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TO

�r.

U®illtam Dllaf�chts THIS BOOK IS

\

AS A SLIGHT EXPRESSION OF TH.E HIGH ESTEEM IN WHICH THE COLLEGE HOLDS HIM, AND OF THE HONOR WHICH HE HAS l:lROUGHT TO THE COLLEGE


Now eager Student, Reader, Friend, In perusing this book please not jest, Naught else have we to give as bequest. E•en tho' its pages you may bore, have comfort This, 'tis not You alone, 'tis the Oracle's Board. See your faults and be not blind, E•en tho' cruel, our intent was kind. Vain is the lesson, not improved, Each fault we've struck you can remove, Nor ever forget to whom it's due.

3

in


llfatulfu ttf Jlnitfrudiun. ATHANIEL BUTLER, D.D., Babcock Professor of Psy足

WILLIAM SHIRLEY BAYLEY, PH.D., Professor of Min足

chology and Moral PhilosojJ/zy. 25

AMUEL

KI1 G

of

CARLTON BEECHER STETSON, A.M., Professor of the

Greek Language and Lite1-ature.

College Avenue.

77 Elm Street.

the Greek Language and Literdture. 2S

JAMES WILLIAM BLACK, PH.D., Professor of History

College Avenue.

EDWARD

WI

and Political Economy.

SLOW

A. M.,

HALL,

Registrar. 229

M a i n Street.

WILLIAM

Librarian

4 Dalton

and

A.M., Sc.

D.,

Merrill

5

Professor of

37

22

IEL TAYLOR, A.M., Professor of the Latin

College Avenue.

College.

JOH

27 College Avenue.

BO. RD 1A

PEPPER, D.D., LL.D.,

i

ST

R

nion Street.

Street.

College Avenue.

GERS, PH.D., LL.D., Professor

of Physics a11d Astronomy. 14

HEDMAN, A.M., Instructor in Greek.

5 Oak 21

Appleton Street. UG

of

Associate Professor of Frenclt in tlte Women's

JOHN HAROLD BATES, A.B., Instructor in Gymnastics.

Professor of Biblical Literature.

WILLIA l

Associate Professor

College Avenue.

College.

EDWARDS WARREN, LL.D.,Professor of Mathe足

RGE DAr

PH.D.,

MARY ANNA SAWTELLE, PH.B., Dean of the Women's

matics and Lecturer on Art.

GE

MARQUARDT,

Modern Languages.

Language and Literature.

L.\BA

Getchell Street.

ANTON

76 Elm treet. DA

Street.

ARTHUR JEREMIAH ROBERTS, A.B., Professor of Rltet足

oric and Instructor in Elocution.

ELDER,

Chemistry.

LIA

SECRETARY OF THE

FACULTY.

FOSTER, LL.D., Emeritus Professor of

BARTO

JOH

17 Winter Street.

Emeritus Professor

SMLTH, D.D.,

Rhetoric. 92

eralogy and Geology.

College A enue; Office, 2 and 3 South College.

SAMUEL OSBORNE,

6

5

Ash Street.

J ANITOR,


!0ffu::ent.

NATHANIEL BUTLER, President.

W. G.· HOOKE, Secretary.

Ja:cullu €.tmuni:tfe:e.

PRES. NATHANIEL BUTLER.

PROF. C. B. STETSO

PROF. J. D. TAYLOR .

.§ftt�:ent tr.mmni:ff:ee. �fftt:eN •

H. S. CROSS, President.

.

W. G. HOOKE, Secretary.

DhmfreriJ.

H. S. CROSS, '97.

H. H. CHAPMAN, '97.

L. E. WALDRON, '97.

C. M. DRUMMOND, 98. E. K. GUILD, '99.

F.

W. ALDEN, '98.

G. A. MARTIN, '99.

W. G. HOOKE, 1900.

WILLIAM HARTHOR

C. E. GURNEY, g8.

E, '97.


U$)omen's �nnference �nadr. l@fftc.et!i. M

A SAWT E L L E, President.

RY A

A HAR R I E T STEPHE NS, Secretary.

ED

Jli'acu rtu QE.1nnmiffu. A SAWT E L L E .

M A RY A

.§fu:tn?nf QE.trmmiff:e.e.

A LICE L

A LI C E L HE LE"

E

Y E, 97.

GERTR ETT

ISE

YE, Cltairman.

TCHE L L, ' 97 . M E R C Y AG

GRACE G

D E SU L LIVA FR

CE

HA R RIET S TE PHE NS, Secr�tmy.

ED

P

r,

"98.

RI EM 'f

ED

G TO FRA

ES BR

N, '97.

H R R I ET STE P HE 1S, 98.

, '99.

M

CES H

8

RY G E R T R

TCHI

SON, 1900.

M A R THA DU IN

DE L E M

SUSA T, '99.

LA P T R A CY, '97.

T YLO R, '9 .


�afalo gue nf 5'fub-enfs.

B

RKER,

Rov

MORRILL, Z '11,

.

.

.

.

.

.

BA

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M ain St. ; Track Athletic Tea m , 2; Class Secretary, 2; Com­

Presque Isle, Me.,

St. Joh n's School ; R icker Classical I nstitute; Class Basebal l , mittee o n O des, 4.

2

Winslow, life., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I 2 S. C . KE, . . . . . . . . . Coburn Classical I n stitute ; Class President, 1 ; First Entrance Prize ; Freshman Readi ng, First Prize ; Sophomore Declamation, First Prize ; Junior Part Lati n ; Junior Exhibitio n ; Senior Exhibition ; Oracle Ed itor, 3 ; Oracle Editor-in-Chief, 4; Class Orator, 4; Class Basebal l, 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Com mittee on O des, 3 ; Colby M instrels, 3, 4.

SETT, GEORGE KEMBLE,/:::,.,

.

.

IBAL HA ILIN, D.. KE, . . . . . . . . . W. Bethel, Me., . . . . . . . . . . 12 S. C . Phillips Exeter Academy ; H ebron Academy ; ' \ arsity Football, l , 2, 3 , -1- ; Conference Com mittee, 4; Athletic Exhi­ bition , l, 2 , 3 ; Orator, l ; Class Football, r, 2, 3, 4; Comm ittee o n O des, 4.

CHAPMAN, HA

.

A T n, . . . . . . . . . . Waterville, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 P leasan t St. Watervi lle H . S.; Y. M. C. A. ; Class H istorian, 2; Conference Committee, 2; Comm ittee o n Odes, 3; C lass Prophet, 4; Ath letic Exhibition, 1, 2, 3 , 4; Athletic Team, 2, 3 , 4; College Record Two-mile Run, 2; College Record H al f-mile Run, 3; H al f- mile Run I n tercollegiate Field Day, Third Prize ; College Record Teo- mile Run, -1-; Senior Exhibition.

CLEMENT, CHARLES LUTHER,

CROSS, HARMON STEVE rs,

Waler..•ille, A T n, . . . . . . . . . . . Waterville H . S. ; Class Executive Committee,r, -1-; Junior Debate ; Conference B oard, 4. 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 c. H . ice-President Oracle, 3 ; Junior Orator ; President

life.,

.


·E, \iVILLIAM ABR H !If, <I> 6. ®, . . . . . . . . Waterville, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 C. H Coburn Classical Institute ; Junior Debate , Prize ; Junior Exhibition ; Senior Exhibition ; College Debate, 4; Inter­ collegiate C hess Tournament, 3 ; Class H istorian, 3; Toastmaster, 4; President Republican Club, 4; Secretary Col lege Debating Club, 4; Conference Committee, 4; Echo Board, 3; Oracle Editor, 3; President Echo Asso­ ciation, 4; Long Jump, College Field Day, First Prize ; Captain Bicycle Club, 2 ; Bicycle Field Day, First Prize, 2 ; Bicycle Field Day, Second Prize, 3; I ntercollegiate Bicycle Race, First Prize, 2 ; Harvard Invitation I n ter­ collegiate Bicycle Meet, Fourth Place, 3; " Fall " Bicycle Meet, Two First Prizes, One Second Prize, 2 ; Vice­ President Football ssociation, 3; Class Football, I, 3, 4; Captain Bicycle Squad, 3; Manager " Fall " Bicycle Meet, I , 4; College Record One-mile Bicycle, 3; Athletic Exhibition , 3, 4.

HARTHOR

H Ll\IE , \iVJLLIAM HE�R v,

JR . 6. Y, . . . . . . . . . . Augusta, Atfe., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 C. H . Cony H . . ; Class Football Team , r, 2 1 3, 4; Class Baseball Team, r, 4; Class H istorian, r ; Secretary Oracle Asso­ ciation, 2; Secretary Amalgamated Association, 2; Assistant College Marshal, 2 ; 'Varsity Football Team, r; Substitute ' arsity Football , r, 2, 3, 4; 120 yards H urdle, First Prize, r; 2 20 yards H urdle, Second Prize, I; 2 20 yards Dash , Second Prize, I ; Quarter-mile Run, Second Prize 2 ; Oracle Editor, 3 ; College Marshal, 3; Junior Exhibition, First Prize ; Parting Address, 4 . ,

KEITH, ALBERT Ru SELL, 6.

. . . . . . . . . . . Waterville, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North St. KE, Waterville H. . ; Dramatic Club, I; Athletic Exhibition, r, 2 , 3; Director Tennis Association, 2 ; Class Executive Committee, 3; Clas Baseball Team , 3; Stage Manager and End Man Colby M instrel Troupe, 3; Glee Club, 4; College Orchestra, 4; Chairman Class Ode Committee, 4.

BLE, ER 'E T EUGEl"E, D. Y, . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blaine, Me., . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 C. H . Ricker Clas ical I nstitute ; Class Football , 11 2 , 3, 4; Mile R un, First Prize, 2 ; Junior Debate , Prize ; Senior Exhibi­ tion ; Address to Undergraduates, 4; thletic Exhibition, r, 2, 4; Delegate to orthfield Convention, 2 ; On List of trong Men, 2, 3; College farshal , 3; 220 yards Dash, Second Prize, 3; I n-door Meet 15 yards Dash , econd Prize, 4. K, HERBERT � KE, . . . . . . . . . . Waterville, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College Ave. \Vaterville H. .; . M. C. A.; Conrerence ommittee, r; Class ice - President, 2 ; Sophomore Declamation ; Awarder of Prize 3; Junior Exhibition ; Cla Treasurer, 4.

P111LnR1

,

IO


Waterboro, JVIe., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 C . H . 4> A ®, . . . . . . . . . . . . Limington Academy ; Coburn Classical Institute ; Y. M . C. A. ; Toastmaster, 1 ; C lass Executive Committee, 3 ; Class President, 4; C lass Baseball Team , 1, 2, 3 , 4 ; Chess Club, 2 ; Conference Comm ittee, 1, 2 ; Treasure r Athletic Associatio n, 2 ; D irector Football Association, 1 ; Athletic Exhibition, 3 ; Chapel C hoir, 2, 3, 4; Colby M instrel T roupe, 3, 4; College Band, 2 ; Glee Club, 4; Substitute 'Varsity Baseball Team, 1 ; Captain of Second 'Varsity Baseball Team, 2; Scorer 'Varsity B aseball Team, 3 ; M anager 'Varsity Baseball Team, 4.

ROBERTS, FRED. ALBERT,

S

A Y, . . . . . . . . Lynn, Mass., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Oak St. Lynn H. S. ; Y. M . C . A. ; Vice- President Y. M. C . A., 3 ; C lass Executive Committee, 2 ; Class Chaplai n , 3 ; C l ass Poet, 4; Treasurer Echo Association, 4; Athletic Exhibition, 2, 3 ; Conference Committee, 3 ; Freshman Read­ ing, Second Prize ; Sophomore Declamatio n ; Junior Exhibition , Second Pri ze.

'OW, CHARLES LAFAYETTE,

TAYLOR, FRED.E LM ER ,

A KE,

. . .

. .

. .

. . .

. .

Bath, Me., . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 8

S. c.

Bath H. S . ; Y. M. C. A. ; Second Entrance Prize ; Y. M. C . A. Treasurer, 3 ; Y. M. C . A . Ptesident, 4 ; Presi den t Athletic Association, 3 ; V ice-President Colby Echo Association, 3 ; Sophomore Declamation, Seco n d Prize ; Junior Debate ; Junior Part, Greek ; Senior Exhibition ; Treasurer Mai n e I n terco l legiate Athletic Association , 3 ; Delegate t o M . I . C . A . A . An nual Meeting, 4; Member Standing Com mittee Colby D ebating Club, 4; Class Executi\ e Comm ittee, r ; Class Football, I, 2, 3, 4; Class Chaplain, 4; M ember Executive Committee Athletic Association, 3.

FRANCIS 4> A ®, . . . . . . . . . . Houlton, Jltie., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 C . H . R icker C lassical Institute ; Class Treasu rer, 2 , 3 ; C lass Secretary, 4; Treasurer Athletic Associati on, 3; Executive Committee Athl etic Association, 3, 4; Manager Tennis Team, 3 ; Athletic Exhibition , 2, 3 ; Treasurer Oracle Association, 3 ; Manager Oracle Association, 4; C l ass Football Team, I , 2, 31 4; Class Baseball Team , 1, 2, 3, 4.

TITCOMB, WALTER

,

Enso\ . . . . . . . . . . . . . Waterville, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 C. H . Coburn Classical Institute ; Class Poet, 2 ; C lass V i ce - Presiden t , 3 ; Class farshal 4; Class Football Team , r, 2, 3, 4 ; Athletic Exhibition, r, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball Team, 1 , 2, 3, 4; Confe rence Com mittee, 4; I n te rcollegiate Bicycle Meet, One-mile Race, Second Prize ; Two-mile Race, Third Prize ; Five-mile Race, T h i rd Prize.

WALDRON, L1NTO

.

II


WATS ON H A R R v B ATES , 6. Y, . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oakland, life., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 C. H . Cobu rn C las ical I nstitute ; Y. M . C . A . ; Class Baseball Team, 1 , 2, 3, 4; Class Football Team, 1 ; Class Prophet, I ; Freshman Reading- ; Athletic Exh ibition, I, 2; Sophomore Declamation ; Class Orator, 2; German Enter­ tai nment, 2; Ju nior Part, French ; Junior Exhibition; Class President, 3; Field Day, 100 yards Dash , Third Pri ze, 3; General Athletic Comm ittee, 4; Chai rman Gy m nastic Committee, 4; Chai rman Class Executive Committee, 4; M i nstrel Troupe, 4. ,

H NTINGTON, 6. KE, . . . . . . . Bangor,lllfe., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 C. H . Bangor H . S.; Y. M. C . A.; Con ference Committee, 3; Athletic Exh ibition , 1, 3; Class Baseball Team, I, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Team, 1, 2, 3, 4; Best Indivi dual Field Day Record, 1, 2; College Record, 100 yards Dash , 220 yards Dash , R u n n i ng Broad Jump, 3; Chapel Organ ist, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, I, 4; M i nstrel Troupe, 3, 4; Col lege Orchestra, 4; Vice-President Tennis A sociation, 1 ; Ecfzo Editor, 3; Echo Editor- i n - Chief, 4; Class Poet, I, 3; Class H i torian, 4; Sophomore Declamation ; Junior Part, English ; Ju nior Debate; Senior Exhibition.

WI- l l TMAN, C H A R LES

\

Fair.field, l/1"e., . . . . . . . T n, . . . . Coburn C l a sical I nstitute; Echo Editor, 3 ; Clas President, 2; Class Football Team, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball Team, 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Committee, 3, 4.

