap in one particular case. "Wool" never gets in the way, but is always willing and eager to dispel the blues and encourage others to brace up and try harder. Considerate toward all, he ha been a irue brother and friend. Close contact with you ha made us realize ihe wonderful worth and value of a sincere and k indly clas mate.

WI L L I A M N E LSON BLAKE "Bill"

"Wealth, thou art m y life inde di" C a ribou H igh School , C aribou, Maine ; Student Counc i l Representative 4 ; Student Council D ance Committee 4 ; Chi Epsilon Mu 4 .

One of the bu ie t fellows ever to enter the college by the Kennebec. The man who could keep up with "Bill' " multifariou dutie had to go some. Besides doing well in his tudies, he has endeavored to furnish the college with various necessities of life­ that is fun, etc. If only he will do in the world what he has done here, the world will be a better place for the human race to live in.

S T A N L E Y C R O C K E R B R O W N , AX A " B rownie"

"Adve1'Siity dost best diso011er v irtue." .Echo 4.

Bo ard 2 ; Y . M . C . A . C abinet 3, 4 ; M u s i c a l C l ubs 3 ,

It requires courage-and lots of it-to battle with some of the hardships that have confronted you, "Stan," and we admire you for your "grit" and perseverance. If you continue to strive as hard as you have at Colby, enduring success is bound to reward you. As a musician you have proven yourself efficient and your musical ability will be greatly m issed. Our best wishes for success go with you.

Thirty-four


J A M E S C U S H I N G B RU DN O "Jim"

" Wha t h o ! a riminer-" Newburyport H igh School, Newburyport, M a ss . ; T rack 1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; C ross-Country 1, 2, 3 , 4 ; Captain of Cross­ Country 4. "Jim" i a f e l l o w that w e all liked-in f a c t c o u l d not k e e p from liking. H e is a high ra n k i n g t u d e n t in h i work. Among the s t u ­ d e n t s h e is q uite pop u l a r. Hi work at t r a c k i h i s o n e great ac­ comp lis h m e n t ( except if you ca l l it so his fi na l mid-year in his­ tory ) . The world needs men like him a n d we wish him the best of luck.

W I LL I A M P R E S T O

C A D WA L L A D E R , K 6. P

"Cad"

"Ou t upon it, I h a ve loved Three whole dwyis together! W a tertown ( Conn . ) High School, 1 9 2 2 ; Com mencement Mani tor 2 ; Colby Band 3 , 4 ; Chess and Checker Club 1 ; Track 2 ; C ross-Country 2, 3; Ha nd book, A s s ista n t E di­ tor 2, E d itor 3; Y . M. C. A. C abinet 3; I n terfraternity T rack 2 ; M u s ic a l Clubs; Glee Club 4 ; Banjo C l u b 4 ; O rc hestra 4 . T h e fact t h a t "Cad" h a s m a n a g ed t o retain h i pop u larity while l ea r ning to play t h e saxophone peak volumes for hi per onalit y . H e h a s t w o places of residence, Fairfield a n d Waterville, a n d it i s d u e s o l e l y to h i e ff o r t s that t h e l o c a l s t r e e t car c o m p a n y h a s m a n ­ aged to pay dividen d s . H i s a l l e g e d m u sical t a l e n t is his o n e fl a w a n d t h a t is merely theoretical. H e n e v e r speaks of h i s personal ambi­ tions, but it is safe to a sume that he will fill a n honored place in some comm u nity selling banjos and other musical instruments on week­ days and leading the S u n day School on the Sabbath.

JOHN

E D W A R D C A N D E L E T , AT n "Candy"

" Bring h i m a lmg, h e p l a y s , you know t h e kind." E n g l ish H i gh Schol, P rovidence, R. I . ; B rown U n i versity 1 ; M u sic a l C l u b s ; A ss i stant Cheerleader 2 ; C o l lege S o n g Leader 2 ; T r a c k 3; I n terfraternity T r a c k ; A sso­ c iate E ditor of O RACLE 3 ; P i G a m m a Mu, 4 ; C h a pel S on g Leader 1, 2 , 3, 4 ; A ssista n t Cha pel P ia n ist 1 , 2 , 3, 4 . scholar, m u sician, brilliant this lost University B ro w n Since prospered. has Colby companion, and mathematicia n , chemi t , Known as the Since entering o u r portals at all times he has DUG. greatest imitation of a s h a d o w of the twentieth c e n t u r y , " J a c k " has fu l fi lled his earlie t promise a s an u n d e r s t u d y to o l d Joe B os w e l l . " T h e B r u te" h a s b e e n the m o s t p r o m i n e n t matador i n t h e history of South C o l l ege, and we w h o k no w can t e l l of s o m e brilliant vic­ B u t seriously, John, we are proud of your rec­ tories over the B ul l . The best of l u c k , Jack. ord and are glad to call you friend.

Thirty-five


K E N N E T H R U S S E L L C O P P , <P � e "Ke n"

Skowhegan H i gh S chool; Glee C l u b 1 , 2, 3, 4; O r chestra Leader 3; H nnor Roll 1, 2 , 3 , 4; Kappa Phi !Cap p a So­ ciety; Col lege Band 1, 2 , 3, 4.

X, the unknown quantity, imported in its pl"i stine Jong-haired state, put through four year ' milling. to !(-accompaniment of "The Maiden's Prayer" on a gleaming bras· trumpet, now depart , fully eQtdpped. He who forces air through a horn two or three nights a week, keeps up to Phi Beta company in the ranks, and does his part o( the bi k ing around the country with the Glee Clubs ·a nd such has done a good four years' work. Add to thi the ac-. cu mulation of a helpmate and you have really qu ite a lad. s

U L M O N T C L E A L C O W I N G, Z '1' "Cle al" We st S p ringfield H igh S ch ool , M a s s . ; F ootba l l 1 , 2 , 3 ; T r a ck 1 , 2; President of Senior C l a ss ; P r e ident of Stu­ dent Council 4 ; Seni o r Council man on A t h let i c C o u n ci l 4 ; M u s i ca l Cl ubs 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; M a n a ger 4 ; C h a i rman J u n ­ ior C l a s s N ominating Committee; M ur r ay P rize Debate 2 ; Goo dwins 2; Assistant Commencement M a rshal 3; U psilon Beta; D r u i ds ; Chi E psilon Mu; Society of Sons of Colby; Honor Roll 1, 2 ; Wearer o f the " C . "

Here is one of those rare specimens o[ what is commonly k nown an "athlete-scholar-good-fellow." The bu y days of this man. the second of the famous "Colby Cowing ," remind one of the ver­ satile actor who plays all of the role , from light to heavy. The only difference is that "Cleal's'' work is the real article. A football player of proven ability, a talented musician, an efficient manager, a capable student and tutor, an able executive and a general all-around good fellow. Truly this man stands out as a leader among his mates. a-

C A R L H A R R I S C R U M M E T T , L. C . "Van"

" ' Tis now the very witching time of n ight." Coburn C l a s s ical Institute, 1 92 3 ; K a p p a P h i K a p p a ; P ress Club; C h i E psilon Mu.

''Van" doesn't get excited very often, but when his leep is dis­ turbed-woe to the u nfortunate culprit. You see, "Crum" needs his sleep, for all his working hour are spent in business deals. Sell 'I He can sell anything! But that' not all. He can sell it at his own price. So we predict that here we have one of Clinton's future merchants.

Thirty-six


R A LP H H E

R Y D ElO R S A Y, z 'I'

"Ralph" Coburn l a ss i c a l I n stitute ; T r a c k 1 , 2 ; Commencement U s h e r ; White Mule Bo ard 1, 2 ; H a llowells, 2 ; Sopho­ more H o p C o m mittee ; A ss istant Student Marshal, 2 ; Student M a rs h a l 3 ; V ice- President of J un i o r C l a s s ; C h a i r m an of J u ni o r P ro m Comm ittee ; Secret a ry­ T r ea u re r of C h i E ps i l o n M u ; Sen i o r Hop Committee. E n ro u t e to s u cce s i s " Ra lp h . " othing that ye cribe can scribble can t e l l the story of how this t a l l a nd d i g n i fied graduate has c o n q uETed the variou task w h i c h have been placed in his w a y d u r­ i n g hi college career. T h i s W a terv i l le y o u t h has capab l y acted a s usher a nd marshal f o r more t h a n o n e commencement a n d i t i with regret t h a t we see h i m t a k e part i n h i s o w n . Hi ready h a n d h a been h e l d o u t to u n d ertake a n y ta k a n d h i s a b i l i t y ha made h i m fi ni h t h e job.. Genero s i t y as w e l l ha m a r k e d Ra lph a big i n heart as in t a t u re.

C H A R LES H E "

"But

R Y E A TO

, J R . , K ...\ P

harl i e "

i ·h o

ca n keep t h e lio n's cu b fr<>m ravenin g ? "

M o r r i town ( . J . ) H i gh School , 1 9 2 2 ; U p s i l on Beta ; Echo Staff 1 ; I n terfrater n ity B a sketbal l 1 ; Sophom ore Hop C m m ittee 2 ; Student C o u n c i l 4. W e have great con fi de n c e i n " C ha r l i e," no m a t t e r w h a t h e u nder­ take . I t makes little d i fference how deeply rooted he becomes in a n y t h i n g , h e ca n extricate him elf i n some w a y o r other, b e i t i n a chem i s t r y exami n a t i o n , in p r o m i e , or e v e n in l o v e . O u r h i g h est t r i b u te i s t ha t he has been a real leader a n d a t ru e f r i e n d , a a l l t h e brothers c a n a t te t . W e d o n o t k n o w w h e t h er h e is t o be a "chem­ ist" or a " C . P . A . , " b u t we do k no w t h a t he w i l l progre and prosper w h a t e v e r he become .

wA R R E

FRA

K E DM U

·ns,

z 'I'

M a n u a l T r a i n i n g H igh School , B rookl y n , N . Y . ; Footbal l , 1 , 2 , 3 ; T e n n i s 2, 3 , 4 ; T rack 1 , 2 ; Debating Society 2 , 3 , 4 ; O u ting C l u b 1 , 2 ; I nterfratei·nity T rack a n d Bas­ ketba l l ; Com mencement M a rs h a l 1 , 2 ; Society of S o n o f Colby ; T re a s u rer of E pi c u re a n s ; P i G a m m a M u ; F reshman B a n q uet C o m m i ttee ; Senior G i ft Committee. W i t h t h e c h a r a c t e r i tic b r o g u e o f t h e "New Yorker," Warren came "down'' here to Colby. Now he is leaving! W h a t a short s p a n o f t i m e i n wh ich to a s sociate w i t h s u c h a fi n e personalit y ! A good t u de n t , a n eager and i n terested sport e n t h u si a s t . a generou and help f u l friend-that's W a rre n . H i s p i c t u re w i l l s h o w h i c l ea n - c u t appearance. Hi I i t o f a c t i v i ti e w i l l s h o w h i s acc o m p l i s h m e n t . B u t a per o n a l a c q ua i n t a n c e w i t h W a rren can a lo n e reveal h i real worth.

T h il'ty-seven


LAREN

E E M E R Y , JR., � 'r

" P l i n y"

"It is better t o figh t for good than t o ra il at ev1'l.'' H iggins C l assical In titute; Up i l on Beta; Football Squad 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 4 ; Interfraternity Basketball 2, 3, 4; V i ce-Presid ent of C l ass 4 ; Druid . " P l i ny" i s one of t h e hardest work r · that ever graduated from Colby. H e ha- worked early and late and bis works form a l i s t f a r too l o n g t o i nclude here. Be ides his work he h a s found time to ta k e n cover a very d i ffi c u lt college c u rricu l u m. A l so he ha. a l way t i m e to t o p and help a fellow s t u dent. These q u a l i t ies together with a determination to win a re u re l y enough to i n s u re a succe s­ (ul f u t u re.

THEODORE PRES

O T T E M E R Y , � 'r

" Ted"

" Th ty woes a re bii'ds of passage, t1·ansitory." H iggi n s C l assi cal In stitute; Goodwin Prize Speaking C on­ test 3 ; Junior P rize E xh i bit; J u n i o r C l ass Day C o m m it­ tee; Interfraternity Basketball 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Secretary Y. M . C. A. 4. "Ted" has b e e n a n u n ti ri n g w o r k e r i n every t h i n g he has h a d a band in d u ri ng h i s f o u r years at C o l b y . He has either as i s ted or had charge of the ticket w i n dow a t a large part of the varsity games and in spite o f h i size he ha a l wa y t u rned the spoi l s over complete. Attention to d u t y , thoroughness a n d a w i l lingness to work w i l l s urely bring him a position o f honor a n d t r u t in h i chosen pat h .

L E O N A R D RO S S IE F I N N E M O R E , L. C . " Lenny"

"Sooth, 'twere a pleasan t life to lead Wit h n o t hing in t he world to do." Li mestone H igh S chool , 1 9 23; Ech o 2 ; K ap p a Phi K ap p a; Secretary 3, 4 ; Student Coun ci l 4 . W e have n o t y e t decided j u s t w hat " Le n n y" i s goi n g to d o . Some s u ggest t h a t he i s going i n to the movie b u s i ness, t h a t is, o n t he recei v i n g end. Some expect him to d ra w u p a law aga i n t afternoon classe . Other than thi . he i a model young man . Lenny's big ambition i to "parler" like a native of his w o u l d -b e - adopted c o u n ­ t r y . S o o n he i ntends to grace t h e h a l l s of Sorb o n n e w i t h h i s pres­ ence. Look for h im when you a re there. Good l u c k , " Lenny."

T h frty-eight


R A L P H T H O M A S F L A H I V E , cf> � e " B ri ck '

"L'etat, c'est nwi!" Methuen H i gh School ; P roctor A c ade m y ; Berkely P re­ paratory School ; Coburn Classical I n stitute ; U. S. N avy 1 9 1 7 - 19 1 9 ; A merican Legion ; Pi K a p p a Delta S oc iety ; D e b at i n g Societ y ; C h ai r m an Senior o m i n at­ i n g Commi ttee ; Student Council 4 ; C an e Committee ; H on o r Roll 4 ; Powder and W i g Society. " Now, what I mean. thi guy's not o hot at ome thi ngs . a n d sti l l j ust the ame, i n other ways, y'k now. he k no' hi t u ff . " So h e peak , t h i s Flahive o f t h e radical left, al w a y of t h e radical, but rarely left. Demagogic foe of i n terests. what so e"er they be ; the Brick has lain ma n y a long h o u r with the steel, ometimes. we must admit, the bra s . of converse. Precinct . ward, city, county, state, na­ tion, conti nent. hemisphere, world-two worlds i f you w i l l-he has 'em all, analyzed, Ji-ted. defined, statistics . factual or fictional, all you want. Loma ney of the future, bar none.

ROLLA

D SI D

E Y FOTTER, � T

" D onuts"

" Fa i r scene ! with other �es, than once, I gaze, The emw-va rying cha r m , your round di.spla ys." Waterville High School ; F ootball 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; Interfrater­ n ity B asketbal l of the " C " .

1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; Student Council 4 ; Wearer

"Rollie"' listened to t h e comman d , "love, honor a n d protect,'" at the e n d of b is J u nior year. Thi wa not a n e n d for "Donut · · though. He played football and basketball. Hi work for the fraternity dw·­ i ng h i years at Colby . h i s sturdy character a n d cheerful per o n a l i ty If his business have won h im the admiration a n d re-pect of everyone. rareer is as ucce ful a h i college career a b r i l l i a n t future i s u rely h is.

P E R L E Y C L I F FO R D F U LL E R T O N , L . C. " Perley"

' Beside him sat a,nother, a,ll w hose face Bore mar ks of pa t ie n ce." F o rt F ai rfield H i gh, 1 92 3 . F o r h a r d , industrious work we refer y o u to Perley. There's no k i nd of work to which he fails to a p ply h i mself w i th all his soul. H is four years at Colby have been marked w i t h d i l igence. B u t be w i l l n ee d i t w h e n he begins to d r u m i nto puerile c r a n i ums t h e i nt r icacies of the bi nomial theorem. W e have no fear for Perley's uccess ; we add our best wishes.

Thirty-nine.


B A R R E T T GA R D N E R GE T C H E L L , ..'l T " B rat"

"Mine be the powe1· which eve1 · to its sway W1'll win the wise at once, a nd by degrees May into 1mco ngenicl l spitrits flow." eedham H ig h School , eedh a m , Mass.; S o n of Colby; H onor Roll 1, 2 ; Echo l, 2, 3, 4 ; Busi nes M a nager 4; Freshman Schol arship; Interfrate rnity H ockey 4 ; Book Store 4 ; Sen ior Token Committee. " Bral " has given fou r years of valuable labor to the Ech o . H is act iviti i n the hou e have been too numerous to record here. W ith a ready wit a n d an ever-present smile he ha now a ho·t of friend· at Colby and i n the city. Four years of brilliant succe - beh i n d him he now journey forth to make a place for himself i n the cold . hard world of busin s, where hi personality a nd gen i us will undoubtedly b r i ng him whatever he may seek.

BASSFORD

A S E GE T

H E L L , ..'l T

"Plop"

"Eve1 y man who i s not a monste r, a ma thema ticia n , 0 1 · a mad philosophe1· 1· t he lave o f om.e wo m a n or other." Needham H igh School , Needh a m , M a s s . ; Sons of Colby; H onor Roll 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Ch ess and Checker Club 1 ; A s­ sistant Ma nager of Footbal l 2, 3 ; German Prize 3 ; J u nior Prom omm ittee; Cla s T reasurer 3 ; I n truc­ tor i n Math 3 ; Instr uctor in German 4 ; President Sons of Colby 4 ; In te rfratern ity H ockey 4 . " P lop" is o n e of tho·e rare persons, who sees a l l. hears all ::i n d talks o n ly w h e n t a l k e d t o . B £ s i d s b e i n � a n h o n o r t u d e n t he ha been a n instructor i n Freshman Math and Germa n . Moreover, he has fou nd time to help many a di couraged fellow student by h i friendly advice and able tutorage. I f he is a ucc�s-fu.l in l i fe ::is he has been at Colby he will travel fa·t and far in h is cho en mathematical career. The u£st of luck . " P lop , " o l d man.

TH EODORE EVERETT HA RDY,

J R. Z '1-

" T e d" Cobur::i Classical I n stitute; U psilon Beta; C h i E psilon M u ; Commencement U sher 1 , 2; A ssistant S t u dent M a rshall 3 ; P roperty Man ager of College Play; So­ ciety of Sons of Colby; Interfraternity Bowling a n d Track. I Uness kept "Ted" away from college for a time, b u t he nhowed p l uck and perseverance and now t h is congenial, red-haired youth is among the graduates. A s "Ted" is a resident of Watervil.le, m a n y of his college f r i e n d s h a v e o f t e n experiencert h i s ready hospitality at his home. H i s precarious position in his courses which resulted from his ret u r n i ng at mid-semester was oon overcome by the "Doc," g i v i ng him the mark of a capable scholar. His immaculate appearance dis­ t i ng u ished him a one of the neatest members of his class, w h i le his large circle of friends pronounce h im as a wholly likeable a n d efficient "Ted.' '

Forty


W I L L I S E R. W I N H E R. B E R T , K � P

" Tluy modesty's

a

ca ndle of thy me1· it."

N o rw i ch U n i versity; Kappa Phi K ap p a. We w i ll match Herbert against a ny a n d all comers in an e l i mi n ation contest to dete r m i ne th Q u iete t a n d most reserved member of ·•he class of 1 9 2 7 . Yet h i s Quiet, understanding smile often conveys m uc h m o r e mea n i ng than w e m o r e v o l u b le beings c a n express. e v e n with the aid o f many words. If silence reaUy is more valuable tha n speech. then we wiU venture the assertion that we shall miss his ilence.

A LA N .J E W E T T H I L T 01 N ,

Z 'Y

"Al" W aterville H ig- h School ; Track 1 , 2 ; Cross Country 2 ; I nterfrate r n i ty Track 1 , 2 ; P roperty M an ager of Pow­ · der and Wig; senior P l ay Comm ittee; I nterfraternity B owl i n g 4.

Another local l a d a n d a credit to the town. M a n y organizations ow� i n a material way a considerable a m o u n t o f gratitude to " A l " and h i s w i l l i ngness to help. Transportation is o n e of the greatest problems o f today i n every branch of endeavor and " A l 's" generous assistance with a U i n h i s power mark him as a n u n s zlfish and p ublic s p i r i ted i n dividual. There are often plenty o f men who are w i l l i n g to "lend a hand," but to as ociate with " A l" i n a n y way is a n added pleasure and a profit. A young m a n with a s t a n d i ng among bis fellows such as is held by t h i s particular lad, shou.ld feel no qualms whatever in the face of the world's work.

EDGAR RUSSELL HOWLAND,

Z 'lr

" E d d i e" West S p ri ngfiel d H i g h S ch o o l , M as s . ; T r ack 1 ; I n terfra­ tern ity B asketball 1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; Secretary of I nterfra­ tern ity B asketball League Council 4 ; College B an d 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; P ress C l u b 3 ; U ps i l on B eta. West S p ri ngfield has sent forth a good.ly number o f its youth fo matriculate at this dear o l d i nstitution, but not among the least do we fi nd our old friend "Eddie . " If you should ask a n y of "Ed's" i ntimates what particular outstanding characteristic is possessed by this in­ dividual, the answer will almost i n variably be "work." And a worker he i too. A pleasurable i n terest in 211 that he attem pts makes his task a wonder to others and a source o f enjoyment to hmiself. A seriou desire to see t h i ngs neat and right, whether it be his tie or h i s classroom work, e v e r characterizes " E d d i e ' s " actions. His many a c ­ quai nta nces t e r m h i m as a h u t i e r and a r e proud to call h i m friend.

FD'rf;y-<me


H E R B E RT

R A WFO RD J E N K I N S

" H erb" Coburn C l assical In stitute, Watervi lle, M a i ne ; Y . M . C . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; P r e ident of t h e " Y " 4 ; Y . M . C . A . C a b ­ inet 2, 3, 4 ; Member of t h e Debating T e a m s 2, 3, 4 ; Me mber of the Executive Comm ittee of the Debating Society 4 ; Delegate to N ational Student Conference, M i lwaukee 4 ; Junior P rize E x hibition 3 ; Murray Prize Debate 2 ; Goodwin Public S peaking onte t 3. olby. H e has entered into Herbert h a s m a d e many friend- while at the various activities of the Debating ociety a n d of the Young Me n 's · hristian A sociation. a n d has held honored position in both of them. Hi s p ea k i ng ability is well known, a n d he is honored among the students for it. H e . too, has been very faithful to his courses . a n d as a re ult of it has been bu y from the begi n n i ng to t h e end of the day. Probably by thi · policy h has gotten more out of college than the We wonder ten year henc if he will be as bu y as he is rest of u-. now.

C LA E S E V A N J O H N S O N , AT n "S wede"

" Th

grea te r the obstacle , the more glory in overcoming it."

N o rwood H i gh School ; Footba l l 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Hockey 1 , 2 , 3, 4; Druids ; Secretary of Senior C l a s s ; Debat i n g Squad ; Wearer of the "C".

E v a n is another brilliant young man from t h a t famou ( ? ) city of Norwood. Nothing daunts h i m , f o r patience a n d h a r d work h a v e been his watchword . Besides carrying on his college work, starring on the football field a n d making a ho t of friends, . . Swede" has selected h i s better half, and is preparing to entPr the benedict clas . When you take the big step, Evan. remember that we are a l l behind you and waiting for invitations. Life holds much promi e for "Swede" for he knows what he wants a n d will spare no effort in attai n i n g b i s a pirations. He b a s learned w e l l t h a t oft repeated m o r el of advice, "Look well to the little things of life, a n d the bigger will take care of themselves.''

JUSTIN OLEY JOHNSON S u l l i van H i gh School ; M athematics 3 , 4 .

Kappa P h i

K a p p a ; I n structor i n

One o f those few chaps who come back after being out for m a n y years. Consequently w e do n o t k now much about h i m a n d c a n no t w r i t e m u c h i n eulogy. A m o n g h i s many experiences is bis t e a c h i n g a t Fairfield. He a l s o w a s a n instructor a t the college d u r i ng h i s last two years here. and those unfortunate fro h who sat under him knew their mathematics when the year was u p . We wish him good speed.

Forty-two


JOHN DOUGLAS JOHNSTON, A T n " D ou g" "He

w ho looks

the part

has

t he b a t t le half

w on . "

Norwood H igh School ; T r ack 2 , 3 , 4 ; Footb a l l 1 ; W i n ner A lbi o n W oodbury S m a l l P r i ze E ssay 1 ; Pi Gamma M u ; M u rr a y P rize Debate ; M ystics ; Pi K a p pa D e l ta ; Treas­ urer P i Kappa Delta ; I ntercollegi ate Debate .

"Joe"

" Doug" is Colby's white collar a d t o t h e n t h degree. H e cer­ tainly hows nice discrimination in dress and bas caused more than one feminine heart t o flutter. His naturally curly hair is another dis­ tinct ive feature about our ·'Nigga h . " "Doug" h a the happy faculty of being a good friend without making any tir about it. Hi brain i active ; hi j udgment keen. and h i s advice incere. "Doug" is that type of c h um for whom everyone is seeking, but which is rare and cel­ . dom found. W e sometimes envy Candelet in h i s role as . Doug's" other half, b u t we have learned mut:h and profited more through "Doug's· • companions h i p and are sorry to see h i m go. O u r good wishes go w i t h you, " Doug."

A R C H E R J O R D A N , JR., :. K E " A rch"

"A n hones t

marn.

iis

t he

n o blest work of God."

E d ward Little H igh School ; F r e s h m a n Cross Country ; T rack Squad 1 , 2 ; C ross Country S qu a d 3 ; O u t i n g C l ub 3 ; D r u i d s ; H on or R o l l 2, 4 ; M us i c a l C l ubs 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Soc iety of the S o n s of C ol by. A rcher i s the sort of chap who i s indispen able. Whenever a word from the wise i s desired Arch is ready t o give i t , and, though, h e is diminutive in stature h i s brain capacity i s mammoth. A rcher is not only a scholar, b u t a musiL ian ::s well, and has spent four years as a member of the musical dubs. Oratory to h i m i a g i f t and h i name has J:"raced t h e honor r o l l as well.

A L P H O N S E W I LL I A M L A W S O N , A X A "Sunny" " M y strength is as the stren gth Because rny heart is pure."

of

ten

C a ribou H igh School , C a ribou, M a i ne ; S op hom ore H o p C o m mittee ; F ootb a l l 1 ; I nterfraternity B a sketbal l 1 , 2 ; C l a s s T re a s ure r 2 ; Wh ite Miile B o a r d 1 , 2 ; I nter­ fraternity O uting C lu b 3, 4 ; Senior O d e Committee ; U p si l on Beta . "Let's drive dull care away." "Sunny'' has his serious moments, hut t h e y are short lived. Ready a t all times for work o r play, never w o u l d he refuse to lend a hand when his services were required. "Sunny's" strength has forced us to concede him a seat among the mighty. Q u ick to act. but not always with restraint where such . was necessary. Contrary to first impressions, "Sunny" uses the English language with the utmost facility and ease--never at a loss for words. As yet your talent are b u t half proven. great things are expected of y o u ; Jet not your a b i l it y be wasted.

Forty-three


M A URI C E W I LL I A M L O R D , A 'I' n " O l lie "

" T h e re is a ch <Yrd in e ve1 y h a1 t t ha t h as a s igh in it, if touched a r igh t . "

Coburn l a s ical I n titute, Wate rville, Maine ; M a il ing Clerk Colby E h o ; A ssistant Bu ine s Man ager Echo 3 ; B u ine M a nageT Echo 4. To b e q u iet. sensible, j u s t u naffected and d i ligent r e< 1 u i res chara:­ ter in the i n ner man. We extend the ymbol o f extreme serenity ·.o Maurice for he mak s less noi · e than d s the rising moon. Hi soli­ tude is often dis:onccrting. but to h i s f r i nds, who k now and under­ stand h i m . many t h i ngs are revealed. Ma urice has the happy faculty of t h i n k i n g before speaking and o f going about h i daily work i n an unobtrusive m a n ner. A conscientious worker he proceeds ::dong -.he ··even tenor of h i way · · enj y i ng t h company o( his friends, the success o f hi' classmates. the acti v i t i s o f college days. Hi' k i n d n ss is evident when needed most a n d h i good v i rtue and ympathy have given him a niche in o u r memory that will grow deeper a tim toll o ff the years.

W I LL I A M A L E X A "Bill"

D E R MA

O M B E R , ..l K E

B . M . C . D u rfee H . S . , F a l l R i ver, M a . ; M a ine Central I nstitute ; Mystics 2 ; H a l lowe l l P ri ze Speaking onte t 2 ; I ntercol legiate Debate 2 ; Vice-President l as 2; O RACLE B oard 3 ; C l a s H i storian 3 ; J u n i o r P rom C om­ mittee 3; E picurean 4 ; E ditor-in-Ch ief O RACLE 4 ; B u i nes M a nager of White Mu.le 4 ; Secretary-Treas­ urer of Student Counc i l 4 ; C l a G i ft Comm ittee ; T reas­ u rer of Debating Society 2, 3 ; P i Kappa Delta 2, 3 , 4 ; Ten ni 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; a pta i n 2, 3 , 4 ; W e are r of the " C " . I f B i l l continue to advance after graduating a he ha i n r n llege, then you may be a.;:sured that he w i l l a c c o m p l i ' h big t h i ngs. By steady p l ugging a n d a w i l l i ngn ss t o t a k e o n e x t r a w o r k he ha c l imbed to the top of the ladder d u r i n g his four years at Colby. H is w i l l i n g ness to lend a helping h a n d , bi per ·everance, n n <l h i s w i n n i ng s m i le are known a nd ad m i r<"d by a l l. He is a rare o m b i nation of scholar, ath lete. a n d gentl man. Although h e ha' done a large amount o f work outside o f college . he has managed to fi n d t i me o m i x i n t a great m a n y r.ampus activities.

WA LDO LI C O L N M AC P H E RS O N , A T n "Linc"

"I ?ruu st have la 1·g�r fields to conq11.er." Abington H i gh School ; Mystic s ; F reshman B a nquet Comm ittee ; Sophomore Hop Committee ; J un ior P rom Comm ittee ; Echo Reporter 1 ; Associ ate E d i tor 2 ; M a naging E d itor 3 ; Secretary A t hletic Council 3 ; P res­ i dent of Athletic Association 4 ; P resident Colby P ress Club 3 ; Varsity Footb al l 2 ; T rack 2 ; Freshman Foot­ bal l Coach 3 ; M u rray P r i ze Debate 2 ; H a l lowell P r i ze Speaking Contest 2 ; Asst. in Economics 4 ; Pi Gamma M u ; Honor R o l l 2, 3 , 4 ; I nterfraternity T rack 2, 3 : I n terfraternity H ockey 4 ; Treasurer I nterfraternity B a sketbal l League 4 . A good student a n d a wonderful friend. His h u mor i s r a r e a n d caustic, a n d bis presence a guarantee o f m i rth a n d good fello,vship. "'Li nc" has h i s own p b i lo ophy o f l i fe which hould lead him where'r be w ills. Waldo posses es a p i r i t o f confidence that is refreshing. Hi judgment i s admirable and his heart on-'! o f gold. We who have associated with h i m feel honored a n d u p l ifted becau e o f his i n fl uence upon us. ' " Linc" i extremely versat ile and yet does all t h i ngs well. Opport u n ity need k nock but once for t h is young ma n .

Forty-f(YUr


VL

E N T P A R N E L L M A T H E R S , <!> � e " T ouchy"

New H a ven, Con n . , High School ; Coburn C la ssical I n sti­ tute ; Footba l l 1, 2 , 3 ; U p s i l o n Beta ; H o n o r R o l l 1, 2 ; C l a ss V ice- P resident 1 ; Track 2 , 3, 4 ; U . B . D a n ce Comm ittee ; B a '5 e ball 1 ; Class P resident 3 ; C h i E psilon M u Society 4 ; Wearer of the " C " . "No-oh ? I s t h a t ·o ? " ' From the l o w t o h i g h C , o r h a l f " dozen octave f u rther the Mather ' voice c li mbs its way. Whether Touchy"s vocal e q u i p m e n t has been a help or a h i ndrance no one will •)Ver k no w : i t is impossible to determine. B u t i f the stalwart youth had not been noteworthy i n everal other respects the falsetto wou l d have done the work. A part from all this, one owes deference to Parnell"s i n tellect-as fi nancier he worked h a rd and wa worked harder, a s paternal a d v i or to a n y w a y w a r d wanderer be was k i n dly a n d ··om­ p a sionate : a n d more than all t h i s . not even the estimable F l a h i ve could ever throw his governme n t a l g u ff fa ter t h a n chemical compe­ t ition capered from the lips of " ' Toll-Bridge."

MAYNARD WARR

MAXWELL, A X A

" Max" M eses B rown S c h o o l , P rovidence, R . I . ; Baseball 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; H ockey 2 , 3 , 4 ; A ss i stant M a nager of F ootb a l l 3 ; M anager of F o otba l l 4 ; lass T reasurer 4 ; Student ou n ci l 4 ; Vice-President Student Council 4; Nominat­ i n g C o m m ittee for C l a ss D a y S pe akers 3 ; M urray P ri ze Debate 4 ; M ystic ; W e a r e r of the " C " . F o r fo u r years M a x h a s made h i s presence f e l t a t Colby. A lway work i ng for Colby, always ready to help a friend . always ready for a good t i me, his record is hard to beat. Our good wishes :.o with you, Max, a n d we k now that you w i l l meet succe s in a n y walk of life that you may enter.

G E O R G E L O U I S M I T T E L S D O R F , cJ> � e " Gus"

"A little spot ; lba irs going fast, We hi1 m bly pra y t h a t they w :ll last." West O ra nge, . J., H igh S c hool ; Coburn Classical Insti­ tute ; U p s ilon Beta 1 ; F'res hm an T rack Captain 1 ; Class P re i dent 2 ; T rack 1, 2, 3 , 4 ; Captain of T r a c k 4 ; M a i ne I ntercollegi ate 1 0 0 a n d 220-y a rd C h a m pion 1 , 2 ; ew E n gl a n d A . A . U . 40-yard Champion 1 ; N ew E ng­ l a n d I ntercollegiate 1 0 0-yard C h a m p io n Z ; Rel a y Team 4 ; Wearer of t he " C ". S h a d e s of ' " Ch a rlie" Paddock ! H e r e ' s '"Gus" the bald-headed flash, the flickering p h antom who would have done t h e ' " 1 00"' i n 9 fl a t . b u t for t h e fact t h a t i t took h i m 9 . 4 . " ' G u s " has m o r e medals t h a n t h e Rajah of Rajhpoota n , a n d m u s c l e e n o u g h t o p i le Ossa o n Pelion. On m a n y occasions " M itts" w a s t h e fi rs t one t o reach t h e ta p e i n h i s spe­ c i a lties, and we hope to hear from you in the f u t u re "Gus."

Forty-five


T H O M AS FRA

C I S M O N AG HA

, K J P

" M o nie"

" Why

h ould t he de1il ha ve all t he good t imes?"

Gardner H i gh School ; Bates

allege ; Honor Rol l 3 , 4 .

We a r e all prone t o mistakes, a n d . . Monie'· i no exception. How­ ever. the fact that he fi n ished h is collegiate education here a t Colby, goes a long way toward blotting out tho e two year at Bates. We shall mis our traffic cop. Such personages usually leave vacancies that are hard to fill. Then . too, he is a tudent-even though he did not alway agree with the idea advance<! by Shakespeare a n d Brown­ i ng. Lastly, he is a skilled musician. The sweet stra i n that u ed to sound through the halls are now gone. No longer will h is wit en­ liven our fraternity meet i n g . But we alJ u n ite i n wishing h im good . . luck whether he continues traffic duty in "Gartner or becomes a second P a u l Whiteman.

J O H N A T W O O D N E L SO

,

Z '°l'

"Johnny" Cony H igh School ; Mystics ; D r u id s ; White Mule ; A rt E d itor 2 ; A ssociate E d itor 3 ; E d itor-in-Chief 4 ; ORACLE Board 3 ; E ·h o Board 2 ; Powd e r and Wig 3, 4 ; O uting Team 1, 2; Track 1, 2; Deba ting Society ; H onor Roll 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Hamlin P rize S peaking Contest ; Sophomore Declamation ; H al l owe l l s ; M u rray Pr ize Debate 4; Chairman, J u n ior Prom Decorat ing Committee ; C h a i r­ m a n , P l a y Committee ; Senior Student Conference 4 ; Sons of Colby ; Interfraternity Track. We may fear for the future of many, we may fear for the future of some. B u t to fear for the future of "Johnny" i s to fear for the future of the sun. Rather crude verse, but none the le s expressive. A glance at the J i t of accomplishments which "Jon . . bas to his credit gives the layman an idea of this youth's ability, but only the students at Colby f u l ly realize b is worth. H is u n usual talent and delightful originality have made him many a n admiring friend among his fellows.

L E S T E R R A Y M O N D N E S B I T T, A X A " Let"

"Small is the wo1·th of beau fly from t he light 1·etired" Revere H igh School , Revere, M a ss. ; Band 1, 2, 3, 4 ; M u sical C l ubs 1 , Cross Country 1 ; Interfraternity B a sketball 1, 2. ; Powder and Wig Production 3 ; D ru id s ; E p icurean. Lester came to us from that cosmopolitan metropolis, Revere ; b u t i n the f a c e of t h a t overwhelming disadvantage h e has m a d e h i mself popular both on the campus and in the tow n . In fact, no party is . complete without "Let . and his clever elocution of Robert W . Service and Rudyard K i pling. Then besides, i t is rumored that he has that undefinable something which E l inor Glyn n and C lara Bow have made so famous. What i s " i t" ? I f Lester decides to further his studies i n medici ne, that field i s to be enriched by one who is a potential great.

Forfly-six


D A R R O L D E D GA R N I C K E R S O N , A T n " D ent "

"Fate endowed m.e wit h g ood loo/cs , fo r w hich I offe1· tha nks . " F a r m i n gton H i gh School ; Secretary F re s h m a n C l a ss ; B a nquet Com m ittee 1 ; F reshman Ba sketba l l ; B a seball 1, 2 ; T rack 2 ; A sst. M a nage r Football 2 ; A ssistant L i b r a r i a n 1 , 2 ; I nterfr aternity Tr ack ; I nterfraternity H ockey ; I nterfraternity Basketb a l l 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Com­ mencement U sher 1, 2 , 3 ; Va rsity Ten n i s 3 , 4 ; Colby P res C l u b ; D r ui d s ; W e a re r of the " C " . Energy makes t h e worJd go round a n d " N ick · · seized h i s share. We hardly dare suggest that "Dent" majored i n something besides French, but the fact remains that he has a keen eye for fem i n i ne beauty. Hi feature are his despair . for who can resist h i m . " De n t · • �is a wizard on the ten n is courts ; he also starTed on the bas­ ketball floor. " N i c k ' • i s a hard worker i n everyt h i n g he u n dertakes, therefore we wish him a l l success in the battle of life.

THOMAS

F RA NC!

O'DONNE LL,

AT !1

" To m "

" The l ess people t hink of t heir grea tmess, the m o re we think of ·it . " N o rwood H igh School ; F ootba l l 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; C a ptain 4 ; B a seball 1 ; U p s i l on Beta ; F re s h m a n Basketba ll ; I nter­ fra ternity B a s ketba l l ; I nterfraternity Track ; H a�­ l owel l PTize S peaking Contest. S i n c e r i t y is i n his v o i c e , loyalty i n h i s e y e , a n d confidence i n h i 0 h a n d hake. Seek n o further f o r the perfect gentleman. Considerate, k i n dly, fi r m , i ndustrious a n d forgiving, he is a l l these a n d more. What a r e honors to "Tom" when friendship i s more to be desired. A s cap­ tain of the football team he was a d m i retl a n d respected b y all op­ ponents. "Tom" has yet to make a n e n e m y . while h i s friends are le­ gion. To k now h i m has been a p r i v i lege, a n d o u r only regret is that we may have failed to properly understand h i s greatnes . Your in­ fl u e n c e has helped u s " T o m " a n d w e sincerely trust t h a t your s t a r of d e s t i n y w i l l never d i m .

A L B E R T U P H A M P E A CO C K , AT n "Al"

" Tolerance a nd Fi·ieriidship a re t he highest v frtues.'' M o u n t Hermon S chool ; Upsilon Beta ; F ootbal l 1 , 2 . 3 , 4 ; H ockey 2 , 3 , 4 ; T reasurer F resh m a n C l a s s ; E d itor Colby Hand Book 2 ; V i ce- President Y . M . C. A. 3 ; Wea re r of the " C " .

" Al " i s t h e m a n w i t h a n over-a b u n dance of youthful s p i rit. After w i n n i ng honors in the he-man game of football, o u r friend tackles h a n dball and give it h i s 0 . K . " A l's" greatness lies i n h i w i U i n g ness to help others. Wh ile at Colby his friends have been legion because h i s h e a r t is b i g a n d h i s helpfulness sincere. "Al" was t h e raging demon i n h i s Sophomore year, a t least toward the unfortunate Freshm a n . He believed i n teaching newcomers their place, a n d he cert a i n l y carried out h i s assignment. Though he has fi n ished the regular college course, he has become fi rm l y attached to t h e old college and also to a certain fair suburbanite, so i s p l a n n i n g to return to us for another year. W e wish you prosperity a n d good luck when you leave us " A l . "

Forf/y-seven


G R E E LY C H A P M A N P I E R

E , Z -¥

"Tick"

Oakland H igh School ; Football 1 , 2; T rack 1 ; B a eba l l 1 ; Interfr a ternity Ba sketba l l 1 , 2 ; M y t i c ; Sons of olby ; College Pl ay 3 ; Powder and W i g P roduction 3 ; Student Council 4 ; las Blaze r ommittee 4 .

A

teacher in t h e b u d . Sou nd phi losophy a n d exact methods f o r the determ i nation of facts are characteri tics of "Tick 's" argum n l a mong his f e l l o w . H is earnest de ire f o r r e s a r c h c a u s e s h i m to seek arguments with his friend . whom he almost i n variably defeats. A stu rdy physique, a oundly rea o n i ng m i n d . a n d a pl asi ng pers nality s i n g le Greely out as a wholly desirable member of society and a credit to Hs chozen profession .

WI LLIAM EDWARD PIER

E,

J R.,

A X A

"Bill" L y n n E ng lish H i gh Schoo l , Lyn n, M a . ; F reshman I n ­ tra-class T rack Medal ist ; B asebal l 1 ; Footb a l l 3 ; O ut­ ing C l u b 1 ; I nterfrate rnity Outing lub 1 , 4 ; T rack 1, 4 ; Interfraterni t y T rack 2, 4 ; A si tant Bu iness ommittee ; B u s i ­ M a nager of O RACLE 3 ; J u n i o r P rom n e s s Manager of O RAC LE 4 ; ha rter M ember of Powde r and Wig D ramat i c Society ; I nterfrate r n i ty Ba sket­ ball 2 ; Powder and W i g Productions 3, 4 ; Senior Gift Committee ; Upsil on Bet a . Here is a m a n t h a t loves o l d Colby a n d o n e whom Colby loves. Everyone from the mo t verdant fr h m a n to the Senior Class Pre ident k nows Bill Pierce. "Such popularity m ust be deserved." B i l l's (our years here have been a long, gruel l i ng- h u rdle race, but he mounted each obstacle with a s m i le of determ i nation, uch, as woman o n ly c a n bring to t h e l i p s of m a n . Y e s , there's a g i r l . Succes attends you, Bill.

L E S T E R PO W L E Y " Let"

"Still wa ters

run

deep."

Good Will H igh School, H i nckley, M a ine. This lad comes f r o m Good W i l l , a n d ha m a d e t h e t r i p every for f o u r years on the train. toical f e l l o w a n d y e t one w h o m are g l a d to call a f r i e n d . H is greatest athletic achievement wa com p l ished at the a lleys at the " Y " . H i four years here at the lege by the Kennebec w i l l stand h i m in good stead in the world.

A

Fol'ty-eight

day we ac­ col­


R A L P H F R A N C I S P R E S C O T T , 4> � e " P re s " P le a s antville, N . Y . , H igh S choo l ; H onor Roll 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; E pi c u re a n 4 ; P resident Chi E psilon M u Society 4 ; L a boratory I nstructor i n Physics Dept. 3 ; L a boratory I nstructor i n Chem i st ry 4 ; Track 1 . Tb� text-tube touch and the two-tube rec e i v i n g set mark the Pres­ cott boy a a man among elements. The long, long y"ars, brethren, that he has spent i n the laboratories, a n d the more long y'ars he plans so to spend, have set their mark u p o n h im . Alchemists s p e n t their t i me t r y i n g to turn lead i n to gold ; this saturated chemist spent quite a lot work i n g over cabalistic filters destined to t u rn maiden hearts i nto amatory crucible -and where h e beat o u t bis predecessors lies in the Cact that he ucceedcd. McCroary Jived with h i m ; he says this is enough.

M ARIO

N O RTON RHOADES, K � P " D usty"

Belfa st H ig h Sch ool ; I n tercol legiate D ebating 3 , 4 ; Pi K a ppa Delt a , P resident 4; Debating S oc i ety 3 , 4 ; M a n ager of Debate 4 ; W i n n i n g Team M u rray P rize Debate 2 ; Second P r ize H allowell Prize S pe aking Con­ test 2 ; Good w i n P rize S pe a k i n g C ontest 2 , 3 ; Fourth Prize 3 ; Second P r ize J u n i or E xhibit ion ; H onor Roll 2 , 3 , 4 ; I nter-fraternity Bowl i n g 4. To q u o t e o n e of " D usty's" debating rebutta ls : " ' W hat difference does it make whether a man i s a n angel from Heaven or a satellite of Mephisto, it's what he says that counts. " From the number of debates and speak i n g contests in which he has taken part, we can o n ly con­ clude that he counts for q u ite a good deal. When you stop to consider i t , however, i t really i s a queer combination-majoring in Lat i n , and l i v i n g on the Southern Plains of Waterville. H i s surroundings may have had omething to do with h i s prevailing condition of ill-health due to frequent changes of heart. " " D usty" certainly deserves a lot of credit. He bas taken enough bard courses to floor three ordinary mortals, yet h e is always ready to a i d i n whatever is the project of the moment. Here's w i s h i n g him as secure a place i n life as he has i n o u r hearts.

C L Y D E E LW O O D R I L E Y , L. C. "Spud" "I

c o u l d a tale um/old."

B r id gton H i gh, 1 9 23 ; H ockey Squad 2 ; Cross Country 2 ; C h i U psilon M u . " S p u d " is a n ideal fellow with whom t o spend a q u iet a n d cheerful evening. Who would exepect such stories from a staid Colby m a n whose ideals are tho e of perfect t r u t h w i t h o u t exaggeration. He would m a k e a good p h i losopher, possibly a psychologist, even a char­ acter-analyst. But let u s w a r n you of this one t h i ng ; don't listen to h i s stories about h i s "perpendicular f a r m . " " S p u d" never gained his reputation for sag-acity from say i n g nothing. May you never catch the measles.

Forty-nine


KARL MAY

A R D ROOD, � K E

" M a ynard"

"SUJ ely, su rely,

l u m ber is m ore s weet t ha n t oil."

o burn C l a s ical Instit ute ; Footb a l l 1 ; D r u i d Club 1 , 2, 3, 4 .

3 ; M u si c al

Karl's talent r u ns i n t h e rhythmatical li ne, b u t to ay t h a t b e is a He is Karl, i n h is l i ne, i a genius. musician i� to say not h i ng at all. a v ry popular man about town. and wherever Karl and h is banjo Karl's personality i s unsu rpassed appear a treat is i n store for all. and h i smile and good cheer has accorded h im many friendships.

L A W R E N CE A U G U S T U S R O Y , <1> ...l e " Larry" W aterville H igh School ; E x.-'25 ; Footb al l , ' 21 , '22 ; T r ac k '21 , '22 ; G le e Club 3, 4 ; ollege Band 3 , 4 ; Chi E p i lon Mu Society 4. We wonder if the deep lines i n t h i gentleman's face were caused by his con tant blo w i n g upon the axophone. Although i l l ness forced "Larry" t o leave college for a while, he returned to the fold i n the fall of 1 925 and is now prepared to go out i nto the world to seek his fortune. Perhaps another Wiedolph i s about to rise to fame. Who knows ?

A R T H U R GA V I N S A N D E R S O N

"A m a n o f wisdom,, is

a ma n

o f yea1·s."

Coburn Classical I nst i tute ; Kappa Phi K a p p a .

A nother o n e of those fellows who stay out a n d t h e n come back Jong afterward. He ha been teaching and t h is year he has come back to fi n ish a n d to keep the ' ' Frosh'' straight in their dormitory, and be­ lieve me this was some job. From what we have seen o f h im he s�ms to be a n ice and l i keable chap.

Fifty


LEONEL LUCIAN SAUCIER, � r " Lee"

" Wha t is there in the g reat sphere of the earth, A nd 11a nge of evil bet ween dea t h a nd b irt h , A nd I should fea r-if I wPre l oved b y thee." W atervil l e H i gh Sc hool ; B a seba l l 1, 2, 3; 3 , 4 ; I nterfraternity Basketbal l 1 , 2 , 3 ; 3 ; W e a re r of th e "C".

Foot ball

ORACLE

1, 2 , Board

" L e e " 'is o n e o f these serious men w h o e least sorrow is s u r e to cause him worry. This, however, is no drawback to t h is p h i losophical youth who always hides h i ' w o r r i e s with a smile. His thoughtful and e a r n e s t advice is eagerly s o u g h t a n d m uc h appreciated by t h o s e who k no w h i m . H a v i ng m a r r i e d at the e n d o f his J u n ior y e a r , he is now busily engaged i n m a k i n g his life a success . a n d i f he con t n i ues as he has begun be surely will be a w i n ner.

P E R RY FO S T E R SH B L E S , � 'l' " Pe r r y "

" ' Twixt s leep and wa f...:i_ng, a nd a t da imi a rose To wage hot war a g a inst his speechless foes." F'reedom T ra c k

A ca d e m y ;

1, 2.

Debating S ociety

1 ;

I nterfraternity

" P e r r y " has devoted h i s years at C o l b y to the a c q u i s i t i o n of those t h i ngs which he deemed most worth-while. Q u iet and unass u m i ng be i constantly sought for scholastic advice. Late and early h e is to be found seated before h i s desk making for h i s o w n all that Colby has to offer him. We expect some day to fi n d h i s name listed among the leading educators of the country.

. '

J O H N I RVINE S M ART, � r

: . . ,:.·'" '

" J oh n n i e"

" A ll I have learned, a nd oo:n lea rn, shows me this­ H o w sca nt, how slight, 11VJJ knowledge of he r is . " H i ggi n s Classical I n stitute ; Debating Society 1 ; P ress C l u b 4 ; Football Squad 2.

''Joh n n ie" is a s t u r d y , curly-haired b o y from n o r t h e r n M a i ne, whose ready wit mahes him more than equal to all comers. and is a constant source of amusement to a l l who k now him. H e is always cheerful, a n d i f he has worries f e w know of them. H i s m a n ly virtues a n d vital­ ity insure his success no matter where h i s path m a y lead.

I

'� h 'I

Fifty-one


T H EO D O R E G R E E N L E A F S M A RT, � T " Te d"

" Clea r-headed f>i 'l'lid, w hose joyful sooni, Edged 'With s h a rp laugh ter, cu ts rl f wa in, The wou1ul:ng cords tha t bind a,nd stra in The hea rt u n t il it bleeds." H i ggins Classical In stitute ; Baseba l l 1, 2, 3, 4 ; C a ptain 4 ; Track 1, 2 ; Goodwin Prize S peaking Conte t 3 ; C ros Country 1 , 2 ; Interfraternity Wi nter S ports 3, 4 ; Geology A ssistant 4 ; W e are r of the " " . "Ted" is one of the e 11na� urning boy . He has won the friendship of all he meets by t h is Q u ietness coupled with an cagerne s �o help anyone who needs he l p , Ea:rer and earnest in attending to the smallest detail of all his dutie . together with the fact that he i a rattling good ba eball player, mak s his position a t Colby one to be envied.

GWYE TH T H O R

DIKE SMITH, K � P

"S m itty"

" Wh o'd stoop to bla m e t h is

<Yrt of t rifling?"

Brow n v i l le J unction H i gh School ; Footb a l l 2 ; I nterfra­ te rn ity Ba ketball 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; D r u id s ; Kappa P h i K ap p a.

"Oh, y e s indeed, I come from Washington, D. C . " T h e innocent visitor a sumes that t h is is correct ; the boy know that he was never out of Brownville until he entered Colby. We let him have h is say, however, knowing that he w i l l get away with it unless the victim ha been to Wash ington. "Smitty" i a worker in b is line and that seems to be English and History. He ha been expo ed to a l l ·.be i;our es given in those t wo depa rtments. It is now rumored that he is about to become a benedict and support a family by teaching chool. We venture t o say that he will be a succe s in both undertakings.

RICHARD

PHINEAS

STAUNTON,

<I> � e

" D ick"

"Music ha th its ch a r m . " South O range, N . J . , H igh School ; Mystic 2 ; I nterfra­ ternity Track 1 ; Coll ege O rchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Glee C l u b 1 , 2, 3 ; P resident G l e e Club 4 ; D r ui d 3 ; Interfraternity Bowl ing 4. " Dick" came to us from Map lewood, N . J . , and with him he brought h i mu ·ical fingers which we have so often seen in action. During his stay at Colby, he specialized in tickling the " i vories," but besides being a musician, " D ic k " has also proved to be a p h i lo opher o f parts and a poet a t heart. He believes that sartorial impeccability is the q u intessence of virtue. You can t ickle the " i vories," Dick, but you will never play for George O lsen ; jazz antagonize your keen sensi­ b i lities, although you may not realize i t now. U you had known this at an earlier year, you might have stood with Rachmaninoff. But t h is should not discourage your melancholy so11l. W e wish you the best of luck, "Dick," in whatever field of l i fe you may enter.

Fifty-two


R A Y M O N D S U L LI V A N , K � P "Tim"

"Cele1·ity wins the race . " Good W i l l H i gh School ; T ra c k 2 . 3 , 4 ; C ross Country 3 , 4 ; C a ptain 3 ; Fourth Pr ize H al l owell P r ize S peaking Contest 3 ; Debating 4 ; Wea rer of the " C " . H a i l t h e m a n w h o r a n second t o N u 1· m i ! " S u l ly" is another o n e o f o u r q u iet classmat s. He spends a great deal o f h i s spare t i m e out on the r u n n i n g t r ac k , while every afternoon he commutes to H i n c k ley, a n d, consequently . we haven't een a m uch of h i m as we have wished. Yet we realize that "Tim" is a true friend o f us all. He ha proved the fact in many ways. I I he only carries that same spirit of deter­ m i n ation and earnest f a i t h f u l ness i nto life, he is bou n d w succeed.

F R A N K C L E M E N T T A Y LO R , A X A "Clem" O a k Grove S e m i n a r y ; I nterfraternity B a sketball 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Debating 2 ; D ru i d .

p

Clem's f o u r years at Colby conta i n a ast w i t h which a nyone might be proud. Never comp la i n i ng about obstacles he e n c o u ntered, always ready t o lend a help i ng h a n d , he has made a host of friends. He came to us from W i nthrop a n d wherever he goes he w i l l be a suc­ cess. O u r best wishes go with you, Clem.

H O R A C E T R U E T R E F E T H E N , AT n " T ref"

"I'd ?·a ther b e sick thwn idle." Coburn C la ssical I n stitute ; Kappa Phi curean ; P h i Beta K a p p a ; A s sistant in H onor R oll 1, 3, 4.

E pi Kappa ; Geology 3 , 4 ;

"Tref" c a m e t o Colby to study a n d n o one c a n doubt that he suc­ done well i n a l l subjects, but bas become attached to He h a ceeded. Geology, and is a n expert a t shattering the earth's foundation with hi A s becomes a b r i ! J i a nt student, be is extremely silent, little hammer. which leads us to wonder about the thoughts contained i n that active Upon rare occasions he emerges from h i s shell a n d i n ­ b ra i n of his. d u l g e s i n a bit o f h u mor a n d welcome repartee. We a re at a l o s to predict this young man 's future, but it at ieast seems possible that he may one day astound the younger generation Don't be too harsh with them , "Tref," with wisdom and k no w ledge. for some of them m a y

be ours.

Fifty-three


F R E D L E V I TUR

E R, K ti P

" F reddy"

"He woilld not di.scount life Paid by installment."

as

fools do here,

E rskine Academy, 1 9 22 ; T r a c k 2 ; C r o s s Country 2, 3 ; Relay Squad 4 ; I n terfrate rnity Ba ketball 1 ; I nter­ frate rn ity Bowling 4 ; Debating Society 4 ; Wearer of "C". The f i r e whistle b l o w , beds a r e overturned ; l o u d voice a r e heard ; then . the noi e subsides. Chief T u r ner has attempted to answer an­ other call, forgetting (or the mome n t that he i once more a college student. In hi- attempts to divide his time between his track work , h is tudie , and his ocial duties, many conflicts have occurred, but Fo ·s Hall ha never suffered becau e of it. We shall miss bis readj­ ne · to laugh at any joke . however poor i t may be, and his w i l l ­ ingness to h e l p i n a n y w a y t h a t he is able.

A L M O N RO D N E Y W A R R E N , L . C. "Al"

" The ve1·y ston es pra te o f

my

wherea bouts."

Deering H ig h , 1 9 22 ; Va rsity Track 1, 2; Interfratern ity Track 1, 2 ; Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4 ; Chi E psilon M u 4 ; Band 1 , 2, 3 ; Weare r of V a rsity C. " A l" is a veritable stone crusher. A l l his wak i n g hours b e spends cracking rocks i n hope of fi nd i n g gold i n Maine. However, it is our expectation to ee him ( i n the far distant f u t u re ) drawing streams of oil from Mexican wastes. But for all his idiosync rasies, " A l " occasionally fi n ds time for out­ side activities. H i s conq uests are many. Hence we certainly recom­ mend Mexico.

JOSEPH WASHINGTON "Jo" Brooklyn, N ew Y ork ; Footb a l l 4 ; B aseb a l l 3, 4 ; fraternity Ba sketball 4 ; P i Gamma M u .

I nter­

T h i s lad from Brooklyn i s certainly a great acquisition t o t h e col­ lege. He came here as a J u nior, and in his two short years has made a great many friends among the Professors and the students alike. Not all of bis ability was lost to the •ollege through scholastic lines, however. for d u r i ng his senior year he played football, a n d in hi3 first year here he played baseball to the honor and to the glory of the college. H is personality will get him a good way o n t h e highway of life.

Jt'ifty-four


R O B E R T M A L C O L M W A U G H , K t. P " B ob " S angervi l l e H i gh School , 1 9 2 1 ; H onor R o l l 1 , 2 , 4 ; I nter­ collegiate Debating 2, 3 ; Pi K a p p a De lta ; K a p p a P h i K a p p a ; S e c o n d P r ize H am l i n P rize S peaking Contest ; F i rst P rize Sophomore Decl a mation ; F i rst P rize H a l ­ l owell P rize S peaki n g Contest ; W i n n in g T e a m M u rray P rize Debate ; J u n io r C l a ss O rator ; Y . M . C. A . 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; I n d i a n a p o l i s Convention, 1 9 24 ; I n terfraternity B a sketbal l 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; T rack 2 . Having everal years a g o from t h e f a r North. "Bob" c a m e to u s A n yt h i n g now fi n ish i ng h i s college d a y s . t a u g h t for t w o years, he i which be i·eally w a n t s to do, he c a n d o . It matters n o t w h o e courses He has acquired h e enter , h e usually era bes through 'vith " A 's". a good k n o w ledge o f French. not only i n the class-room, b u t also on W ith delight he reads French, rather S u n days in the French c h urch. H i s help a n d words of than E n g l i s h : Horace, rather than Stevenson. uccess a n d hope "he reeks h is We wish h i m advice w i ll be m i sed. own rede."

;,{ i . -

,

'

"f· . i

Fifty-five


J U N I O R CLASS O F F I C E R S President

C HARLES P EMBROKE N ELSON

Vice-President

W ILLIAM R OBERT LOMBARD R OBERT C UMMINGS CHANDLER

Secreta ry- Treasurer

Junior Class Roll Henry Kalloch A llen Roland B utterfield And rews Augu tine Anthony D 'Amico E d wa rd James Ariel Ralph Herbert Ayer Charles I ra Bagnall N elson Ward B ai ley Meade J osh ua Baldwin George Paul Bernhardt Charles E d ward Callaghan Kenneth Havenor Cassens Thomas Joseph Caulfield E ve rett O lmstead Champlin R obert C u mm ings Chandler Arthu r Donald C la rk H a rold Edwin Clark Donald P ierce Cobb Carroll Joseph Cooke Cyrus Stanley C orey Gardner Dixon C ottle L ionel E dward Depew E ve rett Richard Drummond John Nelson E rickson

Tenants Harbor ¡ w ytopitlock Lawrence, Mass. South Berwick Lynn, Mass. Houlton China Wilder, Vt. L awrence South B rewer Rockland Dalton, Mass. Waterville Columbia Falls Caratunk Norwich, Conn. Gardiner Meriden, Conn. B ridgewater Fall River, Mass. Dalton, Mass. Waterville Newburyport, Mass. Fifby-seven


Edmond Frank Fiedler Aubrey Erwin Flanders Cecil E ugene Foote Louis P ierre Fourcade John Fairfield Fowler Clarence William Gould Wendell Russell Grant Douglas Clifton Grearson Rufus Manley Grindle Ashton Sanford Hamilton E lwood Jean Hammond Charles Mitchell Hannifen Theodore Everett Hardy, J r . E d w i n Wallace Harlow George Holbrook Hawes Du rward Sawyer Heal Conrad Hartman Hines Lee Leroy Jameson LeRoy M i ller Johnston George Vinton Jones Walter Ferdinand Kn of skie Weldon Ralph Knox Garth Colet Koch Greenlief Hersom Lambert Arthur Benj amin Levine William Robert Lombard Joseph Lewis Lovett Leo Wilfred MacDonald William Forrest MacLean Clyde Lyford Mann Rene Joseph Marcou George Elmore Marr Gordon Parker Marr James Thomas McCroary Earl Howard McKay Philip Hartwell McLeary Vance Leonard McNaughton Donald Hobbs Millett John Walter M iner Gilbert M u i r Edward Martin Nee Charles Pembroke Nelson E dward Randolph Newhall John F rancis O'B rien J ohn Samuel Parker Lawrence Asa Peakes Kent Newcomb P ierce Norris Willard Potter Jack Joseph Ricci Roland Maj orie Robichaud John Everett Rogers Cecil Howard Rose Fifty-eight

Adams, Mass. Sangerville Holyoke, Mas . Purcha e, N. Y. Norcro s Ipswich, Mas . New Li merick Calais Bluehill Eastport Dexter Lynn, Mass. Waterville Gardiner Skowhegan East Millinocket Berkshire, Mass. Houlton Campobello, N. Y. Monticello So. Manchester, Conn. Torrington, Conn . Springvale New York City Waterville West Springfield, Mass. Hudson, Ma s s. So. B rewer Norwood, Mass. L ivermore Falls Winslow Williamstown , Vt. Somerville Adams, Mass. Adams, Mass. Waterville Sangerville Springfield, Vt. Calais North Vassalboro N orwood, Mass. Augusta Lynn, Mass. Lynn, Mass. Winterport Poultney, Vt. Mars Hill Islington, Mass. Meriden, Con n . Waterville Westboro, Mass. Waterville


Cleophas Joseph Roy J uj u n John Saigo Charles J oseph Sansone Sydney P i llsbury Snow A ugust Frank Stiegler, Jr. William Stanley Tanner Joseph Frederick Theria u lt Albert John Thiel Charles Edwin T owne John A lfred Trainor James Kelti e Tufts, Jr. Gordon Granger Welch George Chester West R oss H orton W hittier Lewis Van N orden Wi lson

Waterville Tokyo, Japan N orwood, Mass. Rockland Great Neck, N . Y. Augusta Haverhill, Mass. Canton, Mass. Waterville Waterville Westboro, Mass. Peacham, Vt. Waterville I pswich, Mass. New Rochelle, N . Y.

Junior Class History Oh words ! Oh capable adj ectives ! Come quickly to the a i d of a weary scribe who realizes his incom petence to do j ustice to this excellent class ! The pages of the works of N oah Webster are sti rring gently, and i t seems that any m inute will see the words burst forth i n a full and glowing d escription of the deeds and accom plish ments of these three-year-olds. B ut no. S uc h is not to be. The time for this marvelous revelation is not yet ripe. One year hence this class will pose in the limelight as the graduates of the day, and as such will receive an adequate ovation. So l et the t reatment of this c lass be l i m ited t o a very few simple state­ ments which in n o way d o j ustice t o the real store of activities which owe their i m petus t o this grou p of men. E ntering the old College over the well-worn path w hich showed the foot-prints of the scores of preceding c lasses, this promising delegation began their c onquest. A new record for scholastic achievement, a new record for preservation of numbers, and a new record for athletic prowess, struck a new n ot e of j oy and pride i n the old bell above South Coll ege. M a y the final toll of this same old bell ever retain that singular note which was placed in its keeping by this nucleus of students who are striv­ i ng t o be "Yorthy of the a p pelative, " Colby M en . "

Fifty-n ine


SOP H O M O R E CLASS O F F I C E R S MAYO A UGUSTUS SEEKINS C HARLES ALBERT C OWING

President Vice-Preside n t SecrefJary-Troosrer

H ENRY E STES T ATTERSALL

Sop homore C lass Roll Joseph Dri ko A l len George Al phonso Allison, Jr. 0 borne C oster Bacon R ichard E ric Ben on Carl Frederick Berg trom E d wa rd E velet h B lodgett N ewal Dow Bousfield Web'ster Johnson B rown R u ssell E llis B utler Joseph Bradbury Campbell John Sten Carlson H a rold E u gene Car on Donald Allan Carter William Sheldon Chapin Frank E d m ond Che ter Oscar Moody Chute Carl Taggett C lough M u r ray Alexander Coker Walter Fred Corbett Charles A l bert Cowing Henry E d win C urtis Reed Winter Davis Franklyn Bedell Dexter P h i l i p L l oyd E l y H y m a n Israel Fisch bach

Columbia Falls W ollaston, Mass. Welchpool, N. B. Bethel, Conn. Lynn, Mass. Cortland, N . Y . Waterville Lynn, Mass. N orwood, Mass. B ingham Norwood, Mass. Hodgdon Port land Sheffield, Mass. M anhasset, N. Y . Danvers. Mass. Houlton Fairfield South Paris West Springfield, Mass. G uilford L incoln M attapoisett, Mass. Florence, Mass. B rooklyn, N. Y. Sixty-<me


Francis Charles Foley Harvey George Fotter Howard Douglass Fowl ie Donald Hu lford Fra er Charles Metcalf Giles Cecil Ga rfield Goddard George Francis Grady Herbert John Gunnarson George Han Han en Philip Rufus Higgins Walter Wash burn Hinds Everett Herbert Hol mes Gilman Stan ley Hooper Frederick Abdallah Howard John Francis Hunt Ralph Guy Hutch ins Ru pert Malcolm Irvine John D. Jones Francis Hoxie Jones Charles William Jordan David Franklin Kronquist Robert George La Vigne Frederick Babbidge Lee Lowell Pond Leland Albion Keith Littlefield Lem uel Kingsbury Lord Nathan Randall Lufkin Charles Frederick Martin Floyd Mellen Mason Horace Pierce Maxcy Clifford Joseph McGaughy Earle Alton McKeen Frank Dunlap McLean Chester Earl Merrow Edwin Donald Merry Ernest Edward M i l ler Kenneth Raymond M iller M u rray B. M iller Philip LeP.oy M i l ler William LeRoy M iner Donald Raymond Morrison Chand ler Benj amin Mosher Samuel Gyles Parsons Mulliken E rnest Arthur M undt John Thomas Nasse Charles Herbert Nealley Harold Lambert Newcomb Edward Peter Nizi olek Winston Clark Norcross Warren R idgway Payson Robert Arnold Peterson Norman Leonel Picher Sixty-two

Norwood, Mass. Waterville Harmony Lawrence, Mas . Damari cotta Portland New Haven, Conn. Brooklyn, N . Y. Manhas et, N . Y. Portland Portland Waterville Danvers, Mass. Norwood, Mas . Lynn, Mass. Sanford Caribou Farmington South C h ina Auburn Rumford, R. I . Worce ter, Mass. Dark Harbor Augusta North Berwick Winterport Adams, Mass. South P ortland B ethel Rockland Washburn M i l linocket New York City Mountain View, N. H . N orth Edgecomb Bethel, Conn . Ashby, Mass. B rooklyn, N. Y. Caribou West Springfield, Mass. Graniteville, Vt. H arvard, Mass. Newburyport, Mass. B ethel Woonsocket, R . I. B rooks Gardiner Ware, Mass. Hartland Waterville New Sweden Watervil ) e


Charles N oah P inkham R udolphe Joseph Pomerleau Albert Dia vid Richards, Jr. John Russell Richard s on Elmer R ivkin Warren Fowler Robin on Donald Henry Rollins Sterling C l eveland Ryder Theodore Charles Sam ple Robert Walter Scott N orris Allen Scribner Mayo A ugustus Seekin Stanley Esmund Shein Mark R ichard Shibles Wardwell Shibley Nathan Lawrence Silowitz Jack Sil e r tein A rt h u r H e n ry Snyder Alden Cecil S rague Fred James Sterns Raymond Everett Stickney Allan Julian Stinch field John Dexter Swartz Henry E tes Tattersall M a rtin John Tierney Wend ell Alexander Tufts Lewis A llen T u rner Frank J o eph Twadelle Lennert Axel U ppstrom John E dward Walker M a lcolm Small Weed P e rcy Fuller Williams, Jr. Jam es Henry Woods

Wint hrop Waterville Columbia Falls Waterville B rooklyn, N. Y . N e w Bedford, Mass. Winthrop Portland Mooers, N. Y. Wilton Stratton P ittsfield Providence, R . I . B elfast Fair1i.eld B rooklyn, N. Y . B rooklyn, N . Y . Portland Waterville H a rtland Wolfeboro, N. H. B rooklyn, N . Y. B rooklyn, N. Y . New Bedford, Mass. H udson, Mass. Westboro, Mass. Weeks Mills Skowhegan Worcester, Mass. Winthrop, Mass. Waterville B rewster, Mass. B rooklyn, N. Y.

So p homore Class History In the beginning of the reign of the m ighty " Heal" there entered at Colby a new and wonderful people. You ask, "Who was this peopl e ? " T h i s w a s the wonderful c l a s s of ni neteen h und red twenty-nine. In their first undertaking, the freshman banquet held in Sidney , they were a glori­ o u success. The water of the Kennebec withstand i ng the attacks of "General Heal" and his b rave warriors. This is the second year of thei r soj ourn and things are sti l l going their way. Under the leadershi p of " Seek, ' ' t hey performed well their d uties to the timid frosh . After two months in their watchful care the favored frosh held the banquet unmolested ( ?) in the college gym . This people t h e reupon proved their s u periority t o the class of nineteen h undred thirty by coring t wice in the p u shball contest. They are friends of a l l , s a v e the " t o o fresh, " and n o w reign s upreme. Six fly-three


! C. .SPlfRG ll E

f;

:;>p r;;


F R E SH M A N CLASS O F F I C E R S Presiden t Vice-Presiclent Secreta ry-Trea s u 1·e 1·

D ONALD EDWARD A LLI SON C LARENCE H ERBERT A RBER R OBERT P AR K IN B ROWN

Freshman Class Roll P h i l i p Frederick Allen Donald E dward Allison George Arth u r Andrews, Jr. A n d re w Anthony, Jr. Clarence Herbert Arber Harry Osgood Ashmore Kenneth Gordon Austin Forrest M i lton B atson Philip Stewart E ither Mariano B rodella, Jr. Clifton Rolfe B rown Robert Parkin B rown William B . B rown George Joseph B u rgie} William Nathan B u rr, Jr. Alexander Capps A rt h u r Coddington Casseen John A lbert Chadwick N athan C ha fetz Lindon E d wi n Christie Frank Miner Cobleigh Lawrence Dean Cole Chester Francis Condon P h i l i p C onstant Aa ron C ook

Waterville W ollaston, Mass. Tucson, Arizona Winthrop, Ma s. D orche�ter, Mass. E llsworth Waterville Cam pobello, N. B. Linneus Newport, R . I. Richmond Fairfield Waterville Ware, Mass. Seekonk, Mass. P ri nceton, N . J. Newport, R . I . E ast Grenwich R . I . C olch ester, Conn. Milo N e wton H i gh lands, Mass. Winslow Shrewsbu ry , Mass. Roxbury, Mass. Waterville Sixty-five


William Thornton Cowing Linwood Taft Crandall James Edward Davidson, Jr. Paul Lester Davis Roland Sylvester Delaware R eginald E phraim DeRocher Paul Allen Dibner Wallace A lfred Donovan William Bert rand Downey Charles Malcolm Dowsey Herbert K insley Draper, Jr. Clarence A ubrey Dyer M illan Ludmi f Egert Dexter Everett E l semore John Gardner Fisher Clyde Rowden F i sk Leroy Sargent Ford Jasper Munroe Foster Mark Hood Garabed ian Attilio Frank Gi uffra Ralph Leonard Goddard Nelson Albert Goodsell Donald Grant Grondin Bertram LeForest Harding Robert Low Harlow George Edward Harper Elliott Thorpe Hatch Hugh Gordon Hatfield Otto Arviid Havu Horace Lincoln Heath George Gilbert Henry, Jr. Karl Riester Hines, Jr. John F rancis Moore Honan Ralph Ben.i amin H u rlburt Lewis Wilfred J ackins Gerald Asher Johnson Gordon Neil Johnson Morris Elliott Ka olan M ichael Joseph Karter Alex Katkosky Harland Llewellyn Keay Lewis Kleinholz Andrew Charles Klusick Clarence E dwin Lamb Joh n Henry L ee John Kenneth Livingston Robert B rown Lunt Irving- Russell Magui re Frank Milton Marshall Reginald E mery McAllister E dgar B u rnham McKay A rthu r Montgomery Meckenberg Sixty-six

West Spri ngfield, Ma s. Oakfield Omaha, Nebraska Belfast Augusta Waterville B rooklyn, N. Y. Waterville Welle ley, Mass. Manha et, N . Y. Canton, Ma . Ea t Sumner York Village Grand Lake Stream Norwood, Mass. Groveton, N . H . W e t Roxbu ry, Mass. Strong Cambridge, Mass . B rooklyn, N . Y. Woodford Bethel, Conn. Waterville Abington , Mass. Dover-Foxcroft Chicago, Ill. Pemaquid Harbor Saxton River, Vt. Oxford Buckland, Conn. Ashfie i d, Mass. Berksh i re, Mass. Lowell, Mass. Danvers, Mass. Houlton Waterv i l le Hou lton Hartford, Conn. Waterville Chelsea. Mas . LaGrange B rooklyn , N. Y . Rockaway, N . J . R angeley P ortland Centerdale, R . I . Oldtown North B rookfield, Mass. Needham, Mass. Skowhegan Waterville B rooklyn, N . Y .


Carl E d gecomb Megquier Wallace Whitney Meyer Richard N eiler Theodore Nelson John I r i za rry Pagan A l bert Carlton Palmer N o rman Dunbar Palmer Ralph A nthony Pape Harold Dana Phippen Ovid Felix Pomerleau Walter Paul Quarrington Deane Reginald Q u i nton Thomas Alexander Record Regi nald Cam pbell R icha rdson E dw i n Robinovit William Patrick R ogers Morton I. Rosenheim Bernard C l i fton Shaw Dan a Maxwell Simmons Walter Stanley Slosek Charles Lewis S prague Luciu Hazen Stebbins P h i l i p Alston Stinchfield William Horace Sti neford Edward Ma rshall Stu rhahn E rn est Joseoh Theberge Wendell Hollis Thornton Clinton F rederick Thu rlow Melvin Thomas T reworgy Gordon M a riner Trim Walter E. Tripp Hugh Kearn Tuft s N a t h a n T upper Allen Tu rner Manley Donald Van Tassell George L i nw ood W alsh Cha rles William Weaver, J r . Stanton S h a w Weed H ow a rd H . Whitten John B u rrows Will iams, Jr. A l den Hatch Wilmot Morgan Wil on M a u rice Philip Winniman John Hen ry J oseph Wisno::: k i

Bangor B rooklyn, N . Y. Oak Park, Ill. N ewport , R . I . Brooklyn, N . Y . H inckley H inckley B rooklyn, N . Y . Isleford W inslow P ittsfield Waterville Livermore Falls Newport W orcester, Mass. E ast Lynn, Mass. B rooklyn, N . Y. Waterville Oakland Ware, Mass. Oakfield C olchester, Conn. Strong B rownville Jct. Hartford , Conn. Lawrence, Mass. Rockland Lee S urry C utler Harmony Westboro, Mass. Lisbon Falls Lawrence, Mass. H o ulton M i l l inocket York B each Waterville C l i nton Fall R iver, Ma s. New York C ity N ew York C ity Sprin gfield , Mass. Ware, Mass.

Freshman Class History It's a farce--everyone knows a fre hman class has no H i story-but j ust give us a chance. We were given o u r fi rst taste o f college on the never t o b e forgotten B l oody M o nday N ight. I t was at this occasion that we were shown the Sixf7tj-seve-n


dangerousness of 1 929. However, again t all these odds, we were soon doing things to our credit. We were the first t o hold our banquet on the Colby campu under the very eyes of " Phi Chi . " So great wa our succe that the ophomore abol ished all rules. We were not, however, a succes ful in our next en­ deavor, the pushball conte t. I n football, in hockey, i n everyth ing the class of '30 is well represented . We are a mixed lot of fellow , but we're united in one or two things which we have already learned, and one of the e is loyalty to our college.

Graduate Students Earle Stanley Anderson Frederick Gardiner Fas ett, Jr. Leon Hugh Warren

Farmington, N. H . W e t Medford, Mass. Portland

S p ecial and Unclassified Miles Lancaster Allen E dward Barron R oger Moore Boothby Frank Ronelle Bradbury M iles F rederick Carpenter Donald Levi Clement John Florena Harold Lloyd Grant Jam es Merrill Laughton Lorimer Faunce Mac.Dougall Philip Kenton McCub rey Carroll Cuilen McLeary Thomas Page, Jr. Calixte Vilbon Pomerleau Ralph E rwin Pratt Herbert Sydney Rabinovitz Thomas E rnest Tranfaglia Joseph Trefethen Donald Baldwin Tupper William Henry Watson, Jr.

Sixfll1-eight

Waterville Waterville Westbrook East B rownfield Smithfield A ugusta Roxb u ry Winslow West Ripley Fall River, Mass. Caribou Waterville Waterville Waterville Enfield, N . H . B rookline Revere, Mass. Waterville W orcester, Mass. Friendship


OHE

MSION T'

.