I L LL\.M ' P ERCY FULLER' A

W R I G HT, ARTH R GooDWI 'AT n. . . . . . . I nt's H i l l; Y . M . C. .; Class Secretary,

3;

. eld, lllfe., Readfi Statistician, 4; Junior Debate.

12

.

.

.

.

.

.

1, 2 ,

.

.

. . . . . . . . I I c. H . 3, 4; Athletic Exh ibition,

.

.

.

.

. 7I

Pleasant St.


. . . . . . . . . . . . . Dover, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r P. H . Graduated from D exter H igh School, Valedictorian ; Y. V./. C . A .; Treasurer, r ; Bible Study Committee, 3, 4; Class Poet, 3; Ode Committee, 3, ..J.; Junior Exhibition , First Prize ; M ember of Conference Committee, 2, 3, 4.

BR AN , MERCY AGNES, S K,

GATCHELL, G R ACE, B <I>,

. . . . . Winthrop, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 L. H. Graduated from Coburn Classical I nstitute; Y. \ .C. A.; Sewing School Committee, 3, 4; Class President, r ; F reshman Reading, First Prize ; C lass Orator, 2; Sophomore Declamation, Second Prize ; Junior Exhibition, Second Prize ; Member of Conference Committee, 4 . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .. Machias, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r L. H . Graduated from M achias H igh Sch ool, Valedictorian ; Y. W.C. A . ; Secon d Entrance Prize ; Sophomore Declama­ tion ; Fourth H onorary Junior Part· Junior Exhibition ; Associate Editor Oracle, 4; H istorian, 4.

HAKSCOM, HELEN MACGREGO R , B <I>,

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . Skowhegan, life., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Union St. Graduated from Skowhegan H igh School, ' 9r ; Sal utatorian, and from Coburn Classical I n�titute. '93 ; Y. \\ . C . A. M issionary Committee, 3, 4; C l ass Secretary. r ; Member o f Co nference Committee, l ; Freshman Reading ; Sophomore D eclamation ; Second H onorary Junior Part ; Junior Exhibition ; O de Committee, 3 ; Treasurer, 4 ; Executive Committee, 4.

HANSON, EDITH BRAGG, S K,

HOLMES, HA R R IET FLOR E CE, B <I>,

Eastport, lire., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Union St. Gradu ited from Eastport H igh School, '91, aledictorian, and from Coburn Classical I nstitute, '93 ; Y. \V. C. A. M e m­ bership Committee, 3 ; H an dbook Committee, 4; Class Treasurer, r ; Prophet, 2; Secretary, 3; Senior Exh ibi­ tion ; Poet, 4 ; Ode Com mittee, 4.

AKKI E LEE, S K , . . . . . . Portland, Me. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 L. H . Graduated from Portland H igh School, 9 3 ; Y. W. C . A.; ice- President of Class, r; Ode Committee, 2; Executive Committee, 2; Treasurer, 3 ; Executive Com mittee, 3 ; Secretary, 4; Senior Exhibition.

K ·rGHT,

'

. . . Livermore Falls, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 P. H . , B <I>, G raduated from E dward Little H igh School ; Y. W. C . A. ; omi nating Committee, 4; Class Treasurer, 2; Executi e Committee, 3. 13

LAMB, HELEN FRANCE

.

.

.


. Gardiner, Me. , . . . . Graduated from Gardiner H igh School ; Y . \ V. C . A. ; Recording Secretary,

LARRABEE, EDITH MAUD, B <I>,

.

.

. 2;

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Class Treasurer,

. 1

.

.

.

.

. 5 L.

; Vice- President,

H. 4.

MATHEWS, OCTAVIA \ HlTING, � K,

. . . . . Auburndale, Mass., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 P. H . Graduated from Waterville H igh School ; Y . W . C. A. ; Temperance Committee, 3 , 4 ; Executive Com mittee, I; Third H onorary Junior Part ; Senior Exhibition.

MC C ALLUM , TEXA PATTERSON, . . . . . . . . . Warren, Me. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 P. H . Graduated from Coburn Classical I nstitute, '93 ; First Entrance Prize ; Class Secretary, 2; Vice- President, 3; Mem­ ber of Executive Committee, 4. •

.

. . . Deering, A!fe., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 North St. Graduated from Deering H igh School , Valedictorian ; Y. W. C. A. ; Northfield Committee, 3, 4; Class Poet ; Ode Committee, I ; Freshman Reading ; Class H istorian, 2; Sophomore Declamation ; Class President, 3; Echo Editor, 3; Associate Editor Oracle, 3 ; Echo Editor, 4.

NELSO , ELl\JIRA STARR, B <I>,

.

.

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auburn, Me. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 L. H . Graduated from Edward Little H igh School, Valedictorian ; Y . W. C . A. ; President, 4 ; Class Orator, I; Freshman Reading, Second Prize ; Class President, 2 ; First H onorary J unior Part ; Class H istorian, 3 ; Senior Exhibi­ tion ; Class Prophet, 4; Member of Conference Committee, 21 3 ; Chairman o f Conference Committee, 4.

YE, AucE LOUISE,� K,

TRA v,

East Bethel, Me., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 L.H . L\RTHA D KLAP, � K, . . . . . . . . . . . . orway High Schoel ; Y. W. C. A. ; Corresponding Secretary. 3; Prayer Meeting Comm1ttee, 4 ; Graduated from Member o f '95 until ophomore year ; Class Poet, 1 ; Freshman Reading, Second Prize ; Toast-Mistress, 2; Sophomore Declamation, First Prize ; Echo Editor, 3; Statistician, 4; Member of Conference Committee, 3, 4.

UE,

Vo E,

. . . . . . . . 9 Morrill Ave. . Waterville, Me. , . . . H TTIE BEATTY, B <I>, raduated from Waterville H igh School ; Y. \V. C. A.; Vice-President, 3; Reception Committee, 4; Class Executive Committee, 1; Address to Undergraduates, 4. •

1:-:

GERTRUDE,� K,

.

. .

.

.

. .

Graduated from \ at rville H igh

.

. . . . . . . . Watero£lle , Me., . . . . . . . chool ; Class Executive Committee, 1; President, 4· 14

.

.

.

.

. 107

Western Ave.


.

.

28 S. C . 27 C . H.

Vassalboro,

A LLEN, HAR R ISON SA 'BO R N, . A\'ER I L L , A L BERT GuY,

Milltown , .

.

.

Waterville, .

BATES, WILLARD ASA,

llfuscatine, Iowa,

BROOK S , C L AYTON KING 1A '

Waterboro, .

BRO WNE, HERBERT MAU R ICE,

. .

C L EAVES, A RT H U R \VORDSWO R T H , .

Dorchester, Mass . ,

CooK, RAYMO D HAROLD, .

Fne ' ndsllip, .

.

CORSON, HENR Y LYSANDER , . .

Canaan,

DESMOND, WlLLIAM BACON,

Portland, .

.

DR UMMOND, CHARLES MIL LETT,

Portland, .

DYER , JONAT HAN LYFO R D, .

Charleston,

E LY, GEO R GE ASH LEY,

W Springfield, .Jlllass., .

.

Waterville, .

FOYE, OTIS \VILLIAMS,

.

FULLER, NOR MAN KEIT H ,

Winslow, .

GER R Y, HAR R Y MELLIN,

South Paris,

GETCHELL, F R ED. GARD E R ,

Ban' ng,

G u R EY, C HAR LES EDWI N,

Portland, .

HALL, ELMER E LLSWO RT H ,

.

HER R I CK, EVERETT CAR LETO r, HOUSE, RALPH HOYT, .

.

INGR AHAM, IR A F R A TK, .

.

LI SCOTT, A R AD E R ASTUS, MANS O N, FRA K \VALDO,

.

Baring,

. .

Greene, Augusta, . Houlton,

.

Jefferson, Fairfield,

McFADDEN, WILLARD Low ELL,

Augusta, .

NAS H , EDWARD HE R Y, .

Portland, .

NELSON, JOH N EDWARD, . .

Waterville,

NELSON, JO H N R IC H A R D,

Caribou, .

PAGE, A RT H U R HARTSTEIN,

Fitchburg, Mass.,

PIERCE, THOMAS RAYMOND,

Rockland,

PIKE, FRED. PARKER HAMILTON,

Boston, Mass.,

PR ATT, HENRY HOWARD,

W Springfield, Mass.,

15

1 6 Park St. 23 s. c. 257 Iain St. 26 S. C . 20 C. H. 1 9 S. C. 1 7 C. H. 55 Pleasa n t St. . . . 19 C. H. . . . 31 C. H . 6 7 C ollege A ve. 24 C. H. 32 C . H. 28 C. H. 30 C. H. 27 C. H. '5 s. c. 24 C. H. 1 9 5 Main St. 25 C. H. Fairfield. 2 7 s. c. . 12 C . H. . 5 Belmont St. 15 C . H. II S. C.

19 s. c. 18 C . H. 31 C. H.


RICHARD

ON, BER T R A�I C.\RVE R , . ROBIN 01', FRA::\K ARTHUR, STEP H E 0 1 '}OH. E R V ! ' .

WALDE>' HEZEKIAH,

.

.

WELLllL.\�, J

TIN OLI\"ER, WIL ON, GEORGE ADAM, J R ., Woom1A , CHA R L E M EL LEN, .

s. c.

Brockton, JIIass. ,

18

Bangor,

.

8 C. H.

Houlton,

.

. 6 s. c . 7 6 Elm t. . 32 C. H.

Waterv ille, A ugusta, . South Paris,

.

Waterville,

33

23 C. H.

College Ave.

�arfiaI Q!L u urg:e. ALOE:-;, F R ANK WEiST\VORTH,

LOR IMER, GEORGE HOR ACE , . P HILBR OOK, EUGENE SUMNER,

H aterville,

Brewer,

. . .

BES E Y , LENOR.\, . .

TVaterville,

COLE, ALICE LE:-;A,

Hope,

.

c OK, EDITH MOR R!

D

I

MARY CAR LIKE,

MARVELL,

lABEL

. 72 Elm t. 22 1 Main St. 3 L. H.

.

Wilton, Waterville,

Dow. MARY HoPE, HUMPHREY,

.

Vassalboro,

I

COMBE, EDNA FLORE:-;CF..,

E AN

College Ave. T h e Elmwood. I I S. C.

15

Boston, ll:lass ..

.

"NE, .

lYRA C..\ E,

REID, EL I E G RD N, . SEA R L

11

Fairfield,

3 P. H.

Charleston, Auburn,

5 P. H.

.

Pleasant Place. 7 L. H.

Gloucester, llfass . , . Southbridge, llfass., Dover, NH,

Norway,

3 P. H. 2 P. H.

.

Norway, .

2 P. H.

Bridgton,

3 L. H. 4 L. H.

ll'inslow,

5 P. H.

llfeclzanic Falls,

·owDEAL, Ao.\.

M AY,

6 L . H. U nion St. Fairfield.

ipartial O!rtnu�£. Augusta,

16

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

3

D. H.


Au TIN, ROBERT BETT

·,

.

.

.

BJ HOP, HARVEY HAR\,\-OOD, .

Farmington, �Vestbrook,

BROWN, HARRY SAi'\FORD, .

Fairfield,

BROWN, WILLIAM\ !RT,

Waterville,

CHASE, WILLIA!\1 BR!; ANT, -

Waterville.,

CoR 'FORTH, GEORGE ERA TU ,

Waterville,

EELLS, J 0 EPH OLIVER, .

.

Rockport,

.

Fort Fairfield,

GOODY, ALFRED SPRAG E, GUILD, EARLO

I E T,

.

iVinslow,

G R 'EV, LA\ RE!\"CE EMERY,

Buckfield,

H NSON, HAROLD LIBBY,

Skowlzegan,

HOYT, HE!\"R\'

A lll B RO E,

Dorclzester, Mass.

MALIXG, ER 'EST HEKRv,

Portland, .

MARTIK, GEORGE ATWOOD,

Guilford, .

MERRICK, HUBERT ]A!IIE

Waterv ille, .

-

I

PE RS01, PARKER TUFT':. PILLSBURY, PUTKAM,

l\'RON ALLE ',

ARKEV ARTH

R,

SHA NOK, CHARLE

Farmington,

.

Fairfield, . .

.

Danforth,

RICHARDSON, RALPH CORNER, ROBBI s, ALBERT CYRUS,

. . .

EMERY GOULD, .

Brockton, Mass., Wintlzrop, Saco,

SHANNON, RICHARD CUTTS,

Saco,

SPEAR, CHARLES I 'GALLS,

Westbrook,

SPENCER, HENRY R SSELL1

U aterville, H aterv ille,

STEVENS, WILLIAM OLIVER, STl!ART, ARTHIJR IR\'!KG, ToLMA , DEA

Juo o ,

LORON,

Waterville,

. .

Vo E, HARRY SEBA TIA ,

\

.

.

\VILLIAl\I LI1 COTT,

\VAR R fa , AMBROSE BE TO=",

Sout!t Paris, TValerville,

U aterville,

Norway,

17

264 1ain St. 25 s. c. I c. H. 12 Center St. . . 22 C. H. 67 \Vestern Ave. . 29 s. c. \ inslow. . 19 C. H. . 25 C. H. . r6 C. H. 17 Winter St. . . 16 C. H. 12 . c. 282 �Iain St. . 7 s. c. I c. H. J 4 s. c. 18 S. C. 25 . c. . 21 College Ave. . 21 College Ave. . 273 Main St. 38 Pleasant St. 16 udd t. I 27 Oxford St. . . . . ..\- s. c. 107 \V"estern ve. 7 C. H. . . . . . 12 C. H.


QE>arfia( 4!1.ourg.e. DASC MBE, COLI£ HENRY, . LA:'llB, HEXR y A LLE. PATTER ON, LE\'l T H O � I A

Wilton, Portland, Freeport,.

BO\YMA�, HELE�E HORTEN E, BUCK, JENNIE MAUDE, . . CHA E, ALICE WHITE, CoR ON, EDITH 1ELL!E, Fo TER, R ACH E L Jo.·Es, HARRillfA ' ELE\'IA BELLE, HoxIE, MAUDE LovISE, HuLL, Axxrn HA:>: co:-.lE, . LEMOXT, MAR y GERTRUDE, LOWE, ALICE FREE!l!AN, . . M ATTHEW I MARGARET ET H EL , Pt:Rl::\GT01 I ETT A FRANCE I P RIXTON, ALICE M Y, . Ru. ELL, GRACE LILIAN,

Waterville, Waterville, Waterville, Waterville, Woodfords, . Waver{y, Mass., Waterville, . . . Deering Center,. Waterville, Waterville, 1'Vestbrook, NortliJay, Waterville, Skowhegan, Westbrook, . North Vassalboro, . �Vaterville, . . . . Augusta, Saxton's River, Vt., .

I

.

I

MALL, ;\1 LLIE SEWALL, TET OX,

T \\'ARD, J

GNE

ORRINXA, .

IE A. XIE. .

\\ARD, J \ ILllliR, M.\RY LOUJ A,

IO S. C. 29 s. c. 20 s . c.

22 1 Main St. 104 Front St. 22 1 Main St. 1 8 Temple Place. . . rr Center St. . 7 College Ave. . 2 Center Place. 6 L. H· . . 195 Main St. . 7 Boutelle Ave. . 257 Main St. 2 D. H. 40 Pleasant St. 239 Main St. 9 Park St. . . 2 D. H. 269 Main St. 2 Center Place. 11 College Ave. .