I .�uut


S E N I O R CLASS O F F I C E R S H ELEN C OBURN SMITH A L ICE J ULIA WOOD M YRTLE V IOLA M A I N

President Vice-Presiden t Secretary-Treasurer

Senior Class Roll

Grace Pattangall Abbott Sylvia Virginia B razzell Jean Cadwa llad er E mi ly F rances Candage Louise J obson Chapman J u lia A rdelle Chase M a rguerite Chase Davida M a ry Clark Leola Mae Clement M a rtha Allen Davis Fayalene Louise Decker R u th E l lswo rth Dow M a rj orie Grace D unstan Evie Alma E llis Bvelyn M ac D onald E stey Dorothy Mazie Farnsworth Vera E l len Fellows B arbara McGregor Fife Harriet M a rtha Fletch er A l exand ri n e F uller D orothy Isabel Giddings Dorothy E l den Gould B e rn ice Vivian G reen Lenora E d ith Hall Phyllis Marie Ham Dorothy Isabel Hannaford M a ry Teresa Holland E sther E l i zabeth Knudsen M i l d red Annie MacCarn M y rtle Viola Main

Waterville Fairfield Waterville B l uehill W e_s tbrook, Conn. Houlton Augusta Waterville Thorndike Portland Skowhegan Wayne Rockland Bingham C linton China Farmington K ittery Waterville South O ra nge, N . J. A u gusta N o rth Leeds Dover-Foxcroft Hampden Livermore Falls W inthrop Gardiner Portland Waterville P atten Seventy-one


®�@Cb� � ___.�

Arline Smith Mann Julia Dean Mayo Helen Codman M itchell Prudie Rae Moore Frances Meli sa Nason Lura Arabina N orcros Pauline Virginia Page Florence Appleton Plaisted Wenonah Marian Pollard Angie Catherine Reed M iriam Elizabeth Rice Helen E l ie Robin on Carol ine E lizabeth Roger Mabel Victoria Root Priscilla May Russell Doris Cora Sanborn Helen Coburn Smith Martha Sondberg Marion E l izabeth Sprowl Helen Beatrice Stone E na Mabelle True Frances Jeanette Tweedie Faith Doris Waterman Florence Wolf E rna E mi ly Wolfe Al ice Julia Wood

Milltown New Gloucester Houlton Moore' M ills, N . B . Saco Winthrop Augusta Waterville Waterville Waterville Dover-Foxcroft Livermore Falls Freeport Portsmouth, N. H . Wa l pole, Mass. D ryden Skowhegan York Village Searsmont Lawrence, Mass. Pittsfield, N . H. Rockland Bangor Portland Winslow Springfield, Mass.

Senior Class History Many's the long year I have ticked away the hours in this Foss Hall, many a re the insults which my tell ing face has endured, many are the con­ versations to which I have Ii tened, but never before have I seen fit ·�o speak. "What," you ask me, "has m oved you to this burst of eloquence ?" It is to bid farewell to the women of the class of '27. Day in and day out, yea, "nights in" and "nights out" for some, I have watched them file past to meals, to c lasse , to church, to movies, to dances. and to gym, and never in my clpck existence have I seen a more j ovial, en­ thusiastic, and "co-ord"-inate group. Yes, they are conscientious too, but not painfully so, for I'll confess they haven't worn themselves out with study. They have preferred to take part i n all activities. In hockey, ten­ nis, and volleyball, they have taken great i nterest, although times seem to be few when they have acquired championships, yet, they did get the big Health League cup in 1 926. Delightful tales of their corking good times at hops, shuffles, parties, games and even doleful tales of quizzes and exams have amused me, as they eagerly waited for me to tick the hour for the last call for meals. A great class of experimenters these girls of '27 ! Last year, as J uniors, they surprised and am used most everyone with their pre­ sentation of "Twelfth Night" in modern costume. Of course, some disap­ proved of the lack of Shakespearean dignity of the comedy, but, my word ! Those girls j ust couldn't be dignified. It is most amusing to see their vain attempts to assume becoming dignity this year. To these young women whom I have watched unfold from green fresh­ men buds t o cultured senior flowers, I now bid farewell with con fidence, that, wherever they may go, of them Colby will be proud. Sev e n ty-two


G R A C E D RI S K O P A T T A NiG A L L A B B O T T

.)·

"Julie"

"Odi profan:u rn volgits et a rceo . " C o b u r n C l a ss i c a l I n stitute, 1 9 1 4 ; Colby College, 1 9 1 41 9 1 5 , 1 9 24- 1 9 2 7 ; H onor R o l l 2, 3, 4 ; Secretary P sy­ c h ical Research S ociety 3 , 4 ; V ice-President Lambda Lambda Lambda 4. W e w e r e never q uite c e r t a i n of w h a t J ulie's reaction w a s to u s . n o r . indeed. what s h o u l d h a v e u e e n o u r reaction to h e r . Nor have we ever been entirely able to determine whether or not the collegiate cosmos is capable of unguided reaction. For there are many t h ings in this great world of ours. nor does every bushel hide a light. What can one do about a woman who has two children and m i nds her own bu iness ?

\

,.

S Y L V I A V I R G I N I A B R A Z Z E LL, A � II " S yb "

" The g rea test g ift a woma n 's hea 1·t." C ob u r n C l assical I n stitute, 1 9 2 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; H onorable M e ntion i n Gym M eet ; H ealth League 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; W e a r e r of " C . H . L . " ; Delta S i g m a C h i 3 , 4 ; V ice­ P resident of Delta Sigma Chi 4 ; K a p p a A l p ha .

:

" W e attract heart by t h e qual itie w e display ; w e retain them by the qualities we p o sess." O n e of the qualities that Sylvia has used to best advantage i n w i n ­ n i n g hearts i i n t h t" cu l i nary Department. O h . those sorority ban­ quets, those K . A . "feeds ! " Yet, the chief interest i n Sylvia's l i fe is not cooking ( tho' that will be valuable a little late r ) it i a sport k no w n at Fo s H a l l as archery. Sylvia is a n expert with her bow and arrow. U h e does not take care, she will r i val C up i d himself for we're a l l i n love with her.

J E A N C A D W A LL A D E R , x n "Jean"

"Stra ight and s lender Brown as hazelm u ts, a nd sweeter t ha n the kern els . " W a tertown H igh School , W a tertown, Conn. ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 ; C h i G a m m a Theta ; W e a rer o f " C . H . L . " " J e a n , " t h e q u iet g i r l w i t h t h e pep ; t h e s m i l i n g comrade w i t h t h e O ne of a m a z i n g contradiction. Y e s , h e r com po ition i spark o f fire. he is a charm i ng ho tes ·, for she has the positive certainty is that p r i me requisites o f being a f u n maker a n d a good cook.

Seventy-th ree


EMILY FRAN

E S C A N D A G E , .:P i\l

"Em"

"Life sh ould be fu ll o f em n e s t w01·k, Our h earts unlashed by fo1 tu ne's fr01vn, Let perseveramce c<m que1· fa te, A n d me 1it s ·ize the v i.c to1"s c1'own . "

Bl uehill George Steven Academy ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Stu dent Fel low hip Comm ittee 2 ; Health League 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Mention i n Gym M eet 1 ; Honor Roll 2; L i terary Society 1 ; Reading Room Committee 3, 4 ; Wearer "C. H . L . " ; olby D a y Committee 4 ; Delta S igma Chi, 3, 4. E m i l y cert a i n ly realize t he sig11 i ficance of the above Quotation, f o r s h e is a l w a y s b u s y , a l w a y s conscientiou ly s t r i vi ng to accomplish t h e et task. " E m " i s reputed t o be r a t h e r s i l e n t a n d d e m u r e , b u t w e w h o k now h e r best realize h e r capacity for fun a n d "feeds" as well as for Lat i n . Loveable. accommodat i n g , tru tworthy, always ready to ''look up-and laugh-and love-and Jift"-that's Em ily.

L O U I S E J O B S O N C H A PM A N , � K "C happie"

"Ever gene 1·011s in deed a nd thmightfit.l of others . " Morgan Schoo l , W e tbrook, Con n . ; Y. W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Class Rep resentative to Student League 2, 3 ; President 4 ; D ramatic Club 4; Class Hockey Team 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Voll eybal l Team 1, 2; Wearer of the " C . H . L." and Class N u merals ; I vy Day Pageant 2 ; Sh akespearean Play 3 ; Delegate to Student Government Conference at B ates 3 ; Echo Board 3 ; Colbiam.a Board 1 , 2, 3 ; Chairman of J u nior Dance Com m i ttee 3 ; H onor Roll 3 , 4 ; Chi Gamma Theta. We gave her hard t h i ngs to do because she could do them, house­ chairmansh i p . speeches, toasts . and even head o( Student Govern­ ment. We loved her fra n k ne a n d enjoyed her friend hip. She en­ tered i nto everything with enthusia m , whether hockey, m i dnight lunche or Student Government p la n s , a n d he carried t h i n gs through with efficiency a n d thoroughness a n d was always thoughtful of the desires of others. To her, l i fe must offer a challenge.

J U LIA A R D E L L E C H A S E , A 6 II "Jack" B lack R i ver Academy, Ludlow, Vermont ; Y . W . C. A. Cabinet 2, 3, 4; Wearer of "C. W . " ; Class Hockey Team 1, 2, 3; Varsity 2 ; C l a ss B a seba l l 1, 2 ; B a sketball 1, 2 , 3 ; Volleyball 1 , 2 ; Glee C l ub 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; P anhellenic Se<:­ reta r y 3 ; President 4 ; Chairman 4 ; Pi Gamma M u ; Aroostook Club ; D aughters of Col b y ; D ramatic Club ; K a p p a A l pha ; Echo Reporter 3 ; I vy D ay P l a y 3 ; Colby Day Committee 2, 4 ; Chairman 4. I f you want something d o n e i n the right way, go to A r d e l l e . You can always depend on her. Whether in Y . W. C. A . , sorority, Kappa A lpha or sports, Ardelle is a leader. Het· enthusiasm and i n terest has made many a n event successful. She is always dashing here and there with an i ntent look upon her face. "Here a friend and there a friend A n d everywhere a friend and then-" she i s off hel p i n g someone else. Ardelle's heart i s big and we love her for her goodness.

Seventy-fo u r


MARGUERITE

CHASE, � K

" Peg"

"A m b it ion, Will, A ccO?n plis h me n t." Cony H i gh S c hool ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; M a q u a C l u b , V ice-President of Student League 3 ; P resident 4 ; C l a s s H ockey Team 2, 3 ; C l a s s Volleyball Team 2 ; C l ass B a sebal l Team 2 ; Wearer of the " C . H . L . " a n d C l a ss N u meral s ; M a ndol i n C l ub Leader 3 ; Ivy D a y P a ge a n t 2 ; Committee 3 ; S h akespearean P l a y 3 ; Sopho­ more Declamation, Second P rize ; P a n hell enic Del egate 2, 3 , 4 ; H onor R o l l 1, 2 , 3 ; Chi G a m m a Theta ; Delta B et a . Whoever h a s k nown h e r w i l l t e t i f y t h a t t h e three words above are She is ambitious always, and whatever sh2 characteri t ic of "Peg." a w i l l , in more ways than one, that assures suc­ she h a u n dertake O ne who has participated actively and profit­ cessful accomplishment. ably i n every phase of her college life, is one of t h e few college women A good scholar. a true sport, a sincere who i not de irous o f a career. What other Qualities need a n admirable personality possess. friend.

DA V I D A M A R Y C L A R K " D a rvy"

" Those eyes T hey dance in m ists, a nd dazzle with su1·prise." O a k G rove S e m i n ary ; C o b u rn C l a s s i c a l Institute ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Glee C l ub 1 : Wearer of " C . H . L . " ; B asketba l l ; M ention in Gym Meet ; Delta Sigma C h i . H e r e is another member o f t h a t illustrious group, ca!Jed t h e "town S h e is aJways i n a hurry, but a l l the same she is always ready girls. " for a n y t h i n g, be i t study or frolic , she's right there doing her share. Many have It i s rumored, too, that she is a marvel at enterta i n i ng. yielded t o the wiles of that c u rly hair and those "taki ng" eyes.

L E O LA M A E C L E M E N T , .:l � .:l F reedom A c a d e m y ; Y. W. C. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; H am l i n F i n a l s ; H onor R o l l 2, 3, 4 ; W e a rer of " C . H . L. " ; C l a s s N u m­ eral s ; W earer of " C . W . " ; Voll eybal l Team 1 , 2, 3 ; Baseb a l l 1 , 2 ; Soccer 3 ; H ockey 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; M a n a ger H ockey 3 ; V a rsity H ockey 3, 4 ; Secretary-Treasurer H ealth League -1 ; H ouse Chairman Foss Hall 4; Chi Gamma Theta ; P i Gamma M u .

N

.r · �

.

'·.

,;.

J ust t o show you what a n u n usual person Leola i s , you should be told that she has been Foss Hall's house chairman a n d s t i l l retained I t wou.ld have been q uite a stunt for anyone except her friends. She's always good natured a n d dPpendable--What more would Leola. you desire ?

'

. ,r

,

I

Sevenfly-five


MARTHA ALLEN DAVIS, B X e

"Resolve to be t hyself, and know tha t he Who fi:nds himself loses his misei-y." Portland H i gh School ; Delta Sigma Chi 3 ; K a p p a A l p h a 4 ; D ram atic Club 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Secretary-Treasurer 3 , 4 ; C . W . H . L . 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Glee Club 1 , 2 ; J u nior P l ay 3. Martha is one of those carefree, thoughtless persons i t seems, b u t when one learn to k now h e r o n e fi nds h e r to be a v e r y serious, thoughtful person. We sometimes think that Martha tries to fool us with her gaiety, but we have learned to k now a n d Jove her for herself. Martha has much dramatic ability a n d we expect a great deal of her.,

FA Y A L E

E LO U I S E D E C K E R , � � �

"Fay" Skowhegan H i gh School ; Y . W. C . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4; P ub lic ity Committee Y. W. C. A. 2 ; Art E d itor of Colbia 111a 2, 3 ; Colby D a y Committee 1 ; J u n ior D ance Committee ; Echo Reporter 3 ; Colby P ress Club. W h e n Decker i p u t on a committee everyone draws a s i g h of relief for it is a ure sign that the t h i ng will be done a n d done well. Her real forte is Art as ORACLES, Colbianas, a n d various Foss Hall rooms bear evidence. You have originality, ability a n d deter m i nation, Decker. so we expect great things .)f you.

R U T H E L L S W O R T H DO W " R uthie"

Kents H i ll Seminary ; Y. W. C . A . 1 , 2, 3 , 4- ; C abinet 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Health League, H ealth Leader 4 ; Basketball M a nager 2; Hockey C l a ss Team 2, 3 ; V�nsity Hockey 2·, 3 ; Volleyball C l ass Team 1, 2, 3 ; B asketball Class Team 1 , 2 ; Varsity Ba sketball 1 ; Baseball Class Team 1 ; Soccer C l a ss Team 3 ; Wearer of N umera l s ; I vy Day Play 3 ; Honor Roll 1, 2, 3, 4 ; H ouse Chairman Dutton H ouse 4 . Never ruffled, never weary AJwayg calm a nd steady. Would you have a task well don e ? Ruth, you'll fi n d , is ready. Lessons, p la y , a n d sports as well I n each is honor due. Ever loving, ever faithful­ Never was a pal more true.

Seventy-six


M A RJ O R I E G R A

E DU

STA

, <l> ) I

" Ma r j e "

" T he t rtie b orn Englislww n , Who S a t 's worst perfections does inherit." South Poxtl a n d H i g h School ; Gorham o rmal School ; Y. W. C. A . 1, 3, 4 ; Secreta r y Y. W. . A. 4 ; I vy D a y P a geant 1 , 3 ; Col b ia n a Board 1 , 3 ; W e are r of " . H . L." ; l a s s N u m erals ; B u si nes M a n ager Colb ic11ui 4 ; G l ee C l ub 1 ; I a ndolin lub 1 ; Class H ockey M a n ager 1 ; H ockey Team 1, 3 ; Soccer M a n a ger 3 ; Soccer Te am 3 ; V o l l eyball 1 ; C h i G a m m a T heta. Margie i l i k e the proverbial p e n n y . She a l w a y s r e t u r n s . Anywhere. a nytime. Margie i the l i fe of the party. B u t aside from t h e fun, she ha held many offices a n d is doi ng four years i n three. May you a l ­ way have a many f r i e n d s a you have n o w , M a r g i e , b u t we hope that you will not get "mad on them . "

E V I E A LM A E L L I S , • l> .:\I " E vi e "

"Man delig hts 1ne not. " B i n g h a m H i gh Sch ool ; Y . W . C. A . 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; H e a l t h L e a g u e 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; H ockey Te am 1 , 2, 3 ; Volleyb a l l 3 ; B a sebal l Team 1 , 2 ; Soccer Team 3 ; ·wearer of "C. H . L . " ; C l a s s N um e ral s ; Colby P ress C l u b ; Senior D ance Com m i ttee ; D e lta S i gma C h i . Sweet, s i m p le a n d g i rl i s h , that's Evie. We e e h e r going about with that little preoccupied a i r a l l of her o w n , a n d we wonder at time where her thoughts lie. Evie·s demure m i le has won her m a n y friends o n both sides of the c a m p us. W e a l l wish the u n ·s brightest "Ray•· to s h i ne o n Evie.

E V E LY N

M Ac D O

ALD

ESTEY

"Ev"

" F e w hea rts like h e1· with v i r t u e wcinned, Few heads 1 ith knowledge so info r m ed."

l a s s i ca l I nstitute ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Y . W . C o b u rn C . A . Cabinet 3 , 4 ; M aqua C l u b 3 , 4 ; P resident Re adin g Room A ssociation 4 ; Ivy D a y P l a y 3 ; J u n io r E x h ibition, T h i rd Pri ze ; H ockey 3 , 4 ; Soccer 3 ; Volleyb a l l 3 ; Wea rer of N u m e r a l s ; Delta Sigma C h i ; K a p p a A l p h a ; H on or R o l l 1, 2. She i n deed a true f r i e n d who w i l l do anyth i ng for you. Evelyn i is q u iet, but beneath there is _pluck, fun, a n d friendship for t o e who he is efficient a n d capable, b u t she 1s also a O f course look for i t . which are kept bidden by her m a n y talent Evelyn ha port. good What more could A n artist, m us i c i a n a n d poet ! u n as u rn i ng nature. be desired.

Se venty-seve n


D OR O T H Y M A ZI E FAR

S W O R T H , <I> )f

" D ot "

"Love reckons h ou rs .fo1· mo n t hs, mul da ys for yea rs ; and ev ry l i t t l e a b. e n ce is a n a g e . " hina, Maine ; Y. W . . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; E r k i n e A c ademy H ealth League 1 , 2 , 3 , 4; Wear r of " . H . L . " ; H on­ orable Mention in Gym Meet 1, 2; I vy Day Pagea nt 1, 2 ; Shake pear a n Play 1 ; H o nor Roll 1 . Dot . . Ken . . have n o worri s about a career so �arefully planned. he wa a n a p t p u p i l i n Parmy's Chemistry :ours s a n d Miss " ' Pat'" is a l ways ready to recom mend her as a model housekeeper . seamstress, o r cook. Th happine s of another J u ne bride is assured through these accompli ·hment and her cheerful good nature.

VERA ELLE

"

o t h ing i

FE LLOWS

pl a · a 1 1 t t ha t i s not spiced w i t h v a rie ty . "

Farmington High Sc hool ; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Literary Society 1 ; Wearer of " . H. L . " and Class N u meral s ; Tenni M a n ager 4 ; Volleyball Team 2 , 3 ; Delta S igma hi ; H onor Rol l 3, 4. A variety of ambition , mood , a n d pursuits ha Vera. Poetry, Political Science, A rt . Ten n i , and the .typewriter all have a <:ertain fascination i n them for her. We ail w i ·h we were as capable i n these lines as she. Yes, i t 's variety as well a ability that plea es your best friend , Vera. Don ' t t ry to change to please us, be as you are­ different.

B A R B A R A M cG R E GO R F I F E , <P �[ " B ud "

" A sou l

So full o f si1 11i m e 1· w a rm t h, so glad, So hea l t hy, sou nd, a nd clea r, a nd whole."

Traip A cademy, Kittery, M a ine ; Y . W . C. A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Wearer of " C . H . L . " ; Vice-P resident H ealth League 3 ; Winn er Albion Woodbury Small P r ize 2 ; Senior D a nce Committee ; Chi Gamma Theta ; P resident of Chi Gamma Theta 2. Bet your life Fo Hall ( not to mention the other pus ) is going to m iss the little Scotch lassie with That determi nation and p l uck come right from .. Bud's . . heart with its wealth of f u n and friendship She's a great l i t t l e p a l , a n d a g i r l that Colby c a n be to w i n .

Seve nty-eight

side of the "amthe rosy cheeks. bon ny Scotland . is her very o w n . p r o u d a n d happy


HARRIET MARTHA FLETCHER, � � � " H at"

W aterville H ig h School ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3 , 4 ; Fres h m a n Sch l a r s h i p Prize ; Sophomore Decl a mation 2; V ice­ P re s i d e n t D a ughters of Colby 3 ; P resi dent 4 ; H o n o r R o l l 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; C h i G a m m a Thet a ; P h i B e t a K a p p a . F e w a n d f a r between a r e t h e gi rls w h o c a n enter whole-heartedly i nto college activitie and pull A 's i n all of their �ourses. Observe Harriet ! She i s one of the few. That he i s a tow n girl has been the bane of many an assiduous proctor as she "shushed"' " Hat"s" irre­ pres able laugh. Homesick co-eds will certainly regret the day you leave college, " Hat," a n d we a l l w i h you the best o f luck.

A L E X A N D R I N E F U LLE R " A lex"

" Th e saying t ha t beG!uty is skim. deep is b i i t a s kin deep saying." South O ra n ge H igh School ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 ; H onor­ a ble Mention i n Gym M eet ; G lee Club 1, 3 ; J u n io r D a nce C o m m ittee ; Senior D a nce Comm i ttee ; I vy Day P a ge a n t 2 , 3 ; I vy D a y P l a y 3 ; Literary Society ; Kappa A l ph a . " A lex" i t h e epitome of agreeablenes , t h e o u J o f w i t a n d t h e fol­ lower o f Epicuru . But lest this statement be misleading, i t would be She w i l l di cuss a n yt h i n g well to add that " A lex" has another side. w i t h you, a n ytime, f r o m t h e latest b oo k off the press to the b e s t places to eat i n New York Everyone fi n ds her most i n teresting company and a e r y good friend.

D O RO T H Y G I D D I N G S , � K " D ot " C o n y H ig h S c h ool ; Y. W . C. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; L iterary Society 1, 2 ; B a seball Team 1 ; Class B a sketball Team 1, 2 ; V a rsity T ea m 2 ; M a nager 1 ; Class Volleyball Team 2 ; W e a rer of th e " C . H . L . " a n d C l a s s N umeral s ; C l a s · H e a lth Leader 3 ; P resident of the H ea l t h League 4 ; D r a m atic Club 4 ; I vy D a y , S h akespearean P l a y 3 ; H o use C h a i r m a n o f Foster H ou se 4 ; Delta S i g m a C h i 3 , 4 ; C h i G a m m a T heta.

Probably no g i r l i n t h e ' ' Dot" is g i g a n t i c ment>dJy a n d physically. w o m e n ' s d i v i s i o n has s h o w n such a p t ne s for the two-fold development She i s an o f bra i n a n d b r a w n , a n d attai ned such perfection i n both. ports, a n d m uch i n demand as a n athletic a c k n owledged authority o n Friendly and sympathetic, she i s pleased with a disposi­ i nstructor. A jolly "one tion which J i k e ''the little old lady's" is always "jes' so." Some group of school who laughs a n d yet does not play the fool." going to receive one peach o f a teacher. c h i ldren i

Seventy-nine


D O R O T H Y E L D E.

GO U L D

" D ot"

"T h e1·e is l u ck in leisu re." Liv ermore Falls H i o- h School ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3 , 4 ; Wearer of " C . H . L . " ; Hockey 1 ; Glee Club 1 ; Mention in Gym Meet 1 ; Delta S i gma C h i ; Dance Committee 4 ; Colby Day ommittee 3. " Dot" is the girl w i t h t h e < L i po i t i o n t h a t w e a l l e n vy so m uch. N o matter how many cour es are scheduled for the next day, you w i l l . find her ready to j o i n in any good t i me that comes along Some people want to k now when h e does the necessary studying, but that can ea i Jy be u n derstood when you know what deter m i n is m she has nnd how q u i ckly she can accomplish the ta k put before her.

B E RNICE VIVIAN G R E E N " Bernie "

" Ye a 11iing i n desire To follow k n owledge like a sinh,-ing s t a r, Beyond t he i i t mos t b o u nd of h u ma n t ho u g h t . " Foxcroft Academ y ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Glee C l u b 1 ; H a m l i n Prize Speaki n g ; Sophomore Decl a m ation, F i rst P r ize ; Coburn P r i ze Speaki ng ; Class H i storian J un i or Class Day ; Class Secreta ry-Treasurer 3 ; Delta S igm a C h i 4 ; ORACLE Board 3. There a r e j u t a few t h i n g i n t h e world t h a t really c o u n t a n d bow I n " Be r n ie's" heart good it i to see a per on who has those t h i ngs. there a�e courage and wisdom and beauty, but best of all there i s real She has, that is very deep and true. love there, love of her friend too, that rare and glorious gift, aspirat ion , that "yea r n i ng i n desire'' Those to grow richer in k nowledge, and i n wisdom. and in livi ng. who k no w her wel l , k now that some day Mother Colby will be very proud of her daughter.

L E O N ORA E D I T H H A L L , X fl " Ki d "

"Age oa nnot wit he r he r, nor cust<nn stale her infinite v·a rietty." Ban gor High School ; Class H ockey Team 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Hockey Team 3, 4 ; Class Volleyb al l Team 1, 2 ; Class and Varsity Baseba11 1, 2 ; Class and Varsity Soccer Team 3 ; H amlin P r ize S peaking ; Class V ice-President 3 ; Chi Gamma Thet a . A cla't ter of footsteps without ; a door fl u n g open ; " A n t h i n g to eat ?" The spirit o f youth a n d joy is a n d here we have the "Kid" herself ! hers a n d she is ever welcome. A Joyal heart within and a s m i le with­ out-may they lead you to h a p p i ness, " K i d ! "

Eigh t/y


P HYLLIS MARIE H A M , � � � L i vermore F a l l s H igh Sc hool ; Y. W. C. A. 1 , 4 ; Colby Day Play 3 ; I vy D a y Pageant 1, 2 ; D i st i nction at Gym Meet ; Wearer of C. H . L. ; Tennis M a nager 1 ; Echo Reporter 3 ; T re a s u re r of Student Leag u e 3 ; J u n ior D a nce Com­ m ittee ; I vy D a y Committee ; Colby P ress C l u b ; Delta S i g m a C h i ; C h i Gamma T heta. ' " P h i l " c a n a c c o m p l i s h t h i ngs w i t h o u t telling the w o r l d a b o u t i t . I f you need a suggestion for a party, " Ph i l " w i l l h a v e the idea. If you have cute favors. " P h i l" thought o f them. If you have good refreshments, " P h i l " made them . Although she i small, she will leave a space that will be hard to fi ll.

DOROTHY ISABEL HA

NAFORD, x n

" D ot"

" Good te 1nper is like a s unny daJy ;

I t sheds . its brightness eve 1vwhe re. "

W i nt h rop H igh School ; Y. W. C. A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; C h a i r m a n Soci a l Comm ittee of Y . W . C . A . 4 ; G l ee Club 4 ; I vy D a y S peaker 3 ; E xecutive Board of S tu dent League 3 ; P a n - H ellenic D e l egate 3 , 4 ; K a p p a A l p h a . W i t h h e r adorable s m i le "Dot" h a s endeared herself t o a l l o f us. Always 1·eady to help . never refu i n g responsibility, she has proved her elf a friend indeed. Her sunny disposition will win for her a m i le in the hearts of all who k now her.

M A R Y H O LL A N D , � � � G a r d i n e r H i gh School ; Y. W . C. A . 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; H onorable M ention at Gym Meet 2 ; Literary Society 1 ; Sophomore Song C o m m i ttee ; Senior D a nce Committee ; I vy D a y P age a n t 1 , 3 ; G l e e C l u b 1 , 3 , 4 ; C h i G a m m a T heta. M a r y ' s college career s h o u l d be labeled "The Evolution of a Co-ed . " H e r Freshman year s h e w a s unsurpassingly naive. Her Sophomore and J u n ior years showed a steady rise in the whirl of college society and this year we fi nd her a most intellectuaJ young woman with every i ndication i n t h e world of becom i n g a professor's wife. B u t really, you're j u t the same Mary a n d we'd like to have you stay longer

E ig h ty-one


ESTH E R ELIZABETH

Kl

UDSE

, X n

" K nudie"

"I aw a proper t w im kle in yow yee ry firs t . " ' T LI yoi l , I l iked you r looks at Portland H igh chool ; Y . W. . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; H ealth Lead­ er 1 ; la Ba ketb a l l 1 ; Va rsity B a ketba l l 1 ; Re­ porter Echo Board 3 ; A ociate E d itor O R ACLE 4 ; Chi Gamma Theta. A n i r repres ible �learn i n very nic brown eyes evolves into a con­ tagio 1s chuck le,-that's f u n-loving " ' K n udie. ' " A udden earnest s i n , eerily, keen l o v of the b e t in l i fe . efficient attention to w h a t she t h i nks worthwhile-that's clear-visioned ' " K n udie. ' ' A big-hearted, ex­ pan ive friendline -thats' our " K nudi . ' '

MILDRED A

NIE M A

AR

, A � II

" M ac"

"Her eyes as ·ta rs of t w il ig ht fa ir, Ui.ke t i1Jil ig h t 's too, h er dusky ha ir." W a tervil l e H igh choo l, 1 922 ; Y . W. . A . 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; Vol­ leyball 1 ; Wearer of C. H . L . and Cla umera l s ; H on­ orable Mention in Gym Meet ; hi Gamma Theta ; Delta S igma hi. When a good " "all-ro u n d " ' g i rl is needed we go to M i ldred. Whether it i- athletics, commit tees, or even w r i t i ng songs ( but then she al­ ways is t h r i l led by the poet ic ) Mildred i s right there. She not o n ly ha won the love o[ her fellow students. but she always has a warm greet i n g for her ho t- of town friends a n d neighbors. The good wi hes of her m a ny friends go with her.

M Y R T LE V I O LA M A I

:�

, <r> :\I

" Mert"

41( 61 �

-) -. .

'

Eig hfJy-two

"A s t he t w ig is b e n t , t h e t i 'ee's incl ined."

-

. �i. ·,

Coburn Cl assical I n stitute ; Y. W. C. A. 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; Wearer of C. H. L . ; H o norab l e Mention in Gym Meet 2 ; Liter­ ary Society 1, 2 ; Senior D ance Committee ; Chairman of Colby Day Comm ittee 4 ; Junior Nominating Commit­ tee ; H ouse Chairman 3, 4 ; Class T rea urer 4 ; Shakes­ pearean Play 3 ; Dram atic Club 4 ; Delta S igma Chi 3, 4 ; President 4 ; Honor R ol l 3, 4 ; Kappa A l p h a . Here· "Mert'" whom w e h a v e better k no w n the -e la t t w o years be­ cause she has preferred to live a t Fo s H a l l , rath r than in tow n . Efficient, studious. ambitious, a n d f u l l of f u n i Myrtle Recall her portrayal of Sir Toby Belch in "Twelfth Night.'" the quiet hall when he was house c h a i r m an , the success of Colby Day, 1926. the A's on her rank cards, a n d the joyful countenances of the Coburn students who s i t daily i n her French cla es. A sworn manhater, yet we rather . u pect there 1s one whom she favorably considers.


ARLE

E SMITH MAN

, � K

" L ene "

"Her vo ice was ever s oft, gentle, a nd low­ A n excellent t hing fri a woma n . "

C a l a i s H i gh School ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Cabi net 4 ; T rea urer of C l a s 2 ; C l a s Re presentative to Student League 4 ; H ouse C h a i r m a n cf M a ry Lowe H a ll 3 ; C l a s H ockey Team 1 , 2, 3 ; lass V o l leyball Team 1 , 2 ; Lit­ e r a ry Club 1 ; Delta S i gma Chi 4 ; Glee Club 1 , 2 , 3, 4, M a n ager 3 ; P resident 4 ; Honor Roll 1, 3. S m i l i ng. weet, generous and loving-such i Arlene. Alw,ay h a p p y , always glad to be doing $Omething-a n y th i ng-for you. We thought she was a manhater-in spite of her name, but-weU, even the wisest are fooled. Forever fa i t h f u l to her ideals, what b u t success can ever come to her ?

J U LI A

M A Y O , <I> ;\ I "Judy"

E d wa r d Little H i gh School ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2 3 , 4 ; Social C o m mittee 1 ; Wo rl d F ellow h i p Committee 2; V ice­ Pre ident 3 ; P resident 4 ; M aqua Delegate 3 ; M a q u a C l u b ; Lite ra r y Society 1 ; H am l i n F i n al s ; C l a s s Secre­ t a ry 2 ; I vy D a y Pageant 2 ; MembeT P a n h e l l e n ic Co un ­ c i l 3 , 4 ; S hakespearean P l ay 3 ; D ramatic Society 4 ; l a ss H ockey Team 4 ; K a p pa a rsity Soccer Team 3 ; A l p h a ; D a ughters of Colby ; J u n ior P rize S peaking, Second P rize ; W e a re r of C . H. L. " E ,•en i n a s m a l l place, b u t a f e w outstancling p e r on a r e k nown to everybody," a n d "J udy"' is u n q ue tionably one of those few out­ s ta nd i n g per onalities i n t h e S e n ior cla s. Clever, tactful. w itty, broad-minded, tolerant, conscientious, quite impossible to anger, po se ed o f an u ndy i n g opt i m i m, and above all a lovable leader and a real "thi nl<er"-ah-we wish there were more " J u d i s " ' in this world

H E LE

ODMA

M I TC H E L L , � K

" M ic k "

" The qu ick rn ind fa be t ter than a crown." H ou l ton H igh S c hool ; Beechwood S c h o o l , Jenk intown, P a . ; Y. W. C. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Literary Society 1 ; I v y Day P age ant 2; Colby D a y P agean t 3 ; Chairman of I v y D a y 3 ; S peaker at U n dergraduate B a n q uet 3 ; J u n ior D a n ce C o m m i ttee ; Echo Bo ard 3 ; Women's E d itor of Echo 4 ; Colbia nci Board 3 ; Wea rer of the C . H. L . ; Delta S i g m a C h i ; Delta Beta ; Ode Comm ittee 3 ; A roos­ took Club 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; P residen t 4 ; Eddy P ub licity Chair­ man 4. We j u s t c a n not decide whether y o u h a d better e d i t a newspaper o r r u n a d a y n u rsery, " M ic k " J udging from y o u r excellent work on the Echo Board, a n d your tender m i nistrations of the Freshmen a t Foster you would be quite capable i n either l i ne o f work. There's one thing we"re ure o f , " M i c k . " whatever you do will be i n W a h i ngton, won ' t it ? D o n " t forget to take ' " Leslie" with you !

House

E ig hty-th 1·ee


P R U D I E R A E M O O R E , _\ � Il " P rue"

" Tha t face no a i· t is t ' · skill ca n dim The love-fa ir face she t u rns t o h i m . " orthfield Seminary, 1 9 24 ; H onor R o l l 1 , 2, 3 ; Manager 1 ; D e l t a S i g m a C h i ; P i G a m m a M u .

Tenn i s

Prudie c a m t o 11 from t h e w i lds o f Canada o n ly three years ago, bri nging with h r a capacity for preading " editious propaganda." Yet, i n spite of her origi n , we've learned to love a n d admire her for The dawn ( Don ) of a her a b i l i t ie espec i a U y in the choJa ·tic l i ne. new day ap peared for Prudie when he came to Colby and f ut u re gen­ eration will bask in the light of her good works ( even after ten o'clock ) .

F RAN

E S M E LI S S A N A S O

, � ��

Thornton Academ y ; Y. W. . A. 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Trea urer 4 ; N u meral ; H onor Roll 3 ; Wearer of . H . L. ; C l a Volleyball Team 2, 3 ; Ba eball 2 ; H ockey 3, 4 ; C l a ss P resident 3 ; Second German P r i ze 2 ; F i rst P ri ze J u n i or E xh i bition 3 ; J u n i o r Dance Comm ittee ; ORACLE Board l ub ; Kappa A l p h a . 3 ; Echo Board 3 ; D ram atic O f a l l t h e d i fficult person to s a y a nyth i ng about, Frances walks o ff w i t h a l l t h e p r i zes. For Frances has a complex. S h e j ust c a n ' t bear to have people say nice t h i n g about her and who can talk about Frances and not ay nic thing ? That her complex may be humored, howev r. we w i l l not say that she is clever at w r i t i n g poetry, keepi n g people good natured, e t c . , etc.

LURA ARABINA

·O RC R O S S , 1: K

"Lura" Wate r vi l l e H i gh School ; Y . W. C . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 , Cabi net 3 ; D ramatic Club 4 ; lass H ockey Team 2, 3, 4 , Varsitv Team 4 ; Class Volleyball Team 1 , 2, 3 ; Calss B aseba Team 1, 2 ; Class Soccer Team 3 ; M a nager of Hockey Team 3 ; Wearer of the C . H. L . and Class umeral s ; Delta S igma C h i 4 ; I vy D a y Pagean t 1 , 2 ; S h akespear­ ean Play 3 ; H am l i n P ri ze S peaking Contest 1 ; Senior Dance Committee 4.

Tl

L u ra i no loiterer in life's whirl, Rather she i busy from sun to s u n , A h a p p y , friendly, thoughtful, k i ndly g i r l , A veritable j o y to everyone. She enjoy m a n y an outside affair, Likewise she seems to rejoice i n her work. If there's a party she' l l s u rely be there, But for i t no duty w i ll she ever shirk.

Eigh ty-four


P A U LI

E VIRGI

IA P A G E , B :X e

"A lso to he r w is e s i mple mind." M orse H i gh Schoo l , Bath, M a i n e ; Delta S igma C h i ; K a p ­ p a A l pha ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; M usic Comm ittee 4 ; Wearer of C . H . L. Here is a girl w h o h a s t h e r a r e a nd :har m i ng q uality of b e i n g both gay a nd very eriou at the same t i me. When we &re tired o u t , how plea · a n t it is to I i ten to Pauli ne' ready wit which w h i l e i n jest, bring out the deep truths of life and shows u that P a u l i n e i a real th inker. With her weet voice a nd ready wit he can not help being a wcces in whatever he undertake .

F LO R E N

E APPLE

ON

PLAISTED,

K

" Floppie"

"Sh e is wi e, if I can j11dge he r ; And fa ir s he is, if t hll t mine eyes b e t nt e. " Coburn C l a s sical I nstitute, W atervi l l e , M a i ne ; Y . � . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; L iterary C l ub 1 , 2 ; C l ass B a sketba l l Team 1, 2 ; M a nager of Tennis 3 ; Wearer of the C . H. L . ; D ra m a t ic C lub 3, 4 ; G i r l s ' P l a y 2 ; Com mencement P l ay 1, 2 ; Sophomore Decl a mation, Second P ri ze ; Delta h i 3 , 4 ; D a ughte1's of Colby Society, V ice­ Sigma P resi dent 2 ; K a p p a A lp h a . Brave. clever. enterta i n i ng, efficient. noble. steadfast, true. M a ny other adjectives could a p p l y to t h is girl who is the best friend any­ one could have. No matter how many burden Florence i carrying, he c a n alway fi nd room for one more. a n d each o n e wi!J be surely treated in a worthy m a n ner. May a atisfied h a p p i ness always fi n d it e l f w i t h y o u , " F lo p . "

WE

O N A H M A R I O N P O L L A R D, � K "Winnie"

" Good t e m pe r is like a s mi n y da y, It sheds its b r ightness e ve rywhere . " La wrence H i g h School ; Y . W . Chi 4.

C.

A . 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Delta S igma

" W i n n ie," 'ti- said that "love is b l i n d . " but "there's a t ime for all t h i n gs " a n d certainly Jove i n its biindness has fou n d t i me for you dur­ i n g your college days. To conti n ue cribbing from Shakespeare, " mooth r u ns the water where the brook is deep00-we'll agree i t does in your ca e--you q u ietly going along under o u r very noses and s p r i n g i ng a K. D. R . p i n . We wi h you h a p p i ness along life's way, " W i n n ie ' " a n d the b e t of success i n a n y t h i n g you m a y undertake.

E ight y-five


A

GIE CATHERINE REED

Coornb H i gh School , 1 9 23 ; Y . W . C. A . 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Delta S igma Ch i ; Wearer of C . H. L. A ngie is one o f o u r town !l'irls, but one may see her g l i d i ng to and from classe i n her automobile or occasionally i n Fo s H a l l . A ngie is alway very busy and is never loitering a r o u n d . Conseqt,ently it i hard to become acq u a i n ted with her. B u t even i f it is bard to become a c q u a i n ted with her one finds lhat it is very worth wh i le for she j3 everything that could be asked o f a friend. Kind, thoughtful, true cannot e x p res a l l A ngie's good q ualitie · as a f riend.

M I R I A M E L I Z A B E T H R I C E , X fl "M iriam"

" To do easily wha t i s difficult f o r o thers is the ma 1·k of talen t." M orse H igh School ; O a k Grove Sem i n a ry ; Y . W . C . A . . 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Publ icity 3 ; E d i tor-i n-Chief Col b ia na 4 ; Varsity H ockey 1, 2, 3 ; Varsity Volleyba11 3 ; Varsity Soccer 3 ; Weare r of C . W . ; Second P r ize F reshman Scholars h i p ; H a m l i n Reading ; Orc hestr a ; Ivy D a y Pageant 1 , 2 ; K a p p a A l p h a ; Ph i Beta K a p p a . To follow Mir iam f o r a day i t o realize something o f her capability a n d varied i n terests. Whether i n m usic, sports, classes, o r p l a i n wor k , who w i l l d e n y that he excel ? Besides t h e r e a r e the q ua l i ties for which tho e who k now h r love her most,-h r sweetne s, sin­ cerity, and strength of character.

H E L E N E LS I E R O B I N S O N , -1 t>. � L i vermore F a l l s H igh School ; H eal t h League 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Y. W . C. A . 1 , 2 , 3, 4 ; D istinction at Gym Meet ; Wear­ er of C. H. L . ; I vy Day Pageant 1 , 2; I v y D a y Com­ mittee 3 ; Echo Reporter 3; Press Club ; Delta Sigma Chi ; Kappa A l p h a . Helen i s one of those people that no dormitory should b e without. She's always ready to have a good t i m . Bridge, movies, or a s u ndae, i t 's a l l the same to Hele n . Wherever she i s be sure there' something doing !

Eig h t y-si

·


A RO L I

E E LI Z A B E T H R O G E R S , <I> ) l "Cal"

"I n te n t upon h r des t i n ed CO'll rse G1 a cef u l a n d ·useful in all she does . " H ig h School ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Member

F re e port of a b i n et 3 ; P r ayer Group L e a d e r 3 ; S t u d e n t V o l u nteu om m ittee 4 ; Glee Club 1, 2 ; enten n i a l 1 ; Literary S c c iety 2 ; Gym M eet Co m m ittee 2 ; H o norable Mention in G y m Meet 2 ; Cla s Volleyball 3 ; Delta S igma h i 3, 4 · Col b ia na Board 3 4 ; H ono r R o l l 2; P i G a m m a M u . Caroline ·tarted college way, way back i n the good, old days . b u t due to her pe1·severance h e ha at last reached the final goal. Caroline i one of those q u iet. demure g i r l -but beware. Don ' t ever argue with However, we a l l step back her becau-e she always has the la t word. a nd listen when she speaks because he has had some good experience .. .. during her teach i n g career. Experience i n c ludes a lot. W e wonder, " C a l . " b u t say littJe

M A B E L V I C T O R I A R O O T, -" -" -'1 P o rts mout h H i g h School ; Y. W . C. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Member of Gl ee C l ub 1, 2 , 3 ; M a n a ge r of T rack 2; T rack Team 2 ; Volleyb a l l Team 2 ; H o norable Mention at Gym Meet ume rals 3 ; C. W . 4 ; 2 ; Wearer of C . H . L . ; Cla. s H o n o r R o l l 4 ; D e lt a S i g m a h i 3, 4. I t ' h a r d to s a y a n y t h i n g about Mabel f o r w h o c a n describe i n a few words a conscientiou a person as she ? ShouJd we all try t o do o u r b e s t to the a m e degree, this- m i g h t b e a different w o r l d . Because of this very q u a l ity we can prophe -y for Mabel a good measure of suc­ ces in her f u t u re work.

P R I SC I LLA M A Y R U S S E LL, � K " P retzel "

" Th<nLghts

ai

e like Pa nsies

y<nL

know."

W a l pole H ig h School ; Y. W . C . A . 1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; Class Secre­ tary 1 ; W e a re r of the C. H. L . ; Ivy Day P a geant 1 ; O RACLF Board 3 ; S oc i a l Science Soc i e t y . Patient, p r i m , petite a r e all adjectives which describe Prisci!Ja. Though t f u l, kind, sympathetic, a n d you need b u t to glance at her dai nty hands to k now that they are artistic. She has a queer littJe habit of wrapping herself a ll up within herself a nd becoming entirely obliviou to everything around her, a nd for this she almost won the ., . name of . Dreamer . Above a l l she has a w i n n i ng, i nde cribable way of her own, and that's P r i cilia.

EigMy-seven


DORIS

O RA S A N B O R N , ::!: K "Doris"

"Ever in chee1'f u lest

mood

art tho,u . "

Wi lton Academ y ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Cab inet 4 ; M a ­ q u a C l ub 4 ; Literary C l u b 1 ; H o u e C h airm an o f Fos Hall 4 ; Class H ockey Team 2, 4 ; C l a s Volleybal l Team 1, 2, 4 ; Man ager 4 ; V a r i ty Team 1 ; Ten n i s , C l a s Cham pion 3 ; C l a s s Baseba l l T e a m 1 ; Wearer o f C . H . L . and Class N u merals ; Glee C l u b 3 , 4 ; O rchestra 1 ; I vy Day, S h akespea rean Play 3 ; D ram atic C l ub 4 . Here is a n exa m p le o f a n a l l-round Colby g i r l-one w h o never f a i l to lend a h e l p i ng b a n d . I C y o u w a n t something done, ask Doris. If you want t o k now omet b i ng . a s k Doris. I f y o u want someone to play ten n i with you, ask Dori . o r , i f you want someone to play a m usical i nstrument, why j ust ask Doris. She, with her cornet. will, perchance achieve fame some day. W ith all these accompli hments, need we w i h her good luck 1

H E LEN COBURN S M I T H , � K "Smut"

fi1'r:,,

"Sere ne yet wa r m Hi1 m1a.:ie, yet

he r mind."

F riends School , Wash ington , D . C . ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; L itera ry Society 1 ; C l a s s P resident 4 ; D ramatic C l ub 2, 3, 4 ; College Play 2 ; Commencement P l ay 3 ; Class Hockey Team 1, 2; C l a s s Voll eyba l l Team 1 , 2 ; Wearer of the C . H . L . ; Glee C l u b 1 , 2, 3 ; I vy D a y Pageant 2 , 3 ; S h akespearean P l a y 3 ; Colbiana B o a r d 3 , 4 ; Kappa A l p h a ; Delta Beta. She likes to s i ng. to play, to act a part, or· paint a quaint design on silk o r wood. She enjoys our ports, outdoors and in, our teas at ten, all k i nds of clog , and the companionshi p o f many friends both old and new. Thus goes the saying, "Tell me what you l i k e and I'll tell you what you are."

MA R T H A

S O N D B E R G , <I> i\I

"S onnie"

"Ea t, d'l"ink, a·n.d be mie1•ry for tomorrow ym die." Y o r k H igh School , Y o r k V i l l age, M a i ne ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3 , 4 ; Hockey 1, 2, 4 ; Baseball 1, 2; Volleyba l l 1 , 2 ; Var­ sity Hockey 1, 2; Varsity Volleyba l l 1 ; Va rsity Basebal l 1 , 2 ; Wearer o f C . H . L . ; C l ass N u merals ; H a m l i n P rize S peaking Contest ; J un i o r I vy Day P l ay ; D ra­ matic C l u b ; De lta S igma C h i . Martha w i l l d o a n yt h i n g f o r anyone f r o m m a k i n g over a h a t t o w r i t i ng a p o e m . Though she seems to ride m e r r i l y o v e r l i fe's experi­ ences, she always comes through a test i n the lead.

E ighty-eight


MARIO

E L I Z A B E T H S P R O W L , � Ll �

oburn C l assical I n stitute, Y. W. C. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; H onor R o l i 1, 3 , 4 ; W e a re r of C . H . L . ; Clas Hockey 3 , 4 ; Var­ sity Hockey 3 ; Soccer 3 ; H ouse C h a i r m a n M a ry Lowe H al l 3 ; Delta S igma C h i ; P i Gamma M u . Whoever a w a girl like Ma r io n ? She always acts a s i f she were or to a party she e n j oy i n g life. Whether she i o n her way to cla alway meets you with the same gri n . We could all profit from her example.

H E L E N B E A T R I C E S T O N E , <I> :'II "Brim"

" A form m o re fa ir, a face nwre s weet, e' e 1· ha,,s it been m ry lot to mee t . " L a wrence H i gh School , L a wrence, M a s s . ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 ; C l a s Trea s u re r 1 ; G lee C l u b 1 ; Secretary O uting C l ub 1 ; W e a rer C . H. L . ; H onorable Mention i n Gym M eet, 2 , 3 ; Ech o R e porter 2, 3 ; I v y D a y C o m m ittee 3 ; J un i o r D ance C o m m i ttee ; Chi G am m a T heta ; Delta Beta. Mo t of the i m p r e sion " B r i m " has m a d e o n C o l b y h a v e been made o n the divan i n Foss Hall parlor. We will mi s you and your sweet s m i le next year . " Br i m . " May happi ness and Gus be always with you.

ENA MABELLE TRUE, B X e

" With th�m t h e seed of Wisdom did I sow A nd with mine own hrand wroiLght to make it g1'0w." P i ttsfiel d , N . H . , H i gh Schoo l, 1 9 23 ; 4 ; D e l t a S ig m a C h i 3, 4 .

Y.

W . C . A . 1,

2,

3,

Although E n a has lived i n t o w n d u r i n g her four years at Colby we have seen her about a great deal and k no w her qualities to be terling. She i s always bu y doi n g some good in her quiet u nas u rn i n g way. She i q u iet, it is t r u e , but E na is a v e r y g oo d compa nion a n d s h e h a s m a n y friends. We s h a l l m i s s y o u . E n a .

Eighty-nine


F RA N C E S J E A N E T T E T W E E D I E , X n " T weed"

"Of a m az i n g con t ra dict?'ons is w o ma n made ! " l a ss Vice-President 1 ; Ivy D a y Rockland H igh School ; ommittee 1 ; L i te ra ry Society Pageant 1 ; C l a s S o n g lass Baseball 2 ; Colby D ay Comm it­ 1 ; Glee Club 1 ; tee 2 ; J u n ior Dance C o m m i ttee 3 ; C l a ss H ockey 3 ; lass N u merals 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2 , 3 ; Vo lleyball 3 ; H ono rable Mention i n Gym Meet 2 , 3 ; Man ager C l a s H ockey 4 ; Wearer o f C . H . L. ; Delta S igma C h i ; P i Gamma Mu. W hat are the m i n u tes between classes worth without "Tweed's" hearty laugh and latest joke ? J C a ·ense of h u mor is a pricele s jewel. "Tweed" surely posse•se• the gem of gems. With her spark l i n g wit and magnetic personality ' e -:: a n say of her t r u ly : " W h at for m , what face, What charm. what grace ! ' '

FLOREN

E WOLF, B X e

" Flossie"

" T h n wht!J la ment wh n earth is yoitng a nd S'll m mf}r blos o m ing ?" Po rt land H igh School ; Y . W . C . A . 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Literary Society 1 ; Delta Sigma C h i 3, 4 ; Pi Gamma M u . A l way happy, a l wa) s b u y , ready for work o r p l a y at a n y t i me. She is zealously t r y i n g to hide a l l rem na nts o f Aapperhood by c u lt i ­ vat i ng her cro,vn of g l o r y . We are s u r e that noth i n g but h a p p i ness w i l l enter in where Florence i . Good luck to you .

E R N A E M I L Y .W O L F E , A � IT "Sunny"

" When she laughs, her eyes laii gh Llght dances in h er eyes . " W i nslow H igh School, 1 9' 23 ; y . W . C . A . 1 , er of C . H. L . ; C l a ss N umeral s ; ORACLE leyball 1, 2 ; H ockey Team 1, 2; B aseba l l Pageant 1 , 2; H am l i n P r i z e S peaking ; 3 ; Chi Gamma Theta ; Delta Sigma C h i .

2, 3, 4 ; Wear­ Board 3 ; Vol­ 1, 2 ; I v y Day H o n o r Roll 2 ,

Whether it is studies, dances, banquets or g y m , E r n a is right there in spite of the long bridge j o i n i ng W i nslow and Waterville. Her s u n n y disposition w i n s for her a place in the affections of all those h e meets and more than one " C a m p us Shei k " has cast h i s heart as homage at her feet. Philosophica l ? Yes, irregardless o f the m a n y time he was not present at the roll call. L i ng u i tica l ? S o m e lads and las ies will t h i n k so when they stand before her desk next year. We all k now that the cla s room is but E r n a ' avocation and that her greatest gift, "a woman's heart" is to find another mansion.

Nitn ety


A L I C E J UL I A W O O D , X n "A1"

" There is no wisdo m like fra n loness." W i n t h ro p H igh School ; Y . W . C . A. 1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; F reshm a n c m i n at i n g Comm ittee ; D e l t a S igma C h i ; C l a s s V ice­ P resident 4. I f you want to know t h e truth, i f you want a n honest o p i n ion o n a n y subject, a s k H e r decisions may b e counted u p o n as truth­ f u l a n d fi na l . T h is valuable characteristic will w i n success for her in a l l that she attempts.

"Al."

Nine fly-one


J U N I O R CLASS O F F I C E R S C ORN ELIA A DAIR

President

A RLEEN H ARRIETT WARBURTON·

Vice-Presiden t

S USIE WI L H ELMINA STEVENS

S ecrntary-T reas u re 1 ·

Junior C lass Roll Cornelia Adair M a rguerite E lise Ames Marie Laure d' A rgy Rose Black Franc es J u ne B ragdon Gladys Mae B unker Charlotte B u rns Clary J anet Chase Adelaide Coombs Dorothy Daggett Violet Daviau Margaret Annette Davis Vera F rances Day Marion E stell� Daye Amy Dell Dearborn N ellie Mae Dearborn Hilda Frances Desmond Ava Frances Dodge E velyn Gertr u de F oster

B rownvi l le Jct. Cha rleston Waterville Springfiel d , Mass. Ashland Charleston Livermore Falls Augu ta Bath Waterville Waterville M onson Fairfield Waterville Bangor Portland Ridlon ville N ewcastl e Waterville Nine tty-three


M ild red Lucille Fox Lela Ha kell Gl idden Katherine Beat rice Greaney E l isabeth Bullard Gross Mona Elizabeth Herron Helen Claire Hight Ruth E l i zabeth Hutch in Marion Elizabeth Jacobs Muriel Este Lewis Ruth Melvina McEvoy Helen E l i zabeth Merrick Ena E l lene Page E sther Mary Parker Viola May Philbrook Margery Mooers Pierce Fannie Polley Estelle Margaret Pottle Emily Randall Clai re Jane Richardson Ol ive Elizabeth Richard on Betsy Evelyn Ringdahl Henrietta Rosenthal Margaret Easton Salmond I rma Gertrude Sawyer Susie Wilhelmina St�vens Myra Spencer Stone Dorothy Vaughn Sylvester Grace Maud Sylvester Ruth Nevers Thompson R uth Mildred Tilton Harriet E stelle Towle Emma Fr a nces T'o zier Edna E l i zabeth Tu rkington Evelyn Floyd Ventres Ruth Mae Viles Ella Lydia Vinal Arleen Harriett Warburton Ruth E l i zabeth Williams Helen A l icia Wyman

Ninety-/ou r

Skowhegan Jefferson Waterville Portland Watervil le Skowhegan Waterville Aubu rn Waterville Henniker, N. H . Augusta Waterville Lisbon Falls Kittery Point Oakland New York City Oxford Freeport Waterville Waterville New Sweden Waterville Waterville Canton M ilbridge Lawrence, Mass. Deer Isle Woodland Smyrna M ills Portland Winthrop Fairfield Three R ivers, Mass. Rockport, Mass. Skowhegan No. Scituate, Mass. Lawrence, Mass. Waterville Medford, Mass.


Junior Class History " '28, t here is no b etter cLass t ha n '28 . "

T h e above i s our slogan.

F reshmen a re green ; sophomore a r e sophis­

t icated ; seniors are dinified ; j un iors, alone, are endowed with the qual i t ies of wisdom.

Many and brilliant a re their proofs.

Twenty-eight has been dist i nguished by her orators and readers. Last year she carried off the volleybal l a n d soccer championships.

Many of her

athletic stars have made varsity teams. Take note of her tennis champions. Look at her m usicians and Phi Betes.

What would th" Glee Club do with­

out her ? This is n ot a l l .

Twenty-eight is talented in other ways.

nated the fi rst sophomore dance.

Who origi­

Do n ot overlook the fraternity pins col­

l ected here a n d there. Loyalty t o o u r Alma Mater is the spirit of our class.

I n the c lass­

r oom and o n the athletic field we h ave made a name for ourselves. one a i m is t o furnish a worthy inspiration for the other classes.

Our

We a r e

d etermined to leave behind us a n u nforgotten name.

inety-five


0

a

-


S O P HO MO R E CLASS O F F I C E R S C AROLYN A NNIE H ERRICK

President

J EAN M ARGARET WATSON

Vice-President S ecreW.,ry-Treas urer

B EATRICE M ARY PALMER

Sop homore C lass Roll M a rtha E loise Allen R ut h B artlett Evelyn Lloyd Bell Viol ette Doris Boulter A n nella Gray B ucknam E leanor Gertrude B utler Lucy E li zaeth Chapin Doris Hayward C h u rch Lillia n Bernice Collins Anna L o uise Cone Sylvia D oris C rane Ruth D aggett Leola M i ld red Davis D o rothy E lizabeth Deeth N atalie M a ri e Downs Virginia Dudley Hester M a bel F i field Marian Lou ise Ginn Annie Hooper Goodwin Doris G roesbeck

W atertown, Mass. Waterville Caribou K ittery Hallowell Portland G reenfield, Mass. A ugusta South Berwick Hallowell East Washington, N . H. Waterville N ew port Winchendon, Mass. Alfred Houlton Portland Caribou Waterville Lawrence, Mass. Ninety-.seven


Neta I rene Harmon Corona Curtis Hatch E leanor I rene Hathaway Ethel Rebecca Henderson Carolyn Annie Herrick I rene Gert rude Her ey Martha Almeda Holt E llen Mercie Hoyt Edna Hattie Huff Alice Bradford Jewett Harriet Whitehead Kimball Helen Stewart Leighton E lsie Hathaway Lewis Florence E l izabeth Libbey E l eanor Marie Lunn Agatha Lovina MacEachrean E liza beth Mann Marshall Annie Isora Merrick Beatrice Louise M i l ler Betty Morse Lillian E sther Morse Rosalie Dorothy Mosher Dorothy Louise Morton Lora Gertrude Neal Ruth Anna Norton Methyl Alona Page Beatrice Mary Palmer Alice Wilhelmina Paul Inez Madeline Pelkey D orcas Whiston Plaisted Flora Mabel Rideout Adeleen Mary Robarge Muriel Vaughan Sanborn Thelma E l izabeth Short Ada Steelbrooke Grace Alli son Stone Ola Catherine Swift M iriam Emma Tyler Mary E l i zabeth Vose Jean Margaret Watson F rances Weiss Barbara Annette Weston I rene Core Woodford Dorothy Nellie Woods Florence Concordia Young Nine ty-eight

Fort Fai rfield Fairfield Columbia Falls Houlton A ugusta Waterville Clinton East Madison, N . H. Farmington Head Tide East Boothbay South Portland East Lynn, Mass. Waterville Waterville Ashland Oakland Pittsfield North Jay Brooklyn, N . Y. Walnut Hill Oakland Melrose H ighlands, Mass. West Boylston, Mass. Hallowell Waterville Pittsfield Fort Fairfield Houlton P ortsmouth, N . H. Raynham Center, Mass. Waterville D ryden Waterville W i lton Lawrence, Mass. Augusta South Vernon, Vt. Caribou Houlton Portland Madison Waterville Waterville B rockton, Mass.


Sop homore Class History " May she e'er be proud to guide us Dear Colby, the Blue and Gray, To the goal she has set before us, A beacon along l ife's way." For the best "all-round" class, we of 1 929 far excel. In athletics, i n stu d ies, i n social activities, i n loyalt y t o o u r beloved Alma Mater, i n c l ass spirit, and in talent we outstrip the others. We are exceedingly proud of our class, nor a re we le::.s proud of our Hoc key Championship, a nd loyal " rooters . " T h e "greenness" a n d "dumbness" of last year h a s d isappeared. Al­ though o u r class spirit was excellent last year it has i ncreased ten-fold this year . Our n umber i s not q u ite as large as formerly, but the quality i s j ust as fine and strong. Our t asks and responsibilities have increased. Among them i s that of helping to "bring up" the ignorant ones of 1 930. N o more do we open doors and serve all u pperclassmen, no more do we dance attendance at a superior's command-we, i nstead, are served, and give commands. We are confident that each year will increase our abilities, our use­ f ulness, and our fame. For the next two years we w i l l all strive for higher i deals, so that we may g raduate as the " prize class" of our own Colby.

Ninefly-ninie


FRE S H M A N CLASS OFFICERS President l ice-Presideti t Secreta ry- Treasurer

I SA B UBAR P UTNAM ELIZABETH R ICHARDSON B ECKETT MARGARET P AULINE H ALE

Freshman Class Roll Lou i se May A rmstrong Alice H oughton Bagley Kathleen Bail ey Pauline Bakeman H elen Baker Dorothy Carolyn Balentine E l i zabeth Richardson Beckett Charlotte Hooper Bennett Viola L u lene B lake E lizabeth J anette Bottomley Avie E sther B rawn Helen Woodford B righam P a u l i ne Kathleen Brill Albert a Louise B rown Edvia Veronica Campbell Helen Alice Chase Vi rgin i a C h ristie B lanche Cohen B eatrice Merrill C u n n ingham D orothy Dean Mabel E rl a Dolliff D orothy Mae D onnelly M u riel Iris Farnum Alma W i nifred Glidden Marian Gordon M a ry Louise G rearson

Waterville Portland Farmington Peabody, Mass. Fry b u rg Shawmut Calais La T'uq ue, Q uebec Winslow Pittsfield Thomaston Concord, Mass. East Waterboro Waterville Caribou Houlton Fort Fairfield N ew York C ity Caribou Woodfords W i nslow Waterville W ilton Waterville Portland Calais One hundred cme


Verna Mu riel Green Evelyn Grindall E velyn Mae Hale Margaret Pauline Hale Ruth Elizabeth Hawbolt Mina Al len Higgi ns Carol Gertrude Hill Helen Joyce Hobbs Maxine Hayden Hoyt Dorothy E. Hutchins Harriet J ohnson Helen Avis Ki mball Claire Emma Kyle Barbara Libby Jean Marie Macdonald Evelyn Jewett Maxwell Helen Elizabeth McGillicuddy Marj orie Mary McLaughlin Mary T' . McNamara Baroara M illiken Rena Joy Mills E l izabeth Delahay M iner Margaret Glady Mooers Pauline Annie Beatrice Morin Beatrice Mullen Ruth Agnes Park Lucy E lla Parker Helen Jane Paul Mary Ch ristine Petke M i ldred Margaret Pone F rance Iola Preble Isa Bubar Putnam E velyn F rances Rollins Mary Evelyn Rol lins Ethel Ruth Rose Claudia Rouse Vivian Fern Russell M i riam E dith Sanders Ida Pauli11e Smith Thelma M . Snow Barbara Arline Taylor_ Frances Elizabeth Thayer Mary Thayer Louise Susie Thomas M i riam Jane Thomas Mary Kilburn Wasgatt Althea Mary Wheeler Lucille Norine Whitcomb Arlene B u rrill Williams E dith Woodward Vesta V. York Ruth F rances Young O ne hrund1¡ed two

Dover-Foxcroft Waterville ¡ Caribou Caribou Portland Denny vill'e Fort Fairfield Hope Phillips Waterv ille Fort Fai rfield N orth Va alboro Waterville Albion Calai Fairfield Tu rner Falls, Mass. Harmony Maynard, Ma s. Corinna Caribou Calais Caribou Ashland Corinna Fairfield Winterport Fort Fairfield Winslow Houlton Richmond Danforth Winslow Fai rfield Waterville Waterville A ugusta Presq ue Isle Winslow Atkinson Harmony Waterville Waterville Waterville Camden Rockland Millinock et Farm ington Waterville Boothbay Harbor Mars Hill Camden


Freshman C lass History F reshmen enter Colby every year, and each c lass thinks it is better than the one before. This year the c ase is diffe rent,-we know we are bette r than any previous class. Our class i s start ing with good Colby fundamental ideals and hopes t o work u p to a grand finale before we start o ut on l i fe's seas in 1930. Col lege means a great deal to us, and we are confident that each member will enter all act ivities whole-heartedly, thus keeping the faith and trust Colby puts in us. Our F reshmen D ays m ay well be written Fre hman Daze, yet we have not m issed the real aim of college, which is to s ec u re an adequate education to help us in our l ife work.

G raduate Student E mily Redington Heath

Waterville

Special and Unclassified Dorothy Irene Carter Theora Doe E sther Libby Grace M orrison Gladys Leola Weed Jo Longfellow P attangal l

Fairfield Waterville D exter Waterville Waterville W aterville

One hundred three


F R AT E R N I T I E �

� D R D R I T I E:!:J


8"

ti>

"I

c

F ront Row :

Second Row :

Third Row :

Fourth Row :

D E L T A K A P P A E P S I LO N

Cooke, D rummond, A . Jordan, M acomber, Rood, Fourcade, Lovett

D. A l l ison, Stickney, A nthon y , Record, W i l l i ams, Sturhahn, G. A l l ison

Megquire, Cole, Good, C. Jordan, M i lleT, George, D yer

T up per, Dexter, D avidson, Ford, Thiel, Seekins, Gould

l? (AA)

�l�

@


Delta Kapp a E p silon Founded at Yale U niversity, 1 844 Colors-A zure, G ules a nd Or

ROLL OF C H A P T E R S Y a le U n i versity Bowdoin Col lege C o l by College A mh erst College Van d erbi l t U n i ve rs i ty U n i versity of A la b a m a B rown U n iversity U n i ve rs it y of N orth C arol i n a U niversity of V i rg i n i a M i a m i U niversity K enyon Coll ege D a rtmouth College Central U niversity of K entucky M i d dl eb u ry C ollege Uni versity of M i c h i g a n W i l l ia m s College L a f a yette C ollege H amilton College Colgate U niversity College of the C ity of New York U niversity of Rochester Rutgers Col lege D e Pauw U n i vers ity

1844 1844 1846 1846 1 847 1847 1850 1851 1 8 52 1852 1853 1 853 1854 1855 1 855 1855 1856 1 8 56 1 856 1 856 1 856 1861 1 866

W e sle yan U n iversity Rensselaer P o l ytechnic A delbert College Cornell Un iversity Chicago U n iversity Syrac use Un iversity Columbia University University of C a l iforn i a Trin ity Col l ege Un iversity of M i n nesota M a ssachusetts I n stitute of Tech. T u l ane Un iversity Toronto U n iversity Un ivers ity of Pennsylvania M c G i l l U n i versit y L e l a n d Stanford, J r . , U n i versity U niversity of I l l inois Un iversity o f W i sconsin U n i versity of W ashington Un iver ity of Texas Un iversity of Lo ui si ana U n i ve rsity o f M a n itoba

1867 1867 1867 1870 1870 187 1 1874 1877 1879 1 889 1890 1898 1 898 1 899 1900 1901 1904 1906 1910 1912 1922 1 926

One hitndred seven


[

�·

ci �

F ront Row :

Second Row :

Third Row :

Fourth Row :

ZETA PSI

H a rdy, Pierce, Howl and , U. C. Cowing, E d munds, DeO rsay, J. Nelson, Baird, H i lton

Sample, D ' A m ico, West, C. Nelson, Foote, Snow, Lomba rd, W i lson, C l a rk

C. A . Cowing, Cam pbell , Twade!le, Walker, H i ggi ns, H awes, H onan

W i l mot, T. Cowing, Johnson, T u rner, Gron d i n , Simmons

[? (MJ

�fi)

@


Zeta Psi Founded a t N e w York University, 1 847 Colo1'S- White and Blue

R OLL O F C HA P T E R S N ew York U n i ve r s i ty W i l l i a m s College R u tgers Coll ege U niversity of Pennsylvania Colby College B rown Un"iversity Tufts Coll ege L a f ayette Col l ege U niversity of N o rt h C a ro l i n a U n i vers ity of M ich igan Bowdoin College U n i ve rs it y of V i rg i n i a C o r n e l l U n i versity U niversity of C a lifornia S y r a c u se U n iversity

1 847 1848 1 84 8 1 850 1 850 1 852 1 85 5 1 857 1 858 1 858 1 868 1 868 1 869 i 870 1875

U niversity of Toronto Columbia U n i versity M c Gi l l U nivers ity C a se School of A p p l ied S c ience Yale University L e l a n d Stanford U n i versity U n i versity of M i nnesota U n ivers ity of I l l i n o i s U n i ve rsity of W i scons i n D artmouth Coll ege U n iversity of W a s h i ngton University of Manitoba So. Branch of U ni v. of California U n i versity of B r it i s h Col u m b i a

1 879 1 879 1 883 1 88 5 1 889 1891 1 899 1 909 1910 1 920 1 920 1921 1 924 1 926

One luu 1u:fred nine


i

R.

� §.t1i

·O �

D E LTA U P S I LO N

Front Row : Not in picture :

Anderson, R. Fotter E. B. Mc Kay

G . Getchel l , B . C . Getchel l , S h ibles, T . S m a rt, J. S m art

B.

T. E mery, Fowler, S a ucier, C. E mery,

Keay, An d rews, H. Tufts, T u p per, M c Donald, S p rague, Johnston, L a V igne

Carson, Clough, W . Tufts, K l usick, Thornton, Bacon, M a rshall, A shmore, J. Tufts

H . Fotter, Baldwin, Davis, Bagn a l l , E . H . M c K ay, H e al , N iziolek, Ham mond

Second Row :

Third Row :

Fourth Row :

��

�J

��

\ �\

(? (Ml

��

@J


Delta U p silon Founded at W i l l i a m s College, 1 8 34 Colors-Old Golcl a ncl A z u re Blue

R OLL OF C HAPTERS Williams Union H a m i lton A m herst Wes tern Reserve Wesleyan Colby Rochester M i d d l ebury Bowdoin R u tge rs Colgate N e w York M iami B rown Cornell M a rietta Syracuse M ichigan N orth western H a rvard W isconsin Lafayette Columbia Lehi gh T u fts

1834 1 38 1 847 1 47 1 847 1 50 1 52 1 52 1856 1 57 1 5 1 65 1 65 1868 1 6 1 69 1 70 1873 1876 1880 18 1 1885 1 885 1 885 18 5 1886

D e Pauw Penn ylvania M i nnesota Technolog y warthmore S tanford C a l iforn i a McGill ebraska Toronto Chic ago O h i o State I l linois W a s h i ngton Pennsylvania State I owa State Purdue Indiana C a rnegie Kansas O regon Virg inia M issouri I owa D artmouth O k l a homa

188G 1 888 1890 1 89 1 1 894 1896 1896 1 898 1898 1899 1 90 1 1 904 1 905 1910 1911 1913 1914 1915 1917 1 920 1921 1 922 1 924 1 925 1 926 1 926

One hundred eleven


{'>

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{'>

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§

.,,..

0

Front Row :

Second Row :

Third Row :

Fou rth Row :

P H I D E L TA T H E T A

N ot i n picture :

P a pe, An derson,

Shaw,

G rindle

Flahive , Copp, M i ttelsdorf, Mathers, Staunton, Roy, Prescott

F raser, Mc Croary, Stiegler , G rearson, R icci, Towne, Richa rdson, Bernha rdt

H a nsen, F iedler, Shanahan, Grady, Lufki n , Gi les, Sa nsone

Quinton, Giuffra, H atch, Chester, Weed, M aguire, Weaver, Theberge

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R O L L OF C H A P T E R S

M i a m i U n i versity I n d i a n a U n i versity Centre Col lege W a b a s h College U n i versity of W i scon sin N orthwestern U n i versity B utler College Wesleyan U n i ve rs i ty F ra n k l i n Col lege H an over College U n i versity of M ic h i ga n U n i ve rs i ty of C h icago D e Pauw Un iversity Ohio U n iversity U niversity of M issouri Knox Coll ege U n i versity of Georgia Emory C o l lege I owa Wesleyan College M ercer Col lege Cornell Un i versity Lafayette College U n i versity of C a l ifo r n i a U n i ve rs i ty of V i rgi n i a R a n do l p h - M acon College U n i versity of Nebraska Pennsylvania College Was h i n gton and Jefferson College A kron U n iven:ity Vanderbilt U n i versity Lehigh U n iversity U n i vers ity of A l a b a m a Lombard College A l ab a m a Polytec h n i c I n stitute A l legheny Coll ege U n i versity of Vermont D icki nson Col l e ge Westminster College U niversity of M i n nesota U n i versity of I ow a U n i vers i ty of K a n s a s Sewanee College O h i o St a te U n iversity U n iversity of Texas

1 849 1 849 1 850 1 850 1857 1 859 1 859 1 860 1860 1861 1864 1 865 1 86 1 868 1870 1871 1871 1871 1871 1 87 2 1 87 2 1 873 1 73 1 873 1 874 1 875 1 875 1875 1 875 1 87 6 1 876 1877 1 878 1879 1879 1 879 1880 1 880 1 88 1 1 882 1882 1 883 1 883 1883

U n iversity of Penn ylvania Un ion College Colby College Columbia U n i versity D a rtmouth College U n iversity of North C a rolina W i l l i am s College Sout hwestern U n i ve r sity S yracuse Un iversity W ash ington a n d Lee U n i ve r ďż˝ ity Am h erst College Brown Un iversity Tulane Univers ity W a s h i n gton U n iversity Lela n d Stanford Un iversity Purdue Un ivers ity U n i vers ity of I l li n o i s Case School of A pp l ied Science University of C incinnati U n i versity of Washi ngton Un iversity of Kentucky McGill U niversity U n i versity of Col orado Georgia School of Technology Pen nsylvan i a State College Un iversity of Toronto U n iversity of South D a kota Un iversity of I d a h o W a shburn College U niversity of O regon Colorado College Iowa State College Un iversity of orth D akota W h itman Col lege De nison College U n i ve r ity of Utah U niversity of O kl a homa Colgate U n iversity O regon Agricultural College U n i versity of P i ttsburgh State Co11ege of W a shington S wa rthmore College K a n s a s State College Colorado State College U n i versity of M ontana U n i versity of Southern California Southern Method i s t College U n iversity of A rizona U niversity of Florida Univ. of Calif. ( S outhern B r a nc h )

1 883 1 883 1 884 1 884 1 884 1 885 1 886 1 886 1 887 1 887 1 888 1 889 1 889 1891 1891 1893 1893 1 896 1 898 1 900 1901 1 902 1 90 2 1 902 1 904 1906 1906 1 908 1910 1912 1913 1913 1913 1914 1914 1914 1 9 18 1918 1918 1918 1 9' 18 1918 1 920 1 920 1 920 1 9 22 1 923 1 923 1 924 1 924

One hu ndred thirteen


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A L P H A TAU O M E G A

Not in Picture :

R. MacLeary, P. M ac Leary

John ston, T. T'refethen, Peacock, M ac P herson, O ' Donne l l , E . Johnson, Baker, N ickerson, Berry

J . Trefethen, Candqlet, Lord, Nee, E rickson, H a rlow, M ac Lean, Cal l aghan , Fo1ey

Fi rst Row :

Scott, Payson, C . Godd ard, Carlson, Tra i nor, Tier ney, Chapin, Davis

Second Row :

Trimm, R. Godd a r d , G. Johnson, R. Brown, Lee, H a rding, Stinchfie l d , A ustin

T hird Row :

Fou rth Row :

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Al p ha Tau Omega Founded a t Virginia M ilitary Institute, 1 8 65 Coiors-Sky B l ue and Old G o ? d

R OL L OF C H A P T E R S V i rg i n i a Beta V i rg i n i a Delta North C a rol i n a Xi Ten nessee P i Ten nessee O mega Georgia A l ph a Beta orth C a r o l i n a A l p h a Delta Alabama A lp h a E p s i l on Georgia A l ph a Beta Pennsylva n i a T a u Georgia A l ph a T h eta Pennsyl v a n i a Alpha I ota M i c h i ga n A l p h a M u O h io A l ph a u Pen nsyl v a n i a A l p ha P i N ew Y ork A l ph a O m icron Pe n n syl v a n i a A l pha Rho Ten nessee A l pha Tau Pennsylva n i a A l ph a U p il on O h i o A l p h a Ps i F l o r i d a Al p ha O mega I owa Beta A l ph a A l ab a m a B eta Beta M a ssach usetts Beta G a m m a A l ab a m a B eta Delta Louisiana Beta E p si1on Vermont Beta Zeta O hio Beta E t a Ne w York B e t a Theta M i chi g a n Beta K a p p a M i chi ga n B et a L a m b d a G e o r g i a B e t a I ota South C a rol i n a Beta X i M ic h i g a n Beta O m icron Tennessee Beta Pi M a i n e Beta U p s i l o n O hio B eta O mega Maine Gamma A l p h a M assach usetts G a m m a Beta Indiana Gamma Gamma Tennessee B e t a T a u R h o d e I s l a n d G a m m a Delta I l l inois G a m m a Zeta Nebraska Gamma Theta

1865 1 868 1 72 1872 1877 1878 1 7 1879 1878 1 881 1 881 1 l 1 81 1 82 1882 1 82 18 2 1882 1882 1 883 1884 1885 1885 1 885 1885 1887 1887 1887 1 888 1 888 188 1888 1889 1889 1889 1 889 1891 1892 1 893 1894 1894 1894 1 894 1895

Texa G amma Eta a l iforn i a Gamma I ota O h i o Ga m m a K a p pa Colorado Gamma Lambda K a n s a s Gamma M u M i n nesota Gamma N u I l l i nois Gamma X i I nd i a n a Gamma O m icron Wash ington Gamma Pi M i ssouri Gamma R ho M a ssach usetts Gamma Sigma W i sconsin Gamma Tau I owa Gamma U p silon Kentucky M u Iota O regon Gamma Phi a l i fornia Beta Psi W ashin gton Gamma Chi Wyom ing Gamm a P si Penn syl vania Gamma Omega I owa Delta Beta O regon Alpha S igma I n d iana Delta A l ph a ew H a m p shire Delta Delta Colorado Delta Eta Ohio Beta Rho M i ssouri Delta Zeta New York Delta G a m m a T e x a s D e l t a E p silon K a n s a s Delta Theta O kl a homa Delta K a p p a N e v a d a De l ta I ota N o rth D a kota Delta N u O hio Del t a Lambda Ne w York Delta M u Pennsylva n i a D e l t a P i I owa Delta O mi c ron I n d i a n a Delta Rho M ontana Delta Xi Ne w H a m p s h i re Delta Sigma M a ryla n d Psi C a l iforn i a Delta Phi I da h o Delta Tau South Da kota Delta U ps ilon

1 897 1897 1 900 1901 1901 1 902 1 903 1903 1 904 1905 1906 1 907 1 908 1 909 1910 1911 1911 1913 1913 1915 1915 1915 1917 1917 1917 1?18 1 91 9 1919 1 920 1 921 1921 rn22 1922 1 922 1 923 1 923 rn2a 1 9 24 1 924 1 924 1 926 1 926 1 92()

One hu nd1¡ed fifteen


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Second Row :

Third Row :

Fou rth Row :

LA M B DA C H I A L P H A

Ayer, Lawson, Taylor, M a xwel l , Pierce, S. C. B rown, N esbitt, And rews

O ' B rien, Whi ttier, Chandler, M u ir, Laughton, McCubrey, C. H i nes, H a nnifen, Ros

M a n n , Rol l ins, W. J. B rown, Mi ller, Snyder, Treworgy, M a xcy, Al len, K. H i nes

Wi lson, H atfiel d , Ch ristie, Rogers, Phippen, McDouga l , Batson, Brackett, H en ry