.

�atfia( Q!Luur5:e. C R

1

·,

jE . IE

out!zbridge,.ilfass.,

ERTR DE,

18

7 L.

H.


CLARK, HENRY WILLIAM, . . COTTO CARL, . . . . . . . Cu HMAN,ERNEST THOMAS, DOUGHTY, ALDE ELIPHALET, . FITZGERALD,MILLARD EDWI FOGG, CHARLES EMERSON, . FoL 0111 , HAROLD MORRELL, . FURBUSH,HENRY DEARBORN, GrnBo ·s,J o HN BERNARD,. . . GILBERT, PERCY EMERTON, . HARDY, WARRE FOLLA SBEE, HAY 'ES,HAROLD \VOODARD, . HEDMAN,SIMO PETER, . . . . HERRICK,ER 'EST LAWRENCE, . HOOKE,WALTER GEORGE,. HUDSON, JAMES HE IRV, . . . . ]ACK, \VILLIAM BLAKE, . . JE 'KINS,EDWARD DRUl\IMOND, . LAWRENCE, FRED Foss, . . . . LEAR ED,ORRIN ALBERT, . . . McDor ALD,CHARLES DEARBOR , PARKER, MILLARD lSAMBERT PEARCE,ARTHUR CUSHING, PHILBRICK,BE JAMIN ELDEN, SAFFORD, EDWARD RAYMOND, SANBORN, AR 'OLD MERRIAM, SAWYER,FERNALD DA vrn, . . SEVERY, FRA K JOSEPH, TOWNE, CHARLES FRANKLIN, TUPPER, ERNEST HOWARD, VE TRES,ERNEST EGAN, . . I

I

.

Boston, Mass ., Fairfield,

. . .

West Paris, .

.

.

.

.

West Paris, .

Old Town, Hartland,

. .

.

Boston, .ll:fass. ,

. .

.

Boston, Mass., Billerica, Mass., . Old Town,

.

.

New Sweden, Levant, . Foxcroft, Guilford .

Portland,

Waterville, . Fair.field, . Fairfield, Bath,

. .

.

.

. . .

.

Hallowell, .

.

.

.

.

Somerville, .llfass . , Waterv ille,

.

.

.

Roslindale, .ll:lass., Wilton, . .

.

Otisfield Gore,

.

Chase's .llfills, . Winslow, .

.

Oakland, . . East Con' n !h, 19

.

·waterville, Cl inton, .

. 6 C. H. . 22 s. c . . . . . . I I c . H. . . . 6 C. H. 2 1 Summer St. . r 4 Pleasant St. 227 M ai n St. Pleasant St. . . 2 1 C. H. . . 107 Kennebec St. 222 fain St. . . . . 8 C. H. . . 13 . c . . 2 1 College Av. . 13 S. C. . . 2 1 S. C. . . 30 C. H. . . 24 High St. . . . 14 C. H. . . . 22 s. c. . . . IO S. c . . 255 Main St. . . . 18 C. H. . 20 College Av. . 255 Main St. ' . 14 C. H. . . . II High St. 20 C. H. 22 C. H. 82 Front St. 9 Center St. ·

. .

·

.

.

.


WARNER , ALBERT GARDNE R ,

.

.

\ I REN, \ ASH! GTO� A LLAN VA GHA"N,

Hopedale, Mass. , Woodland,

92 .

.

College Av. . 13 s. c.

jp)arfia( Q!L.1mr�:e. FLOOD, JOH '.'< A RT H R, SCANNELL, JOH.

Nashua, NH, New Market, NH, jay, . . Fairfield, . . . . . . .

. .

THOMAS, .

THOMPSON, OTHO HENR v, . TOTMAN, HE,-Rv F R ANKLI� •

AMES, LULU MAE, . . BATE '

.

.

.

L E X A EVELY '. . .

C I I AKEY, GR ACI E EMMA, .

.

CRIE, NELLIE\ HITTE. ·, DIVER, FLORENCE

1AV, .

GALLERT, AntEE PA LA, . HARLOW, H ATTIE

AL:llA, .

H "TC!IJ.' ON, EMMA FR ANCES, . J NE

STELL A Lour E,

MAGRATH, MARGE E TELLE, . ME E R ,' E, LOI

BOR E, MAR I .- TH :llP ON, . .

PI KE, GERTRUDE MABEL,

.

.

PI!I LBRO K, MARY GAR DNER, ROBERT",

.

AL ETT A, . . . .

PERRY, MYRA Jo E PH I ."E,

POWER.,

GNES JULIA, . . . ARAH

ATLA. T, .

Ros ELL, ET H EL MAE,

TI R R ELL, JEN�1E EL E. TOZIER, CAR R IE MAY ,

.

'

. . . . . . Farmington, . . . Oakland, . . . . llfi"lton, . . . . . . . . . . . Rockland, . . . . . . . . . . . Detroit, lllfirh., Waterville, . Gardiner, . Skowhegan, . Waterville, . .Milton, . . . Vassalboro, . Waterville, . . . Woodfords, . . . . . . Westboro, llfass., . . . Augusta . . . . . . . . . South Norridgewock, . . . Caribou . . . . . . . . . . . . Augusta, . . . . . . . . . . South Paris, . . . Somerville, Mass. , . . . . . . .

.

20

C. H . C . H. . . 14 s. c . 2 3 H igh St. .

.

. .

.

. .

. .

.

.

. . . . .

.

.

.

. . .

9

Center St· Center Place. . . . . . 70 Elm St. . . . . . . 4 L. H. . . 77 Elm St. . 54 Silver St. 1 5 College Av. . . . 3 D. H . . . r 1 Ash St. . . 70 Elm St. 7 Leighton t. . . . . . 5 Ash t. 31 College Av. . . . 7 College Av. . . 2 Center Place. . . . . 273 Main St. . . . . . . 7 L. H. . . . 1 Center Place. I Appleton St. . . . . . . 7 L. H . . .

. . 9

. . . 2

.

.

. 21


�llllt:�n�.

�artial ABBOTT, ALICE RUTH, ... .

.

.

.

BENSON, LOUISE MAY, .... BRACKETT, ETHELY

MARGUERITE, .

HALL, SUSIE AGNE ' HOLDEN, GRACE BELL, MERRICK,

ELLA MARY, .

STUBBS, MATTIE \VILMA,

Waterville, . . Waterville, Newport, . Gray, . . . . Waterville, . Waterville, . Brew er, . .

.

S. C. South College; C. H. Chaplin Hall; L. H., Ladies

2[

.

. . .

Pleasant St. 221 Main St. . . 273 fain St. 221 Main St. . II H igh St. 282 Main St. 239 Main St. 50

.

Hall; D. H., Dr. Dunn's; P. H., Palmer House.


.$ummatJ1 uf .$fubtnfn. ,. ,.

SE !ORS ..

.

J NIOR SOPHO�IORES . FRESH�IEN . .

Total

Men.

Women.

Total.

20 41 33 37

16 17 20 27

36 58 53 6-t

IJI

80

211

,Jturn1£t Iail£mb£tll uf '97. FRED. B RTON BRADEEN, z \}I, . of P. Medical School, '99. CHA• . LA F REST CHA�IBERLATN, AY, Mechanic Falls, Jltfe. *CHARLE ARTH R Cox, Z \}I, ARTH R JAMES D K TON, A KE, . B. . Law School, '98. DE LAFAYETTE FLYNT, <I> A®, . . Augusta, JVfe. *i E\ 1-lALL ]A K ON, A Y. FREI. MERRILL MA ·suR, Z \}I, . . . . . . Houlton, lltfe.

H ELEN EMILY B 'XKER, [1:-;. JE R�ON, Li; ·v E\'ELVN CRo BY, BERTH.\ FOOTE, . . . . HATTIE JORDA .. l\lcCALLUl\I, :-\:\'IE H 'T H IN ON PEPPER, � K, . LEi\'A M.\ \'TOZIER, • . . tRo · MAY AME. , . . . . . . . . 11::-INIE E�llL\' GAL LERT , • Decea�e<l.

,. ,.

Waterville, Me. Waterville, life. Waterville, fife. Washburn, ll:fe. . Warren, life. . Waterville, life. . Fairfield, fife. . . Unity, fife. 1 [ alerville, Jl/e. 22

EDWARD SAM EL O sBOR E, . . . . . . Waten1ille, life. . . . Livermore Falls, Me. HOWARD PIERCE, A Y, CHAS. ALTON ST URTE V AN T , ATO, B. U Medical School,'98. HERBERT LEWIS SWAN, <I> A®, . . Brown University, '98. tGEORGE LORIMER BAKER, A Y, . . . . . Boston, lltfass. tYuGORO CHJBA, . . Rochester Theological Seminary, ' 99. tHARRY LAWSO GI LMA , . . . . . . . . Waterville, Me.

tMrRIAM FANNY GALLERT, tGRACE MABEL GooD RD, tFLORENCE LYDIA M RRILL, *i ELLIE MAY NICHOLS. tFANNIE MAY PARKER, .. tMARIO Lo I E PARKER, . tHELE BRTt RY P RINTO ', tR Tl-I DALTE STEVE s, . . . tADDIE ETTA FAR HAM WEYM 'TH, t Partial Course.

. Waterville, fitfe . Waterville, Me. Cornish, Me. Bangor, Me. . . Bangor, ll!le. Waterville, .iltfe . Waten;i/le, lltfe. Biddeford, lltfe.


NAME.

DATE OF BIRTH.

8,, r 8l{

Barker Hassett Chapman Clement Cross . Harthorne Holmes . Keith . Noble . . Philbrick Roberts . Snow . Taylor Titcomb Waldron Watson . Whitman Williams Wright

Me. April '75 Dec. 1 6 '75 Me. Me. April 28, 72 Me. Jan. i6, '74 Me. June I2, ·74 Aug. 21, '72 Me. Sept. I 3, '74 Me. Me. Sept. 2q, '75 I, '70 Jan. Me. Me. April 13, '75 June II, '73 Me. '68 N. S. July, Me. Sept. 30, 73 March 29, )5 Me. Nov. 20, 75 Me. April 30, '74 Me. Me. Nov. 24, 173 Me. June 28, '74 Me. May 3, '72

Miss Brann . . Miss Gatchell . Miss Hanscom Miss Hanson Miss Holmes Miss Knight Miss Lamb . Miss Larrabee Miss Mathews . Miss McCallum Miss Nelson . Miss Nye Miss Tracy Miss Vigue Miss Vose .

Me. Me. Me. Mass. Me. Me. Me Me. Me. Me. Me. Me. Me. Me. Me.

1 Sept. Aug. J

I

19, 12, Sept. rq, Jan. 12, Aug. 20, Nov. 25, May 11 Feb. 7, March 311 July r5, March 25,

July Feb. Sept. Dec.

28,

J

' 7'

:73 72 7 )3 73 , 74 '77

'72

'74 '75 175 '75 9, '75 3, :16 n, 72

1

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 5 5 5 6 5 5

ft. r 1 149 ft. o� 142 ft. 11 175 ft. II 147 ft. I56 ft. 6� 154 ft. 10 � r55 ft. 8� 150 ft. IT I52 ft. 10 I36 138 f t. 6 ft.

ft.

ft.

7 r 6

ft. 8� ft. 9 ft. ft. .'i� ft.

7

5 ft. 5 ft. 7)4 5 ft. 3)4 5 ft. 5 ft. 2 5 ft. 7 5 ft. 4� 5 ft. I� 5 ft. 6 5 ft. 5)4 s ft. 4)4 5 ft. 6 5 ft. 4 s ft. 5 5 ft. 3X

1

155 160 165

1 148 165

16o 170 137

KI

97 1 16 IT2 99 115 130 114 105

I26

IIS�

u2 rm

I

n8

105 132

I

I

I

FUTURE OCCUPATION.

RELIGIOUS PREFERENCE.

POLITICS.

Unitarian. Unitarian. Congregation'st Methodist. Methodist. Baptist. Cougregation'st Swedenborgian. Free Baptist. Baptist. Congregation'st Baptist. Baptist. one. Baptist. Baptist. Baptist. Congregation'st Methodist.

Republican. Republican. Republican. Prohibition't Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican Prohibition'tl Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican.

Medicine. Law. Undecided. Teaching. Teaching. Law. Law. Medicine. Law. Architecture. Medicine. Ministry. Ministry. Business. Medicine. Law. Teaching. Teaching. Teaching.

Baptist. Congregation'st Congregation'st Baptist. Bapt � st. Baptist. Baptist. Coogregation'st Congregation'st Baptist. Congregation'st Baptist. Baptist. Congregation'st Universalist.

Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican. Republican.

Teaching. Teaching. Teaching. Teaching. Study. Teaching. Undecided. Teaching. Teaching. Teaching. Teaching. Missions. Teaching. Teaching. Teaching.

l

23

E1 GAGED.

I

FAVORITE STUDY.

A widower. No. Once. No

French. German. Greek. History. o. Chemistry. No. Physics. \Viii be before Social Science. o. [commencem't None. Logic. No. No. Chemistry. Yes. Chemistry. No. Ethics. In hunting for one Physics. Three times. Nooe. 'No. Chemistry. English Literature. Once. Literature. In love. Physics. No. Greek. No. 6 days in the week German.

1 I

I

On Sat. evenings. It's a secret. No. o one knows. ot yet. To all appearanNo. [ces. Parents don't o. [approve. Yes. In work, yes. o. Will be soon. No.

I

Literature. Mineralogy. English Literature. English Literature. History. German. Literature. German. German. Greek. Latin. Geology. Ethics. Chemistry.


--

-�������-

Barker. Bassell. Chapman. lement. Cross.

LANG FAVORITE ExPR ESSION.o

I C 1' NA M E .

Blossom. George. Chap. Clem. Cross.

G-D - i t . ugar (?). By Hollands ! Gee W h i taker ! Come off.

Harthorne.

Billy.

H

H olmes.

Billy.

Keith.

Al.

Dam m i t I

�oble.

By Jove l

'oble.

-- !

oak your head !

.$fafi gft �

FA V0R 1 TE A�l USEM E

To practise at the bar. To reach Heaven. To beat Bowd o i n . To be 7 ft. tal l . To h e l p " Santa . "

Talking.I

To get on e x h i b i t ions.

Ph ilbri c k .

Phil.

i\ly Stars I

To stay at Holmes.

Roberts. now. Ta,lor. Titcomb. \\'aldron.

Rob. harley. Fred. Tit. Lin.

Gosh Darn il ! You d on't say. Gee w h i z ! H -- ! ! General Profa n i t y.

Playing Ball. Preach i n g. Going to sociables. Rid i ng.a Loafing. Asking Questions.

Merci. Gay. cummie.

Goodness me I I 'l l be d umbsquizzled ! warted.

Read i ng j o h n . G e l l i n g up theatricals. Talking.

Du ffy. Liebe. �an. Lambie. Bee.

h, ;\ly ! Mercy ! • racious Peter ! Squelched. .mcious !

m i l ing. Blu. hing. Playing parchesi . leeping. Popprng corn.

Bothe.ration.

Telling stories.

"

11

Tracv. ii;;- ue. Voc.oe.

������� �

rgan.

Polly.

There are others. Land sakes J

Mak ing K n ight h i d eous. To be rich. Cooking. make To happy.

;o\. G.