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Lambda Chi Alp ha Founded at B oston University i n 1 9 0 9 Colors-Purple, G reen a ncl G old R O L L OF C HA P T E R S Bos ton U n i versity M a ssachusetts A gricu1tura1 Co1J ege U n i vers ity o f Pennsyl v a n i a Pennsylva n i a State Col lege B rown U n i ve rs i ty M assachusetts I nstit ute o .f Tech. U n i versity o f M a i n e U ni versity of M ichigan Rlutgers U n i versity B uckne1 1 U n i versity Worcester Polytechnic I n s titute Cornell U n i versity U n i versity of C a 1 if o rn : a W a s h i ngton State Co1l ege R hode I s l a nd State College D a rtmouth College L o u i s i a n a State U n i versity D e P a uw U n i versity U niversity o f I l l i n o i s A l ab a m a Polytec h n ic I n stitute K n ox ColleP-e U n i ve rs i ty o f Georgia Un ion College P u r d u e U n i versity Bu t l er College U n i vers ity o f S outh D a kota H a rv a rd U n i ve rs i ty Colgate U n i versity N o rthwestern U n i versity O regon A gricultural Coll ege University of W i sconsin C u m be r l a n d U n i ve rsity U n i ve r s i ty o f A l a b a m a Missouri School of M i nes U n i ve rs i ty o f D e n ve r

1909 1912 lal2 1912 1912 1912 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1914 1 9 '14 1914 1914 1915 1915 1915 1915 1915 1915 1915 1915 1916 1916 1916 1917 1917 1917 1917 1917 1917 1917

I n d i a n a Un iversity U nivers ity of Texas Iowa State College O klahoma A. a n d M. Col lege Franklin and M a r s h a l l College Syracuse Un iversity New H am pshire State College Un ivers ity of R ichmond Ohio U n iversity Wabash Col lege Western Reserve Un iversity Colby Coll ege U n iversity of W a s h i ngton U n iversity of A k ron U n i versity of C i n c i n n a t i U niversity of P i ttsburgh W a s h ington and Jefferson Coll ege De niso n U n i versity U n i versity of Chicago U niversity of Nebraska S o uthern Methodist Un iversity Washington a n d Lee U niversity Vanderbilt Un iversity Colorado A gricultural College M ic h i ga n A gricultura l College H am i lton College North Carol i n a State Trinity Coll ege K a n s a s A gricultura l College U n iversity of O kl a h o m a U n i versity of M i ssouri U n i versity of North Carol i n a Lehigh Un iversity W i l l i am and M a ry C ol l e ge

1917 1917 1917 1917 1917 1918 1918 1918 1918 1918 1918 1918 1918 1919 1919 1919 1919 1919 1920 1921 1921 1 92 2 1 9 22 1 922 1922 1 923 1 923 1 923 1923 1!:}24 1 9 26 1 926 1 926 1 9 27

One hitncl11¡ed seventeen


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K A P P A D E LTA R H O Fou rth Row : Third Row : Second Row : F ront R uw :

Miller, Nelson, Ch ute, Mil lett, Boothby, Peakes, Benson, C a rter, H a rlow Tanner, Stinneford , L. Tu rner, C assens, Lee, K ronquist, Irvine, N asse, H ooper Corbett, Mosher, Bai ley, Stinchfiel d , Jones, H u rlburt, Cobb, Tripp, Tattersall Cadwallader, F . T u rner, Adams, Rhodes, Smith, Waugh, Bennett


Ka pp a Delta Rho Founded at Middleb u ry Col lege, 1 90 5 Colors-Blue a nd Orange

ROLL OF CHAPTERS M i d d lebury C o l l ege Corne l l U n iversity New Y ork State Teachers' Col lege Colgate U n iversity F r a n k l i n College P e n n s y l v a n i a State Col le ge U n i versity of I l l i nois

1905 1913 1915 1917 1919 1 920 1921

B ucknell U n i versity P u rdue Un iversity O hio State Un iversity U n iversity of C a l ifo rn i a U n iversity of M ichigan U n iversity of I n d i a n a Colby Col lege

1 9 2. 1 1921 1922 1924 1925 1 926 1 926

One hundred nineteen


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T H E L A N C E R S C LU B

McKeen, Condon , Knofski , Knox, Caulfield, H. Clark, A riel A l le n , Riley, Crummett, Fi nnemore, Ful lerton , Wa rren

Second Row :

F ront Row :

Livingstone, Littlefiel d , E gert, Uppstrom, Ryder , Van Tassel

Third Row :

F ou rt h Row : Ca rpenter, Clements, Corey, Martin, Peterson , Katkosky, Walsh

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The Lancers Club Founded at Colby College, 1 924 Colors-Ma roo n and Silve 1¡

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Salmond, A l l e n, Weston, Leighton, Goodwi n , B utler, Daye, Young, Tilton, R. Daggett

Whitcomb, H athaway, M. Sanborn, J. Chase, Dearborn, B rown, D . Daggett, Bakeman, Brigham, Dea n, Bail ey

G ross, Merrick, Nea l , H a tch, W y m a n , P ut n a m , Rideout, Dud ley, Blake, Sylvester, V entres

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ROLL OF CHAPTERS Colby C ol lege B oston Un iversity S yracuse U n i versity George W a s h lngton U n i ve r s i ty I l l i n oi s Wesleyan U n i versity U n iversity of I l l i n oi s U n i versity of Denver Un iversity of C a l i fornia U n iversity of W a s h i ngton M i d d l eb u ry Col lege Un iversity of K a n sa s J ackson Col l ege L e l a n d S ta nford , J r . , U n iversity R andolph- M acon W o m a n 's College Southern M et h o d i s t U n iversity University of I n d i a n a O regon A gricultural C ol l ege R hode I s l a n d S tate Coll ege O h i o Sta te U n i versity

1 874 1 904 1 905 1906 1906 1906 1 90 1910 1910 1911 1913 1913 1915 1917 1917 1917 1918 1919 1919

Un ivers ity of W i scon sin Florida State College for Women U niversity of B uffalo W ash ington State Coll ege U n i versity of Tennessee Icwa State College Cornell Un iver ity Un iversity of M i n nesota U niversity of Louisville Miami Un ivers ity University of Nebraska A delphi Col lege U niversity of M ichlgan Un iversity of M onta n a U ni' e rsity of Iowa U n i versity of California O h i o Wesleyan Un iversity V a nderbilt University W stmi nster College

1919 1920 1 920 1921 1921 1921 1921 1 92 1 1 922 1922 1 923 1 923 1 9 24 1 924 1924 1 924 1 9 25 1926 1 926

One h undred twenty-three


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Rose, P i erce, Cadwallader, Knudsen, Rice, H annaford, Lewis, H a1 1

Richardson, Tozier, M acdonal d , A d a i r , Sawyer, Morri son, Kyle

Front Row :

0.

W il li ams, Donnelley, Libby, Coombs, Sylvester, Grearson, M iner, C. Rich a rdson, Towle

Collins, Baker, H ol t,

Bagley, Rollins, Wa sgatt, Henderson, Watson, F o x , P a r k , Kimball, Her rick, Mer rick

Second Row :

Third Row :

Fourth Row :

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Chi Omega Fou n d e d at t h e Unive rsity of Arka nsas, 1 8 9 5 Col o rs-Ca rd inal a nd St ra w

ROLL O F C HA P TE R S U niversity o f A rkansa T r a n s yl v a n i a College R an d ol p h - Macon W om a n 's College U niversity of M ississippi T u la n e U niversity, Newcomb College Un iversity of Ten nessee U niversity of I l l i n o i s N o r t h western Un iversity U niversity of W i scons i n Un iversity of C a l ifo r n i a U ni versi ty of K a n s a s U n iversity of Nebraska U n iversity of Texas West V i rg i n i a University U niversity of W a s h ington U ni versity of Colorado Co lby College D i c k i n son Coll ege F l o r i d a State College U niversity of W as h i n gton U n i versity of O regon Tufts Coll ege Syracuse Un i versity O h io U n iversity M i a m i Un iversity U n iversity of Mi ssouri U niversity of C i n c i n n a t i Coe College U n i versity of U t a h K e n t ucky S t a te U n iversity N e w H am ps h ire Col lege Lela n d S t a n ford U n iversity K a n s a s State A gricultural Coll ege S outhern M et hodist College Cornell U n iversity O regon A gricultu r a l Col l ege O hi o S t a te U n iversity U n i ve r s i ty of O k l a ho m a U n iversity o f C h a t t a n ooga

1895 1897 1899 1 899 1 900 1900 1900 1901 1 902 1 90 2 1 902 1902 1904 1905 1905 1 906 1 906 1 907 1 908 1 908 1 909 1910 1911 1913 1913 1913 1913 1914 1914 1914 1915 1915 1915 1916 1917 1917 1918 1 9 18 1918

Swarthm ore College U nive rsity o f P e n nsylvan i a I owa State University P ur d ue Un i versity P ittsbu rgh Un iversity Hollins College O k l a homa A gricultural a n d Mechanical Coll ege M ontana State Col lege D rake U n iversity U n i ve rsity of M i n nesota W i l l i a m and Mary College U n i versity of M a ine Un iversity of A labama U n i versity of Georg ia Rhode I s l a n d S tate Coll ege Southwestern P resbyte rian U n iversity H unter College U n i versity o f I n d iana Iowa St ate College University of A rizona U ni versity of N o i¡th Carol ina University of Maryland S o u thern B r anch of U n iversity of Cal ifornia State Coll ege of W a shington A labama Polytechn i c I n st i t ute University of N orth D a kota M arietta College Louisia n a S tate U niversity U n i versity o f South D a kota W i ttenberg College O gl ethorpe University H i llsdale Col l ege U n i versity of N e w M exico Westminster College Ohio Wesleyan Col lege Michigan State Coll ege Pennsylva n i a State College

1919 1919 1919 1919 1 920 1920 1 920 192i 1921 1921 1 92 1 1921 1 922 1 922 1 922 1 922 1 922 1 922 1 923 1 923 1 923 1923 1 923 1 9 Z3 1 924 1 924 1 924 1 924 1924 1 924 1 925 1 925 1 925 1 925 1 9 25 1 9 26 1 9 26

One htundred twenty-five


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DE LTA D E LTA DELTA

Root, Clement, Decker, H o ll and , F letcher, Nason, Robinson, Ham, S prowl

Downs, He rsey, Cam pbe l l , Ch ristie, Dearborn, H i l l , Ba rtlett, Preble

H erron, L u n n , J acobs, H ight, Thayer, S a nders, M a rs h a l l

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Delta Delta Delta Founded at Boston Uni ersity, 1 888 Colors-Sil ve1·, Gold a nd B l ue

R OLL OF CHAPTERS Boston U n iversity S i m pson Coll ege Knox College A d r i a n C o l lege St. L awrence U n i versity of Cincinnati U n i vers i ty of Vermont U n i versity of M in nesota U niversity of Nebraska B aker U n i versity N o rt hwestern Un iversity Syrac use U n i versity O h i o State U n i versity U n i versity of W i scon sin Go u ch er College U n i versity of C a l ifo rnia B ucknell U n iversity U n i ve r s ity of Iowa U n i ve r s ity of Pennsylva n i a R a n d o l p h - M acon W o m a n 's College T ransyl v a n i a U niversity Colby C ol lege D e P a u w U n i versity W as h i ngton State U n ivers ity U n iversity of C ol o r a d o U n iversity of O kl a h o m a U n i ve rsity of O regon A de l p h i College M i a m i U n iversity Southwe stern U n i versity V a n derbilt U n i versity Un iversity of Texas A m e s Col lege Doe College F ra n k l i n College W yomi n g U n i versity

1888 1889 1889 1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1894 1895 1896 1896 1896 1898 1903 1903 1904 1 904 1 90 5 1907 1 908 1 908 1 909 1910 1910 1910 1911 1911 1911 1911 1912 1912 1912 1912 1913 1913

Neva d a · Un iversity Cornell University Stetson Un i versity A rkansas Un iversity D ru ry Col lege B rena u College Hollins o l l ege M t . Union Col lege University of M ichigan Un iversity of M i ssouri K a n s a s State College F lorida State College Pittsburgh Un iversity Southern Methodi st College M id d lebury College University of M a i ne I n d i a n a U n iversity O regon Agricultural College W a shi ngton State B utler College Transylvania College A l a b a m a Un iversity Colorado State Col lege Lel a n d Stanford , J r . , University Un ivers ity of I l l inois Uni versity of Southern C a l ifornia Whitman College Un iversity of Kentucky Un iversity of Tennessee O h i o Wesleyan University Southern B ranch of Un iversity of C a lifornia Un iversit v of M ontana W ashi ngt n Un ivers ity Un iversity of M i ss i s s i p p i

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1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1914 1914 1914 1915 1915 1915 1916 1916 1916 1917 1917 1 9 18 1918 1918 1918 1918 1919 1919 1 9 20 1 920 1921 1 923 1 923 1 923 1 925 1 926 1 926 1 926 1 926

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D . Deeth, P . Moore, M . M acCarn, A. Chase, S . B r azzell , E. Wolfe, D . P l a i sted

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S . Thomas, A . Glidden, V. Russe l l , R. Thompson, V . Philbrook, E . Libbey, R. W i l l i a m s , V . Day

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Alp ha Delta Pi Founded at Wesleyan Female College, 1 8 5 1 Colon;-Blue and White

ROLL OF C H A P T E R S N e wcomb C ol l ege, T u l a ne Univ. Southwestern U n ivers ity Lawrence College F l o r i d a S tate College B r e n a u Coll ege R a n d o l p h - M acon W o m a n ' s College T r i n i ty C ol l ege I ow a State Col lege U n i versity of I o wa U n i versity of Texas B oston U n i ve rs i ty U n iversity of I l l i nois U n i versity of K a n s a s W a s h ington S t a t e Co l lege H a nover Col lege W i ttenberg Coll ege U n iversity of C a l ifornia U n iversity o f Louisiana U n i ve r sity of O hi o University o f C ol orado U n i versity of M i ssouri Col b y Col l ege U n iversity of Nebraska

1 90 7 1 908 1 908 1 909 1910 1910 1911 1911 1911 1912 1912 1912 1912 1913 1913 1914 1914 1 9 14 1914 1 9 14 1914 1915 1915

Southern Methodist University Kansas State College University o f Washington H oward College U n iversity of P ittsburgh Un iversity of Tennessee University of O regon Un iversity of W i scon s i n Un iversity of N e w Mexico Okla homa Agr. and Mech. Coll ege O h i o State Un iversity George W a s h i ngton U n iversity Ohio Wesleyan University Un iversity of M i nnesota University of West V i r g i n i a Un iversity of S y racuse B utler College South B ranch of U n i v. o f Cal if . U n iversity of Couthe r n C a l ifornia O regon Agricultural College Un iversity o f I n d i a n a U n iversity of Ch attanooga U n iversity of M i nn esota

1915 1915 1917 1919 1 920 1 920 1 920 1 920 1 920 1 921 1 921 1 922 1 923 1 923 1 9 24 1 9 24 1 925 1925 1 925 1 926 1 926 1 926 1 926

One hundred twenty-nine


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F ront Row :

Second Row :

Third Row :

Fou rth Row :

P H I MU

M ayo, Fife, F a rnsworth, Ellis, D unstan, Main, H. Stone, Rogers, Can d age

H uff, Tyler, H ale, Hoyt, M. Stone, M ooe rs, Doll off, Mosher

W a rburton, H i ggins, Stone, Ginn, Boulter, Fi fiel d , Plaisted , Hobbs

Foster, Dodge, Desmond , S ho r t, B uc k man, P al me r , A me s, Hawbolt

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Phi Mu Founded at Wesleyan College, 1852 Colors-Old R o-se and White

ROLL OF C H A P T E RS H o l l i n s C o l l ege Sophie N e wcomb Co llege U niversity of Tennessee Southwestern U n i versity R a n d o l p h - M acon Woman's College Bren a u Coll ege U n ivers ity of New M exico A k ron U n i versity Un i versity of M a i ne H a nover College K n ox Coll ege W h it m a n Col lege O h io State U n iversity U n iversity of Texas U n i ve rs ity of M i ssouri A delphi Coll ege Mill s a p s Coll ege L a wrence Coll ege I owa Wesleyan Col lege George W a sh i n gton U n i versity Un iversity of Southern C a l ifornia B a ke r U n iver si.ty Southern Methodi st U n i versity U n i versity of C a l iforn i a U n i versity of W a s h ington

1 904 1 906 1 908 1 908 1910 1910 191 1 1912 1912 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1914 1914 1914 1915 1915 1915 1916 1916 1917

Colby Col l ege New H a m pshire State College U ni versity of W i scon s i n D ickinson Col l ege S¡warthmore College U n i ve rsity of I n d i a n a S yracuse U niversity Un iversity of Pittsburgh U n iversity of Georgia Un iversity of Nebraska Un iversity of I l l inois D r a ke University B ucknell College University of A rkansas U n i versity of O kl a homa W ashington Un iversity O h i o Wesleyan U ni versity H oward College U niversity of M i nnesota M i ddlebury College Un iversity of Iowa U niversity of M i s s i s s i p p i U n i ve rsity of O regon Ohio State U niversity

1918 1919 1919 1919 1919 1919 1 9 2.0 1 9 201 92 1 1921 1 921 1 922 1922 1 922 1 923 1 923 1 924 1 924 1 9 2'4 1 925 1 925 1 926 1 92.6 1 926

One humdred t h irty-one


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Jewett, Thomas, York, Black, Mc Evoy, Swift Pond, Bell, T r ue, Wolfe, Bragd a n , Pa rke r

Second Row :

F ront Row :

BETA C H I T H ETA M. Page, Woodward, Groesbeck, E. Page, Cone, Weiss

T h i r d Row :

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Beta Chi Theta Founded at Colby College, 1 924 Colors-Green a, nd Wh ite

One h u ndred th irty-three


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Phi Beta Kapp a Society Colby C hapter ( Beta of Maine ) Founded at William and Mary College in 1 7 7 6 Colors-Green QfYl,d WhVte

OFFI C E. RS FOR 1 926-1927 President

E rnest Cummings Marriner Secreta ry-Treasurer

Carl Jefferson Weber Executive C o m m ittee

Thomas B ryce Ashcraft Annie Harthorne Wheeler Helen Worster Springfield MEMBERS F ROM 1 926 MEN

Abbot E merson Smith Roger Adams Stinchfield Herbert McCoy Wortman

Donald Norris Armstrong Francis Fi rth Bartlett Donald Chester Freeman WOMEN

Mary M arguerite Albert Frances Christine Booth Agnes Julia B rouder Dorothy E lizabeth Farnum Hilda Mary Fife One hundred thirty-six

Adelaide Stone Gordon Imogene Frances Hill Agnes Elizabeth Osgood Mollie R0osevelt Seltzer Esther E lizabeth Wood


Pi Ka pp a Delta Founded at Ottawa University i n 1 9 1 2 Alpha Chapter o f Maine established i n 1 9 2 0 President

Marion Norton Rhoades

Vice-President

Charles Pembroke Nelson

S ecreta ry- T,rea s u rer

John Douglas Johnston M EMBERS F ROM 1927

Frank Thomas Adams

John Douglas Johnston

Ralph Thomas Flahive

William Alexander Macomber

Marion N orton R hoades M EMBERS F ROM 1928

Kennet h H a venor Cassens

A rt h u r Benj amin Levine

Gardner Dixon Cottle

C lyde Lyford Mann

Cecil E ugene Foote

Charles Pembroke N elson

George Holbrook Hawes

Law rence Asa Peakes

Leemont Roland Kelley

George Cheste r West One h undred thirty-se'ven


E p icureans C LASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED AND T WENTY-SIX

George Butler Barnes

Melville Graves Kilborn

Paul Mercier E'dmonds

John Staples Tibbetts

William Elmer Fagerstrom

Clarence Roland McLaughlin

James Bernard Sprague

C LASS OF N I NETEEN H UNDRED AND T WENTY-SEVEN

William Alexander Macomber

Carl Albert Anderson

Ralph Francis P rescott

Lester Raymond N esbitt

Warren Frank Edmonds

Horace True Trefethen

One hu ndred thi1·ty-eigh t


Druids C LASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN

Karl Maynard Rood

Richard Phi neas Staunton

A rcher Jordan , Jr.

Darrow Edgar N ickerson

John Atwood N elson

Evan C laes Johnson

Ulmont Cleal Cowing

C lement Frank Taylor

Clarence Emery, Jr.

Gwyeth Thorndike Smit h

Carl Al bert Anderson

Lester Raymond N esbit

C LASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT

Jo eph Lewis L ovett

John A lfred Trainor

John Albert Thiel

E lwood Jean Hammond

George Paul Bernhardt

Leo Wilfred MacDonald

Jack Joseph Ricci

Charles Mitchell Hannif en

Charles Pembroke Nelson

Philip Kenton M c C u brey

George C hester West

William Sta nley Tanner

William Forest MacLean

Donald H obbs Millett O n e lvundred t hirty-nine


Mystics C LASS O F N INETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN

Rowland Everett Baird John Fairfield Fowler Maynard Wa rren Maxwell Greeley Chapman P ierce

William Alexander Macomber John Douglass Johnston Waldo Lincoln MacPherson Richard Phineas Staunton

C LASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-EIG HT

Charles E dward Callaghan Edmond Frank Feidler Douglas Clifton Grearson Edwin Wallace Harlow

Leroy Miller Johnston Clyde Lyford Mann Charles Pembroke Nelson Jam es Keltie Tufts

C LASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED AND T WENTY-NINE

Walter Washburn Hinds Mayo Augustus Seekins Frank Edmond Chester John R ussell Richardson Cecil Garfield Goddard John Sten Carlson One hundred f arty

Alden Cecil Sprague Harvey George Fatter John Francis Moore Honan Philip Rufus H iggins Joseph D risko Allen Horace P ierce Maxcy


Up silon Beta C LASS O F N INETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN U l mont C l e a l Cowing C h a rl e s Henry E aton , J r . V incent P a t rick M athers E dga r R u ssell H owl a n d H a ro l d E ugene C a r son

A lphonse W il l i a m Lawson George Louis M ittlesdol'f Thom<.qs Fr anc i s O ' Donnel l A lbert Up ham Peacock W i l l i a m Edward P ierce, J r .

C LASS O F N INTEEN HUNDRED A N D TWENTY-EIGHT R a l ph H e rbert A yer Charles I r a B a g n a l l A ugustine A nthony D 'A mico E verett R i c h a r d D r u mmond Ja mes T homas M c Croary John Nelson E ri c kson

ecil E ugene Foote Louis P ierre F ourcade W a l ter F red Corbett Durward S awyer H e a l J ames M e r r i l l Laughton A ug u s t Frank Steigler

C LASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED A ND T WENTY-NI N E Reed Winter Davis George A l ph onso A llison, J r . F ra n k l y n Bedell Dexter J o h n E dward B a n y Francis harle Foley R i c h a r d E r i c Bensen GP.orge Francis Grady Webster J oh n ston B rown F rederick B abbidge Lee C a rl Taggett C lough Robert Walter Scott Ch a rles A lbert Cowing A rt h u r H e n r y Snyder

C LASS OF N INTEEN H UNDRED AND THIRTY H a rry O sgood A shmore C l i fton R o l fe B rown P a ul Lester D a vis W a l l a ce A l fred D onovan Karl R iester H ines H ar l a n d Llewell y n K e a y J oh n H e n r y L e e

W i l l i a m P a t rick Rogers Bernard C l i fton S h a w P h i l i o A l ston Stinchfield Dona-l d A l l ison E rn est Joseph Theberge A l le n T ur ne r A l de n H atch W ilmot

One hundred {01-ty-one


Ka pp a Phi Kapp a Founded at Dartmouth College in 1922 Delta of Colby E tablished in 1923 OFFICERS FOR 1926- 1 927

Frank Adams True Trefethen Leonard Finnemore J o eph Anderson E dward Colgan, M .A.

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Faculty Sponsor M E M BERS

Gwyeth Smith Almon Warren Justin Johnson Robert Waugh George Jones Alvarus B ennett Willis Herbert Kenneth Copp Gordon Welch Carl C ru mmett Arthu r Sanderson Clyde R ussell Professor Lowell Haines C HAPTER ROLL Un i versity of Penn ylva nia D a rtmouth College Lafayette College M iddlebury College U n i versity of Maine Syracuse U niversity Colby College Miami University W a sh ington and Lee University Gettysburg College College of W il l i am and M a r y A l l eghe College Wittenburg College D rake U n i versity J ames M i l l i ke n U niversity Wake Forest College E mery and H e nry College Un i versity of Pittsburgh B i r m i ngham Southern College Un iversity of Rochester H amline U n iversity

ny

O ne hu ndred forty-two


Delta Sigma Chi Founded at Colby C ol lege in 1923 OFFICERS FOR 1 926-1 927 Myrtle Main

President -Vice-President

Sylvia B razzel

Sec1¡eta"t-y-Troosurer

Bernice Green MEMBERS

M a rguerite Ames Frances B ragdon Sylvia B razzel E m il y Candage Davida C lark Martha Davis A my Dearborn Hilda D esmond Ava D odge Evie E ll i s E velyn E st ey Vera Fellows E velyn Foster D orothy Giddin gs Dorothy Gould Bernice Green

Katherine G reaney Lela Glidden Phyllis Ham Mona Herron Marion Jacobs Mildred MacCarn Myrtle Main Arl een Mann Helen M itchell Prudie M oore Lora Norcross Pauline Page Margery P ierce Florence P laisted Wenonah Pollard A ngie R eed

B etsy R ingdahl Caroline Rogers Helen Robinson Mabel R oot H enrietta R osenthal Martha Sandberg Marion Sprowl D orothy Sylvester Edna Turkington Grace Sylvester Edna True A rl een Warburton Ruth Williams E ma Wolfe Florence Wolfe A l i c e Wood One hw ndred .forfly-three


Kapp a Al p ha Founded at Colby in 1 898

Senior Society for Women

OFFICERS President

Florence Plaisted

Secretary

Evelyn Estey

Treasurer

Myrtle Main

MEMBERS Helen Robi nson

Julia Mayo

Helen Smith

Martha Davis

Frances Nason

Pauline Page

Dorothy Hannaford

Sylvia B razzel

M i riam Rice

Ardelle Chase Alexandrine Fuller

One hundred forty-fou r


Chi Gamma Theta Founded a t Colby i n

S op homore Society f o r Women

1900

S O RiO R E S IN U R B E Ed i t h C h ester Bertha Choate A l ice C l a r k i n Katherine D u n d a s G race Gra n t M a ri o n H ayden

K atherine H atch M a b l e Libby Fl o rence P reble Lois S m ith M a r ion S p r i n gfield A n nie Sweet

Bertha Teny Ma rgaret Totman C l ar a Weber Gl adys Welch M il dred W i ng

S O R O R E S E M E RI T A S Mary H ol l a n d Louise C h a p m a n Leonora H al l E rn a W olfe B a rb a r a F ife M arguerite Chase E sther K n udsen Phyllis H a m M i ld red M a c C a r n

Helen Stone D orothy G idd i n gs H ar r iett F l etcher Leola Clement R uth T ilton Cornelia A d a i r A m y Dearborn R uth H utchins M y r a Stone

D o rothy Daggett Emma Tozier M on a H e r ron M a rgaret D av i s M arjorie D un stan H el e n W y m an H a r r iett Towle A rl ee n W ar b u rton

SORORES I N COLLEGIO H a r r iett K i m b a l l M artha A llen Natalie D ow n s E li zabeth L ibby Grace Stone

B a r b a r a Weston L i l l i a n Collins E leanor L u n n L i l l i a n M orse H e ster F ifield

R uth D a ggett J e a n W a tson Ruth B artlett E l s i e Lewi s Annella Bucknam

One

hundred

f<Yrty-five


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Student Council Ulmont C leal Cowing

President

Maynard Warren Maxwell

Vice-President

William Alexander Macomber

Secreta ry-Treasv,rer

FRATERNITY REPRESENTATIVES William Alexander Macomber, ..l K E Frederick Elwood Baker, A T o Greeley Chapman Pierce, z TI Maynard Warren Maxwell, .\ K A Roland Sidney Fatter, A Y Charles Henry Eaton, Jr., K A P Ralph Thomas Flahive, TI A T Leonard Rossie Finnemore, A K William Nelson B lake, Non-Frat.

CLASS PRESIDENTS 1 927-Ulmont Cleal Cowing 1 928-Charles Pembroke Nelson 1929-Mayo A ugustus Seekins 1 930-Donald Edward A ll ison One hundred forf/y-eight


Student League President

Louise Jobson Chapman I rma Gertrude Sawyer Gla dys Mae B unker P hyllis Marie Ham Dean E rma Vyra Reynolds

Vice-President Secreta1!J T1·easurer Faculty A dviser

CLASS REPRESENTATIVES Arlene Smith Mann, '27

E lsie Hathaway Lewis, '29

R ut h Melvina McEv oy, '28

Helen Alice Chase, '30

The Student League of the Women's Division of Colby College was founded and given active powers by the faculty i n 1922. Its obj ect i s to regulate order and decorum among the women i n the dormitories a n d i n the Cit of Waterville. A l l women registered at Colby are members. Besides the active officers it has a n executive board consisting of Dean E rm a Reynolds, Louise Chapman, Irma Sawyer, Gladys B unker, and a representative from each of the fou r c lasses. The Student League has, besides its other m eetings, two regular meet­ i n gs a year, one i n the spring and one i n the fall to read the constitution a n d to make amendments. Ma s meetings are called by the president whenever n eeded. One hund:red f01·ty-nine


Young Men's Christian Association ¡

Herbert Crawford Jenkins

President

Lawrence Asa Peakes

Vice-President Secretary

Theodore Prescott E mery

Treas u rer

William Robert Lumbard

C HAIRMEN OF C O M M ITTEES Ca,m p us Service Me m bership a,nd Life Wiork

Charles N oah P inkham Lemuel Kingsbury Lord

Fioo, ncial

William Robert Lombard

Dep utation a nd Com m unity Service

Howard Douglass Fowlie

Ha ndbook

Lawrence Asa Peakes

Publicity

Theodore Nelson

Meetings

Gardner D ixon Cottle

One hiwulred fifty


Young Women �s Christian Association President Vice-President Secretary Treas urer Student Volunteer Rep1·esenta t i e U ndergr< duate Representative Assisva.nt Underg rrul :ua te Representati e L

Julia Dean Mayo Elisabeth B ul lard Gross Marj orie G race D u nstan Frances Melis a Nason Florence Concordia Young Estelle Margaret Pottle G race Allison Stone

C HAIRMEN OF COM M ITTEES Religious Meetings C o m m unity Se1·vice Conference Pu.b licif;y World Fellowship Music Social Mem bership Bible Study Town Girls

Julia A rdelle Chase E velyn M acDonald E stey Gladys Mae B u n ker Doris Louise Groesbeck E l la Lydia Vinal Arlene Smith Mann D orothy Isabel H annaford E lisabeth B ullard Gross Ruth E llsworth Dow D o rothy Daggett

One hundred fifty-one


Society of the Sons of Colby Bassford Case Getchell

President

CLASS OF NINETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN U lmont C leal Cowing Bassford Case Getchell Warren Frank E dmunds Archer Jordan, Jr. Barrett Gardner Getchell John Atwood Nelson Greeley Chapman Pierce CLASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT Everett Richard Drummond Elwood Jean Hammond Theodore Everett Hardy, .J r. George Holbrook Hawes Garth Colet Koc h

William Robert Lombard Donald Hobbs Millett Charles Pembroke Nelson Lawrence Asa Peakes Kent Newcomb P ie rce

CLASS OF NINETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-NINE Charles A lbert Cowing R ussell E ll is B utler Joseph B radbury Campbell Charles William Jordan Percy Fuller Williams, Jr. CLASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED A ND T HIRTY Carl Edgecomb Megquire George Arthur Andrews, Jr. William Thornton Cowing Ralph E rvin P ratt Nathan Tupper One hundred fiffly-two


Society of the D aughters of C olby Harriett Martha Fletcher

President

D orothy D aggett

Vice-President

C LASS OF N I N ETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN Florence A ppleton P laisted M i riam E lizabeth Rice Doris Cora Sanborn Julia Dean M ayo

Julia A rdelle Chase H arriett M a rtha Fletcher L eonora E dith Hall Helen Coburn Smith

CLASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT E m m a F rances Tozier Ruth M ildred Tilton Evelyn Floyd Ventres

Amy Dell Dearborn Helen E lizabeth Merrick M u riel E st es Lewis Dorothy D aggett

C LASS OF N INETEEN H UNDRED A ND TWENTY-NINE Ruth B a rt l ett M a rtha E loise Allen Virginia D u d ley Ruth Daggett M a ry Thayer

L ora Gertrude Neal Annie Goodwin Hooper M uriel Vaughan Sanborn Corona C urti s H atch M i ldred Anne R oberts

CLASS OF NINETEEN H U NDRED A ND T HIRTY Pauline B akeman Helen Alice Chase

Helen Kimball Isa Bubar P utnam E dith Woodward One h undred fifty-three


The Woman,s Health League Founded 1 9 2 1 Dorothy Giddings, '27

President Vice-President

Helen Wyman, '28

Secretary-Treasurer

Leola Clement, '27

HEALTH LEADERS

Ruth Dow, '27 Hilda Desmond, '28 Harriett Kimball, '29 Louise Grearson, '30

(}ne hwrufred fifty-fou1·


The Aroostook Club Helen M itchell

President

B etsy R i ngdahl

Vice-President Secreta 1'y-Treasurer

Mary Vose MEMBERS

Ardell e Chase Helen M itchell Frances B ragdon Betsy R i ngdahl R uth Thompson E velyn Bell Virginia D u dley Marian Ginn N eta Harmon Ethel Henderson Agat h a MacEacherean Alice P a u l M a ry Vose Jean Watson

E dvia Campbell Helen Chase V i rginia Christie Beatrice C u nn ingham Evelyn Hale Margaret Hale Carol Hill Harriet Johnston Rena Mills M argaret M ooers Pauline Morin Helen Paul Mildred Pond Miria m Sanders Vesta York One hm:n&red fifty-five


Colby Debating Society OFFICERS President V'hce-Presiclent Secretary-Tre;.a surer Man.a ger of Deb,ate

Lawrence Asa Peakes Charles Pembroke Nelson Gardner Dixon Cottle Marion N orton Rhoades

The Colby Debating Society enj oyed a very successful season last year. The squad was made up of many old men and several new ones. I n all there were about thirty on t h e entire squad. While t h e teams f o r Colby lost the first th ree debates, all of the rest of the Colby teams were victori­ ous. This year there are many of these veterans left t o aid in the season. Several of the m ore formidable opponents that were encountered last year were : University of Maine, University of Verm01;t, University of New H am pshire, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst College, and M iddlebury College. O n the whole, the season was very successful and there was quite a bit of material to work with this year.

One luu ndred fifty-six


Colby Press C lub O FFICERS President

F rederick E l wood Baker

Vice-President

A lvarus Frank Bennett

Secretm·y

Claire Jane Richardson

Treasurer

M i riam E lizabet h Rice

The Colby P ress Club is an organization formed on the campus last year for the purpose of maintaining a better spirit of co-operation among t he student publications. E ditors-in-chief, m anagers, and managing edi­ tors of a l l student p ub lications, and m embers of the class i n Journalism a re eligible to membershi p . D u ri ng the past year t here h a s been a decided i nt erest shown by those eligible t o membership, resulting i n a larger and more i n fl uential organiza­ tion. As a result of this club there has been a decided improvement i n the spi rit shown by the heads of the various student publications. It is hoped t hat t he club will continue i n future years the good work done this past year.

One hundred fifty-sev�n


Colby Athletic Association OFFICERS F O R 1 925 A N D 1 926 PresiJdent

Wal d o Lincoln MacPherson, '27

Secr1etary

John Nelson E rickson, '28

Treasurer

Dr. Thoma

Senior Councilman

Ulmont Cleal Cowing, '27

J wnior Councilman

John Nelson E rickson, '28

Facuity Representatives

B ryce Ashcraft

Dr. George Freeman Parmenter Dr. Thomas Bryce Ashcraft

A lum ni Representatives

Albert Foster Drummond, '88 George Fred Terry, '22

Athletic Director

Prof. C . Harry E dwards

COUNCIL M E MBERS Football Manager

M aynard Warren Maxwell, 27

Baseba,ll Ma.na ger

Ralph Herbert Ayer, '26

Track Manager

A ugustine Anthony D 'Amico, '26

Hockey Manager

Carl Albert Anderson, '27

Tennis Manager

William Alexander Macomber, '27

One hundred sixty


Colby C a p tains Football

J o h n N elson E rickson, '28

Baseb a ll

Theodore Greenleaf Smart, '27

T1¡ack

George Louis M ittelsdorf, '27

Cro s C oun"bry

Raymond S u llivan, '27

ReLay

Charles Joseph Sansone, '28

Tennis

William A lexander M acomber, '27

Hockey

Clarence William Gould, '28

One hundred sixty-one


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Washington , McD onald, F iedler, D rumm ond, Fotter, Saucier

Johnson, Call aghan, Rogers, O ' Donne l l , C a pt. ; E r ickson, Capt.-elect ; M ac Lea.n , Peacock

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Review- of Football Season Col b y started the season with elev n l etter men.

The results o f l a s t season an d

this l a rge n u mber of vete r a n s held t he promise of a successful se aso n . hope for the l i n e was b a sed on t he recruits from the F reshman team of

Considerable

1 9 25.

T h e cu stom of h aving a foot ball training camp, revived last year, was continued this yea r .

The men gathered at t he State Y . M . C . A. Camp at W i nthrop Center and

were put t h rough a week of cond ition i n g , signal practice an d black-board d r i l l .

The

week after the ret u rn to the C a m p u s t he hopes of the team l'eceived a severe blow. Cleal Cowing, V a rsity g u a r d from l ast season, and a tower of strength i n the l i ne, w a s be­ ca use of injury, forced t o g ive u p football for the year . H oweve r , th e period of preparation w a s short, and t h e t e a m was n o t i n t h e best con d i tion for th e fi rst game, ag ainst B r own U n i versity. one-sided contest.

B rown won

35-0 in a n entirely

Colby p u t u p a bitter struggle, but was entirely out-cla ssed by its

heavier op ponent .

A s i n previous years, B rown had the a d vantage in n u mbers and

skill over th e B l u e and G ray. Th e next game, with the U niversity of New H a m pshire at D u rh a m , was a d ifferent a ff a i r .

Colby out-played the

e\.v H a m ps h i r e t eam al l a round.

The odds seemed in

favor of the Roundymen until a blocked Colby punt was fal l e n on behind the goal line

by a n o p po s i n g l i ne m a n , for t he o nly score of the game.

I n the opening periods both

teams were slow, b u t c h a nged i n the fi nal half when they got goi n g an d m ade a f ast a n d furious fi n i

b,

with a

core

6-0 for New H a m pshire.

The following week Colby won from Lowell Texti l e at W aterv i l l e . team was a sc r a p p y delegat ion a n d fo ug ht well th roughout the game. wh ile i t pl ayed a good game, d i d not show a n y exceptional skil l .

T he Text il e

The Colby team,

The fi n al count was

6-3 for Colby. The next week s a w the opening of t he State Series, with a victory for Bowdoin a t W aterville. opening pe riod .

T he vi itors got the jump in t he first half and scored t wice i n the T hen the M ule set its teeth and held for two periods.

period Col b y m a d e t wo touchdowns by use of a brilliant passing game. this, t h e Pola r Bear made a third thouchdown and c a r r ied off a

I n the final I n spite of

2 1 - 1 4 victory.

T h e following Saturday a determined W hite M ule i n vaded O rono a n d there gave the confident B rown Bea r its bitterest State Series struggle i n years.

The fi n al score,

7-6, i n favor of M a i ne furni shes small i n d ication of this exciting battle. was c rowded w i t h expectation a n d t h r i l l s that k e p t b o t h s t a r t to finish.

The g a m e

tand s on their t o e s f r o m t h e

C o l b y ' s c l e a n , hard p l a y i n g a n d team w o r k s e t a record that future

Colby teams w i l l have hard work to b reak. T h e fol lowing g a m e with the nat ure.

ewport

aval T r a i n i ng B a se was of a d i fferent

The Newport team worked hard, but lack of teamwork was very a pp a rent,

a nd C ol by won

25-6.

I n this game Colby showed the same spirit a n d team play t hat

ha d so s u r p r ised M a i ne . T he Bates g a m e on A rm istice D a y closed t h e football season. a n d m a n y accu rate p a sses bounded f r o m s t i ff fingers.

T h e d a y w a s c ol d ,

The G a rnet t e a m was power­

less a ga i n s t the C ol by line which c a rried everyt h i n g before i t , and opened gTeat holes in the B obca t defence.

1924.

Co lby won,

1 4-0, m a k i n g t b e se co n d v ic tory since t h e d e f e at of

I t i s hoped that these v ictcries over the Lewiston College will d evel op i n to a n un­

broken string.

One hu ndred s ixty-three


Baseball Schedule, 1926 Herschel Peabody

Capta'i n

Edward Roundy

Coach

George Roach

M011UJ, g er

A pril 24 26 27 28 May 8 12 14 22 26 28 29 2 June 4

University of Maine at Waterville Lowell Text i le at Lowell Tufts at Medford Rhode Island State at Kingston Lowell Textile at Waterville Bates at W aterville Bowdoin at B runswick Univers ity of Maine at Waterville Bowdoin at Waterville Connecticut Aggies at Waterville Bates at Lewiston University of Maine at Orono Bowdoin at Watervi lle

One hundred sixty-four

Colby 7 7 4 9 13 9 8 1

7 2 2 14

Opponents 1 2 3 10 6 3 5 5 Rain 9 7 1 4


®�(!;(1� Jfi!Jt­

B aseball Season" 1926

Coach R o u n d y bega n the sea son e a r l y by c a l l i n g out a l l battery c a n d i d ates, Feb­ r u a ry 25. P rospects fo r a good t e am depended upon the development of good pitching m ateri a l w h i ch , a s usual, was very scarce. The outfield and infie l d positions were fil led The team worked well under C ap t ain by vet e r a n m a t e r i a l from the p receding yea r . Peabod y a n d c losed a successful year by t r i m m i n g M a i n e a n d B o w d o i n, which gav e u s a t i e for the State C h a m pionsh i p w i t h M a ine. T h e opening game with the U niversity of M a i ne was p l a yed on Seaverns Field, April 23. Coach Roundy st a rted A n d e r son ag ai nst the M aine team . I t was A n dy's first major game and he immedi ately p r oved that he had th e stuff by hold i n g M a ine to T he t hree h i ts and one run i n five i n nings. T raino r p itched the l a st four i n nmgs. Colby s luggers foun d the M a i ne h u r l e r s easy, so the result was a 7 - 1 victory . The team left for a t h ree-game t r i p to M a ssachu setts a n d Rhode I s l a n d on A p r i l 2 5 . Lowell Text i l e p roved to be a w i l l ing victim i n t h e fi r s t game. H ea l h e l d t h e Tex­ tile batters helples s f or seven i n nings wh1le his mates were having a field day with home runs, doubles and t r i p l e s i n r a p i d order. T r a i n o r woTked the Tema i n i n g i nn ings. The following d a y , Colby battled Tufts i n a tight game. The Colby team w a s up a gain t S h u m a n , one of the best twirlers i n N e w E ng land. H e p itched a great game, but ou r s l u g gers went right after h i m a n d cha lked u p t hree big runs early in the game. Coach Roundy u sed Trainor i n t he box. He pitched good ball for eight i n n ings, d u r i n g w h i c h t i m e T u f t s was u nable to s c o r e a r u n , b u t blew u p a f t e r two men b a d b e e n r e ­ tired i n the n i n t h a n d w a s re lieved by A nderson. A n d y s t o p p e d the T u ft s r a l l y , a n d the t w o teams went i n t t h e t e n t h i n n i n g w i t h t he score 3-3. C o l b y scored the b i g r u n o n a h a r d single b y Scotty M a r r , w h i c h scored J a c k M c Gowa n , w h o h ad l ined o u t a beautiful tri p l e to deep T i g ht . R hode I s l a n d State defeated C o l b y 1 0-9 i n t he l a s t game of t h e t r i p . Weather conditions weTe terrible, a heavy wind kee p i n g the a i r filled with d r y sand t hroughout the game. I t was a poor ball game. Lowe l l Te xt i l e w a s again defeated when they p layed i n Waterville, May 8. The Colby stickers had another b i g d ay, piling u p a big lead at t he start. Score, 1 3-6. The first Sta te S e r ies game was p layed May 12 against B a tes. C har l i e S m al l , the B ates sta r , was in the box, but p roved ineffective against the Colby men. C redit s hould be given t o S m a l l for h i s work, a s he had a b a d ankle a n d should h a ve been on t he ben c h i n stead of p itching a b a l l game. The Bates i n field was off color, too, a l l of w hi c h hel ped in the victory. A nderson twirled t he full n i n e i n n i ngs for C o l b y , a n d h ad a n Score, 9-3. e a s y d a y . O ' B rien c ircled t he b a ses on a h i t t o center. Colby tra veled t o B r u nswick May 14, and won its secon d State Series game, 8-5. B ot h teams hit wel l . Colby p u l led a big ral1y i n the ninth inn ing. B owdoin was lead­ ing, 5-3, when Colby went t o bat. H its, e r rors, daring base r un ni ng, a n d the i n trod uc­ t ion of pinch h itte rs by Coach R o u n d y , who p l ayed a nice hunch, p ul le d the game out o f the fire. H e a l h e l d the Bowdoin team safely i n t he n i n t h inni ng. T h e U n iversity of M a ine g ave Colby i ts fi rst S e rie s defeat a t W a ter v i l l e , M ay 22. Per ry , th e M a i n e h u rle r, h a d a g o o d d a y , yielding bu t five h i t s a n d one r u n , w hi l e M a i ne tou ch ed u p T r a i no r a n d A nderson for e ig ht hit s a n d five runs. Colby entert a in e d Con necticut A ggies on Seaverns F i e l d , M a y 28. I t p roved to be a wei r d game. The Connecti c u t p itcher used a slow motion windup t h a t p roved d e ­ ceptive . H ea l started for Colby, but h a d a n off d ay, a n d retired i n t he t h i r d i n n ing. Trainor went i n a n d held the A ggies hitless a n d runle ss for the r em a i n i ng s i x i n n i n g s . C o l b y t ried h a rd to overcome a n i n e r u n lead, but fel l s h o r t , an d h a d t o a c c e p t defeat, 7-9. Keith and M c Gowan hit for four sacks during the gar.cfe . B ate_ defeated Colby at Lewiston, M a y 29. It was a slow game, as Colby c o u l d n 't do m u c h a g a i n s t S m a l l who a l lowed four hits. O n J u ne 2 , Colby t raveled t o Orono a n d defeated M a i n e i n a n exc i ti n g, eleve n i n n i n g game. T h e score was 2-1 , a n d it t e lls the st o ry, a s i t w a s one of the b e st games T r a in or a n d P e r r y booked u p a p retty h u r l i n g d ue l , while both teams of th e y ear . p layed great ball. C a pt. Peabody won the game with a l on g home r u n i n t he eleventh . Colby e a rn ed a t ie f o r t h e S t a te C h a m p io n s h i p by t r i m m i n g Bowdoin o n J u n e 4 . The w h o l e Bowdoin t e a m h a d a n off d a y , w h i l e Colby celebrnted w i t h free hi tt i n g a n d s m a r t baseba l l . A n derson t w i r l ed a n i ce game. Ted S m a rt, ou r s t a r t h i r d baseman is Captain of t he 1927 C l u b , a n d should lead the team t h rough a s uccessful season. He wi l l have a strong n ucleus i n M a cD o n a l d , O ' B r i e n , A n derson, a n d T r a inor, lettermen, b e s i d e s exceptional m a t e r i a l i n H a n n i fe n , E r i c k o n , T i e r r y , Scott, C a l l a gh a n , a n d N iziolek.

One hundred sixty-five


Cross Country MAINE INTERCOLLEGIATE CROSS COUNTRY MEET, LEWISTON, MAINE B rudno was the only man to finish within the first ten. Allen, a grad­ uate from the Freshman ranks, j ust m issed finishing i n tenth place. Cap­ tain Sullivan, Johnston , Brown and Rivkin were the other members of the team. THE SEASON The Cross Cou ntry Team ran only one race this season. The team had only t wo regulars to depend on. However, several new men showed up well as the season progressed . The veteran Bates team had no trouble in leading the pack of runners home, while the Maine t eam found the going hard for second place. Next year's outlook for a good team seems m uch brighter.

One himdred sixf;y-six


Relay Captain Coa ch

Char Jes Sansone M ichael Ryan

BOSTON ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION I NDOOR GAMES, BOSTON, FEBRUARY 5, 1 927 Colby was represented by M ittelsdorf, Baker, Sprague and Sansone, in a three-cornered race with N ortheastern University and Worcester Poly­ tech. After the first leg, the race was l eft for Colby and N ortheastern to decide. The race was close all the way, but Colby lost by a few yards in the fast time of three m i nutes, fifty-four and two-fifths seconds. T H E HAROLD T. A NDREWS POST I NDOOR GAMES, PORTLAND, FEB. 18, 1 927 Due to inj u ries, M ittelsdorf was unable to run, and Sprague, Rivkin, A n d rews a n d Sansone i n a dual relay race, were defeated by the fast B os­ ton College team i n th ree m in utes, six and three-fifths seconds, a new record for the games. THE A M ERICAN LEGION I NDOOR GA MES, B OSTON, FEBRUARY 22, 1 927 I n the last relay race of the season, Colby was rlefeated by North­ eastern University i n a thrilling race. Colby was represented i n this race by M ittelsdorf, Andrews, Sansone, and Sprague. N ortheastern w·o n by a small margin over the other teams in the fast time of two m i n utes, fifty­ four and three-fifths seconds. One hiundred sixty-seven


Track Captaim

Russell Brown

Manager

William Ford

Goa.ch

M ichael Ryan COLBY RECORDS

M ittelsdorf, '27 M ittelsdorf, '27 Meanix, ' 1 6 Brown '26 Sanso i{e, '28 880 Yard Run Sansone, '28 Mile Run Brudno, '27 Two Mile Run 1 2 0 Yard H u rdles Weise, '24 220 Yard Low Hurdles · Taylor, '25 Stanwood , ' 1 6 Shot Put Joyce, ' 1 6 Th rowing D iscus Seekins, '29 High Jump Nardini, ' 1 4 B road Jump Herrick, ' 1 2 Pole Vault Kemp, '23 Wentworth, '25 Hammer Throw Treworgy, '30 Javelin Throw 100 Yard Dash 220 Yard Dash 440 Yard Dash

One hu ndred sixty-eight

9 4-5 sec. 21 4-5 sec. 51 sec. 1 m i n . 59 2-5 sec. 4 min. 26 4-5 sec. 9 min. 48 3-5 sec. 15 4-5 sec. 24 4-5 sec. 39 ft. 6 i n . 124 f t . 6 in. 5 ft. 1 0 in. 2 1 ft. 4 1 -3 i n . 1 1 ft. 143 ft. 4 in. 154 ft. 5 i n .


Dual Track Meet MASS. I N STITUTE O F TECH NOLOGY

S . COLBY COLLEGE

WATERVILLE, MAINE MAY, 1 926 M . I . T.

76 1/2

Colby

52 1/2

This was Colby' onl dual m eet for the year. The l o of Colby's t rack star of the year before was m uch i n evidence. Seekin was high point winner of the meet, while Mittel dorf e tabli hed a new record i n t h e o n e h undred yard d a h . RESULTS O F F INALS-TRACK E VENTS 100 Yard D ash-Won by Mittel dorf, Colby · second, J. Wiebe, Tech ; third, K . A . Smith T ch. Time. 9 4-5 �econd . ( N ew Colby Record ) . 220 Y a rd D ash-Won by M ittelsd orf, Colby ; econd, Steinbrenner, Tech ; third, K. E . Smith, Tech . Time, 22 econds. ( Equals Colb Record ) . 440 Yard D ash-Won by Leness, Tech ; second, tie between Baker, Colby, and VIeagher Tech. Time, 51 3-5 econds. 880 Yard R u n-Won by Leness, Tech ; second, San one, Colby ; third Fay, T ech. Time, 1 m i n ute, 59 second . 1 20 Yard H igh Hurd les-Wo n by Newhall Colb · second, Seekins, Colby ; third, Guerin, Tech . Time, 1 6 1-5 seconds. 220 Yard Low H u rdle -Won b' Steinbrenner, Tech ; second, Newhall, Colby ; third, Guerin, Tec h . Time 26 3-5 second . M i l e R u n-Won by Sansone, Colby ; econd, D. A. Smith, Tech ; third, B rudno, Colby. Time, 4 minutes, 35 4-5 econd . Two Mile R un-Won by Ch ute, Tech ; second Rooney, Tech ; third, Aker­ l ey, Tech. Time, 10 m i nutes, 16 1-5 econd . R u nn i ng B road Jump-Won by Wiebe, Tech ; second, Severy, Colby · third, Fort, Tech. D i tance, 22 feet, 7112 inche . R u nning H igh J u m p-Won by Seekin , 0olby ; econd, Tarwell, Tech ; third, Fort, Tech. Di tance, 5 feet 7 inches. Pole Vau lt-Won by Sanford, Tech ; second Sack, Tech ; third, tie between S. Snow, Colb y and G u er in, Tech. D istance, 10 feet, 6 inche . Di cu Throw-Won by Seekins, Colby ; econd, B road ky Tech ; third, Glantzberg, Tech. D istance, 1 1 6 feet, 8 inches. Javelin Throw-Won by VIcCarthy, Tech ; econd , Seekins, Colby ; third, Fort, Tech. D i tance, 149 feet, 8 inche . Shot P ut-Won by B roadsky, Tech ; econd, Gla ntzberg, Tech · third, Mar­ tin, T ech. D i tance, 39 feet, 83/t, inches. Hammer Throw-Won by Glantzberg, Tech ; second, Holmes, Tech ; third, M a rtin, Tech. D istance, 141 feet, 1 0 i nche . One hundred sixty-nine


The Thirteenth Annual Intercollegiate Track and Field Day BRU NSWIC K , MAINE, MAY 15, 1 926 53 1;2 37 33 1/2 11

Bowdoin Bates Maine Colby

Colby entered only a few contestants i n the State Meet, and with this handicap was not able to finish better than fourth place. RESULTS OF FINALS-TRACK EVENTS 100 Yard Dash-Won by Mo.strum, Bowdoin ; second, Connor, Bowdoin ; third, M ittelsdorf, Colby. Time, 10 seconds. 220 Yard Dash-Won by Mostrum, Bowdoin ; second, Farrington, Bow­ doin ; third, Mittelsdorf, Colby. Time, 22 2-5 seconds. 440 Yard Dash-Won by Tarbell, Bowdoin ; second, Baker, Bates ; third, Fanning, Bowdoin. Time, 5 1 1-5 seconds. 880 Yard Run-Won by Willis, Bates ; second, Wakeley, Bates ; ¡l; hird , Thompson, Maine. Time, 2 minutes, 5 seconds. 120 Yard High H u rdles-Won by Littlefield, Bowdoi n ; second, Torrey, Maine ; third, Chandler, Bowdoin. Time, 1 5 3-5 seconds. 220 Yard Low Hurdles-Won by Littlefield, Bowdoi n ; second, True, Maine ; third, Lucas, Maine. Time, 24 4-5 seconds. Mile Run-Won by Wills, Bates ; second, Sansone, Colby ; third, Hillman, Maine. Time, 4 min utes, 21 2-5 seconds. Two M ile Run-Won by Wardell, Bates ; second, Brown, Bates ; third, Brudno, Colby. Time, 9 minutes, 49 2-5 seconds. F IELD EVENTS R unning Broad Jump-Won by Rowe, Bates ; second, Caldwell , Maine ; third, Smith, Colby. D istance, 22 feet, 5 1;2 inches. Running High J ump-Won by Kend all, Bowdoin ; second, Seekins, Colby ; third, Costello, Bates. Distance, 5 feet, 1 0 14 i nches. Pole Vault-Tie between Hobson, Maine, and Kendall, Bowdoin ; third, tie between Proctor, Stitham and Guilfoyle, Maine. D istance, 11 feet. Discus Throw-Won by Barrows, Maine ; second , Snow, Bowdoin ; third, Seekins, Colby. Distance, 127 feet, 8% i nches. Javelin Th row-Won by Sager, Bates ; second, Emery, Maine ; third, tie between Young, Maine, and Adams, Bowdoin. D istance, 182 feet, 1h inch. Shot Put-Won by Thompson, Maine ; second, D ickson, Maine ; third, Ray, Bates. Distance, 42 feet. Hammer Throw-Won by Pillsbury, Bowdoin ; second, Loud, Bowdoi n ; third, Gallup, Bates. D istance, 152 feet, 6 112 i nches. One hwndred sevenf!y


Tennis Cci ptain-Man,a ger,

W i ll i a m M a comber

TENNIS SEASON,

1 9 26

Beginning the year with the poorest of p rospects, the Colby Co1lege tennis team ca me from behind a n d built u p a squad of p l a ye rs which made a n u n us ual l y fine show­ ing for the season. Hea d e d b y Captain William M acomber, '27, the only veteran a n d letter man to retu r n , the squad worked d il igently and built a strong team from the l a rge group of a s p irants. " D u d i e " K n ox, '28, who had seen some experience in the p revious season, l a n ded one of the positions, while " Re d " Tatter s a l l , '29, and " Dent" N ickerson , '27, won the other positions on the team. With these men a s s i ngle players, and with M acomber and Tatte r s a l l , and K n ox and N i ckerson p a i r i n g u p in the doubles, Colby was well r e p resented i n a l l of the m atches. I n the State Seri es contest s , the Colby qua rtet defeated the Uni versity of M a i ne, 5-1 , lost to B ates Col lege, 4-2, a n d were defeated by the strong Bowdoin team, 6-0. A closely contested m a tch with New H a mp s h i re resulted in a 4-2 l_oss. The team j o u rn eyed to M a ssachusetts and held Worcester Tech team to a 3-3 tie, but l ost to the powerful S p ri n gfield U n iversity C l ub, 6-0. The State T ou rn ament, which was held i n W atervil l e, found C a pta i n M a comber a n d Tatter s a l l fighting for doubles honors, but they were forced to t a ke the position of r u n ners-up after playing the victorious B owdoin pair a n d putt i n g u p the stiffest type of competit i o n . T he m atch went the l i m it i n sets, and the Colby team deserves m u c h c re d i t for its a chievement. C a pt a i n M a c omber went to the semi - finals i n the s ingles tourna ment, while T a t­ ters a l l made a good showing for h i s first ye ar in collegiate tennis. The p rospects for the next season's team a r e very fine, with al l four of the letter men a v a i l a b l e , C a p t a i n M a c omber, K nox, T atter s a l l and N ickerson .

One hundred sevenf/y-one


Captain Managf!ir Coach

Hockey

C l a rence Gould C a rl A n derson E dwa rd Roundy T h e outlook at the begi nning of the Hockey season was exceptional l y b r ight. The candidates for the positions left em pty by the grad uati ng c l ass of '26, were al l men who h a d been tried a n d were known to be capable of fi l ling those positions. An exhibition game with Bowd oin at W aterville resulted in a 7 to 2 victory for the Blue and G ray. The Colby team had the a dvantage t h roughout the game. T he high score was the result of one of the best exhibitions of team play ever seen at Colby. T he following games, with the R a mblers at Portl and, t he Un iversity of New H am p ­ s h i re a t D urham , Cabots at Watervil le, a n d the University of New H am pshire at Waterville were cancelled because of the weather. Colby then pl ayed an exhibition game with Bates at Lewiston which was very close, Bates winni ng, 3 to 2, i n the second over-time period. Two d ays l ater the B l u e a n d Gray made u p this defeat i n a 2 to 0 win ov e r Mass. Aggies a t Waterville. T h e t w o t ea m s we re e ve nly m atched, a n d bo th g o als w e r e the r e su l t of hard skating a n d clever p a ssing. The fi rst of the State Series games was with Bowdoi n at B ru n swick. This one bore n o resembla nce to that above. Both teams were i n the best of con d ition, and it was not until the end of the second over-time period th at the Polar Bears were able to break the tie for a 2 to 1 victory. The next game , with Bowdoin a t Waterville, resulted i n a 1 to 0 win for the visitors. Neither team h a d the adva ntage a n d neither of them seemed to be able to keep the puck. It was not until the second over-time period that Bowdoin succeeded in slipping a goal by West. T he following game with Bates was pl ayed i n a snow storm and was of necessity slower than it would h a ve been under ordinary conditions, b u t no l ess interesting to w a tc h . The Roundymen p l ayed their h a rdest, but the Bob-cats were not to be defeated, a n d c arried a 2 to 1 victory back to Lewiston. Colby then journeyed to Lewiston bent on a venging their defeats. This proved to be n o easy task. I t was not until t h e fourth over-time period that the M u l esters were able t o m a ke the goa l that gave them a 3 to 2 victory.

One hiind1red

eventy-two


Freshman Football W all ace Donavan

Capta in

E l mwood H ammond

Ma na ger

G renville V al e

Coa c h F R E S H MA

F O O T B A L L S E AS O

,

1 926

Last f a l l s a w the opening of t he second year of F reshman football at C o lb y .

Be­

tween forty a n d fifty men re spo nde d t o Co ach Vale 's c a l l for c an d i d ates for the yea r­ ling squad.

Among the v a ri o u s men who responded we re several who h a d starred at

the v a rious p r e p a r a tory schools from which they had come. " W a l l i e " D o n a v a n , who, the year before had sta rred

at W a terville H i gh, was

chosen to lead the tea m , and proved to be the m a in stay of the backfiel d .

He also p roved

his worth i n his ability to c a r r y the b a l l , and did some excellent work i n punting. T he re s u l ts of the season were, on the whole, rather d i s a p pointing, b ut t he s p i r it of the team w a s excellent and canno t be j u dged by the comparat ive scores. The

u m m a r y of t he g a m es i s as foll ows : Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. N ov .

9 16 23 30 5

K e nts H ill at Waterville E. M. C. S . a t B uc k s port H ebron a t W aterville N otre D a m e at Waterville Coburn at L ibbey Fie ld

F reshmen

O pponents

0 6 0 12 0

0 15 0 0 24

18

39

O n e hmidred seventy-three


C olby Oracle Association W i l l iam A l exa nder Macomber

P resident

S ec,,.e ta ry- T reas u rer

W i l l i am E dward Pierce, J r . E sther E l izabeth K n udson

A rt Edito1¡ T H E O R A C LE B O A R D

W il l iam A lexander Macomber

Editor-in-Chief

W i l l iam E dward P ierce, J r .

Business Mmw,ger

E sther E l izabeth Knudson

A r t Edito r A ssocia t e Editors Louis Pierre Fourcade,

Cecil E u gene Foote,

Ja mes Keltie Tufts, J r . ,

Jack Jos�ph R icci,

'28 '28 John A lfred Trai nor, '28 LawTence Asa Peakes, '2 Gardner Dixon Cottle, '28

'28 '28

Rol and Butterfiel d A n d rews, H a rold E dwin C l ark,

' 28 Helen A l ic ia W y m an , '28 Helen C l a i re H ight, '28 Dorothy Vaughn Sylvester, '28 M a rgaret An nette Davis, '28 A va F rances Dodge, '28 F rances J une B ragdon, '28 Bus iness Staff Leroy M iller Johnsto n ,

One h u ndred seventy-six

'28

George Chester West,

'28

'28


The Echo Board F rederick E l wood B a ke r , B a rret � Gardner Getchell , M a u rice William Lord, adman M itchell , Helen Lawrence A a Peakes, Rufus M a n ley Grindle,

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor Business �Ia n a ge r Editor Wom en's D ii·is io n Ca mpu.s Editol' Litera ry Edit o r C l y d e Lyfo r d M a n n , M u riel E stes Lewi ,

A s o cia te Editors

J ames Henr

'28

Woods,

'29

A s i font Edit ors

E l i abeth B u l l a rd G ross,

'2

Spo1·t ing Editor

F ra n k l yn B e d e l l Dexter, Augu tine A nthony D ' A mico, E d ward James A r i el, '2

Spol't ing Staff John '28 John

As ista n t Bus ines

27 '27 '27 27 '2 '27

'2

'29 elson E r ick on, Ed' ard W a l k e r ,

'2 '29

.11a n a g el' '29

J oseph Drisko A l len,

Neal D ow Bou fiel d , '29 H oward Douglass Fowl ie, '29 D a v i d Franklin K ronquist , '2!J E r nest E dw a r d M i ller, '29 Arthur C o d d i n gton C a een, '30

Repol't r

Bus i n ess

Charle M a 1 c o l m Dow ey, A ttilio F ra n k Giuffra, '30 Theodore • elson, '30 Alex Katosky, '30 Luciu H azen Stebbins, '30

'30

ta.ff

George G i lbert H e n r y , '30 Gordon G ra nger V. elch, '29 C a rl E dgeccmb M egquier, '30 Henry Edwin Cu rti s , '29 H a rold Dana P h i p p e n , '30 Cecil Ga rfield Godd a rd , '29 Dana M axwell Simmons, '30 C h a r l e Lewis S p rague, '30 E rnest J o eph T heberge, '30 Ralph Leona r d God d a r d , '30 Melvin Thom a s TTeworgy, '30 Bertram Le F o rest H a rd i n g , '30 George L inwood Walsh, '30

One hu ndred seventy-seve n


Colbiana Board Publ ished t h ree times a year by the women of Colby College BOARD OF EDITORS M i riam E l i zabeth R ice

E dito r-in-C hief Fi?'st Assis tant Editor Sec01id A ssista-n t Edito1 ¡

M uriel E stes Lewis Helen Coburn Smith ASSOCIATE EDITORS Doris H ayward Church

Lite rary Editor A rt Editor A liwinae Editor Y . W. C. A. Edit01¡ Joke Editor

Doris Louise Grosbeck Caroline E l i zabeth Rogers E l i sabeth B u llard Gross Corneli a A d a i r

Business Staff Business Manager Ffrst A ssistant Manager Second A ssistant MG/IW,ger

O ne hundred seventy-eight

M arjorie Grace D un st a n Arleen H a rriett Warburton N a talie M a rie Downs


The White Mule BOARD OF E D ITORS

E ditor-in-C hief

John Atwood

Business Ma;nager

el son

W i l l i a m Alexander M acomber

A dvertising Managm¡

P h i l i p R ufus H iggins

A rt Editor

John Atwood

CircuLat ion M a1ui ger

elso n

H oward Douglass Fowlie EDITORIAL S TAFF

C h a rl es Pembroke N el so n

A ugustine A nthony D ' A m i c o

R a l ph Herbert A ye r

B U SINESS STAFF Louis Pierre Fourcade

Franklyn Bedell Dexter

One hundred seventy-nine


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GLEE CLUB

Stickney, Knofskie, Baird, Copp, M r . Smi th ( D irector ) ,

U.

C. Cowing, H a rlow, A. Jordan

W i l l iams, Coker, C. Jordan, George, Cadwallader, Simm ons, H avu

Stinchfield, Payson, Weed, Johnson, Na sse, Quinton

P . Allen, Treworgy, T . Cowing, F o r d , Pinkham, S h a w , M . A l l e n

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C olby Musical Clubďż˝ OFFICERS President, Edwin Wallace Harlow

Ma.oo,ge r, Ulmont Cleal Cowing

Assistant Ma.nager, Robert George La Vigne

GLEE CLUB A ccom pa tnist , Harold Edwin Clark ¡

Director, Harrison A very Smith

First Tenors

Edwin Wallace Harlow, '28 John R ussell Richardson, '29 Leslie Francis George, '29 Philip Alston Stinchfield, '30

Herbert Kinsley D raper, '30 Dana Maxwell Simmons, '30 Charles Noah P inkham, '29 M ur ray M iller, '29

Second Tenors

Rowland E verett Baird, '27 A rcher Jordan, Jr., '27 William P reston Cadwallader, '27 M urray Alexander Coker, '30 Leroy Sargent Ford, '30

Malcolm Small Weed, '29 Sterling Cleveland Ryder, '29 Raymond Everett Stickney, '29 John Thomas N asse, '29 Deane Reginald Quinton, '30

Baritones

Kenneth R ussell C opp, '27 Clarence E mery, Jr., '27 Robert George LaVigne, '29 Charles William Jordan, '29 John Barrows W i ll iams, Jr., '30

Walter Ferdinand Knofskie, '28 Warren Ridgeway Payson, '29 Melvin Thomas T reworgy, '30 Bernard Clifton Shaw, '30 Gerald Asher Johnson, '30

Basses

Charles Albert Cowing, '29 Stanley C rocker B rown, '27 William Thornton Cowing, '30 Ulmont Clea l Cowing, '27 Phi l i p Frederick Allen, '30 M iles Lancaster Allen, '30 - Otto A rviid Havu, '30

One h11ndred eighf;y-three


Orchestra Leader, Kenneth R ussell Copp, '27 Violins

Leslie Francis George, '29 William Thornton Cowing, '30 Mile Lanca ter Allen, '30 Gerald Asher John on, '30 Herbert Kin ley Draper, '30 Cello

Ulmont Cleal Cowing, '27 Tru m pets Kenneth Rus ell Copp, '27 Walter Ferdinand Knofskie, '28 Berna rd Clifton Shaw, '30 Clarinets Dana Maxwell Simmons, '30 Philip Frederick Allen, '30 Trom bmes Warren Ridgeway Payson, '29 Malcolm Small Weed, '28 Saxophones Lawrence Augustus Roy, '27 William P reston Cadwallader, '27 Horn M urray Alexander Coker , '2 9 D1-um s Charles Albert Cowing, '29 Piano E dwin Wallace Harlow, '28 One hundred e ighi71J-four


B anjo Club Lea,der, John Thomas N asse, '29

A ccom pa,rnist, Edwin Wallace Harlow,

'28

Ma,nd olins

Charles N oah P i nkham, '30

John Thomas N asse, '29

Otto Arviid Havu, '30

Tenor Banjos Bernard Clifton Shaw, '30

A rcher Jordan, Jr., '27

Charles William Jordan , '29

William P reston Cadwallader, '27

Melvin Thomas Treworgy, '30

Leroy Sargent Ford, '30

P h i l i p Alston Stinchfield, '30

One hmulred eighty-five


'The ""Po-wder and Wig,, Society Colby Men 's Dramatic Society.

Founded at Colby College, March 14, 1926. OFFICERS

President Secretary

Treasurer a nd B usiness Ma nage1¡ Fa c ulty Supervisor C H ARTER M E M BERS

Ralph Herbert Ayer A ugust Frank Steigler William Edward Pierce, Jr. Alden Linwood Kittredge Russell But ler John Atwood

Ralph Herbert Ayer Cec il E ugene Foote Ralph Thomas Flahive Cecil Augustus Rollins

Ralph Thomas Flahive Cecil E ugene Foote George Holbrook Hawes Horace Pierce Maxcy Charles Pembroke Nelson Nelson

ACTIVE MEM BERS

Charles M i tchell Hannifen E dwin Wallace Harlow Karl Maynard Rood Cecil E ugene Foote August Frank Steigler Donald H u lford Fraser Claes Evan Johnson John Sten Carlson George Holbrook Hawes William E dward Pierce Robert Cumm ings Chandler Richard Ph ineas Staunton Charles Pembroke Nelson Horace Pierce Maxcy John Atwood Nelson Alden Cec i l Sprague George Chester West Rowland E ve rett Baird Conrad Hartman H ines Ralph Thomas Flahive Frank Edmond Chester Ralph Herbert Ayer George Linwood Walsh One hundred eig hfly-six


Dramatic Club Helen Coburn Smith

President

Florence Appleton Plaisted

Vice-President

Martha E loise Allen

Secretary-Treasure1¡

M EM BERS Helen Coburn S mith

Myrtle Viola Main

Florence Appleton Plaisted

Julia Dean M ayo

M artha Allen Davis

Julia Ardelle Chase

Lou ise Jobson Chapman

Martha E loise Allen

Dorothy Giddi n gs

Lura Arabina N orcross

Frances Melissa Nason

Martha Sondberg

One hiindred eighty-seven


Girls, Glee Club Leader, Arline Mann

Manager, Harriett Towle First Sop ranos

Martha Allen Janet Chase Ruth Daggett Natalie Downs M uriel Farnham Eleanor Lunn

Dorcas Plaisted

Ruth Bartlett Dorothy Daggett Violet Daviau Amy Dearborn Corona Hatch Arline Mann

Second Sopr anos

Violet Boulter Pauline B akeman Dorothy Hannaford Lillian Morse O live R ichardson B arbara Weston

Helen Chase Mildred Fox Harriett K i mball Alice Paul Emma Tozier Harriett Towle A ltos

Ardelle Chase Elisabeth Gross Harriett Johnson Doris Sanborn M iriam Tyler One himdred eighty-eight

Doris Grosbeck Mary Holland Claire Richardson Edna Turkington Mary Wasgatt


Women�s C olby Day "With hearts beating strong And with j oyous song-" did the members of the Women 's Division celebrate their Colby Day this year on Friday evening, October the twenty-second. The program was a complete success from start to finish with loyalty and college spirit running high. The open ing speech by Dean Reynolds, '14, was a cordial welcome to all alumnae and friends of the college. Following this were the class songs and speakers. E lizabeth Beckett, '30, spoke for the Freshmen, B eatrice Palmer, '29 for the Sophomores, H ilda Desmond, '28 for the J un iors, and Leonora Hall, '27 for the Seniors. After a vocal <:olo by Vivian Russell, '30, accompanied by Helen Paul, ' 29, Miss Minnie B unker, ex-'89, rose to speak for the Alumnae. And �hat a delightful, interesting, informal little talk it was, filled with reminis­ censes of the days when Colby was smaller in n u mbers, but j ust as large in the spirit of loyalty and ervire as it is today. How we enjoyed hearing of those days, of the fine old professors, the college life, the i deals and hopes of those earnest, young people! Yet we caught a glimpse i nto the realm of pleasure and fun, too, as she told of their l ittle parties and of the necessary "duty" calls a few days later by the embarrassed young men who had been so fortunate as to be invited. Indeed, we enj oyed · her talk, and were p leased to find that her transfer to the University of California had i n no way detracted from her fi rst love-that for Colby. The last n u mber on our program was an entertaining two-act farce, "An Open Secret,'' presented by the Dramatic Club. The characters were as follows : Madge Apthorp, a college girl Jean, her confidante Mrs. Apthorp, her mother Grace Apthorp, her sister, aged ten E dith l Elinor I Carrie � Classmates M ay I Kate J Agatha Meade, a girl not in the secret

(

I i I l

Martha Allen Frances Nason Florence Plaisted Martha Sondberg Doris Sanborn Louise Chapman Lura Norcross Myrtle Main Dorothy Giddings Helen Smith

M usic for the occasion was furnished by the Colby Girls' O rchestra. With the singing of "Alma Mater,'' which now seemed to hold for us a new significance, another Colby Day came to an end .

One hundred nitnety


Men�s C olby Night " The most enthusiastic and successful Colby N ight ever," was the unanimous opinion of all those present at President Roberts' ann ual rally, which occ u r red October 22, the eveni ng before the Bowdoin game. P resident Roberts evening.

presided and introd uced the speakers of the

H ersey Keene, a member of Colby's victorious 1 9 0 5 team, spoke first. H e was followed by Dr. Stewart of the same team. The principal speaker was D r. Herbert C. Libby, Mayor of Waterville. He declared that the team was backed by : a living and growing Colby ; an i nterested and loyal faculty ; the finest board of t ru stees i n the country ; an intensely loyal graduate and u ndergraduate body ; loyal friend s ; and the "greatest college president i n the country." Senator Wadsworth, ' 9 2 , chairman of the board of t rustees, next en­ couraged the tea m . Carroll N . P e rkins, ' 0 4 , the representative o f t h e board of trustees, reminded the team that all former Colby teams were watching them. D r. M a rq uardt, of the faculty, then rendered h i s usual i nteresting s peech. The two final s peeches were delivered by Coach E dward C. Roundy, and Captain Thomas F . O ' Donnell, '27. Coach Roundy asserted his con­ fidence i n the team and i n the fact that they were physically fit and wo u l d fight a good fight t h e next day. Captain O'Don nell expressed faith i n both team and coach, and a firm purpose to do the best that was h umanly possible. Perhaps the m ost encouraging event of this memorable Colby N ight was the P resident's prophecy that with i n two years Colby would possess a new gymnasi u m . T h i s w a s heartily seconded by Senator Wadsworth. The o ratory of the eveni ng was well suppl emented by the Colby and Hebron bands, and by the refreshments supplied by President Roberts which were served by " Chef" Weymouth.

One humilred ninef/y-one


Ivy Day M i ss Ivy D ay was ob erved by the Women's D i vision on M ay 22, at Foss H al l . Dorothy H a nnaford, a s mistre · of ceremonies, gave the a d d ress of welcome. I n stead Glee Girls' the by on put wa program ting intere very a Pageant, ring p S usual of the Helen Mi tch ell, Chairman of I vy Day, presented Fol lowing the O peretta, Mi Club. lub, in a p preciation of her a corsage bouquet to Miss E m ily H eath, l eader of the Glee ass istance in supervising the progr am , which was as follow : · My Sun b The Swan

PART I

E. di Capua C. Sa int-Sae'Yls

a

a

PART I I

C a r ry M e Back t o O l d Virginny

Bland Moza rt Hayden

b D rink to Me O n l y W i th Thine E ye

c Dost Thou Love Me S i ster Rut h

Si ter Ruth, Ma rjorie Du nstan Brother John, Leonora H a l l PART I I I OPERETTA

"THE QUEST OF THE GYPSY" Isabel Ida Barbara Lillian M yra Rhoda Dorothy Jean Cora Lena F a ith Gypsy Man Co unt ry Bo y

Clua 1·a cters

M a rtha A l len Mary H o l l and H e le n S m ith Violette Boulter E dna Cohen Ruth Daggett Pearle Grant C l a ire Richa rdson E lizabeth Gross A lexa n d rine Fu ller O l ive Richa rdson True H a rdy H a r riet Towle

A cco1npcmist, Je ssie A l exander Specialty Dances, Louise Chapman, Bern ice

Collins

A t the concl usion of the O peretta all the c l asses j o i ned in the Proce ssional M a rch, led by the Seniors in cap a n d gown. M iss Edith Grearson, P resident of the Senior C l ass, cond ucted the planting of the ivy, a n d presented the trowel to the J uni o r Class P resident, Fra nces Nason. The I vy Day Ode, sung by all, concl uded the exercises for the afternoon . In the evening a performance of W i l l i a m Shakespeare's " Twelfth ight" was pre­ sented i n modern costume, at the Junior H igh School. Professor Carl J. Weber di rected the pla y . A vote wa taken on whether the play was more or less effective i n the modern backgrou n d , but no decision could be made as the votG was even l y di v ided. The cast was a s fol lows : "TWE LFTH TIGHT" V i o l a , l ater d isguised as Cesa rio Captain M a riner Sailor S i r Toby Belch M a ria, Cou ntess Olivia's m a i d S i r A n d rew Aguecheek, o n e of S i r Toby's friends D uke O rsino C u rio, an attendant o n t he Duke Fabian, Countess O l iv i a 's bell boy M a l volio, Cou ntess O l ivi a 's steward Countess O li via Lady-in-Waiting Sebasti a n , the brother of Viola Antonio, a sol d i e r of fortune Officer of the I l l yr i a n Police

One hwndred nimety-two

F ra nces N a on R uth Dow E velyn E s tey M y rtle M a i n J u l ia M a y o Dorothy Giddin gs A rdelle Chase M artha D av i s Lura Norcross M a rtha Sundberg Helen S m it h Alexandrine Fuller Lou i se Chapman Doris Sanborn M a rguerite Chase


EXHI BITI ONS

·


LYFORD INTERS

H O LASTI

PRIZE SPEAK!