Jn it.

Talking French.

' I n hi" ht:atl.

'<pre sion

wa

a

n

l Punning.

Lh r , D e m o thenes,

tc.

her Lamb.

·

+� �:; s��� � ! �� ti�

I'll be j i gered. , dssors I h, M a m ma l

1 Through b i - hat. ' The

Playing t h e

;��!��� ?i �� �W

T. P. Peggy. Pocahontas.

M . D.

Por h i s general good behavior

intelligent An agent. A good fellow.

m u ician. insurance

For s m i l i ng on exam i ttation da\•S. ' A chemist. For ieading the 97 chorus. Maid happy. For h e r engagememt. ourt. F?r studri ng one eve11i ng d ur j udge of t he upreme ' mg a 97 frolic. A tax collector. For selling 1 30 books. Tbe owner of a flower garden For her progress in ethics. filled with poppies and weet Williams. ' For keeping awake on the President of 97. fore 1 1oon of ;\farch 2, t 97.

M iss Brann. " Gatchell. H anscom . ·•

'elson. • ye.

A dweller in t h e tents of wicked ness. A better and a wiser man.

To i t t \·ent a flying machitte. H a been realized.' To live i n 'oah's ark. To keep a coal lire.

Wright.

k allum .

For care of the bric ks d u r i ng vacation. For leaving the girls alone for 3 years. For preserving bis yonth.

A pugilLt. I n the Salvation Army. .\ Cross."

For h e r d imples. For her trust i n Providence. For keeping quiet, date forgollen. t n n For her interest in Boston. For solo singing. For never getting an ry.

Wright.

1\lanbews.

I A ::�fi�1:i�7����istopbeles.

To go t o Germany. g 1 e ;1 e ,i e world. To be s i x feet tell. To tell a tory ·traight. To travel i n M a i n e. To be a prima donna. To be wise.

B i lly.

"

n 0 le. o e e For passjng chemistry. For keeping h i s whistler moist For h i fatherly appearance.

��� r:!�f�� f \� � �?�g

For helping

\\' illiams.

·•

BRING.

To get a sheep s k i n .

I

H an. on. H ol mes. K n ight. Lamb. Larrabee.

WORTHY OF

BLE MENTION.

l\ l i l k ing Cows.

Great Scot t !

\\' b i t .

•·

I

HONOR

" Ma k i ng u p . ' '

\\'at.

\V h i t m a n .

11

I

To make the plans for a r) n . r e T To help Moody. To go to Fannini:-ton. To get another girl. To work i n the Pulp mill. T o b e the double-headed m an i n a mu eum. To become a Bangor alderman. H as n ' t any.

\\'at son .

" "

To run wheels.'

To play w i t h Francis \; ilson. To t al k fl uently.

Travelling.

' Nawth i n . 1

'1 1 G HEST A M B ITION.

porting. B u c k i ng the Tiger. a i l i ng. P u l l i ng down R u m . conference E n fo r c i n g decrees. Playing cards.

Theatre.

k now better l

trf ' 9 7.

H o ( l )me(s)

To l i ve wit hout ing.

work-

For his sobriety.

' A married man. For h is " treat . " A m i n ister.• For h i s good head o f hair. r. A sai n t . o F o n 1 J us t w h a t he i s d F o r h is k nowledgE.. o f t h e A ompanion of Buffa lo B i l l . moral law. Advance agent for L i t t le Born on the " ten lots." Egypt. More than he ever will b e . For keeping hi. temper.

���;��T � i!'.

F i r s t electman i n No. Fair­ field . lem wash d isbes. A farmer.

For bis meekness.

��� ��i�t� �� r:�:�� � ��f��:

,

I re preached the s a m e sermon fourteen consec u t i ve t i m e s .

furmerly used ; now the women o f ' 97 are members of the Anti-Slang • Be ause of her

ucce"� at pillo\\-d x.

A reformer. A h u morous lecturer. A stump spea ker.

s�ociat ion.

7

G

A m i n ister's daughter. A follower of Demost hcnes. A football-player. In the m i le walk. A member of t h e o n ference Committee. A schoolma'am.

Between a m o n k e y and a man.

h e is now a member o f Kappa Alpha.


.$ummarn. �lm.

\,\Thole n u mber at the beginning of course, 33. years ; o f the you ngest twenty-one.

Present m embership, 20.

The age of the oldest man is twenty-eight

The average is twenty-three.

The h eaviest weighs 175 pou n ds ; the lightest 1 76. The tallest man is 6 feet l i nch ; the shortest,

ďż˝

The average is 1 53.

feet 5 .Vz i nches.

The average h eight is 5 feet 7 i nches.

Seven of the class are Baptists ; fo u r Congregationalists ; th ree ti.f ethodists ; t wo

n itarians ; one Free- Baptist ; one

S wedenborgian ; o ne has n o religious preference. T here are seventeen Republ ican s ; two Proh ibition ists. Five will teach, four w i l l e nter upon the study of medicine, five will study law, two will enter the min istry , one w i l l ente r busi ness, one will study architecture, and one is u ndecided.

iWttnnm.

Whole n u mber at the beginning of course, 32. Present n umber, 1 5. The age of the oldest is twe nty -five ; t h e youngest ni n etee n .

The average is twenty-two.

The heaviest weighs 1 32 poun ds ; the l ightest 97. The tallest is 5 feet 7 Yz i nches ; the shortest 5 feet.

The average is I I 4 pounds. The average is

Eight are Baptists ; six are Congregationalists ; one is a

5

feet 3 i nches.

niversalist.

All are Republicans. Twelve will teach, one will engage i n missio n work, one w i ll study, and one is u ndeci ded.


uf '97.

Q!rlass

LA

ELL : -.

Ul'len.

i nety-Seven, ' Rah l ' Rah !

i nety-Seven, ' Rah ! 'Rah !

H obble, Gobble ! Razzle, Dazzl e !

is ! Boom ! Bah !

olby, 1inety- even ! 'Rah ! ' Rah !! 'Rah ! ! !

CLASS COLORS : ORANGE A N D BLACK.

lf>f 1U:rr!f. FR

. R

BERT , President,

H. H. PUT

\V. F. T I TC H.

C. H. W H ITM

;\I, J R ., rice-President,

\ Historian.

C. L. C LE M E T, Prophet. L. E. W ALO RO

� r n . Secretary

. P H l LB R I

W.

.

F. E. T

\' L

G. W R I G HT, Statistician. E. E.

' \V, Poet.

, .Marshal.

H A RT H O RNE, Toast- Afaster.

.

O B L E, Address lo Undergraduates.

W. H. H O L M ES,

R, C11 aplain.

JR.,

Parting- Address.

C!!i x r .cnfi\Jc @rtmnniftcr. H . B. \

T

H.

. C ROS

P. F. \\ ! L U A 1 .

� lrnt miffre u n · � '£ .ff . . R. K E I T H .

R. �L BAR K E R .

26

H . H . C H APMAN.


Turn rolls around and once more a Senior H i story m u st be written. Glance at any Senior H i story of the past and you will see that each Senior Class claimed t o be the bright­ est, best and strongest, i ntellectually and physically, that ever " left the classic halls of learn­ i ng. But we do n ot cl aim t his dist inction. Facts are i ndisputable, and as we leave these associations of the past four years, we have some t h ings to regret. 'Twere better had many things been left u ndone, at least let us leave them u n said. As the t i me draws near for departure, we feel sorry to leave ; but, o n the whole, we are glad that our preparatory work i s completed, as far as college goes, and that we are t o t ry new fi elds. W e h ave seen some of our original n u m bers d rop out and new recuits j o i n our ranks. We cannot claim distinguished scholarship, but still we have our proportionate part of scholars. Many of our n umbers have been temporarily harassed by Chemist ry, Physics, Languages, etc., but they h ave managed to survive the ordeal, and if their flags are not proudly flaunti n g i n t h e breeze, yet they are n ot at h alf-mast. I n athlet i c sports w e have always been hampered b y lack o f n umbers, but rarely, i f ever, would you fi nd a class whose " sand " has d isplayed itself t o such a degree. On the t rack, diamond, gridiron, in " scraps " a n d " rushes," our " sand " h as tol d , and although we have succumbed t o n umbers, y e t we h ave always " fought a good fi ght. " In matri m onial ven t u res our class is apparently a u nit, although we have lost one man, to whose en raptured eyes charms of the gentler sex were i rresistible. O n e has had the courage t o declare openly his i ntentions, some are " has beens " and others are seeking " to be." A s a class we have always commanded the respect of our contemporaries. U nder our leadership athletic sports have received a new i m petus, and the Ee/to has again secured a recognized place among college publications. As we have said, we have m uch to regret, we have more to b e pleased at. We feel t hat our temporary failures have in many respects proven a blessin g, t hat our successes will spur us on to renewed effort i n t h e futu re. N in ety-Seven will always u n i t e t h e O range and Biack with th e B l u e and the Gray. 27


nr

Q!r{agg

'97.

!IDom:en.

, � ��-==J-+--�--1� �� ----, -�� r----1 ��._-ll----"'•� �

CLASS

all

Of

is

the

the

n i n e - ties

queen .

YELL :

--'•,.__��P"---

ev

-

Colby,

er

Nine - ty - seve n .

Colby,

CLASS COLORS : ORANGE A N D BLACK.

10 ffn::er;. 11

A GERTR E D I T H MA A

A L I C E LOUISE

DE V O E, President.

H ATT I E BEATTY V I GUE, Address to Undergraduates.

I E L E E K N I G H T, Secretary.

MARTHA D

E D I T H B R AGG HA SON, Treasurer, H ELE

YE, Prophet.

H A R R L ET R LO R ENCE H O L M ES, Poet.

D L A R R A BEE, Vice-President.

LAP T R ACY, Statistician.

M ., cGR EGOR H A 1SCOM, Historian.

'1!tx.erufiir.e Q!Ltrnnniffee. •

TE1

D I T H B RAGG H A N 0 .

PATTERSON M cCA L L M .

E LM I R A ST RR

E LSO .

!0'it.e Q!L 1.n mniffee. H

R R I ET FL

RE

T

E H

L IE .

lE R C\' AG E

-

BR zB

N.

1

I E H TC H I SO

PEPP E R .


.. ..

T H I has always been the motto of '97. If i n any way she has failed to live up to the spirit of her motto, let n o man, -or girl, either,-presume t o criticise her for it. For what girl, what college girl, hath attain ed perfection ? But even as we ask the question, forth from the echoing caverns of t h e Past, whither the college years have gon e with hurrying feet, comes the answer, borne to us by the breezes of praise, " '97 girls." Perhaps in some cases there is less need of modesty than in oth ers. In our four years here at Colby, we girls of '97 have done much as all other Colby girls have done. \Ve have worked and we ha e played , and all our days, our work-days and our play-days, have been very, very happy ones. W.e were meek and docile Freshmen, obeyed the Sophomores and d i d the bidd i n g of upper-class girls as all well-conducted Freshmen should. To be sure, we did have our Peanut D ru n k during t hat Freshman year, and that was in a Sophomore's room. The wrath of the powers that were came down on our defen seless heads for ome of the d eeds that were done that night, but those are things of which no loyal '97 girl will tell you. We also ducked a lawn-party of Sophomore boys and girls from the windows of Lad ies' H al l once in our Freshman sprin g, but i t was a clandest ine lawn party, and they deserved it. We continued as we had begu n . As Sophomores we did our best to train up in t h e way they should go, the amiable Freshmen committed to our care. Ask them if we didn't ! Our J u n ior year was very gay and full of all manner of good t i mes, with now and then a touch of some­ thing d eeper and more lasti ng. This was, perhaps, our happiest year, and i t passed the most swiftly of them all. Almost before we k n ew it, we were back in the old places as Seniors. H ere we have fou n d the t ruth of that old sayi ng, " Be good and you will be happy, but you won ' t have half as much fun . " We have been good, better than any year before. Our Senior year shows a record of hard, faithful work, such as we may well be prou d to look back upon. \Ve have been happy, too, but t ruly we have n ot had half as much fun as we used to have. No, we have been sedate and quiet and have set a most excellent example, one that t h e lower classes, alas, do not seem much i nclined to follow. \ e have gon e to few sociables, to fewer recept ions, to very few lectures and exhibitions, and as for the M essalonskee, i t i s forgotten land t o most of us. Ve ha,¡e stayed at home and st udied. Can it be that we girls are really what a heartless ] u n ior recently called u , " grass widows " ? Be t hat as it may, we are fi fteen happy, j oyous girls, and we are ready now t o go out from our Al ma M at er, to fill whatever places may be wai ti n g in the world for us. The m istakes that we h ave made-and they have been all too many-let those who come after u s avoid, and what little of good there has been in our acts, let them strive t o copy. H owever others may regard i t , '97 will always be t o us fi fteen girl s the symbol of four b ard but happy years, and t h e bond which shall bind u s closer than aught else.


OJrlasit uf

'98.

Ulen. CLASS y ELL

AA.aA.a ! a.AaAcf ! a.AaA.a !

:-'

v{KTJ €crrl. ro ITTivOww. !

Colby,

inety-Eight ! ' Rah ! 'Rah ! ' R ah !

Boomerate ! Boomerate ! Chi ! Xi ! Gamma ! Alpha ! Colby,

inety-eight.

CLASS COLORS : PINK

J O H 1 E . N E LSO , President.

H A R R ISO

·o R M AN K . F L L E R , Vice-President. ,

S. A L L E 1 , Orator.

H E RY H . PRATT, Poet.

F R E D . G. GETC H E LL , Secretary. C H A R LES M . \ OODMA

AND GRAY.

J UST!

Treasurer.

0.

W E LL MA , Historian.

B E RTRAM C. R I C H A R DSO

R A V M O . . D H . COOK, Toast-Master.

,

Awarder of Prizes.

EUG ENE S. P H I LBROO K , Chaplain.

EL 1 E R E. H A L L , Marsh£Ll.

H E R B E R T 1. B R O \\

ARTH

R H . PAGE.

E,

<Exrmfiu2 @L.unnnitt22.

B E RTRAM C. R I C H A R D 0

JOH

E. N E LSON.

@r mm11itt:e2 nn !0b°£:!f.

A RA D E . LIN COTT. 30

JO

T H AN L. DYER.