G CONTEST

p e c i a l p r i ze aggregating o n e h u n d red d o l l a r , the g i f t o f W i l l H a rtwe l l Lyford of the cl a s of 1 79, of hic ago, I l l i n o i , a re made avail able to the College, an d a re op n to the young men attending preparatory chools in M a i ne, New H a m p h i re, and M a achu ett . Th c h ief object of the p r i ze · i to encou rage p ub l ic speaking, and the award a re made for general exc l l ence i n declamation. H OOLS R E PR E ENTED I N 1 9 26 Ba ngor H igh L i vermore Falls H igh Brid gton Academy Maine Central I n stitute M a l den ( M a s . ) H igh B r i dgton H i gh anton H i gh M il o H igh a r rnel H i gh Newport H i gh North ( Worce�ter, Ma s. ) oburn la sical I n stitute ony H i gh Portl an d H i gh E a tham pton ( M a . ) H igh R ichmond H igh E a t M i l l i nocket H igh S a nford H i gh Edward Little H i gh kowhega n H igh Good W i l l H igh Strong H igh Traip Academy H ebron Academy I aterville H igh Higgin l a ical In tit ute We tbrook H igh J o rdan H igh W i n throp H i gh Leavitt In titute ommerce Worce ter ( M a �- ) H i "'h Scho0l of

H igh

LYFORD PRIZE FOH 1 9 25-1 926 Fir t pr ize, W i n low L . Jone , Portl an d H igh ; econd p r i ze, L i n wood Lagerson, We tbrook H i gh ; t h i rd p rize, Georg E . Lodgen, M al de n ( M a � · ) H igh ; fourth prize, A l bert L. Hall, Worce ter ( Ma s . ) H igh. · E V E T E E 1 TH AN U A L M U R R A Y P R I Z E D E B A T E T h e sum o f o n e h u n dred dol l a r , t h gift of George Edwi n M u rray, o f t h e c l a s o f 1 8 7 9 , o f Lawrence, M a ach u ett , i aw arded t o t h e · i x p u b l i c debater cho en from a m ong the tudent electi n g Public peaking 6 . Seventy-five dollars i g i ven to th e w i n n i n o· team, to be divi ded equally among the t h ree peakers · twenty-five dollars i s gi ven t o the losing team , t o b e d ivided i n l i ke manner. M U R R A Y PRIZE'S FOR 1 9 25- 1 926 '2 ; Ken neth H . W i n n i n g team , C h a rl es P . Nelson, '2 ; L aw rence A . P ake Losing team, Joh n D . Jo h n o n , '27 ; Arth u r B . Levine, '28 ; Lind a y C. a sen s , '2 . V a r n u m , '26. SEVE T E E N T H A N N U A L H A L L O W E L L P R I Z E S P E A K ! G C O N T E S T S peci al prizes aggregating o n e h u n d red dollar , t h e gift of F lorenti u s Merri l l H a l l owel l , o f t h e c l a o f 1 7 7 , a re awarded t o t h e best speaker among t h e students elect i n g Public S peaking 6. The aim i s the encou ragement of public peaki n g. SIXTEENTH A NUAL GOODWIN PRIZE SPEAK! G 0 TEST S peci a l p rizes aggregating o n e h un d red dollars, g i ven b y M atie E . Good w i n of Skowhega n , M a in e , in memory of her h u s ba n d , Hon. F erre t Goodwin , of the class of 18 7, are awa rded to students in the Men's D ivision for excellence in the delivery of origina 1 addres8. A N UAL H A M L I P RI Z E S P E A K I N G CONTE ST A fi rst prize of ten dollars and a second p r ize of five dollars are awarded to the two best speakers i n the F reshman H am l i n Pr i ze S peaking Contest, Men's D ivision, for excellence i n p ublic read ing . S im i l a r award s are made i n the Women's D iv i si o n . S O P H O M O R E PRIZ E D E C L A M A T I O N A fi r st p r ize of t e n dol l ars a n d a second p r ize o f fi v e dollars are awa rded to the two best peaker in the Sophomore Declamation , Men's D i v i s i o n , for excellence i n declamation. S i m i l a r awards a re made i n t h e Women's D i v i s i o n . J U N T O R P R I Z E E X H I BI T I O N A fi r t p r ize o f twenty-five dollars, a second p r ize o f fifteen dollars, a n d a t h i r d prize of t e n dol l a rs a re awarded to the t h ree b e s t speakers i n the J u n i o r Exhibit ion, Men's D i v i si o n , for excellence i n com pos ition a n d declamation. S i m i l a r awards a re m ade in the Women's Divisio n . S I X T H A NUAL CO BU RN PR I ZE S P E A K I N G C O N T E S T S peci a l p r i zes aggregating o n e h u nd red dol lars, the gift o f Louise H elen Cobu r n , o f the c l a s s o f 1 8 7 7 , are awarded to t h e best speakers i n a p u b l i c contest o p e n to a l l members o f the Women 's D i v i s i o n .

One hundred ninety-[our


C.CJ M M E.N C.EM EN

T


Junior Class Day MON DAY, JUNE 14, 1926, 9.30 A. M . LOWE R CAMPUS Prayer

Theodore Prescott E mery CLASS ODE Hail to thee, blest alma mater, Guardian of a fuller life, Lead us on to nobler efforts, Teach us mastery in the strife, N ot the mastery of our fellows, Not the gain of selfish praise, But the strong, eternal triumph Of each self through endless days. Short the years h ave been and fleeting, Spent within thy sacred halls, Learning how to heed thy message Sounded out when d uty calls. Guided by thy l ight inspiring, Truth has held before our gaze, Thou hast fostered, led us, nourished­ Praise to thee, our mother, praise. I n the year that lies before us May thy counsels give us m ight, Gird us for the life triumphant, Arm us for l ife's noble fight. Hail to thee, our alma mater ; May the scroll of fut u re days Show us ever true and loyal, P raise to thee, our mother, praise.

History of Women

Bernice Vivian Green

Poem

Martha Sandberg MUSIC

H istory of Men A ward i ng of Gifts

William A lexander Macomber Robert Leroy Bowerhan

C lass O ration

Rowland E verett Baird

Address by Class Guest of Honor

R ichard Alston Metcalf

One hundred nimety-six


Senior Class D ay LOWE R C A M PUS T U E SDAY, JUNE 1 5 , 1 9 2 6 , 1 0 A. M. O R D E R O F E XE R C ISE1S MUSIC

P rayer

Gabriel Raphael G uedj MUSIC CLASS ODE

( Air : "Our Yesterdays" ) The world calls us on to its cares and its song, We are leaving dear Colby's halls ; And the h ou rs we h ave spent, filled with m irth and content, Will help us when d uty calls. Down the pathway of life, 'mid the toil and the strife, Colby's fame we will t ry to u phold ; And in memory's lane there will always remain H appy thoughts that can ne'er grow old. Donald E dwin Sprague

Oration

Agnes E l izabeth Osgood

A wardin g of Honors

Gilbert Linwood Earle MUSIC

Address to Undergraduates

Adelaide Stone Gordon Joseph Frank Goodrich

Address by C l ass G uest of Honor

Clarence Edmund Meleney, L L . D . , '76

S i nging of P i pe Ode Smoking of the P i pe of Peace Willow Address

M ollie R oosevelt Seltzer Claude Lawrence Stineford

Parti n g Address

Paul Mercier E dmunds

Singing of the Parting Ode One hundrred ninetty-seven


THE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH

Annual C ommencement OF

Colby College WED ESDAY, JUNE 1 6 , 1 926 ORDER OF E X E R CISES MUSIC Prayer

Rev. George Merriam

Add ress, "The Dewdrop and the Aby

"

Abbott Emerson Smith

Address, " Ideal of Modern Youth "

Agnes E lizabeth Osgood

Addres , " Life and Character of Elij ah Pari h Lovej oy" Donald Chester Freeman Commencement Add ress

Rev. Arthur Word worth Cleaves. D . D . , '98 Conferring of Degrees A warding of Prizes Benediction

Honors in General Scholarship THE M E N 'S DIVISION Magna Cum LatUde

Herbert McCoy Wortman

Donald Norris Armstrong C u m La,ude

Roger Adams Stinchfield Francis Firth Bartlett

Abbott Emerson Smith Donald Chester Freeman

THE W O M E N 'S DIVISION Magna C u m LatUde

Dorothy E lizabeth Farnum Agnes Blizabeth Osgood Mary Marguerite Albert Cum Lwude

Frances Christine Booth Mollie Roosevelt Seltzer Hilda Mary Fife Julia Agnes B rouder Esther E lizabeth Wood Adelaide Stone Gordon Imogene Frances Hill One hu ndred ninety-eight


Honors and Prizes A warded 1925-1926 T H E M E N 'S DIVISION Con d o n Meda l : Cornm e n ce m en t :

Ken neth J . S m i t h . P r ize f o r excel l e nce i n E n g l i � h C o m p o s i t i o n , Donald C . Freem a n , '26.

H erbert . W o r t m a n , D o n a l d N . A rm trong, A. Stinchfiel d , F rancis F . B a rtlett, Abbott E. S m i th, Donal d C . F reem a n .

Members of 1-'h i B ta Kcippci :

F i rst P 1 i z e , R o l a n d E . B a i rd ; Second Prize, M a r i o n T h i r d P r ize, H e rbert . Je nkin .

J u n '.o r Exh i bitic n :

Soph o-m o 1 e Decla nw t io n :

Roger

. R hoades ;

F i rst Pr ize, Cecil E. Foote ; Second Pr ize, A r t h u r B. Levine.

ot awarded.

Ha nilin Reading :

F res h mmi S h olc o s h' ip P1 izes : H iggins.

F i r st P rize, Lowell P . Lela n d ; Second P r ize, P h i l i p R.

GERMA

Pi·izes fo r E ceilen e i 1 1 Ge1 ntc m : L a wrence H. C la rk , '2 7 .

PRIZES

F i r t P r ize, Bas ford

C.

Getchel l , '27 ; Second Prize,

GREEK PRIZES

Fos t e r M e m o r ia l Greek P1 i-e : A wa rded .

A l b ion vV oodbw y Snrnll Pi ize :

F o r excellence in i nterpreti ng of Greek A uthors,

ot

No com pet ition.

THE WOM E N'S DIVISION Co m mence m e n t : P r ize f o r excel l ence i n i\lle mber of Phi Beta Kap7; a : D c rothy

E n g l i s h Com position, A gnes E .

0

good

'26.

E. Farnum, A g nes E. O sgood , M . M a rguerite hristine Booth, Adel aide S . Gcrdon, Mollie R . S el t ­ A l bert, A g nes J. BTOude r, F. zer, H i l d a M . F i fe, E t h e r E . W o o d , I mogene F . H i l l . F i rst P r ize, F rances M . N a son ; Second P r ize, J u l i a D . M ay o ; T h i r d P r ize, E velyn M . E stey .

J u n i01· Exh ibition :

Sopha-mo-re Decla m a tfo n : H orn.

Hamlin Reading : F1

F i rst P r i ze , H a r r i et E . Towle ;

Second P rize, A lberta V a n

Not a wa rded.

h ma n Sch olci rs h ip P1 i�

s:

D ud l e y .

F i rst

P rize,

GERMA

M a ry

E.

\

ose, Second

Pr ize,

irginia

PRIZES A.

For excellence i n i n te r p reting of G r eek A uthors, H i l d a

M.

W y m a n , ' 2 ; E l ie H . Lewi , '29.

D ivided between R u t h

M.

Helen

Pi izes /01· Excellence i n Ge1 n'l!a n :

T i l t o n , '28 ;

G R E E K P RI Z E

Fos ter Me m o 1 ial Prize : F i fe , '26.

Cob u n1 P1·ize Spea king Cm1 test :

ot a w a r de d.

One h u nd;·ed n in ety-n ine


Degrees Conferred in 1926 B ac h e l or

o

f Arts

THE M E N 'S D IVISION E lmer Forest Allen Roxbury, Mass. George Butler Barnes Hou lton Francis Firth Bartlett Waterville Carl John Bergman China Everett Joseph Condon Shrewsbury, Mass. William Moody Ford Whitefield William Edward Garabedian Cambridge, Mass. Gabriel Raphael Guedj Belfast Reuben Freemont Hunter Houlton Hartland Roy Hilton Short Abb ot t E merson Smith Waterville Donald Sprague Boothbay Harbor Leon Hugh Warren Portland Albert William Wassell Worcester, Mass. THE W O M E N 'S DIVISION Mary Marguerite Albert Virginia Elizabeth Baldwin Mildred E mma Bickmore Frances Christine Booth Agnes Julia Brouder Helen Hope Chase Edna Conant Mary Alpha C rosby Helen E lizabeth Davis Irma Vesta Davis Lena Rumery Drisco Dorothy Elizabeth Farnum H i lda Mary Fife E lsie Mitchell Frost E dith Melvina Grearson Beatrice Emma Ham Margaret Coralie Hardy Madeline Pauline Woodworth E mily Redington Heath Imogene Frances Hill Edna E velyn Kellett Esther Angelia Lord Pauline Amanda Lunn Madeline Marcia Merrill Jennie Louise N utter Agnes E lizabeth Osgood Doris Irene Roberts Lerene Mae Rolls Marion Bradford Rowe E velyn Leda R ushton Two Fuwru11¡ed

Houlton Bangor Charleston Lawrence, Mass. Methuen, Mass. B rownville Winterport Waterville Newport B urnham Belfast Wilton Kittery Waterville Calais L ivermore Falls Sanford Fairfield Waterville Portland Lawrence, Mass. Bangor Waterville Mad ison Monson P ittsfield, N . H . Sherman Mills E ast Peru Woodfords Methuen, Mass.


Mollie R oosevelt Seltzer O live May Soule Florence D avenport S t evens E liza Franklin Tarrant E sther E lizabeth Wood

Fai rfie l d Augusta M i lton Mills, N . H. Manchester, N . H. B lue. Hill

Bachelor of Science THE M E N ' S D IVISION Donald Norris Armst rong Waterville Isaac E ugene Bagnall Houlton Stephen B u rbank Berry P rovidence, R . I . Roy Arthu r E ither Houlton Kenneth W i lliam B ragdon Westbrook Russell Frederick B rown Fairfield Gilbert Lenwood E arle Lisbon Falls Paul Mercier E d m u nd s New York A rthur William E kholm Norwood, Mass. Worcester, Mass. William E lmer Fagerstrom Samuel Robert Feldman Springfield, Mass. ' E ve rett Arnold F ransen Lynn, Mass. D onald Chester Freeman A ugusta N ew Sharon Clyde E dward Getchell J oseph Frank Goodrich P ittsfield Clarence Edwin Hale Washburn Hope Roy K night Hobbs N o rt h Vassalboro Isaiah M atthew Hodges Farmington George French Ho¡dgkins Stonington , Conn. Charles Otto Ide Millinocket P h i l i p E dward Keith West O range,' N. J . Melville G raves Kilborn Waterville Alden Linwood Kittridge Gorham Leslie E ugene Knight M ethuen, Mass. A lfred Norgate Law Waterville Cliffo rd Henry Littlefield Abington, Mass. Carl Reynolds MacPherson M anchester, N . H. W i l b u r B ulman McAllister Cambridge, Mass. John Anthony M cG owan, J r . Wytopitlock Clarence Ronald M c La ughlin N orth Vassalboro Harry M u i r Hulls Cove B e rnard N ickerson B elfast Carroll Snow P a rker Waterville E llis Freeman Parmenter Houlton Herschel Earle P eabody Smyrna Mills George E dward Roach Oakland Norris R oy Sawtelle Waterville Kenneth J efferson Smith Franklin Jam es Bernard S pr�gue Clinton Roger Adams Stinchfield B rownville Jct. Claude Lawrence Stineford Houlton Harry B urnham Thomas Two htitndred

on e


John Staples Tibbetts Carroll Dana Tripp Lindsay Charles Varnam Herbert Mc Coy Wortman

Farmington Portland Waterville Wytopitlock

THE WOM E N ' S DIVISION Clara Mary Collins Katherine Mary Coyne Adelaide Stone Gordon Helen Irene Ky le E sther Althea Lord Girlandine Irene Priest N ela Goldie Sawtelle Ruby Marion Shuman Ruth Katherine Tu rner Edna May Tuttle

Portland Waterville Woodfords Waterville Ea t Lebanon North Vassalboro Oakland Week Mill Augusta Somerville, Mass.

Honorary Degrees MA STER OF A RTS

C lyde Elwin Russell, '23 Walter Llewellyn Gray, '95 Charles Loring Andrew E leanor Bailey Woodman

Waterville South Paris Augusta Winthrop

D OCTOR OF DIVINITY

Rev. George Merriam, '79 DOCTOR OF HU M AN E LETTERS D rew Thomas Harthorne, '94

Skowhegan Waterville

DOCTOR OF LAWS

Judge Norman Leslie Bassett, ' 9 1 Judge Charles Putnam Barnes, ' 9 2

A ugusta Hou lton

D OCTOR O F LETTERS

Robert Lincoln O' Brien

Two hundred two

Boston, Mass.


Dr. Mar quardt In Dr. Marquardt were combined the virtues of h is n a­ tive and of his adopt ive country. H e was typically German i n his painstaking thoroughnes , his scorn of superficiality, his pat ient endu rance of a grinding routine, i n the tenacity with which h e held to what he believed to be r ight and the fide 1 ity with which he discharged every known d uty. B ut, though born and bred i n the north of Germany, he had l ittle sympathy with the m il itaristic and imperiali tic ideals of P russia ; and with his bride h e early sought the privileges that America offered. And more keenly than the average native American he a ppreciated and enj oyed the freedom of life and breadth of opportunity w hich this count ry af­ fords. H e was proud to be an American citizen ; and when "America" was cal led for h e could sing i t l u stily straight through to the end and quite put to shame some of us na­ tives who are apt to falter and fall out on the later stanzas. To him ours was the " Sweet land of liberty ; " and he was one of its "noble free." I n politics, religion, a n d a l l o f life h e was an i ndependent, i m patient o f all c ramping d ogmas ; yet q uick to respond to sentiment. Who of us that knew him can forget the l i gh t i n his eyes and the m u ic in h is voice as he recited from his favorite German poet ? N ot only was D r . M a rquardt master of his own native language and literatu re, b ut he had also a quite remarkable command of the E nglish language, and was quick to detect and prone to criticise any sli pshod use of i t by us to whom it i s our m other-tongue. It a fforded h i m distinct satisfac­ tion t o be able to correct his student 's bl unders i n E nglish expression. D r . M a rquardt was a born teacher. He made the c lassroom exercise so a ll-absorbing that the problem of discipline, in the narrow sense of the word, rarely a rose. His happy tempering of sternness and strictness w ith flashes of p ungent wit and h umor saved him from the unhappy experiences that so many foreigners have when they undertake to teach our young barbarians. That same whimsical play of wit made a speech from " Dutchy" an in­ dispensable featu re of Colby N ight . Perhaps few of us realized the sleep­ l ess nights those speeches cost him before and after : before i n pondering what he would say, and after i n mourning over those "best points" that he forgot to bring out. What will Colby N ight be without him ? A n d what will Heaven be to h i m without his bel oved Colby c lassroom and campus-a n d California ? H e loved Colby and wa devotedly loyal to all her i nterests. H e loved his students and was intensely interested in t heir interests and enterprises. H e held i n memory and i n his affection a l l the s o n s and d a u ghters o f C o l b y w h o m h e h a d known i n his thi rty-five years of service, and watched ever with pleasure and with pride their suc­ cesses. And who can estimate his contribution to those successes, or count u p t h ose extra h o u rs that he so freely added to a n all-too-heavy schedule in his eager desire that all, even the slowest and d ullest, hould "make the grade." ·

CLARENCE H . W HITE. Two hitndred five


Necrology" 1926- 1927 GRADUATES Name

Cla s

Died 1 927

'73

Nathaniel Butler, Jr.

'74

Charle

'76

Ansley Ezra Woodsum

1 927

'80

Herbert Le lie Kelley

1926

'83

Charles Dole Edmunds

1 926

'85

Frank Howard Edmunds

1926

'86

John Ryder Wellington

1926

E mery Williams

1 926

'96

Edward Lindsay Hall

1926

'07

Lewis Walker Dunn

1926

'17

Theodore Nathan Levine

1927

N ON-GRADUATES '65

Frederick Charles Thayer

1926

'70

Prentiss Mellen Woodman

1926

'70

John Richmond Hathaway

1926

'79

Oscar Charles Davies

1927

'81

Charles Williams Mathews

1 926

'82

A lfred Hyde N oyes

1 927

'88

Charles Kelsey Allen

1 926

'93

E ugene Lincoln Torrey

1 927

'23

Dean Simpson

1927

Two hundred six


Washington S quare" Ne""W" York City By BETTY MORSE Those of you who have been to Washington Square, South, may have caught u p a fragment of its temperament, but only a fragment. To know Washington Square, South, to know its temperament, you must live there among those tall, overcrowded tenements, that line the narrow, dirty streets ; among the cries and laughter, the songs and th reats of an Italian people that steadfastly refuses to become Americanized. . Then, having noted all this sordidness and squalor, if you l ooked across the park to Washington Square, North, you were agreeably surprised, and also a bit perplexed. These two streets, Washington Square, South and Washington Square, N orth, that face each other with only a park between them, are extremely opposite in appearance and temperament. Wa"sh i ng­ ton Square, North is an aristocratic street, and its i nhabitants boast of position, wealth and distinguished ancestry. The i rony of it ! These two streets, as unlike as can be, face each other almost defiantly, and only a small park, two or three blocks square, to keep them properly sectioned off. The park i tself is a place where a stu­ dent of human nature may go i n quest of material. There you may find occasional art ists from the neighboring Greenwich Village i n the conven­ tional garb of unconvent ionality, trying to put on canvas a replica of New York University, or the J udson Memorial, or perhaps Washington Square Arch. There you may also find students from the University, lolling about i n the sun, and watching the painted shop-girls who go by not at all u ncon­ scious of this appraisal. There, t oo, you may see nurse-maids perambulat­ ing their charges, or keeping a watchful eye on them as they play on the lawn. Occasionally these children of fortune, who are much t oo young to be aware of social differences, make advances to the dirty, ragged Italian children who romp about noisily. They attract each other for some u nknown reason ; perhaps the poor marvel at the handsome clothes of the rich, and the rich, i n turn , marvel at the slovenly rags of the poor. It is said that opposites attract. *

*

*

*

Four girls of possibly seventeen years of age were grouped together near the north side of the park. They looked like flowers, as sweet and expensively exquisite as a Fifth Avenue Shop could make them. And right in the middle of that pageant of flowers, like a splash of color, a single purple dahlia, was Toinette Givan n i o, very evidently from the Italian dis­ trict to the south of the park. She was dark and exotic, and of a rich, lus­ cious beauty. She was like a dahlia, only she lacked its fine, delicate finish. The girls who had encircled her, were imploring her to do something, but she was abashed at their loveliness. Their grace and poise made her feel self-conscious and awkward. She seemed c onfused. "But I can't go, " she was saying i n l iquid tones. "For one thing, I haven't the clothes. I live down that way. " She pointed south. "What of that ?" replied a slim girl in blue. "I will lend you one of my d resses. Oh, perfect ! My pale gold chiffon with your j et black hair ! Grit, wouldn't she be the belle of the ball ! My dear Toinette, you m ust go ! We shall all meet at three tomorrow and make more arrangements. Bye ! " T w o hundred eight


Three girl waved a farewell, and made their way n orthward arm i n a rm . They were Margaret A lcott, E leanor Peck, and Joan Sumner. ( You have heard of these prominent fam i l ies, no doubt. Their names are known not only i n New York, but i n Paris, Vienna, and London. I n the old days of the Metropolitan Opera H ouse, when only the distingue could afford to attend, a l l eyes were promptly centered o n these elite as soon as they en­ tered their boxes. A low buzz would lift on the air and hover there until the rise of the c u rtain . ) And now the daughters of such families were making a peculiar move. They were asking a person from "below" t o one of their parties. Had social distinctions been erased, then ? Had classes of society moved u p o r down, according t o their positions, and merged into one ? No, that had n ot yet come to pass. These girls, children of the rich, had no altruistic purpose in m i n d . I n fact, they had always made it a point to snub all those whose stations in l ife were below their own ; but these girls had played together in the park as children. Grit had had an Italian n u rse who used to bid Toinette's mother the time of d ay, while the children overcame their fi rst shyness and became q uite friendly. As a youngster of five, Toinette was fascinated by these fortu nate children, who in t urn were attracted by her. B ut as they grew older, they realized that the park was not a m e lting pot ; it was a barrier between two classes. They realized that snubbing was n ecessary t o show their superiority. On the part of Grit and her friends, snubbing was requ ired t o put persons i n their proper places ; on the part of Toinette, snubbing was required to maintain some dignity. Living in adj acent neighborhoods, they met freq uently, and Toinette often received the condescension of a pert nod of the head in recognition ; she a lways returned the recogn ition as condescendingly as possible. N ow, they had actually stopped her on her way from high school and i nvited her to a party. It was almost unbelievable. Why, Toinette pon­ dered. Why ? While she washed the supper dishes, and attended to the fire i n the stove, while she prepared her studies for the n ext day, she asked herself this question. And then, woman-like, she knew. It came on her all at once, and she felt that its truth was unquestionable. How d o women know '? They j ust know,-that is all the answer one can give. I t was-it m ust be-Margaret A'lcot t 's brother, William. When Toinette was quite small, William, who was then called " B oy," had force­ fully tried to take from her a n old stick that served, with the help of a faded pink ribbon, as a doll. She had immediately raised the stick, to which only a moment before she had been crooning a l ullaby, and bro ught i t d ow n heavily on Boy's head. At once there were screams, tears, a m other apologizing profusely to an outraged n u rse-maid, and a public beat ing for T'o inette by her parent. S ince then Boy had held 'her somewhat i n awe ; fear was m ixed with admiration. E ven when, during the process of growing up, a n unwritten law pulled them in opposite directions, this incident was not forgotten. Toinette sensed William's glances of a pproval as she passed him, although she did n ot venture to look his way. That was it ! William wanted to see her ; to see of what stu ff she was made. Well, she would l et h i m see. The only difference b etween them, after all, was that their parents were rich while hers were poor. Their fine manners came from the private t utoring they got. The tutoring was a result of wealth. It a l l came from m oney-. She stormed and raged about wealth, and how poorly a pportioned wealth was. Two hundred n ine


When the day of the party arrived, Toi nette wa in Grit' room, admir­ ing her elf in the long gla . Her borrowed gown of gold ch iffon made her look l ike a young god de . She wa lovely, and knew it. She wa formally introduced to William ; he acknowledged the intro­ d uct ion as formally. Could he be Toinette Givannio ( she thought ) brought up in squalor and uglines ? With what magn i ficent bravado she took her place beside him, on a divan i n the win dow, piled high with beau­ tifu l cu hion , and at there between horror and fascination. She thought of unl ight laugh i ng in and out of pri on bars, and the i nner glow that pose sed her, pread o u t and made her eye cint illate. This, then, wa the capt ivating world which alway eemed to stretch ju t beyond the reach of her finger tip ! Thi mu ic, thi dancing, the e pretty gi rl , this lovely room ! She had quite forgotten William. What had he been aying all this time ? Oh, yes-that tick with the pink ribbon. She managed t o an swer yes or no occasionally, although she barely heard what h e said. When she had danced everal time -alway · with William, and a lways returning to the d ivan i n the window she began t o sense a n uncomfortable ituation . She realized that everyone at the pa rty held h imself or h erself a l i ttle aloof ; that William too, wa merely satisfyi ng a peculiar whim. They had found a cheap toy in a ten-cent tore and were going to play with it a while, then to s it away in scorn , and return to their more expensive playthi ngs ! Toinette looked about her. Until now, she had been blinded by the sumpt uousness of the place ; but all at once he saw t hrough it. Here were these gi rls, i rresponsible, vain snobs. What did .all this amount to-all this sparkli ng, i nce sant talk, almost gush ing as if bidding for favor or popularity ? Is this what the n orth side stood for ? Mere mechanical l ife, false relationsh i p , and perpetual convention. It was not for Toinette. At least there was purpo e in life at the south side. She liked t hat word "pu rpose." She was only seventeen, and could not conquer the world, but she wa going back to her south side with a pu rpose. She would t each , preach, and practice t here, and lift their living to a h igher plane. "Care to dance this one ?" William looked h opeful. "Well, j ust this one, and please, I should l ike to be taken home." "What ! So soon ! L ife has n ot begun yet ! " "No, i t hasn 't ; b u t it starts with a purpose n ow. Just one dance and I must go. " She went . The next morning she remarked to her work-worn mother, "Did you ever know t he difference between there ( pointing a finge r ) and here ? We have wooden sticks about which we tie a pink ribbon, and we build u p d reams about them . The stick becomes a doll . The doll becomes real ; it talks, etc. They have real things, lovely dolls, and fail to see their value. We have purpose ; they drift . That's the d ifference between Wash­ i ngton Square, North and Washington Square, South. Give me this side ! "

T w o h undred ten


Interlude A One-Act Play Adapted from the Story by Henry Meade William By ROLAND E . B AIRD, ' 2 7 C HARACTERS : M AE : Th e y o,un g w ife of Max well Da hlg ren LORRE TURNER : Th e form e r lo v e r of Ma e SANDRA : A m a id TI M E : M i d -afternoon of a warm day in J u ly PLACE : The Dahlgren home in Santa Barbara, California SCENE :

It is m id-afternoon of .a wa. 1 m s wm m er clay at t h e b egin ning of July. The s u n , strea m fog in fro m t h e windo ws on e it h e r side of t he well­ stocked b oolwa e b uilt into t he wall at t h e right , t ints with an u n rea l g l o w the needle-point design on th e oosy chair pliaced a t best a dvan­ tage for t h e light fro m the fU?·ther win d o w a nd fo r rea dy a ccessibilit y t o t h e shel es. T he wann ligh t , strihng t h e daintily colorf u l design of t h e rugs on the polished fl o o r, seems t o belie. the coldness of the he.a 1th on t h e left, which , t h ough vart'ha lly o bscured b y a n ornate s creen, le nds its a t m osphere t o the coo!ing ease of t h e clivia n w hich rests in. the s hadow of a heav y o b l ong, highly polished t a ble s ta ndin g i n t h e cente r of t h e room a n d facing t h e fire-pl1ace (l t a n easy angle. A n ea.sy chair has been pbaced at the 'llpsta g e en d of t h e fire-place and faces the dimatn. Fro m half-opened French windows at the b ack of the ro o m.. , left, a fit­ f u l b reeze st irs t-he lea es of a book of com p ositions opened at random, on the 1;ack of t he baby g rand p ia n o sta ndin g in t he c o rner, ba ck-left. Back-right opens into a tapes t ry-h ung ha ll co?'lmecting wit h the o u t­ sid e , a,nd offering the on � y mi t rn.nce to .the roo m . Upon one end of a table a silk ha t with g lo v es a nd ca ne h as b een m etic ulously placed. The o t h m· e nd holds a t eleph o n e h idden in the q uain t for1n of a n old­ fia,shioned doll. T o t h e righ t of t h e French win d o ws is a. writitng desk of delica te work­ manship . *

*

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ACT I Sce ne 1 As t h e c u1'1·ain rises , M AE is s eated a,t t h e desk, h e r b a ck to t he roo m , evidently c o m posing a letter. This finish ed she rises, g oes t o the win­ d o ws ( back-left ) , a nd looks o u t dream ily on the terra ced shru bs with their quiet leaves dozing in the la.zy war m t h of the aftern oon sun .

SANDRA ( co m ing from the ha ll b e a riJn g a jewel-case ) : The j ewel-case, M'am. MAE ( turns from windo w , a nd .fiaces Sandrn,) : Oh, yes. You startled m e, i t is so qu iet. Place it on the table.

( The maid pLaces the casket upon t h e up-sta,ge encl of t h e table, a nd turns to le.ai e, ) MAE ( A di an.cing fo t a b le . She rests her h(J/Y/,ds upon t h e casket. ) : One

m i nute, please, Sandra. the car i n the m orning ?

You have everything ready to be placed i n

Two hil1ulired elev"n

·


SANDRA ( turning ) : Yes, M 'am. I h ope you have a pleasant trip. MAE : Thank you, Sandra. It was so fort unate t hat Mr. Dahlgren could manage to get away at this time. (iSa,nd1·a turns to leave. ) And oh, Sandra, if everything has been attended to, it won't be necessary for you to serve this evening. You may leave on your vacation this after­ noon if you wish ; only please see me before you go. Someth ing may come u p at the la t minute. SANDRA ( curt·sies ) : Thank you, M'am. ( ExiJSts . ) ( Mae looks down a t t h e jeivel-oase a nd absent-mmdedly runs h e r fin­ g,ers CYVer the em bellished surfa,ce. Her tho u.ghts a re fa,r from Santa Barbara,. Fma Uy, picking w.p the ca sket, she oarries it to the div a n where s h e sits, one l e g curled under her, t h e case in h e r lap. ) MAE ( s till toying with .the carved lid ) : Memorie , how they linger ! They spring to life when we are least prepared. (She takes a tiny key sus­ pended from a delioa,te gold chain a round her nec k ; unlocks and slow­ ly opens the casket . ) Why can we never completely destroy the t races of yesterday ? ( She takes a sealed let.t·er from the b ottom of the cas­ ket and fingers it. ) Lorre, you impulsive dear. You said you would never write. How long ago that seems now. How far away. That was a wonderful year with its round of gaieties, its i nformal parties, and its i nt imate life ; intimate life, Lorre. ( She imip ulsively starts to break the s eal, then just as abr'W[J•tl!y stops . ) No, that is past. Green­ wich is far from Santa Barbara ; it must forever be far from Max Dah lgren 's wi�e. ( Mae heS'Vt·a tes, then carefully tears the unopened letter into tiny bits. She rises Q.;nd goes to the fire-place where she draws aside the screen, Q/Y/,d places the torn shreds of the letter on the hearth. ) It is over, Lorre, it m ust be over. I gave you everything, everything I had to offer. Now, ( as she lights the torn scra ps of the ( Sh e stands suddenly as though to drive the letter) it is over. thoughts froni her mim d ; and yet the crim,kling pa .per ho·lds a fascitrw� tion for her. She is loath to turn awa y. She m us es . ) You said you would never write, but you did. You vowed you would never see me again, but-Oh , Lorre, you did come after all. You h aven't forgotten, and, ( ia ch oked sob escapes her) dear God, neither have I . ( Door b ell rings. ) (!Mae turns, stwrUed. There is a suggestion of guiht 1Jn her manner as she faces the hall. Sandra, dressed for the street, is seen goiJng to the door. ) LORRE ( outside ) : Is Mrs. Dahlgren at home ? SANDRA ( at hall e ntnanc e ) : A gentleman to see you, M 'am. MAE : You may show him i n . And Sandra, that will be all. We shall be at home two weeks from tomorrow. You will be ready then, of course. ( As Sandro exits, Lorre ent·ers, a m v,ch-worn panama in his ha;nd. He is of medium height, his well-knit frame accenti10;ted b y the genteel shabbiness of his clothes . ) LORRE (Jadvanc1Jng ) : Mae ! MAE ( crossing to meet him ) : Hello, Lorre ! Let me take your hat. ( Lorre strolls to t/he fire-vlace while Mae pZaces his oot on the hall table besid;e that of her husband. It is evident toot she notices the contra.st . ) M A E ( returYl!img ) : I ' m so glad y o u could come out, Lorre. Two lvundrred twelve


L ORRE : I couldn't go through Santa Barbara without seeing you. Do you m i n d ? ( Mae smiles in reply. Lo1·re continues, looking aroun d the room with an air of awe and timidfity. ) And this is your home Mae ? ' It is awfully nice. MAE ( crossing, and seatin g herself on t he diva n ) : We l ike it here. Won't you smoke ? LORRE (1a.s he takes a worn package of cigwrettes from his pocket ) : My, but you m ust be h appy here. ( M1a e 1mdioates that he is to sit in the easy chair b y the fire-place. L orre accepts the pro/erred cfuair and sit-s, his legs nonchalantly crrossed, the fingers of one hand oaressing the textwie of t he chair arm while the other hand holds his cigarette. He m uses, g.azimg thought­ fullty at the ciga rette. In the silen ce th·at follows, Mia e covertly studies L orre. ) M A E : When did you come out, Lorre ? LORRE ( s-till m usimg ) : Last week. ( Lorre fum b les mth the package, and ofjers ,a cig,arette to Mae. She accepts it and s mooithes it o ut . They both light up. L CYrre simks ba,ck into the ch;air. ) LORRE : I 've quit the store. I bummed my way out from New York to San Francisco, and got a l ift down here yesterday i n a car. I 'm going to paint stage scenery i n Los Angeles. That wiff make enough money to keep me alive while I ' m doing my own painting. But I will be here i n Sant a Barbara two or three weeks before I go. MAE (�m p ulsiv ely, as she thinks of the vacation the.{, ha,s b een planned) : B ut- ( oalm er) That's j ust wonderful, Lorre. I'm so glad you l eft. You hated that j ob so. LORRE (,animate d ) : Mae, do you remember the day you said I'd never have the courage t o leave the store ? That was the day we had a long argu­ ment about your solo dance with the O ukranski Company. ( Mae nods Well, a month later, about t h e time y o u married Max pensiv e lty . ) Dahlgren, I got a raise. Then a nother followed, and father congratu­ lated me o n settling down. About two weeks ago h e made me head of the furniture department-that's a pretty b ig j ob, you know. He told m e that he was glad I had given u p trying t o be temperamental . H e l ooked s o damned solid and comfortable that I laughed i n h i s face, went back to o u r-wel l ( with an QIJ>Ologetic s mile ) my rooms, a n d n e v e r saw the office a g a i n . ( Lorre pwuses an d folds his arm s ) I h a d t h e courage, M ae. ( Mia,s had b een listenimg, sm oking her cig(JJre tte wiJth quick, short pu.ffs. She ka,s grad1))(1llty relaxed on the divOJn until now she seems perfectly a t ease. ) MAE : Good for you, Lorre. That 's splendid. LORRE ( leaning back, a n d blowing s m o ke thoughtfully tow ards the ceil­ ing ) : I like the way you are wearing your hair, now, Mae ; so black a n d wavy, a n d careless. MAE : Thank you, Lorre. Max made m e change it. LORRE ( Starts t o smile. He rises and strolls around the room . He g oes t o the table and disinterestedly turns a few leaves o f a b ook lyimg there . ) : You should be happy here, Mae. MAE ( curtlty ) : We like it here. Two hundred thirteen


LORRE ( still a ppa re n tly interes t ed in t h e book ) : Max till with the same company ? MAE : Ye , Max is still with Rathburn, Starr and Boyd. He is manager of the Santa Barbara office. LORRE : See m uch of the Man field crowd ? They are here, I understand. MAE : No, we haven 't een any of them. Max doe n't like them very well. ( L o rre closes the book, s t ubs his ciga rette in a t ra y o n t he ta ble, looks at Ma e, t·h en st rolls to the bookcase ( righ t ) , where he beco m es in ter­ est ecl in looking o v e r the shel es. S uddenly h e t u rns. )

LORRE : You've given up dancing ? MAE : Yes, I gave up dancing. Max thought-Oh, Lorre, have you another cigarette ? ( 1L orre fis h es o u t a nother ciga rette a n cl offers it to Ma e. He lights it for h e 1· 1across tok e t a b l e . He looks a g a in a t Mae who i s sta ring into the fire-pLace ; re-a 1'?·a nges the t rinket o n the table, then goes t o th£ French window and looks o ut . )

LORRE ( t u 1'n ing s u dcle n l y ) : For God's sake, Mae, where are you going ? What are you doing ? I can't bear to ee you rot a way here you with so much. · ( Ma e s h rugs her sho ulde rs indifferen tly. Lorrre com es up to the cha ir he has vacatecl a nd cl ra ws it close to the diva n . ) Have you forgotten that wonderful night when Olive Sterns played for you, and you danced and we all sat around on the floor, or on the l ow bed­ spri ngs in the corner of Peggy's big living-room on Perry Street ? You danced wonderful1y, Mae. I guess you are laughing at me because I came here after vowing that I'd never see you again if you left me and married Max. The vow was stupid, I guess. Stupi d ? Maybe i t was stupid o f me to come. ·

(1 Lor'te t h ro ws his head back, a nd s ta re3 at the ceiling. Ma e starts im pulsively a s t h ough t o g o t o Lorre, then settles back on the divan . )

MAE : No, Lorre, i t was very nice o f you t o let m e know that you had come to town. LORRE ( He has risen .a, nd is walking to a nd fro befo1·e t he fire-pla ce. Suddenly h e t u 1"YlS . ) : I wrote you once. You never _answered me. MAE ( gZances a t the hearth, then at L o rr e ) : Why-I never received any l etter, Lorre. It m ust h ave gone astray. LORRE ( slowly ) : I sent it here, and in it I said someth ing- ( sm iles ) It is j ust as well it never came. ( He s tep.s t o fia ce Mia,e. There is a tense silence. ) In it-Oh, Mae, Mae(\As L o 'rre bends 10V1e r Ma e, the words still on his lips, she moves t o w a rd h im . ) ( Teleph one bell rings . ) ( M.a e st·a1rts g uiltily. Lorre looks t o warrd the hall a nd then q uestion­ ingly cd Mae. )

MAE : I m ust answer it, dear.