To CONDENSE t h e history of '98 i n to even a large book would be a task o f n o small proportions, but we are asked to place o n a s ingle page that which shall, to generations yet unborn, stand as a signal memorial of what '98 has , and what she can still, acco mpl ish. We feel, with Artemus Ward's Shakeresses, that this i s i n deed " too, too m uch," and o n account of this " much­ n ess " we, too, are i nclined to abandon the task as hopeless. But posterity i mploringly calls to us, and we cannot bear to disappoint such a cry. As F reshmen, the largest class that ever entered these classi c halls, we were undoubtedly a huge success. Not even the doughty Sophomores with their bold-faced braggadocio could i n t im i date us, although it was only after re­ peated lessons that t hey fi nally l earned that we really did possess what we claimed to possess-viz: the campus, the whole campus, and all t h i ngs with the campus. This claim w e have n ever yet relinquished and i s now a n u n­ disputed possession of ours. Our career as Sophomores opened auspiciously o n Bloody Monday night, several of the Freshm e n being so elated at the event as to j oi n in the celebrat ion. (We are rem i n ded, by the way, that t he skirt-dancing of t h e evening was particularly m eritorious.) We endeavored, throughout t h e year, t o do our duty as the Lord H igh Stewards of H is Maj esty ct> X. That our immediate successors appreciated our efforts in this l in e, was evident from the marked i mprovement shown by all, certain members of this h eterogeneous conglomerat ion adapti n g them selves especially to our careful and t horough t reatment-the t reatment being : first, one dose Verbum Sap (which m eans a word to the w£se i s suffic ient), followed by l iberal ablutions of cold water, appl ied externally, and i n extreme cases applications of shoe-blacking salve, with m i d night walks. T H E WAR C RY was, of course, editorially assumed by us, and, from the illuminated frontisp iece, to t h e half-tone photograph o n the last page, i t was a noteworthy edition. In every detail our j ournalism was conducted on t h e principle, " Tell t h e t ruth, let t h e chips fall where they m ay ; " also " S£c Semper Tyrann£s." This l i n e of procedure, of course, assured the success of the edition, alth ough many t hought w e were m ean , you know ! Almost i mperceptibly we passed t he half-way m ark of our college course, and i n our most graceful manner soon acquired those digmties and quali ties which have, from t i me immemorial, character ized the J unior. We have relished the task that was m arked out for us, and, with assidious care, w e have succeeded in " layi n g out " Chemi st ry and its elder brother m u m m y Physiology, cold a n d stiff, i n t h e i r respective sarcophagi. T h e " Deutsche Sprache " h a s b e e n handled without gloves, a n d i n a l l departments we have m a d e ourselves a n ind ispensable quantity to Colby. We m u s t lay down o u r p e n , b u t w e wish those who h ereafter peruse t h i s memorial to remember that ' 9 8 £s, has been, and w£ll ever b e a t rue hustler f o r Colby and her i n terests. 31


of

QJ!la!lll

'98.

lllJ tnmm . CLAS

yE L L

AA.aA.a ! ci.A.aA.a ! ci.AriA.a ! v[KYJ for/. ro <ruveww. !

:-'

Colby,

inety- Eight ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! '.Rah !

Boomerate ! Boomerate ! Chi ! X i ! Gamma ! A lpha ! Colby, Ni nety- Eight.

CLASS COLORS : PINK AND GRAY.

ED A H A R R I ET

,

T EP H E

1YRA C

E M

M A BE L A

L• .

R A BE

LA

President.

M A RY C A R O L l E EVA S, Historian.

E H UM P H R EY, Secretary.

EL 1 E G O R DO

EY.

R A H ATT I E S M I T H , Treasurer. A L I C E L ENA COLE, Poet.

R V E L L, Vice-President.

R ErD.

C. B LA C H E W

LKER.

Q!I. .o m m iffe.c trn ® b .c s .

J

ET

H R I TINE

TEPH E

A LI CE LENA 32

OLE.

M A R Y CA R O LI N E E V A

1


IT was a long, long, st eep h ill, stretching up, up, and i n the d istance, on the s u m m it, could be seen a castle. Nearly t h ree-fourths of the way up t h e h ill sixteen girls were t o i l i n g , now laughing merrily, n o w s i l e n t , as if i n d espair. In the di stance below, another band of girls was seen, and at the foot, st ill another , but they were so far away t h at they looked like mere specks. At the gate of the castle a fourth company of maidens was about to enter. The s ixteen maidens looked u p at them w ith ad mirat ion, but did not qui cken their pace, a few even cast envious glances beh ind at t h e t ravellers below. The maidens were walking with a l ighter step than formerly, for they had, j u st before, left part of the load which t hey carried. I t made a h uge pile beside t he path- thirty-t wo large chemistry-books, sci ssors and i n n u me rable bottles of m uc ilage. " Take one," a placard read, sedu ct i \ ely. But not for long were they t o walk burclenless. Suddenly a skeleton appeared in their path, waved its long, bony arms, and from a large black box d rew out sixt ee n small, green vol u m es labelled H u xley, presented them, and walked away, followed by thirty- t wo m i sty eyes. The path now became very st eep, and the maidens were all the t i m e st u mbling over skulls which lay i n their way ; but, presently, the road became beaut iful again, and t hey gayly m arched on, s inging German songs. Some few of the maidens were every now and then t u rn ing their heads t o l oo k eagerly across to another h il l run n i n g parallel to their own. Up this h ill their " brothers " were t ravelling, and not u n freguently black figures could he seen steal i n g across th e valley to walk awh ile with the maidens ; some fou n d t h e path so easy that, l ike the Lot u s eaters, t hey forgot the way back. They now passed a sign which read , " J u nior Ease. " The maidens looked back along th e way which they had lately come, then their gaze travelled forward so far as the eye could see ; they looked at one another do ubtfull) , shook thei r heads and said, " Where is i t ? " The wind sighed through the branches ; there was no an swer, so they plodded on. 3

33


nf

Q!rla :s n

'99.

ill'hm .

CLA

YELL

: - ' Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! ' R ah ! ' Rah ! Up to date, ure as fate, That is what we are. 'Y7ro rwv ()f.flJv, everything's our own,

wcpV..f.W. cpO...oun KO.l Df.°i:µJL 7r0Af.f1WV, In the college push, We are in the line. ' R ah ! 'Rah ! ' R ah ! ' R ah !

Colby,

l

inety- ine.

CLASS COLORS : VIOLET AND WHITE.

, EO R G E A.

1 A RTI

H

H

, President.

RRY

. BR

B E R T J . M ER R I C K ,

W 1 , T 'ice- Presidenl.

A 1 R C . E R . \ A R R E1 ·.

ER

ecrel01'J1.

E T H . M A LI

G, Treasurer.

@:: x n u f i u c Q!l. trnT m i ffcc.

HAR

EV I . 13 1 H O P.

DEA I J . T

LMA .

34-

'


TttE history of our class is in m any r spects similar to t hat of all other c lass s. We have done something for the College, and it has done m uch for us. V e have been progressive, not digressive. On the campus, in the athlet i c field, and i n the class-room, we have shown our elves gentlemen, athletes, and scholars. I ndeed, by many we are considered a model c lass. The Fresh­ man reception, at wh ich several membe rs of the present J u n ior class were found wit hout the wedd ing garments on, and were consequently beaten and thrust out o n t he piazza, where th ere was weeping and wailing and snatching out teeth ; the banquet at H ager's, and the d ispersion of the mob at South College : the exit to S kowhegan, and the, review of h er police force, are the three marked events of our Freshman year. The Sophomore year brought with it new j oys. M indfu l of our past experi­ ence, we laid aside the old dogma, " an eye for an eye," and received the Freshman class with a fatherly p irit, which we shall cont inue to exercise toward it so long as necessity demands. I t was especially fitting t hat t h e last class of the century should c o m e at a ti m e when great reforms were needed. Bloody Monday n ight has been abolished, a nd for the present the cane-rush has been placed under the ban. In the coll ege curriculum we have m own large swaths. The love songs of H orace, the ghost stories of Pliny, the philosophy of Socrates, the sophistry of Lysias, t he good English of Gen ung, have all been consigned to literary graves. Re t, rest, perturbed spirits ! But that which will forever dist inguish '99 from her brother classes is, t hat with her came our honored President, Dr. Butler. Thus we close the record of t wo years, and trust t hat the past shall be to us an i n cent ive t o greater act ivity and larger usefulness.

35


nf

Olrla s s

'99.

J!l) ll llt.e It. C u. �

YELL :-' Rah ! ' Rah ! ' Rah ' ' Rah ! ' Rah ! ' Rah ! p to date, Sure as fate, That is what we are. 'Y7ro Twv 8f.wv, everything's our own,

cp[A.oiat Kat O€tfJ.U hOAf.f1wv, In the coll ege push,

w</>f.Af.La

'vVe are i n the line. 'Rah ! ' Rah ! ' Rah ! ' Rah ! Colby,

CLASS COLORS :

M A R Y LO

ISA W I L B R

inety- ine.

VIOLET AND WHITE.

President.

R AC H EL J O E

FOSTER, Vice-President. M O L L I E SEWALL

MALL, Secretary. AG E

COM I M A

TETSO , Treasurer.

�x.emtibl.l Q.!L unnniff:e.e.

JOSIE A

J EN N I E MAUD B C l< . H E LE "E H O R TE SE BOWMA

:l6

IE TOWA R D.


' T W A S on a bright September cl ay, The g i rls came t roopi n g bac k.

\tV e'll h el p t h e Fres h m en m a ke t h e i r mark, \tV e ' l l show t hem what t o do.

" We ' re Soph omores now," we gayly cried, " A nd n o t a t h i ng we lac k . "

We'll even take them after dark And make t h em beg some, too. We' e st ruggled h ard with Phaedo, deep;

W e played a game of basket -ball , ' T was sc i e n t i fi c, too.

Vve've studied German

B ut, oh, alas ! i t was n o good,

erbs.

We've written articl es, and oh !

The Fres h men, how t h ey t hrew !

We've learned of all t h e herbs.

v e've h el ped t h e poor Armen ian, to , \tV i t h con cert and w it h cash . We've clone j ust what we o u g h t to d o And t hought of n ot h i n g r ash .

37


QJJ l a s iY uf LA

1900.

YELL :-llKouE, llKouE, who are we ?

ream of the

ineteenth Century,

cp O ouc; txo:1E11 7rAdcrrouc; a�, ...

�,r1.'L11 Tro°A.£:1wt ELfll f'�'

Colby, Colby, Biff ! Boom ! Bah ! �ineteen H u ndred ! ' Rah ! ' R ah ! 'Rah !

CLASS COLORS :

A LOE

E.

GOLDEN BROWN AND LE.MON.

10 ffi rl!r�. Pnst"dent. V. \ I R H

RL�

I ··ice- President.

E. F GG,

F:R

Treasurer.

E T T. C

HM

JOH

, 1-fislorian. 8 . G IB B

r

,

Propltet.

H A R O L D W.

H AY E

,

Poe/.

<!E X l' nt f i \n: @r o m m i ff cL' . B E . "J

1 l ;\ E. PH I L B R I

K ..

FE R

L

D.

ER.


.. .. ABO U T t h e m iddle of Sept m b r t h y m ade t h e i r appearan ce, t h at mot ley, unsoph i st i cated

col lect ion of boy , k n own as our F re hmen.

R i d i n g on t h e car - a l t h o ugh some came on

foot-was a novelty for t hem, an d upon aligh t i ng from t h e car steps their faces bore i g n s of sad ness. I t was occas i oned, n o doubt, by the t hought t hat t h e i r fi rst r i� e \ a at an end ; perhaps, too, from t h e t i m i d it y w h i c h poss sses a F res h m a n ' s being u po n h is fi rst arrival a t college.

H al f fearing half curiou , t h ey a-. kwarcl ly

harnbl cl across from the station, b r i n g­

i ng w i t h t he m o l d t ru nks a n d val i ses, a n d searc h i n g for " Sa m " to t e l l t h e m a place of age.

t o r­

I n t h e absence of " Sam," good friends were found a mong u pper classmen, who were

very glad t o o-ive them i n format i o n . The brill iant verdan cy of t h e new arrivals gave i n terest t o t h e i n n ocent q uest i o n upper c l assmen.

w i t h w h i ch t hey p l i ed t h e

Obsolete books and deserted roo m s were d i sposed of at fabulous prices, a n d to do them j us ­

t ice i t should be said that t h e y took t o t h e i r fi rst l e s o n i n col l ege fi nance very aptl y . Now t h e c o l l ge h a l l n:: s ound with t h e i r c h i l d i s h pra t t l e . They h a e as u rn ed a stately m ien, a n d w i t h o u t t h ese y o u n g b o y t here would be no college.

A n ll mber of e m i n e n t persons h ave g i ven t h e i r o p i n i o ns about t h is cla

.

pace allow

us to 8 uote o n l y a few : " They rem i n d me of a series of m iscues. " - iVA LTER GRA r P u H ooKE. " The figures 'oo when appl i ed to t h e pre ent F resh man c lass have a double s ig n i fi ca n c . " -DR. M A RQU A R D T.

" A coll e c t i o n of b e i ngs t h e l i k e of which have n ever occupied F re h me n seat s . " -" P

' I could not stay among t h e m . "- E R

E T E.

E 1TRES.

"

" Papa P ierce says I am the oldest act i n g boy i n t he class . " - IA TE R FRED LA\ RE CE.

39

LLEN.


OJ!fass

of 1900 . .. ..

tllhl lit£ ll.

C u. s

YELL :-aKou£, aKou£,

w h o are we ?

Cream of the Nineteen th Century. cpl>1.ou<; EXOfJ.£V 7r A£LCTTOU<; �:1.l.v 7rOAE/.UOt £lEv

s�,

µ.�,

Colby, Colby, Bi ff ! Boom ! ' Bah !

:-.!ineteen H u n d red ! ' Rah ! ' R ah ! ' R ah !

CLASS COLORS :

E l �L

FRA

H

CE L

TC H I 1

.

O J\ , President.

E MAY

RE '

GOLDEN BROWN AND LEMON.

DI

LCLL

ER, M AE

V ice. President. A M E , Secretary. STELLA

LO U I

E

JO l ES ,

Treasurer.

M A RG E

E TELLE

MAGR

TH,

Historian.

C!f x e cn f i b � Q!l: u 11uni tt.c1\

M

kV

RD

ER

L

1VR

K.

P H I LB R

A I M EE P

G

. T E L LA

L L E R T. 40

I.

J

EPH I N E PER R V .

l I S E J O !ES.


• • 0

'

a fi ne, bright day in last September, Mother Colby fl u ng wide open h e r

a r m s t o receive her you n gest, the g i rl s of 1 900, a n d prepare them for th e i r places i n l ife. On our fi rst appearance at chapel we found that Prex had gi en u s t h e seat s fart hest from t h e doo r, for h e knew t h a t we were younger a n d s t ronge r than o u r older s i sters and more able to wal k.

He greeted us very cordially on

that fi rst morni ng, but it frightened us a l i tt l e to see so m a n y of h i s b rethren about him.

H o wever, o u r t error soon fled when we were told

that i t was

m �rely an acc ident, and somet h i ng that was not l i kely to happen agai n . O u r older s i sters were anx i o u s t o meet us, and gave u s many a reception.

W e not iced t hat some o f them

preferred meet i ng our older brot hers t o meet ing us, but we d i d not care, for t here were many more sist ers­ and brot h ers too.

' Our n earest s i ster, the girls of 99, ga e u s a party H allowe'en, and played al l manner of trick

us her superior k n o wledge and power, but she d id not frighten us. gam e of basket-ball, too, but s h e d i d not .

We l i ked it.

to show

She t ried t o beat us in a

So she was angry u n t i l Prex calmed her by saying that it should be

most pleasing t o t he older mem bers of t h e family to see the baby w i n n i n g laurels. When we saw t h e rest of t h e girls out wal k i ng and riding w i t h their b rothers and rece i v i n g cal ls from t hem, we felt j ealous and wanted to know some too, especially o u r t w i n . but a few of the bashful ones.

So we gave t h e m part ies a n d met all

Some of the girls l i ked one b oy bett e r than the rest, b u t we can't see why.

We s i n cerely hope t hat not h i ng-no t even a boy-will enter t o break the s t rong bond t hat fast e n s u s together. Our older brothers we do not feel m u c h acquainted with as yet.

They ought t o k n o w us, however, for

several t i mes they h ave asked Prex t o send us o u t of ch apel fi rst, and they s i t there and look at us. hope some day t o know them too.

41

But we


Jhm.e 30,

Mu

P R A Y ER .

Mu 1 .

H is tori es-Gentlemen , - Ladies,

.

. .

.

. C A R LETO l E V E R ETT .

-

I N G ! 'G

F CLA

Poem , " At Virgil's Tomb, " <ldress to

1896.

.

.

.

T

HI

I

WETT M O FFATT.

ODE. .

FL

R ENCE E L I ZA BETH Du

]E

ndergraduates,

Eo A

1c.

H

M S J C.

ration, . . . . .

. .

. . H

. . I .

M

42

N.

I E E L I Z A BETH P E P PE R .

R R Y W ESLEY D u


M u r e.

PRAYER .

Mu r e.

Prophecies-Gentlemen,

E V E R ETT LA �!OXT G ETC H E L L.

- Ladies,

. . O u v E Lou

.

E

RoBBT);S.

PIPE ODE. S �! O K I N G P I P E OF P E A C E . 1u re.

Address to U ndergraduates,

.

Parting Address,

C H A R LE

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

] AME

M A DI o;-.; P r K E.

E DW A R D SAWTEL L E.

M · r C H E E R I N G TH E H A L L .

Ar n :-Sadie Rax

Let us sing a song of greeting To each other ere w e part, That shall come with earnest feeling, From the depths of every heart, For to N i nety-Six and Colby W e have evermore been true, And we proudly sing the praises Of the dear old Brown and Blue.

And the s u n of Colby's greatness, As the sh ifting years shall pass, Cannot shi n e in golden splendor On a more u n ited class. For to N inety-Six and Colby \Ve have evermore been true, And we proudly sing the praises Of the dear old Brown and Blue. 43

Far away our l ives may lead us From the campus and the " Bricks," But our h e arts will beat responsive To the name of inety-Six. For to 1 inety - Six and Colby We will evermore be true, And we'll proudly sing the praises f the dear old Brown and Blue.


.$ euentu- Jfiff {J

ml nnual CJ.rumntencemenf. .. ..

iapp oilrfm:enhT. ff

Robert Louis Stevenson " . . . . . . . *·' The Children's Laureate ' ' *"

.

.

.

. . . HA .

H ero of the R evolutio n '' " Chaucer " . . .

. . .

ET H EL E L I ZA B ETH FARR.

. .

.

*" The Monroe Doctrine " . " Emmett's I nsurrection " . ff

The Age o f Elizabeth " *''

O LI V E Lo · r E R O B B I N . A LBERT SAWYER

.

cotland's Deliverer "

. "

. .

.

.

c R

LE A H

HOXIE.

S A R A B LA � C H E M AT H EW

" The Poetry of the I ndians " " Ten nyson

as

M A R T H A C LA R A ME. E R V E .

a Teacher "

. •

" The M i ssion of Poetry "

. . FRED \VILL!A�I PEAKES.

. C H A R LE

" The Little I srael in the Wilderness " *ff The French cadem y " . . . . *" The \ omen of ' The Faerie " Elijah P. Lovejoy "

ueene ' " .

FL

R Ei

E E LI Z A BET H

. EDNA .

1 ERRILL.

B E J A :\l l N K I M BA LL .

J ES .

44

P A D E L FO R D .

. . . ]01-IN BRADlll'RY

'

ed.

.

. FRED M O R G A

*'' Publ ic Opinion and Public Men * ff ur I nternal R evenue ystem "

u

DUKK.

. H A R R Y \VE LEY

E V E R ETT LA MONT GETCHELL.

*

E.

COLE.

. . . . RICHARD COLLI::-\

.

merica's Place in Literature *"

C A L L S H A I L ER H A LL.

. M A R \' S I B Y LLA C RO S W E L L .

W ETT

D M

IE E L I Z A B ET H

· ;-; N . F F TT. PEPPER .

. H E...: R v \i\TA R R EX Fo

·

.


�cgtccs Ql!unfcrrdr.

To the members of the graduating class.

K ATH A R I 'E B E R R Y , 1 893. LORA G R \ C E CUl\ll\l l

NATH A ?\ G R A 'T Fo T E R , 1 89 3 . GS, r 89 3 .

M E R L E S I IT H G ETC H EL L , 1 89 3 . C H A R LE S NOR l\IA:>i P E R K I N S , 1 89 3 . G E O R G E C ROSBY S H ELDON, 1 89 3 . GEO R G E O T I S S'.\l I T H , 1 893. GEORGE HE ' R Y STODDA R D , l 89 r . D ENKIS EVARTS Bow:-.1AN, 1 89 3 .

LUCIA H AS K EL L M OR R I LL , l 9 3 . F R A N K E R l\ION R U S S E L L , r 89 3 . C H A R LES F R ED E R IC

s l l T H , 1893.

EVE R A R D C L A R EMOI:\T M EGQU I E R , I 9 r . E L I Z A B ET H M AT H EWS, r 879. EDWA R D

JO H N

COLCO R D , I 87 5 .


] U ll lf 29, 1896.

M

PRAYER.

I .

Poem- The Warrior Jl!artyr

.

.

ODE.

C LAS

ration- Tlte Ideal American Citi:::en

.

. .

. H.

S. C R OSS.

. M ERCY A. M

BRA

IC.

H istory of Gentlemen . .

. . W. A. H A R T H O R N E .

H istory of Ladies . . . .

. Mu

A \. A R D I � G OF P R I Z ES .

.

.

.

.

L.

ALICE

YE.

1 c. . H . s. P H I L B R I C K .

'97's C . l . -'9i s Confirmed Invalid . .

H. H. C H A PJ\J A N .

T. F. M . - Two-Faced Man

. H . B . WAT O N .

D.

in

R . -DweL/ers in aints' Rest J

.

. C. C.- Colby's Clzampion Cltinner . . . . L . Our Liglltning Linguist . . .

0. L.

A . M.

-

R.

.-

of

H ELEN

.· .· � .·

inety-. ine- Class Horn and. Water Pail

L.

Y E.

M. H A

H . H . PUT 'AM, J R .

A Jlfodem Rip Van Winkle

T. H . T. - Tlze Heavenly Twins Class

{

. ALICE A

.

.

W . F . TIT OM B .

. L. E. W A LDROK. .

c . E.

G.

H A NO .


J]e)resentafinn nf .§ fafue, .$ ainf ®enrg1t

�rcscnfafinn ®i:m. TR-Jlfalen1n. 0 h ark ! 0 h ear !

H ow st rong and clear

0 mot her fair !

W i t h grat eful h eart s ,

T h e s t o n e t o t hee we b ri ng,

From o u t the ages d i m , There comes t o - day a m el ody,

And for thy f u t u re's l istening sons,

The warrior-martyr's h y m n .

S t i l l shall i � s pure note ri ng.

L i s t t o t h e a n them ages old,

A s now i t t h robs in voiceless rhym e,

T hese silent l i ps may bring,

From c h i seled eye and brow,

I t t h ri l l ed the T u scan m aster's hand,

A song of t ri u m p h , strengt h , and t ru t

H e made t h e marble s i n g.

'' N o n e is my God b u t T h o u ! "

47


�Cll!Jtattt nt e. M

IC.

M

PRA Y ER .

* Mind a n d fatt r, te enson, .

H ER BE R T

Plea for Good Ci tizenship,

.

H A R T l l O R 1 E.

II

\\' P l l I L B R I

. M ER v Ac · Es B R A .

1 dern Ci il izat ion,

. . G R A E GAT

·1

The Tyran ny of Mammon, The Twelfth Di ci1 I ,

J R EGOR H A

Beginning of Abolition , Ex

u

. � fr I '.

ed. 4

. .

1•

G EOR G E K EM BLE BA . • ETT.

. . . Mt

K.

. H A R R \' BATES \VAT. 0 · .

Pathos in the H u mori"t , The Puritan Theocracy, . The Fou nders of

.

. EDITH B R A G G H A 1 ON.

A Daughter of Florence, R obert Louis

r

\\. I L L I A i\ I A .

. . . C l l A R L E. LA F.\ Y ETTE

H E L L.


M U S IC .

M SI C.

PRAYER.

t Lati n Version from the Greek of Plato . . . t* Latin Version from the Greek of Thucydides . M u n icipal Reform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Story \Vriter of Drumtochty . . . . t German Version from the Engl ish of Dickens *t German Version from the French of Racine .

T I GTO� \ H ITl\I A K .

C HA R LES H u

Thoreau *t Greek Version from the Latin of Quintilian t Greek Version from the Latin of Livy Sappho . . . . . . . The Bel oved Disciple . . .

.

.

.

. A LI CE

LF.NA

COLE.

A RT H R H A RTST E l K PA G E . L ICE

.

Mu

.

Lo

I E

VE.

F R ED E L M E R TA Y LO R .

1 c. 1ARY CAROLIXE . CH

E V A :\"

.

. R A L P H H OYT H OUSE.

R LE

LUTH E R C L E M ENT. N X I E LEE K

IGHT.

. H E LEN G E R T R D E S U L L I VA N" . .

. B ER T R A l\ I C A R V E R R I C H

R DSOK.

Mu 1 c . . J oh n Keats, Poet . . . . . . . The College M a n in Politics . . . *t French ersion from the German *t French Version from the German T homas Paine . . . . . . . . . . * Ou r Parliamen tary Lea ders . . . Uni versity Settlements : Theory and

. . . . . . . . . . of Theodor Storm of Lessing . . . . . . . . . Practice .

.

H A R R I ET F L O R E '.\" C E H OU.I E .

.

4

t J u nior

.

E.

S�l lTH . L r x c TT.

. L A U R A H ATTI E

A R A D E RA TU

. G EO R G E KEll!BLE B A S ETT. .

.

.

ERKE T EUGENE

0 T A \' I :Yl u s 1 c .

* E xcused.

I LLI AM ABRA 1 H ARTHOR

\

Part.

49

10B L E .

\: H IT r G MATT HE W S .


93apti;f <l!L fptrdi .Th'ribau QE\trninf(, Jhm£ 1 2 , 1 896.

f)E) tu gra m nt £. M u re.

PRAVER.

M USIC.

R emarks of C o l . I ngersoll a t t h e Recent Reuni on of H is Old Cavalry Command The Unknown

peaker . .

.

The Dream of Eugene A ram .

.

.

.

EowJN G UE R . EV.

C H A R L ES

.

. .

. ARAD ERA TU

.

. .

Plea for the Recognition of the Cubans as Belligerents

. .

.

LE

L r N COTT.

ORA B ES EV.

A R T H U R W O R D SW O R T H CLEAVES. M usic.

Extract from Speech at the Republ ican Convention in Boston, March H is Mother's

ermon .

.

.

.

. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

27 , r 896

. E E R ETT C A R LETO .

.

peech at Dedication of the Battle Field at Chickamauga Ce nsure of Ambassador Bayard .

.

.

.

CHA R LE

.

.

H E R R IC K .

. M A R V C A R O LI N E

E A

M EL LEN \VOO D M A

.

. A R Tl l U R H A R TSTE l l\' PAGE.

Mu 1

Puritan Principle and Puritan Pluck . . election from The American The

·•

A Tale of Two a y

B E RTR A M CA R E R R r

HARD 0 1 .

ities " �

.

DWA R D N E LSO .

H E Ry H

holar's Courage M

·�re.

50

\\' R D

p R TT.


Jlfre£Iqman

mtrahtng .

.. .. M

M u 1 c.

PRAYER.

IC.

H A R R v S E B A T I A :-> Vo E .

A Race with the Tide -Spo.fford .

The Rhy m e of J ennie Eagleheart. -Aldndi

.H EL E

P udd ' nhead Wilson' s Plea for the Twins. -JIIark Twain

.

E H O R TE� E BO\ lllA

H E Rv

.

Ru

.

ELL SPE TER.

M u IC.

The Swan-Song.-Brooks . . Travers'

.

. ELE I A BELLE HARR l i\ I A . .

.

HAROLD LIBBY H AN ON .

F irst H u nt.-Davis .

Rizpah . -Anon . . . . .

. PEA R L CLA YTO

Selection from " A Gray jacket." -Page

.

.

Mc I N TIR E .

. RALPH H O R N ER R J C H A R DSO ..

. lVI us1c.

The Vagabonds.- Trowbridge . . . . .

.

. . .

The Angel and the Shepherds.- Ut allace Abe Barrows' Plea.-Davis

. ALB ERT CY RUS R O B BI!\ . .

.

A L I C E FREEJ\IA

T

LOWE .

. G EO R G E ATWOOD M ART I K .

. . 1Iu IC.

51


)

lll u ll i r bl.! ct o l b g, © l ee (!!f u b .

.. .. M

Mu 1c.

P R A YE R .

I C.

D E BATE. QUE TIO:-\' : Resolved, -T h a t the election of Will iam \1 c K i nley w o u l d be f o r the best interests of t h e A merican People. Affirmative. T H OMA

R A V ;\'IOND P I E R E

RTH 'R \VOR DS\V O R T H C L E A V E '

\VI L L I A M

A B R A J\I H A RT H OR E.

Negative.

E E R ETT C A R LETO:.\ H ER R IC K ,

GEORGE

T W O D M A R T I :.\,

jOH

Mu 1 . Decision Awarded to the

egative.

Mu I . Judges .-Ho. · . NATHANIEL M EA D E R .

H A R \'EY D . EATO:.\.

E LWOOD T. \, Y l'll A :.\ .

EDWA R D

EL 0 .


J11n 11 tip� �ea11

1 896-18 9 7 .

.. ..

�lalili .of 1896. $mh1r (!!; x f!illifhm. 1EN : Prizes for excel l e n c e i n composition t o H arry \I esl ey D u n n . \N'oMEN : Prizes for excel l e n ce in composi t i o n to F l orence El izabeth D u n n . �:crman

�ri1eff.

M E N : F i rst Prize t o H arry Wesl ey D un n · Second Prize t o J oh n Bradbury M erri l l . WOMEN : F i rst Prize t o Florence E l i zabeth D u n n ; Second Prize t o E t h el El izabeth F arr. 18:1.emC1 .rr �

of � f!i

iB £fo ilirlppn.

M EN : A l bert Sawyer Cole, R i c h ard Col l i n s, H arry We l ey D u n n , C harl es Ben j am i n F ul ler, C h arles Benj a m i n K i m ball, J oh n Brad bury M e rr i l l . ·wol\J E : F l orence El izabeth D u n n , E t h e l Eli zabet h Farr, Caro L e a h H ox i e, a r a B l a n c h e M at hews a n d E d n a S wett M oftatt. 53


@ifa!X!l uf

18 9 7 .

Jl u n i o r QE x f1ib i f h m .

M E : F i rst Prize to W i l l i a m H en ry H ol m es, J r. ; Second Prize to Charles Lafayet t e Snow. WO M EN : Fi rst Prize to M ercy Agnes Bran n ; Second Prize t o Grace Gatch e l l . ]J u n i o r

�rite

'.®.cbah?.

To Ernest Eugene Nobl e, H armon Stevens Cross and W i l l i a m A bram H arthorne, speakers appo i n t ed on the a ffi r m at i ve of the q uestion : " Resolved, t h at t h e Greenback s should be w i t h d rawn from c i rcul ation . "

@ifa!X!i u f 1898. $ o p f1 om or c jp r i t c i>.cdamafhm.

M EN : F i rst PriLc t o Everet t Carleton H errick ; Second Prize t o A rt h ur Word s worth Cl eave . �amrtn

i)D tip?!i

i n fua l'r i n ,{l .