( Ma e goes to t he hall. Lorre sin ks into the ea,sy chair, fum bles for his cigaret te3, a nd l ights o n e . He s m oke , gazing thoughtfully at t he ceil­ ing . )

MAE ( He r voice is heard froni t he hall. ) : Yes, this is Mae, Max. That typewriter makes so much noise. What did you say ? Our plans chrmged ? Not tomorrow ? In fou r weeks ? Oh, you dear, which ever I- ? Two hundred four teen


(1Mae co m es to t h e ha U e nt ra, nce, looks t h o ug htfully at LO?'·re, then a t t h e t w o ha ts resting on t he hall t a b le. Ha ing n a cle h e r decision, she t u rns i m.p u lsively . )

MAE : Let's go i n fou r week . I t won't b e o warm, then.

(As the c urtain fa Us, Mae cid a nces with outs t retched m·m s t o Lon·e , w h o st?'. l l ga� es a t t h e cei l i n g a nd s m okes. )

FINIS N AR " ISSUS The pool lie i n b reath le expectanc) , not a ripple marring its sur­ face. In sympathetic eagernes the willow by the brink bend every sil­ vered leaf, and approaching twilight has hushed the oice of the forest. N a rcissus bend t o h i image in the m irroring waters. '.I'o touch this ision ! H e is o clo e and h e would take it to hi bosom if he could. Too that if h i b reath fall too bea i ly upon it, it v. i l l anish v ell he knov. utterly. If h e could but ta) av. ay he need n ot feel this poignancy of inter­ m i ngled j oy and torture. B ut h e canno stay awa ! *

*

*

*

The ound of a u niver e a re t illed and the spirits of a l l the earth l i sten i n a silence u rcharged with emotion. The cour e of the ages stands for a moment, for a m other comes clo e t o the heart of her child and 'Che child is a quiet pool of welcome. How nea r ! The g reat noise of battle fade awa - and are not hea rd. The fate of nations attends, for in the grim ten ion of battle two oldier-pal almo t enter one i nto the heart of the other. Almo t ! The poignant pit of the g u lf. I f we would dull that feeling of frustration and would not ense the gulf, we m ust needs dwell apart i n spi rit, never d rawing clo e t o 'Che heart of our fellows. B ut ·we cannot sta awa ! HOURS B E FO R E DAWN S p ray, Z ipping again t dark rocks, deep-groo ed By the gnashing of angered, h ungry wa\ es, Foiled by their buh ark Through n umberless eons. Sky, Sleepily buo) ing on its soft bo om P roud-sa iling pirate clouds. Winging away In the dawning. H o u rs before dawn Had h idden the whole of this glor , E xcept the kiss of wind and the splash of wa\ es ; But somehow, J u t the feel of the wind on my cheek Wa ec tasy u preme. M. R. Two hundred fiftee'TI


HOW GREAT What constitutes a great football team ? Ideals of greatnes¡s vary. Mohammed woul!d 1have differed with Christ, Na poleon with Lincoln, and so on. Each of us has h is conception of what greatne i . The writer of this a rticle happened to be trailing a big bus once, i n w h i c h w a s a college football team going o u t o f state to play another college where a kid was selling sand­ team. The bus stopped at a crossroads . . wiches. A member of the team asked the boy to hand the basket in through the door so each might have a little lunch. With an eager grin -Che kid passed the basket of sandwiche to the player. Here was business. Here was more money than he'd made in a long time. But wait a minute. Suddenly the basket came flying through the door and l anded at his feet . "Here, kid, here's yer baskit. " A number o f wise cracks came from within t h e bus ; then they were gone. Not a cent had been paid for the sandwiches. Not even a thank you. The kid began to c ry. But it wasn't to patch a broken heart that I passed him a two-dollar bill. I hate to see a kid lose faith in h u man nature, especially through a football team, where he's su pposed to find it. There must h ave been some man on that team who wanted to pay the boy, but maybe he'd have been the butt of a few wise cracks. A football player isn't supposed to show emotion. Anyway it was a pparent that no one in the car knew that one on the side of fai r play is a maj ority. Was that a great football team ? ANON. A BRICK AND A MAN T ry as I will, Do what I can, I like a brick More than a man. Take u p a brick And throw it down ; B reak it in two, Toss it aroun d . L a y u p a brick, And there 'twill stay, But you can't t reat a man I n j ust that way. I like a man Less than a brick, For one will run, While the other will stick. R. M . G. Two htundred s ixteen


FAMILIAR A n a rtifex w h o m I h a v e never known, There dwells within the c unning case of bone, That d omici les the part of me that thinks. Sequestered, there h e l ives and works alone. At times by strain i ng of the inward eye, I have been able secretly to spy U po n this craftsman hid, but could not tell If he t o me were foeman, o r ally. When he desires, on the anvil of my mind, To some formation strange by h i m designed ; He eats a m orsel of my thought, wherefore I know its e sence only, not its kind. H imself the same a lway, his o utward guise Is m u ltiform. New shapes he occ upies ; But still there is in a l l of them some m a rk By which the hidden dj i n n I recognize. A hairy carcass, with a matted skin Caught round its ribs and h a u nches thin, That m arked o n stone with charred and c rumbling wood, Thus once I saw him ; grisly was h is grin . A rugged form, in smoky l eather d ressed, With frost scarred cheeks and eyes wind stressed, Whose gnarly hands were sore perplexed to carve O n ivory tales his prowess to attest. A roaring sort of man with lovelocked hair, H.is table littered, ale pots, rapiers yare, H e writes, a n d j ests, and blows a n errant kiss. I ' ve watched him laugh, I 've heard him swear. Half hid within a d i rty hood, his face D eep l ined and scowling, eyes that ever race About the parchment sere before him spread, A monkish man, a n ugly, grim grimace. Two hundired seventeen


And once, nay, more than once, hi month adrool, His wry rib. wrapped in motle , on a stool Odd carved, before an em pty th rone he wept­ His ob made ring hi belled cap-a fool. I ee him mo t a cholar old and sage, A cou rteou , gentle man, and glad to wage Profound discou re, with stately, graceful peech ; The apience of his lip denies their age. If only once I could break through and seize Him fast, and make him train the sodden lees Of t ime, put on and doff h i everal per ons, The things he'd tell ere he regained hi ea e ! CYNICUS.

SONNET CONCEIVE D IN A MOVIE I fear that love i but a deep m orass Of doubt, a fleeting phantom of despair, A draught with bitter d reg , and doomed to pass With swiftness of a falling comet-ft.are. All precious things will m eet decay and rust , T h e b e e w i l l mourn the rose's drooping head, To.d ay's rare gifts will be tomorrow'. d ust, You r lips, my sweet, will lo e their ripened red. But like the warrior who, sword-pierced lies Inside a tent and with h is fa iling breath Deludes h imself ancl m ockingly denies With song and j est the imminence of death. [ reassu re myself and gayly say : "Our love will last forever and a day." P. N . , '28.

Two hwidred eighteen


O N E MARI GO L D I s a w him o n e d a y i n h i garden, S urrounded by flowers, A m ulticolored patchwork I n spangled profusion , Such a boundles confusion Of a sters and mignonettes, Heliotrope and violets, Chrysanthemu m and daffodils, Sweet Williams, pansies and j onquils, That I wondered why he passed them all Ignored each wondrous bloom Till he came to a small weak marigold . H e r e I a w him fold The pointed petal s gently, While deep i n thought he gazed i ntently At its crown of gol d . As i n h i s garden So the man was i n his world : Good to l ook u pon, Staunch of limb and noble face ; To the manner born with a natural grace To win him friends, Love, wife, home and place In the affa i rs of men, That many c ovet but seldom gain ; Possessed of boundless wealth, S urrounded by beauty, he, With youth and health Could choose a s he willed . B ut t h e u rge i n h i s heart h a d been seemingly stilled, And the l ure of the l ovely was silent and cold I n the warmth of his passion For one marigold. R . M. G.

Two hmufred nineteen


BURNS Singer of songs of l ife and love, Liver of l i fe, scorner of fame, Master of words and melodies, Burns, our brother's name ! Cursed with the cu rse of burn ing blood, Seared by the heat of passion's flame, Torn by the drags of power m isled, Burns, our brother's name ! Judged by those unfit to j udge, Spu rned by men of spiri t tame, Cast off by those who owed him aid, Burns, our brother's name ! Blessed by gen i us, by insight true, More noble i n his very shame, Man, all man, as men a re we, Burns, our brother's name ! CYNICUS.

CO MPULSION I have seen men raise an altar, Then go and draft their God . I have seen men force the halter On a horse, then use the rod. But the God they found was l ike the horse : They kept H i m in a stall, And only by the rein and rod Could make their dumb and balking God Do any work at all.

T w o hundred twent;y


S M I L E , OLD T I M E R , S M ILE Whether you're swinging a pick i n the street, Constructing a path for plutocracy's feet, Drilling for wealth i n the bowels of earth Selling your brawn for less than it's worth ; Whether you're pi ling up c oi n for the boss, Making his gain your invaluable loss ; Whether you ache to the t i ps of your toes, And the stench where you work is a hell to your n ose, And the hate of your work i s a hell to your soul, And ! he death of your body is l ife's only goal ; O r whether you l ive in o pulent ease, Sailing for health i n your yacht o n the seas, O r s pending a w inter of sloth at the beach, Learning the lessons the dollars may teach ; Doing the town in your bright, gilded car, C ursing the gods for the man that you are, Pampered with plenty yet rueing the cost, E ternally seeking the soul you have lost, Willing to give a l l the wealth that you own And l ive i n a h ovel for health that has flown ; Remember that happiness springs from the heart , I n palace or h ovel, i n the h o m e or t h e mart ; Learn this, old timer, whatever your l ot, Whether l um per or loafer, p reacher or sot ; Remember that happiness b reeds from a grin ; A smile on the face is worth two kept with i n . R. M . G .

C H I E F VIR'J'UES When tumult and excitement Seem the o rder of the day ; W h e n life's a dance ; w h e n gambler's chance, And a gun and lance h ol d sway, I f you ask for m y opinion O f m a n 's virtues chief, I'd answer : "A silent ch in, a fighting grin, A n d a soul within the man, sir." R. M. G .

Two hwnd:red twenty-one


THE FOOL AND THE K I N G A k i n g h a d once seated himself down to eat, When a fool perchance entered and knelt at his feet, And he said, "O, good master, please give me a crumb, I 'm sick and I'm hungry, for m iles I have come." The king tu rned and scowled as he said t o the fool, "Get hence, lazy knave, for I 've made it a rule That none shall come here and receive e ' re a thing 'Till first they give something that's good for the king." Then u p rose the fool and the king sadly eyed : "O Master, remember the Savior who died O n the cross years ago by old Galilee, How He once bathed the feet of one lower than he." Then mild grew the king as he said to the fool, "Eat, my good man, for you've paid me i n full. Drink from my glass and taste each fine thing, For you 've surely brought something that's good for the king." R. M. G.

CON SOLATION Under the stars at n ight there comes to me A vision of the destiny of man. Touching witb soothing hands a restless brain, Healing an aching heart made sick by strife. And needless pain-j ust retribution for My own shortcomings i n my daily tasks. Consoled by this there v isits me a peace Which by its potent charm enables me To view all men and things with calmer sight­ To measure and to balance without fear And give to every man the j ustice due ; A courage too, that rushes through my veins, A river crystal clear bestowing l ife On parched and burning sands. The mind of man, Made over cautious by rebuffs of day, Needs such a restoration, else his fears Turn all his gai n to loss-and b lessed hope That, though we know not whence our lives m ay come, Nor whither bound that thing we call our soul, To die i s but to live ; that l i fe goes on B eyond the grave i n brighter, better, ways. A. D . Two hundred twenty-two


ON A W I N T E R ' S N IGHT A myriad stars and the moon's soft glow, And the crunch of steel on the frosty snow. The snort of horses and the tinkle of bells, And the l urch of the sleigh through the drifted dells. The swam p tree's crackle and the fox's bark, And the lonely old farmhouse, empty and dark. A knoll of birches with a m illion gems Set o n a m il lion sparklin g stems. And far o'er the fields of sifted down The twinkling lights of the distant town. A thicket of s pruce and sombre fir, A tug o n the reins and a nu dge at "her. " A nod of her head and the driver's "Whoa ! " Stopping o f s leigh where t h e moon don't show. Ru stle of furs and a blissful sigh, Smoldering flame i n a dark, deep eye. Pucker of lips and a bending back, Closing of eyes and a gurgling smack ! Then a myriad stars and the moon's soft glow, And a crunch of steel on the frosty snow. R . M . G.

I NDISTINCT Just as a shadow at twil ight, From the sun in the western skies Falls ind istinct t o the vision, A n d blends with the earth where it l ies. It i s j ust so hard for the soul to see Where truth has begin n i ng and fancy dies. R. M. G. Two hundred twenty-th ree


EDITOR 'S NOTE-What follows ha been carefully con idered by the ed itor, and although he is afraid that the English Instructors ( ?) may question his decision, ha decided that humor is l iterature, that this is humor, and therefore hould be included in the literary section. ASK ME ANOTHER 1.

What other two profe or would Profes or Weber name as the th ree best profes or at Colby ? An .

2.

When will we get a new GYM ? Ans.

3.

ooner.

P rofe sor Li bby.

W h o w i l l b e t h e next Governor ? Ans.

5.

Sometime, if not

Who would l ike to be the next Governor ? Ans.

4.

Professor Weber and Profes or Weber.

Positively not P rofessor Libby.

Nero fiddled while Rome burned ; who kept c lasses while Coburn bu rned ? ( Nob le soul ! ) Ans.

P rofessor Weber.

6.

Why are Co-eds ?

7.

Who says, and in our opinion equals " . . . . point, naught, n aught, naught, five ?"

8.

Who wins the popular vote for unpopularity ?

Ans.

Ans.

Ans. 9.

They aren't.

Professor Stanley.

P rofessor Weber.

About whom was it said, "If that is what Oxford does to a man thank God , t here are not more of them ?" Ans. The gentleman has had altogether too much publicity al­ ready.

10.

What professor would y o u characterize a s t h e d umbest, t h e m ost nar­ row-minded, the meanest, the unfairest, the biggest hypocrite, and any other terms of endearment that may enter your state of conscious enmity to the tyrants of student life ? Take your choice, except P rofessor Weber, he has had Ans. enough, poor soul.

Two hwndred twenby-four


BIG GUESSING CONTEST W H O 'S W H O IN THE WOMEN'S D IVISION

Open to any single male i n Men's D ivision.

RULES 1.

2. 3. 4.

O n l y o n e guess on each a llowed, a n yone r.eed ing more does n 't deserve to w i n . T he faculty a re not el i gi ble to compete. ( H owever, i f the dem a n d i s strong enough, we shall r u n a sepa rate one for them. ) Send two bits with each a nswer to the Contest E ditor. T h e contestants absolve t h e O RACLE from a l l respon si b i l ity for i m p a i red eyesight. The j udges will be professors D u n n , Chester and G r iffiths. PRIZES F irst- T in-ri mmed colored g l a sses. Second-"How t o M ake Love t o Co-eds , " b y Prospero Webber. T h i rd-Season t icket t o Jimmy E vans' Revue. N O T I C E- A l l above a re cm·p'its rnent i of bona fide co-eds. ( 1 ) , ( 3 ) , and ( 7 ) a r e not Greta Garbo, C l a r a B o w , or B i l l ie D ove ; ( 2 ) positively is N O T Lon C haney.

CONTESTA N T'S COUPON 1.

6.

2.

7.

3.

8.

4.

9.

5.

10.

-������

D etach a n d send to Contest E ditor.

Two hundred tw<mfly-five


Marvelous New Discovery

"VIVO -VIN 0" REJ U VENATES THE ENTIRE S YSTEM

Make

Hair Grow Where It Never Grew Before. One bottle will make you the man you think you are.

G o o d'

for

Rickets,

R heum, Hebe-Jebes, St. Vitus

dance,

k i n d re d

and

all

a il ments.

Drink the contents ; the V ivo

in

the Vino

does

the rest.

Before Taking After Taking TESTIMONIAL I was an instructor i n a small college in the E ast and to recover from the effects I began taking V I V O -VI N O and the re ults were aston ishing. I began to think I was somebody and knew something. For yea rs I suffered with insom n i a which manifested itself everywhere, but in the cla ss-room, where I often ;vent sound asleep. Occasion a l l y I w o u l d w a k e , but this w a s n o t often. I g r a d u a l l y g r e w thin until m y friends no longer recognized me. O ne morning I went to put on my tie before the mi rror and to :my chagrin I found that I h a d tied it to the broomstick which stood d i rectly behind me. I could stand it no longer-time and again I fell t h rough my collar-at l a s t I heard of a remarkable discovery- V I V O - V I N O-and knowing it could make me no worse I decided t o t ry a bottle. The resu l ts were quick and positive. I began to get to class on time a n d actually began to have something to say when I got there. The holl ows i n my n e ck b e g a n to fill out and I discovered that at l ast I could ke e p my head f r o m f al l i ng t h rou g h my c o l l a r . N o lo ng e r am I troubled with strombosis o f the repocardical p h ary­ n i ptical empedosis, and the bronchitical empyemia has entirely disap peared. H a irs have begun to m a n i fest themselves on m y c hest. Thank God , I say, for V I V O - V L 0. I am so ha ppy t h at I want to tell a l l my friends. Thank God, again for this remark­ able di scovery. Now I know my l ittle sister loves me. KOWARD H E LPS PELSEY, T h e Squelchor, C ity.

Two hundred t wenty-six


WATERVIL LE (MAINE) MORNING SENTINEL

PROSPERO'S COLUMN By K ARL

ON

W EBBER

{ A p o l o gies t o Art D u ffy's C o l um n ) B ea r with m e gentle R e a d e r , a n d i m ­

SA

MAYOR MAKES HIS REPORT

agine yourself tran sported to that l a n d of

eternal

banana in

sun h i n e ,

D e n mark,

where

and

other tropical fruit grow

p r o fu s i o n .

H e r e w e s h a l l visit t h e

b i r t h p l a c e of that i m m ortal playwright, H a m l et. ' r ote

He

that

it

was,

greate t

" S h akespe a r e . "

you of

know,

all

During the

who

com edies, c o urse

of

our s o j o u r n w e shall visit the exact spot where

hake peare

Jew t h e gentle D es­

d e m o n a , crying a s h e did so, gadget

"E

pluribus

t h e h o u se d i v ' d e d a g a i n s t i t s e l f

<' a n n ot w a b b l e i n the w a b e . "

H e r e it

' as that O t h e l l o raised h i s c ursed d a g­ g e r a n d sm ote J u l i u s C aesar in t h e for­ um.

H er e , too, did Sir J o h n Falstaff, in

words

galvanic

Iago.

0,

wa

denounce

the

cunning

l a n d of h istoric l o r e

here it

that t h e n o b l e K i n g L e a r , crown i n

h a n d , uttered t h e p r o phetic words, " B y all

the

laws

of

etwy m o logy,

swinetax

a n d pro oodie, the sledded P o l ock n ot p as s ! "

sha l l

I n e v e r r e a d t h i s glowing

1 h a v e b e e n Ma yor of Waterv i l le 1 h a v e

Si nce -a ved

the

city

many

v i lle, the

beyond

best

any

s h a d o w of

a d m i n i t ra t i o n

be

g e n t l e w o r d s o f o ur own G e o rge ·wash­

$ 1 ,5 0 0

a

year.

report

a

bomba t i c

ingto n , wh o , speaking a t t h e B at t l e o f

o nl y

well

too

k no w n

t h a t i - not

glad

by

to

that

my poli c y .

you

fool.

O n s u c h a n ight m ethinks Troi­

l u s m o u n t e d t h e V e netian w a l l s a n d ere t h e cock c r e w thrice threw h i

slipper

a t t h e s l e e p i n g J e s i c a . A n d n ow , gentle Reader, that o u r fearful t r i p i s done

m ay t h e r e b e n o m oa n i n g a t t h e bar, when time l i k e a p u l s e shakes fierce through

all

the

world,

for

he

said,

Fight o n ! " a n d i n t h e spring a y o u n g m a n ' s fancy l i gh t l y t u r n s to t h o u gh t s o f l ov e , t o striv e , t o e e k , to " F ight o n !

fi n d , a n d n ot t o y i e ld , f or they're h a n g­ i n g D a n n y D e e v e r in t h e m o r n i n ' . P R O SP E R O .

for

" Mo d e s t y

k i n deep."

is

a

I think,

doubt,

it

ha to

to

have

ever had. do

o--for

I

am

too

t o do s u c h :

A s I have o f t e n s a i d modesty

H o w e v er,

does,

and

i

my m o t t o is "Speak

myself, Herbert." My platform is a n I for me fir-t, myself econd.

a n I , and In infu

only

1 do n o t b lo w my o w n

a l l of t h e f o o l part o f t h e p e o p l e , b u t

but

not

ervice and I shall

t i rade o f w o r d ,

all o f

horn : I a m not t h a t sort .

o f t h e p a rt o f t h e

a

continue

before,

all

have

r am n ot g o i n g t o make t h i s

of t h e p e o p l e p a r t of t h e f o o l , a n d p e o p l e you c a n ' t t i m e

I

1 h a v e g i v e n W ater­

1 h a v e g i v en of my t i m e a n d

t ribute, b u t w h a t I a m reminde d of the

G e t t y s b u r g , r e m a r k e d , " Y o u c a n part a l l

dollars.

a v e d t he c i t y m o ne y , b u t

c lo i n ir

I

a n no u n ce

ion o f new blood

my app o i n t m e n t . the

h o u ld b e of great b e n e fi t

to t h e c i t y .

% C h i e f of Police, Howard Phelps K e l e y O v e r eer o f t h e P o o r , Everett Fisk trong L o w e l l Q u i n to n H a y n e B a n d M a ster, I n spector o f Sewers a n d L i g h t h o u s e , Matthew Whiting Ro a . H a rr y Edwards fa:' Fire Ch ief . W i t h rop H a m o r Stan ley Fire Truck Driver, General U t i l i t y M a n , E u c li d Helie C u rt i s H u gh Morrow Water B o y , % M o n d a y , W e d n e d a y s a n d Frida y s .

@

D a i l y e x c e p t M on . , T u e s . , Wed . . T h u r s .. Fri., and Sat. S D i n i n g c a r a ttached. Mine i n hopes, T H E MAYOR.

Two huriulred twenty-se1Jen


At the Last Golden Da"Wn When the artist of ages has painted the east i n a last golden dawn, And my soul w ith the souls of the millions shall rise at the sound of His horn, And shall gaze on the work of the artist and follow the colors that blend, Shall I read i n His canvas the secret of life and the "why" of the first at the end ? Shall I stand and recall the despair of my youth, and its doubts and its hopes, And recalling, be cast once again i nto doubt by the soul that still gropes '! Shall I dare 'gainst rebuffs of the past to anticipate Sesame then, 0 ye artist of ages ; ye architect ancient, etern al, and m aker of men ?

I shall dare !

I shall h ope !

¡ I shall l ive b ut to l earn, b u t to read as you

paint. I shall follow your work ; I shall glean what you mean, be the tracery faint, I shall learn to d iscern by your work of the past, by your pastels of youth, That at last, when the picture time's infin ite dawn, I may know and be known by the truth. R . M . G.

Two hundred twenily-eight


.

.

.

. ... · . .. . . ..

..

..

'

..

.

.

·

.

-

..

.. -·.

. .

·.

. .

.

"

-

.

.

-

· . ,·

·· . - "- . · . .�· . << . : �-: .. : . .. - .· <. �· : :_ :;. �--·:. ··..= . : : ... . . :· . .. . . . . .- . . . . . .. : . . . � .. .

.

.

.

-

.

·

.

.: . �

...

.

-

.

. ..

· _ .. · . "- : .

-

:

·.

. ·

·

.

.. . ,•

. .

.

..

. -


A l l w e l l turne d out C o l b y M en are not o utfitted b y Harmon's, b ut a l l C o l b y Men

o utfitt e d

by

H a r­

mon's are w e l l turn e d out. A t t h e Elmwood Every T w o Weeks T o Serve You !

Brunswick , Maine

c� c J enney A NArlON·WTDH

The Peoples National Ban k

D E PARTMENT

o.

STORES

R E A DY-T O - W E A R DRY GOODS

Men's Clo thing

T h e Servic e B a n k

Furnishings and Sh oes W ATERVILLE

M A INE

46-48 Main Stre et

Wate rvil l e ,

Two hundred thirty

M ai n e


A C o m plete Line of H igh G r a d e FRATER

ITY A

D C O LL E G E

Stationery, Banners , Memory Books, and Fountain Pens

Colby College Store CLARE

CE E M E R Y

College Store W e Feature

J . D . J O H TST O N

For Ice C r e a m a n d S o d a FINE C H O C OLA TES A N D H O M E- M A D E C A N D IES

Kuppenheimer Clothes F O R Y O U N G M EN-B O YS

LCYVell and Covel

Apollo

Fish

P A C KA GE C A N D IES

The

H . R . D u n h am Co. T w o Stor e s :

W A TERVILLE

Page a, nd Slutw

F AIRFIELD

H AG E R'S 1 1 3 M ai n Street. Watervi l l e ,

M ai n e

T w o hundred thirty-01ie


H. E. W A DSW O R T H

H . S. W O O D M A N

Presi dent

Treasurer

Wadsworth & Woodman Company ·

M a nufacture rs of

Ta b le O i l Clo t h s

Winthrop, Maine

Two hundred thirfly-two

·


E. H. EMERY MER CHA N T TA IL O R

2 SILVER STREET,

W ATERVILLE TELEPHO

Everything fo r th e

M A I NE

E 1 0 6-W

C o m e i n a n d s e l e ct t h e. W a t c h you w o u l d like for

B u ilder

Gra d u ation, W e Suggest A lso

Proaor & Bowie

B R A CE L E T S NECKLETS S

CHAI RI

GS

FOU PE

TAIN PE CILS A

OTHER

J UST A CR OSS THE B R I DG E I N WINSL O W

S

D

O V E LT I E S

F. A . H A R R I M AN 9 8 M a i n Street

Watervil l e ,

M ai n e

T w o hundred thirty-three


The Newton Theological Institution C o u rses Lea ding to B . D . a n d S.T. M . D egrees a n d A dvan c e d D e grees f o r Post-gra d uate Stu d e nts. C o u rses i n Harvard University o pen to Newton stu de nts through a ffi liation.

C O U R S E S IN R E L I G I O U S E D U C A T I O N FO R W O M E N

A d dr ess t h e President : E V E R E T T C. H E R R I C K , D . D . , Newton Centre, M assachusetts

Rollins-Dunham

Reliable Insurance of

Company

Every Description

HA RD WA RE DEA LERS

BUILDING M A TERIALS, PAINTS and O ILS

Boothby & Bartlett Company AGENTS

1 7 6 Main Street

WATERVILLE, Watervil l e , M ai n e

Tivo hundred thirty-{our

M AINE


D EPEN D A BLE FURNISHINGS F O R STU DENTS' NEEDS

Desks, Tables, Chairs, Couches, Rugs, D raperies,

Beds,

Mattresses

an d

Bedding WE O P ER A TE TWENTY ST O RES I N NEW E N G L A N D

Atherton Furniture Company 2 1 M A IN STREET,

W A TERVILLE, M AI NE

Holmes-Swift, Inc. Whole sale Grocers

Turcotte Candy Shoppe For

D istrib u t or s o f

Fort W e st ern B r a n d F o o d

LIG HT LUN C H HOME-MADE CANDY, SODA ICE CREAM, FRESH AND

P ro d u cts

S A L T E D NUT S

And Fancy G r o c e ry S p ec i alties 1 8 9 M a i n Street

W A TERVILLE M AINE

A U G USTA

Watervil l e , O pp. Post O ffic e

M ai n e T e l . Co n .

Two hiindred thi,rty-five


SA M UEL CLARK

L. G . WHIPPLE

Shippers a n d Dea lers of a l l k i n d s of

A nthracite and Bituminous

Coal

Wood, CoalJ LimeJ CementJ Brick and Drain Pipe OR DERS CAREFULLY FILLED A N D P R O M PTLY ATTE NDED T O

G. S. Flood & Co. , I nc. C o a l Yards a n d O ffi c e :

M A I N A N D PLEASANT STREETS Telephone 840

Two hundred thirty-six


G eorge H . P erry, Presid ent

.

E dw a rd F . Pierc e

5 Trea surer l G e n era l M a n a ge r

PIERCE - PERRY CO. Succ essors to

G E O R GE E. G ILC H RIST C O . JOBBERS OF

Hea ti ng and Plumbing Supplies Ste e l , Wro u ght Iron a n d Brass P i p e

Water Works Materials D istributors o f

H O FFMA N V ALVES AND C O NTR OLLED HEAT EQUIP M E N T 2 3 6 C o ngress St. , Corner P u r c hase Street

B OST O N

The Ticonic National Bank A c o m p l ete b a n k i n g serv ic e c o n ducte d u n d er t h e d i r e c t s u p e rvisio n of t h e

United States Government 1 1 3 Years C o nt i n u o u s B u si n e ss

W ATERVILLE

M A INE

Two hunifred t h irty-seven


Store OVER FIFTY YEARS THIS STORE HAS H A D THE PATRONAGE OF THE COL足 LEGE.

T H A T SH OULD BE ARGU MENT

ENOUG H .

Telephone 58

1 18 Main Street

CROZIER

L. H. Soper Co.

THEOLOGICAL

Department Store

Scholarships f o r approved stu d ents.

SEMINARY Tuition and room rent fre e

DRY G O O DS, G AR MENTS,

Seminary has metropolitan advan足 tages of Philadelphia. Seminary's re足 lations to Uni versity of Pennsylva n i a m ake the following c ourses possi ble :J.

Courses only,

2.

M ILLINERY

for

Courses

with

Education

VICTROLAS A N D

3.

Graduate pa tors sity.

B.D.

pastors,

Seminary

Social

emphasis Service.

on

Religious

Seminary

a nd

Degree of B . D . , or A . M . , or both.

course

or

and

or Diploma.

special

and

University.

VIC TROLA RECORDS

preachers

Degree o f

in

teachers.

advanced

scholarship

Seminary

and

for

Univer足

Degree o( Th.M. a n d Ph.D.

Address :

Watervil l e ,

T w o hundred thirty-eigh t

M ai n e

M I LT O N G. EV A N S , LL. D . , President, C hester, Pa.


Th e Place Where

Elmwood Hotel

You Eat R e g u l a r Dinner 5 0 C e nts Soup ,

Meat,

Tea,

M a n a g e d by C o l l e g e M e n C at e rs t o C o ll e ge M e n

Vegetables,

Coffee. with

Roast and

Fancy

Potatoes.

Hot

Rolls

Pie,

a nd

Pudding,

Butter

all above orders.

M i lk

Fed

Saturday-Fried

Chicken

every

Scallops

with

Tuesday Tartar

Sauce every Friday.

S p e c i a l Su p pe r M e n u Pri c e 4 0 c t o 9 5 c C A FETERIA SERVICE

Meat,

Vegetables,

Hot Rolls

and

Potatoes,

Butter

with

Tea,

Coffee.

all above orders.

Sunday Special Dinner

IN BASEMENT

From

1 1 a . m . to 3 p .

rn .

P ri c e 6 0 c to $ 1 . 0 0

Franternity B a n q u ets a S p e c i alty

American a n d Chinese Restaurant ( Formerly

Harmon

Electric

Cafe )

Private Dining R o o m for P a rties

Pocahontas Fuel Co. I

Years of Experience

C O RP O R A T E D

E N ABLE U S T O

M i ners, Shi p p ers, Export e rs a n d B u n k e r Su p pl i e rs of

C ORRECTLY O UTFIT

" Original Pocahontas"

C O LLEGE M EN

COA L

J A M E S B L A C K , R epresentative

Largest P ro d u c ers o f Smo k e le ss C o a l in t h e U n i t e d States No. 1 Broadway, New York

Benoit's

O perates Fleet o f Steamers, T ugs a n d B arges for Transportation o f C o a l a l o n g Atlantic C o ast

Shops for Men and Boys M A IN E

AND

M A S S A C HU S E T T S

Boston,

Mass.,

Board

of

Trade

Building ;

New

Bedford, Mass., Dock and Office Pocahontas Wharf, foot of H i l lm a n Street : Portland, M e . , D o c k a n d O ffi c e Pocahontas Wharf , foot of Moul­ ton Street ; Norfolk, Va., 1 1 7 Main Street ; C i n ­ c i n nati, O hio, Tra c t i o n B u i l d in g ; B l u e-field, W . V a . , Pocahontas B ui l d i n g .

Two hundred thirfly-nine


The College Drug Store

Rochester Theological Sem inary

DEALERS IN

President C . A. Barbour, D . D .

Kodaks and Supplies

3 0 0 A LE X A N D E R S T .

Stationery, Periodicals

R O C H E ST E R , N. Y .

H uyler's, Apollo and Foss Candies

A Graduate School o f Theology

Ice Cream Soda Curriculum adj usted to modern conditions

COLLEGE AVENUE

Located i n E ducational and

PHARMACY

M usical Center

54 COLLEGE AVE NUE O p p . Seaverns Field

W rite for Catalogue

The Little Gift Shop

L. G. BUNKER, M .D.

The Pla ce Where Things Are Different E xcl usive Line of Novelties B askets, Candles, Jewelry, Pictures, D i stinctive Greeting Cards for A l l O c casions

C I RCULATING LIBRARY N ELLIE K . C LARK Waterville, M a i n e

56 Temple St.

W atervil l e , M a i n e Phones : O ffi c e 4 9 -W

50

O ffic e M ain Street

Residence 4 9 -Y Residence 4 4 Silve r Street

Practice Limited to Diseases of Eye . Ear, Nose and Throat

CHOATE MUSIC COMPANY

THE

EVERETT 0. F I SK T E A C HE R S' A G E N C I E S

M ���tr:� d . M5:: . ·. ·. ·. ·. ·. ·. ·. ·. ·. . ·. ·. ·. . ·. ·. ·.��� ����,'.�;s ��: k �:r:c�s�� � · /\ : ·. ::.·.'.·:.'.·:.'. . '. . .'io'i2�i1f��:h fi�;: St. Philadelphia, Pa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1420 Chestnut Pittsburgh, Pa . . . . . . . . . . 549 Union Tnist Bldg. �l�:l�;�:.�.hiX1�.· ·:.'.'.·:::::. :.3.1.1.sr��:� �1�i: Kansas City, Mo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 20 McGee St. Portland, Ore. . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 Journal Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. . . . . . . . . . 5 4 So. Spring St. '

'

.

.

.

. . .

.

. .

Two h:undred forty

WATERVILLE

M AINE

The National Memory and Fellowship Book

Used at West Point, A n napolis, Co lby College, and at the Principal Col­ leges and Schools throughout t h e C ountry

Published Exclusively by

College Memory Book Co., Chicago, I ll.


C OLBY COLLEGE Col by Col l ege wa

tha rtered by t he G ener a l Court

o f l\ I a s s a c husett

Febru a ry

27

Students m a y s t udy for either t h e

1 81 3 .

A . B . o r B. S.

Degree a nd fo1¡ the A . B . Degree ma3 p resent a l\I odern La n g u a ge in p l a ce of Gree k . and " omen a re educ a t ed

The men

in sep a ra t e divis i ons.

They h a ve d i fferent Chapel Ser' ices and a dou b l e s e t o f h o n o r prizes.

For Information and Catalogue, A ddress

PRESI D ENT A. J. ROBERTS Water ville, Maine

33 College Avenue

Two hrwndred f<Yrf/y-one


The City Job Print Prin ters to Colby College

Everyt h ing in Print ing and Engraving that a College Man, Woman or Society needs.

Come in and consult us, no matter how trivial the j ob.

McALARY & JOSEP H , Proprietors Fred D . M c Alary

Fran c i s M. J oseph, Colby, 1 9 0 1

I N B:ASEME NT, S AV I NGS B A N K BUILDING WAT E RVILLE, MAINE

I c e Cream a n d Soda

TELE PHONE 207

H aines Theatre Barber

H ot Drinks, A ssorted Choc olates H ome-Made Candies Candy or Ice Cream M a d e to O rder

Shop The place where the college student gets a square deal

on R e asonable Notice

The Spear Folks FINE C USTOM TAILORING

L. R. BROWN 95 Main Street

Waterville, M ai n e

Tel ephone 2 6 6 -M

Ei ght Alleys

Four Tables

EXPERT

0.

WORKMANSHIP

A . M athieu

Propri etor

C o mpliments of

Winslow & Scannell Wholesale Conjectioners AUBURN, M A INE

J. B . Palmer

F. A . Tibbetts F. H. Porter

Elm City Bowling Alleys A. G . Hilton, Prop. 1 5 1 M a i n Street

Two hundred forty-two

Waterville, Maine

Watervil le

Steam

Laundry 1 4 5 M a i n Street

Watervi l l e , M ain e


Lockwood Company WATE R \ ILLE, l\L- U :�rE

Fine Sheeting and Shirting L ockwood and Cast Iron B rands

Selling Agents

D EERING, M ILLI KEN & COMPAN Y 79 Leona rd S t reet

� e w York

BO T N

S. A .

C H I CAGO

C.

GREEN

R. GREEN

S. A. & A. B. Green Co. A n th racite

COAL

Bitum inous

Coke, H ard Wood a n d Kindlings WATERVILLE, MAINE

TELEPH ONE 30

OFFICE :... 5 1 l\Lu � STREET

Two hundred forty-threc


Dunlap's Lunch 6 Maple Street

Ju t

\_ c 1 路0

the TTack

H ome Cooking O rders Put Up t o Take O u t

' T i s t h e P l a ce Whe1路e Rea l W e Lea d , Other

Fol l o w

JAMES W. BRINE COM PANY 286 Devonshire Street Boston, Mass.

Highest Q uality

of A thletic Go ods

o lJ. ege :Men E a t ' Clean l i Jr n

Two hu ndred forty-four

O u r Motto '

01n plin i ent.路 of

Keyes Fibre Company Papyrus Plates, Dishes, Etc.

Manufactured

Catalogue Free of Charge

i

Waterville


Coburn Classical Institute 1

obm·n

Ch

20 - 19.;./7

i ·al In t it u t e i

a

ol l e o-e P repa ra tory

w i t h a i·eeord of one h u n cl.re l a nd

ix yea 1·

P1· p a 1·

·omse

fo r a l l col l ge .

eo l l e o· .

A t h let i c s fOl' a l l

Spec i a l tuclents.

of

uc e

ful

s

·hool r v i ·e.

fo1· t h o e not going to

Stan l a rd

of

·hol a 1· hip and

cha racter hi o·h. G ood equi1Jment a n l an exp e r i enced f a c ul ty .

For c a t a l ogu

1' r i t e the P r in c i pa l

D R EW

T.

H�IB T H O R X Waterv i l l e , :\Ia ine

Box : 9 -

Qua lity

Service

Fairfield Publishing

Emery-Brown Co.

Company THE GALA HAD PRESS, I NC .

One of Central M aine's

T h e College Printers

Leading Department Stores

Catalogu e, B oo k and Co m m ercial Prin ting Fairfield, Maine 1 92 M a i n Street

.A.J u;ay Empli a hng Q ii a l'it y ·

Telephone 40

Two hundred forty-five


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Carter's

Lunch

For College Students Board by the Week

Good Table Service

OPEK DAY A X D � I r H T

Good H ome Cooking

L unches P u t Up to Take Out

3 MAPLE STREET - Next Door to College Pharmacy - P H O NE 893-R

Gladys Balentine

Redingt on & Co.

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IIoward�Wesson Co. Wo rc e s t e r; Mass.

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Conven iently Located , With Veal's of Experience in Producin,g College Annuals. l1_e ady to Give You Comple te Service. Business Managers and E ditms Appreciate om Constructive Help.

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Publishers of the 1 927 ORA CLE

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a


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Oracle 1927  

Oracle 1927