WO M EN : F i rst Prize t o A l ice Lena Cole ; Second Prize t o Mary Carol i n e Evans. 5 o p T1 om o n '.® .cCJalc.

To A rt h u r Wordsworth Cl eaves, Charles Ed w i n Gurney, and John Edward Nel son , speakers o n the n ega­ t i ve of t h e question : " Resol ved, t hat t h e u n l i m i t ed right of su ffrage should be extended to wom en . " � .tl n orrlt'Jl 1hm i o r

� a tf n ,

1896.

ME : Grecli', Arthur H art stei n PaO'e ; Latin, Ralph H oyt H ouse ; Gennan, A rad Erast us L i n cot t ; Frenclt, Ber t ram arver R i chardson . \) ME • : Greek, A l i ce Lena Cole ; Latin, M ary Carol i n e Eva n s ; Frcnclt, Laura H at t ie S m i t h ; Ge1 11za11, H l cn G rt rucl c u l l ivan . @ifa!X!i uf 18 9 9 . fil} a m f i n

ip ri1c�

i n !11 :ca'lli n 11 .

M E N : F i r t Prize t o o r g A t wood Mart i n ; Sec n d P r i z e t H en ry R u ssel l Spen cer. . \ ME : F i r t l riz ' to Elevia B l i e H arri man ; econcl Prize t Pearl Cl ayton M c i n t i re.

@i l a !i !i uf 1900.

F i r t Priz for . u p rior hool . b egan H i fh

x ,1 1 nc

m

Qfr 11frn 1 1 c.c p r i z e.

pr paration for c ! l eg , E m ma Fran 54

H u t c h i n on from t h

S k ow-


Jli'.onnb.cb' at iQ af.c il:l ni\l.ctr�ifu 1 8-14 .

PH I .

Yale U ni versity

1 844

RHO

Lafayette C9llege

1855

TH ETA

Dowdoi n College

1 844

TAU

Hamilton College

1 8 56

Colby University

1 845

Mu .

Colgate University

t 8 56

SI GMA .

Amherst College

i 846

Nu .

College of the City of New York .

1 856

GA M M A

Van derbilt

1 847

BETA

U n iver ity of Rochester

i 8 56

I

PSI .

U PS I LO .

.

n i versity

University of Alabama

1 847

PHI C H I .

Rutgers College

1 86 1

Brown University

1 8 50

PSI P H I

D e Pauw U niversity

I 866

1 8 50

GAl\I JIIA PH I

'Wesleyan University

1 867

ortb Carolina

1 85 1

Ps 1 0.M EGA .

irginia.

1 85 2

BETA

1 852

CHI . .

. University of M i ssissippi

B ETA

. University of

ETA .

University of

l iami University

K A PPA

PHI

Rensselaer Polytechnic

1 867

Adelbert C ollege

1 868

DELTA C H I

Cornell University

1 870 1 87 I

C HI .

LAJll B D A

Kenyon College .

1 852

PH I GAl\DlA

Syracuse University

PI

Dartmouth College

1 853

G A llDIA

Columbia College

1 87-t

I O TA

Central University of Kentucky

1 8 54

T H ETA Z E T A . .

U niversity of California

1 876

1 854

A LP H A C H I

Trinity College

1 8 79

1 85 5

PH I EPS I L

University of M i n n esota

1 889

1 855

S!G:\[A TAU

A LP H A A L P H A .

O M ICRON E PS I LO �

l iddlebury College University of

I i chigan

. Williams College

55

BETA

Ia sachusetts I n stitute of Tech nology . 1 890


(!frfa b li5f!:eb in

1 845 .

.. ..

JJfraft.e!I in rutcb.e. P PLETON A. PLA I ST E D , Hon. REUBE

'

FOST E R , ' 5 5 .

Prof. EDWA R D W . H A LL,

Rev. ASA L. LANE,

R e . W . H . S P E 'CE R , D . D . ,

' 62 .

'62.

Rev. H OWA R D R . M IT H E LL, ' 7 2. Pres.

ATH A . · 1 EL BUT L E R ,

H A RVEY D . EATON, ' 8 7 .

D A N A P. FOST E R , ' 9 1 .

5 I.

73.

Up

ilon,

'66.

A L B E RT F . D R U M M O D, '88. ELWOOD T. WY IAN, 0 90.

Prof. FRA. K W. J O H • O N , '9 1 . Prof. CAR LTON B. STETSON , ' 8 1 . F R A N K K. S H AW , ' 8 1 . W I LL I A M PULS r F E R , M . D . . ' 86.

JO H

H E DJ\TA ' ' 9 5 .

]OH

H . BATES , Theta, ' 96 .

lli'tafc.eg in rutnib:et!I ifaf.e. 1897.

EO RGE K EM BLE BA

ETT.

H A N N I B A L H A M L l ::-1 C H A P M

A L B E RT R USSE LL K E I T H .

C H A R LE · H u T I , GTON W H J T M A

H ER B E K T S H A W PH I L B R IC K .

F lt E D E L M E R TAYLO R .

H E.

RY H A R R ISON PUTNA lll , J R . 1 898.

CHARLE

M l LLRTT D R U M M

F0RA N K A RT H U R R O B l NSO .

'D.

C H A R LE

B 1r nT R A M CA R \' E Jl R 1c H A R DSOK.

M ELLE ' \Vo

OMAN.

1 899.

COLL H E. R Y DA� O M B E . HAR

VA R N E Y A RT H U R P UT.NAJI! .

R A L P I T H O it N E R R I C H R DS N .

LO L I B B Y H A NSON.

E R :-1 EST HE R Y MALI · c .

G U L D S H A )o! NO N .

C H A R LES E M E R Y 19

SlM

N PETER H EDi\I A )ol .

0.

R I H A R D CUTTS S H A N N O '.

SPENCE R . L I V E R STEVE

H EN R Y Ru SELL W I LLI A M

EowA R u D Ru11or o N D j EN K J ·s. C H A R LES D EA R BO R N McDo ALD.

WA LT E R GEORGE I I O O K E.

R ::-IO L D M ER R I A M SAN B O R N.

j A .!ll ES H E )o! R Y H D!:i N . B E NJ A !ll l

ELDE ' P H I LB R I K .

56


PHl ZETA D E LT

S lGllI A CH! E PS I LO ' RHO K A P PA

.

TAU

Ur I LO K XI . LA M B DA

Psr I OTA T H ETA

X1

A LP H A ALPHA P I

Nu ETA

Mu BETA

U niversity o f City of ew York Williams College Rutgers Colleg-e . University of Pennsylvania Colby University . Brown Un iver5ity Harvard U niversity Tufts Col lege Lafayette College Uni\'ersity of orth Carol i n a University of 1ichiga n llowdoin College . Cornell U niversity University of Californ i a Uni ersity of Toronto Columbia College J\fcGill U niversity Case School of Applied Sciences Yale University . Leland Stanfo1 d Jr. Un i,¡ersity University of Vi rginia .

57

1 8-1-6 r 8-1-8 1 8-1-8 1 8 50 1 8 50 1 85 2 1 85 2 1 85 5 1 857 1 858 1 858 1 868 1 869 1 8 70 1 8 79 1 8 79 1 88 3 1 88 5 1 8 89 1 89 1 1 89 2


JITtaft:eg itt illt dr.e. H O :'\ .

I !II O X

. BR

\ N, ' 5 8.

E V E R ETT

C O LON E L F R A � C ! S E . H EA T H ,

'

58.

M.

T H O M AS W .

Ho . . NAT H A

I E L M E A D E R , ' 63. F R A , K A . S M IT H , ' 6 4 . F R EDEil! K c . T H A Y E R , M . D . , ' 64. R. W E ' L E Y D u . '.'\ , ' 68.

STA C E Y ,

ST EPH EN STA R K ,

' 76 .

6 '81.

K I M B A LL,

13.

H U B B A R D , ' 84 .

S H E R I DA N PLAI T E D , W I LL I A M

ALTON F . T U P P ER ,

'95.

W I LLI A l\l L. WATERS, ' 9 5 .

' 86.

W. M E R R I LL , M . D.

'93.

C LA R E CE E . T U PPElt.

H ON . W . C . P 1 � 1 LB ROO K , ' 8 2 .

FRANK

' 92.

D E N N I S E . BOW M A N ,

H A ll R Y W ESLEY D U N

' 8 8.

F . F R ED H I LL ,

' '96.

JITtaft.e.s in rutniu.er.sifaft. 1807. ROY

M O R IU LL

BARKEK.

1898. f ll A N K

R

\

E TW

l l E RT BETTS

C LA Y T O .

KL

R T H ALOE:'\. UST I N .

MA

H E N R Y L YS A N DER CO RSO !' .

T H O M A S R A Y M ON D P I E R E.

J O H N EDW A ll l ) N E LS N .

GEORGE ADAJ\1 W I LS N , j R .

\VI L LA R D LOW E L L

BROOKS.

MA

. F A D DE.K.

1899.

WILLIAt>I

H U B E RT J . M E R R I C K .

W J R T B 1t0W N .

A L B l!. R T C Y !l U . RO B B I 'S.

H E, RY A LLEN LA I ll .

V

JlllEN FO LLA N S B E E H A R DY.

E R . E T LA \ R EN

mo .

H A llOLD

MOR R I LL

F O LSOM.

0 1r n 1 N ALBERT L E A it N E D.

' H E R LU C K . F R E D Fo · s LA w n E xc E .

58


�df a mtpsilnn .

.No-imbe'b af

l!UiUtnm!Zi

�oUcg£,

1834.

Uni\·ersity of M ichigan

1 87 7

Williams College

1 8 34

Union College

1 838

Amherst College

1 847

H arvard Uni,•ersity

1 88 5

orthwestern U ni versity .

1 880 1 880

H amilton Colege

1 847

University of Wisconsin

Adelbert College

1 847

Lafayette College

1 88 5

Colby University

1 8 50

Columbia College

1 88 5

University of Rochester

1 852

Lehigh College

1 88 5

Middleberry College

1 856

Tufts College

1 886

Bowdoin College

1 857

De Pauw Uni versity

1 88 7

Rutgers College

1 858

U niYersity of Pen nsy 1 vania

1 888

1 860

Uni,·ersity of Minnesota

1 890

1 86 5

Massachusetts I n stitute of Technology

1 89 1

Colgate University

1 865

S"·arthmore College .

1 893

Brown Uni versity Uni versity of the City of

r

ew York

Cornell Un iversity

1 869

Leland Stanford Jr. University

1 89 5

Marietta College

1 870

Uni versity of Cal i fornia

1 895

Syracu se University

1 86 3

59


[? .e-:esfa u C i s f1.eb" 1878.

111r afrcs in llir b c. H o x . E o M u x o F. \\ E B B , ' 60. P R F. W A L L E F. E L D E :-1 , Bowdoi n , ' 89 .

HoR T I O R. Du H A M , ' 86. C 1 1 A R LES E. D O R R , ex. , ' 96. R EV. . T. D UTT � . D . D. , l3 ro w n ,

70.

JOEL F. LA ll R A BEE, . 7 . R Ev. A . T. D u • • D . D. , Colgate, ' 7 3 .

Jfrah:c!i in rutn ittcr!i ifafc. 1897. \ T LL I

i\I

H . H LJ\l

s,

JR.

ER E T E . OBLE. H A R R Y B. w T ON.

1 898. RT l l U R \\ . LE \'E�. F R ED. ' · ET l l E LL. F R ED. P. H . PI K E .

C H A R L E E. U l :o\ EY. E\. E R ETT c. H E R R T K . EUG E N E . P l l l L B R ( K . Ju T I X 0 . \ ELLJll X .

C H A R LES L . s,

W.

H A R R Y M. ' E R R \'. IH F. 1 :-rG R A H M. ]011 E. STEPI I E• o

1 8D9. ju.., E P H

.

E L LI S

A R L OTT ::\ . H \ KO L L \\·. H

EO R G E MBH

. M A RT I N. \ H R E :\ .

1

\ \" J': ES,

P R K E R T. PEA RSOX .

E B.

0.

K. \ I LL l A M B. J F E J . A L U D. S \ \\'\' 6o

IL

ER E T H . T

PPEH


JJfu n n b .eb af l!Uia:mi ill n ittcr.sifu. 1

188-± .

.. ..

!H u ll uf O!rf1aph�rs. 0H t 0

ALPHA

I N DIAN

A LP H A .

K ENTUC K Y ALPHA

I

I

..J.

I OWA A L P H A

I

I o wa \ esleyan

..J.9

GE

M ercer

Center College

1 8 50

.

GAMMA

RGIA G A l I A

O H I O DELTA

ni versity

niversity

niver ity of Wooster . Cornell University

I

71

1 ' 7 -:! 1 72

1 85 1

NEW YORK ALPHA .

University of Wisconsin

1 85 7

P E X ::-1 Y LVAl\IA ALPHA

Lafayette College

l

Northwestern University

i 859

C A LI FO R I A A LP H A

University of California .

1 87 3

Butler University

Michigan Agricultural College 1 87 3

. \Vabash

I N D I ANA BETA \VISCONSIN AL P HA I LL I N O I S A L P HA

l'v i i ami University I n diana University

College

1 87 2 873

1 85 9

M I CHI GAX B ETA

OHIO BETA .

. Ohio Wesleyan Un iversity

1 860

I RG I N I A BETA

niversity of Virginia .

1 87 3

I

D IANA DELTA .

. Frankli n College

1 860

V I RG I ' I A GA i\I I\lA

. Randolph Macon College

1 874

I N D I ANA EPS I LO N

. Hanover College

1 860

. U niversity of

1 87 5

M IC H IGAX A L P HA

. University of M ichigan

1 86..J.

PEN 'SYLVA N I A BETA

. Gettysburg College .

L

. De Pauw Uni versity

1 868

P E X N S \I LVA N I A GAlll i\lA .

. \\

Omo GAMMA .

. Ohio University

1 86

DIANA

D I AN A ZETA

E BRASKA ALPHA .

ORTH C A R O L I A BETA

A LPH A

.

ebraska .

1 87 5

ashing' n a n d Jefferson Col. 1 87 5

University of

. Carolina .

. Vanderbilt University

1 75

I LL I N O I S BETA

. University of Chicago .

1 86 5

TEXNESSEE

M ISSOUR I ALPHA

. M issouri University

1 870

M I SSI SS I P P I A LPHA

I LL I NO I S D E LTA .

. K n ox College .

1 87 1

ALABAMA A LPHA

GEORGIA ALPHA

. University of Georgia .

I 87 1

I L LI N O I S EP ! LON

lllinois Wesleyan U n i versity . 1 87 8

1 87 1

l LLIXO I

Lombard

GEO R G I A BETA

Emory Coll��e

61

ZETA

. University of

1 876

1ississippi

University of Alabam a .

n iversity

1 87 7

1 878


A LA BA Jll A B ETA .

. A labama Poly te h n i c l n stitute 1 879

P E N N S Y LVA N I A D E L1

A

. Al legha n y College

.

N EW Y O R K

1 879

D ELTA

E W H A M PS H IR E A L P H A

V E R M ONT A LI> J J A

U n i versit y of Vermont

1 879

K E NTU K Y D E LTA

P e :-INSY LYAN I A E l'S I LO !'

Dicki n son College .

1 880

MASSACH USETTS

.

A LPHA

GA M M A

Westm i n ster College .

1 880

TEXAS

M l :-I N ESOTA A L P l l 1\

U n i versity of M i n nes ta

1 88 1

N EW Y O R K EPSI L O N

State U n iversity of I owa

1 88 2

V I R G I N I A ZETA

KA

U n i versity of Kan sas .

1 88 2

PE

SAS A L P H A A J\1 f A

SY L V A N I A

1 8 84

1 884

Central U n i versity

1 88 5

. Williams College

i 887

1 88 8

1 882

MASSACH USETTS BETA

. Am herst Col lege .

1 883

RHODE

. Brown Uni versity

TEXAS BETA

Uni versity of Texas

1 883

L

1 883

Ill

ZETA .

PEN. 'SYLVA N I A ZETA N e w YOR K BETA M A I N E ALPHA

hio State U n i versity . U n i versity of Pen n sylvania nion College . Colby U n i v ersi t y

A LJ>JJ,\

1 88 7

. Leh igh U n i versity

H i l l sdale College

I SLA N D

1 88 7

Washing'n and Lee Un iversity

ETA

Univ ersity of the South

.

1 886

Syracuse U n i versity

TEN. ESSEE BETA

M I C H IGAN

1 886

. South western U n i versity

M 1 sso u 1u BETA .

I O W A IlETA .

Colu mbia U n i versity Dartmouth College

1 88 8

Tulane U n iversity of La.

1 889

M I SSOU R I GAM MA

Washi ngton U n iversity

.

1 89 1

1 883

C A L I FOR N I A BETA

. Leland Stanford Jr. Univ.

1 89 1

1 883

I LLJ

OIS ETA

. U n i versity of l ll i nois

1 89 1

ETA

. Case School o f Ap. S ien e 1 89 1

1 88-t

U l SlA A A L P H A

1 1 10


Jh: a:ft £!i tn Mtb£. H . C. P RIN C E , D.

J.

G LLE RT,

' 88 .

' 9 3.

' 90. Prof. A . J . RO BER TS, GUE . C H RLE S W . V I

1 897.

ERTS . F R ED. A . ROB

HOR E . WI LLl A M A. H ART 189 8. E. R A LP H H. H ou

ROW N E . H E R B ERT M . B OT IS

w. FOYE .

RA Y M O K D

H . COO K .

W . A . B T E S , ' 98 .

B. W A LTE R F. TIT CO M

ORMAN RAD

1899.

OW N E. H A R R Y S. B R GUR N E Y . LAU RE 'CE E.

D EAK J . TOL M "W I LLI A M B . C H ASE.

MYR O

H E· RY w .

C LARK .

RBU H . H E N R Y D. FU

E DW A R D

R.

S A F FO R D .

A L DEN \V I LL

E.

DOUG H T Y .

RD I . PAR KER .

63

FUL LE R .

A. P I LLSBU RY .

\\' I LLl A M

190 0. AN. H EN RY F . TOT M

K.

E . LT C\ COT T .

FRA�K

L . \VA LDR O

J. SEV ERY .

C H A RL E

F . TOW NE.

.


Jflmmlle'J) af trre iBir_ginia !m i f ifaru J ht!Yfifufe, 1865.

A L P H A E P. t LO N , A . & M. College, .

. A l abama.

A L PHA

Nu,

M t . Union College, .

B ETA B ET A .

Southt>rn U n i versity, .

. Alabam a.

A LP H A Psr ,

Wittenberg College, .

Ohio.

B ETA D E LTA ,

U n iversity of Alabama, .

. Alabama.

BETA

ETA ,

Wesleya n U n i versity,

Ohio.

Lela n d Stan ford Jr. U n i v .

. California.

BETA M u ,

M ercer U n i versity,

. Georgia.

B ET A

R ETA P ALPHA

r,

Z ET A ,

B ETA I OTA ,

Georgi a State School of Tech. , Georgia.

A L P H A T H ETA ,

Emory College,

A L P H A B ET A ,

GA M M A MMA

B ETA

ZET

'

A �Ht A ,

. Georgia.

ALPHA R HO,

Lehigh U n iversity,

. Penn sylvania.

TAU UP I LON,

U n i versity of Pen n sylvania,

. Penn sy l va n i a .

A LP H A UPS I LON,

Pen nsyl va n i a Col lege, .

. Pennsylvania .

. M assach u setts.

A LP H A r H T ,

P<; l l�OX ,

Maine State College, .

. Mai ne.

A LP H A TAU,

A L Pl l A ,

Colby

. M ai ne .

B ETA

Pr,

TAU ,

'

B ETA K A PPA ,

BET

Ml< R O � .

A LP l l

C111,

ET

TH ET ,

L P H A ] ELT 11

R O :-/ ,

A ll1 M A D E LT A ,

Adrai n College,

.

l ich iga n .

B ETA

H i l l sdale Col lege, .

.

1 i chigan .

LA M B DA,

. M ichiga n .

lbion College, n i versity of

. Carol i n a .

orth Caroli na,

Trin ity College, t. La" rence

n iver ity,

ornell U n iversity,

Ohio. . Pen n s y l v an i a.

. Il li nois

Tuft Col lege, .

A LP H A M

L P f l ,\

State U n i versity, .

. I n di a n a .

n i versity, .

Ohio.

M uhlenberg College,

. Louisian a.

'

Ohio.

M arietta College,

B ET A O M EGA,

Rose Polytech n i c In t i t u te

G AM M A TIET M lA

n i versity of Georgia, U n i versity o f I l l i nois,

Wooster U n i v ersity, .

A L P H A IOTA ,

Tulane U n i versity,

EP. I LO � .

B ETA

. Georgia.

RHO,

. Ohio.

. ?\

M EGA ,

A �MA

EP. I L

Drown Uni versity,

Rhode Islan d .

South Caroli n a Col lege,

S. Caro l i n a .

S. W . Pres. U n i versity,

Ten n essee.

Van derbilt U n i versity,

Te nne ee.

.

W. B.

. Ten nessee.

U n iversity, .

Cu mberl a n d Col lege

. Ten n es ee.

U n i ver ity of the

. Ten n essee.

outh,

, Austin College,

Texas .

. Carol i n a .

B ETA ZETA ,

U n iversity of Vermon t , .

\ ermont.

ew York.

B ET A ,

Washi ngton a n d Lee

V i rginia.

D E LTA,

Uni versity of \ irgi n i a,

\\

York.

niv.,

Virgi n i a .


<fsfablisf1£il 1892.

Jfraft.es. itt llh'b.e. W. £. NOBLE, '95.

G. \V. l-lox.1E, '94.

E. E. KIDDEH, Beta Upsilon, '96.

Jiraft:es. in !btttiir:er.sifaf:£. 1897. CHARLE� L. CLEME�T.

PEllCY F. \VJLLIA�l .

HARMON S. CROSS.

RTHUR G. \\ RIGHT.

1898. HARRISON

. ALLEN.

GEORGE A. ELY.

]ONATHAl\ L. DYER.

ELMER E. HALL.

GEORGE E. CONFORTH.

HARRY S. VOSE.

1899. HARVEY H. BISHOP.

ARTHUR I. STEWART.

1900. \VILLARD E. FITZGERALD.

JOHN B. GIBBONS.

ERNEST T. CUSHMAN. PERCY E. GILBERT.

jom1 T. ScA�NELL.


mun-Jlkafernttu. 1897.

L. E. \VA L D JW :\" .

1898.

A. G. AYE R J LL. \

. 13. D E

E. 1 1 . :\A

�l

:\" O .

JI.

j. R.

E LSON.

W A L D E !\.

F. w.

A. H . PA G E . H. H .

H.

1 ANSON .

PRATT.

1899.

£.

K . GUILD .

1900. CHAR LES £ . FOGG.

\VA H r NGTON A .

jOHN A. F L

66

.

WI REN.

oo.

A UI ERT G.

WARNER.


Jlfraf£rnifn Olrnn\1£nfhnt!l . .. ..

ASH \ I LLE, T E

r

.,

November 1 2 and 1 3 , 1 896.

Delegate : GEORGE

EW YO R K ,

.

K.

BAS ETT, ' 97 .

April 2 3 a n d 2 4 , 1 897.

Y. , Delegate : ROY 1 . BARK ER.

�:elta Mp"!iilmt. . October 2 1 -2 3 , 1 896.

BOSTO , r-.IASS . , Delegates : E R EST E.

'OBLE, '971 J UST!

0 . W E LLMAN, ' 98.

�l!i �:e(fa �(!£fa. �o,·ember 2 3-29, 1 896.

P H I LA D E LP H IA, PA. . Delegates : H E RBERT

M.

B RO\\

E , ' 98 , WALTER F. T I TCml B , ' 9 7 , W I LLIA :t: H . H ARTHOR 1E, ' 97 .

December 30 and 3 1 , 1 896, and Jan uary r , 1 89 7 .

C LE\' E LAN D. O H IO,

Delegate : P E RCY F . \: l LLIAi\1S, ' 97 .

BOSTO

1,

!0.:e1u QEnglatilt ctmt'.u:entwn. December

1ASS. ,

r o,

1 896

Delegate : PERO E . G I LB E RT, 1 900. 67


--

..J - J.

I

� '

-- -

!j igma mtappa . .. ..

£;unrt£s in filtrbe.

E:.l ! LV P. 't: E A D E R , ' 7 . PH T A M . PI E R E, ' l . j E :\ � T E M . S!ll IT l l , • I . J ES I E E . B U N K E R , '94.

L I L L A M . l -I AZELT N , '94 . ' F R A N K H . M R R I L L , 94. MARV B. LA K E, '95 . . ROSE A. Gr LPAT R ICK .

E M M A K K A U Ff. F LO R E N CE E. DUNN, ' 96. J ESSJ E E PEPPE R , ' 96.

s;un1 t£li in ilttni\t :et11ifat£. 1 897. M E RCY AG E. B R N . EDITH B R A GG H A N N . N I E LEE KKIGHT.

CTA \' I A \: H I T I NG M A T H E WS. AL: E LOUl. E V E . M A RT H D U J\ L p T R AC \' .

LE:-.;O R A BES EY. ALI E LE NA O LE . E D N A F LORE. CE DA

M

A N :>l l E H UTC H I 1 S O N N 1 :-.1 A GERT R U D E Vo

P E PP E R . E.

1 898.

Ol\I BE.

H E L E :\ E H O R TE :\ E. B W M .\ ).. . J EN N I E l\[.\ D E BUC K . A L ICE \ H ITE II E.

RY C R O LI K E Ev N . M A B EL A N . IE H UM P H REY. EDNA H A R R I ET TEPH ENS. 1 899.

RAC H E L ]ONE F T E R . M U D E L UI e: H O X IE . ALI E M A Y P R I N T

1 9 0. L LU M

! M EE p

E

ME LA

E l\t:.I A fRA:\ LLERT.

] A ' E T C H R I TINE STEPH E I NA Su. AN T A Y LO R .

S n: L L A Lou r

H UT H I :\. () '.'( . E J o ::-; E .

ES

Luis A L ETTA M ESERVE.

6

M OLLI E EWA L L Jll A L L . J OS EP H ! 'E THOMA WA R D.

M Y R A JOS EP H I N E PERRY. MARY

H O N E R PH I L B R O O K .


. ..

1897. GRACE GATC H ELL. H ELEN

H A R R I ET FLORENCE H O L M E .

E D l T H :\ l AU D L A R R A B E E.

T E N A P TTERS X 1\I c(A LLU I .

H EL E X F RANCES LA;\l B.

cGR EGO R H A .:\scor.i .

E L\I I RA STA R R N EL 'O N .

1898.

E D l T I ! i\ J O R I U S COO K .

l\l Y RA CA E

M A R Y H O P E Dow.

LAURA H ATTl E Si\l l T H .

[AR ELL.

H ELEX GER.T RUDE SULL I V A N .

ELSIE G RDON R E I D. C A R OLI N E BLA ::-\C H E

W LKER.

1890. EDITH

LICE F R EE >I A � LOW E .

ELLI E CORSOX. E LEVI

AG:'\ E

ETTA FRA:"CL P R I � T O N .

B E L L E H A R R I M A ;s' .

GRACE L I L L I A X Rus 'ELL.

M R Y G E RT R U D E L E M ONT.

COR l :'\ XA STET o x .

J o I E A:-;xrn TOWARD.

il l A RY LOUI S A \ I LBU R .

1900. LOUISE

IA y BEN 'ON.

fLOREX E

N E L L I E \V H ITTEN C R I E . G R A C I E E:l l i\[ A C H AN E Y .

M ARGE ESTE LLE

f AY D I VER .

U I E AGNE

H

LL.

GRACE B E L L H OLDEN . C A R R I E M A Y TOZI E R .

S A R A H A T L A � T R B E RTS.

69

� E LLA

1 AG R AT H . I A RY M E RR IC K . G E RT R U D E M A B EL P I K E ·


, EO RG E U A � A BO R DMA.:\ PEPPE R ,

L BAN ED\V RD

mherst, <I> B K.

W I L L I A M AUGUSTUS ROGERS, Brown , <l.> B K.

W A R R E , Brow n , <I> 13 K.

BENA !

HE

RY SW EETS E R BU R R AGE, Brow n ,

H LO G LEY W H I T M A N , Brown ,

<I>

<l.>

B K.

B K.

!© f fi.c.er s . .:\ATH

1 I EL BUT L E R , President.

\ I LL I A M A GU TU

ROGERS, Secretary. W I LLIAM B LAC K , Treasurer.

JAME

<f x .e cnfi\1.c 4!r.ommiff.e.e. \ ! L LIAM A G

T H A:\' I E L 13 T L E R , PERC I VA L B

T S ROGERS,

N EY,

FRA

70

J A M ES W I L L I A M B LAC K ,

K W I N S LOW JO H

S


F. W. A LD E

President.

', ' 9 8,

E. H. MA L T t\ G , '99, PR

F. \V.

.

Secretary.

B A Y LEY,

Treasurer.

�x.ec11fitt.e Qtommiftee. F.

\V.

E. H . M A LI

A L D E N , Cltairman.

G, Serrelnry.

From tlte Faculty. P R OF.

]. H.

W BAT .

.

BAYLEY .

PR

S.

F.

J. W. B L A C K .

PROP. C . 8 .

TET 0

From Ihe Alumni. DR. J.

E. T.

. H I L L.

. A. B

\V Y :vt A N , ' 90.

R LE I G H , ' 9 -1 .

From the Students. F.

�. T

YL

R,

'9 7 .

J.

\ 0.

] . f-I .

W E L L M A � . '9 8 . Hl

OS

,

1

oo.

. F. T I TC

M B,

' 97 .

D. ] . TO L M A

',

'99 .

H . B. \VAT ON, '9 7 .

P. E. G I L. B E R T , 1 900.


.5u&-<romm iffre. ]. F . H I L L , \ L O . , C/1airma11.

D.

]. TO L\ I A :\ , '99, Serretary. PROF. C. B.

F. A . R O B E RT

,

TET 0 ;\ .

\\'�

F. T J TC O \ I B , '97, Treasurer.

H . H . P T � A ;\ l , '97, Captain.

'97, Manager. ] . E. STE P H E

'

. 73

O � . '98, Scorer.


mtni\1rrsifJJ; Q!rmn,

1896 .

.. ..

B. H . H. P t: TX A '.\1 1 '97, r b.

v. A. P L· T � A '.\f , '99, 2b.

T. C. To K E R ,

C F F ! .:\ , '96, Capta in a n d c.

L. T. PATT E R .

'96, 3b.

H.

R . B. Ali T I :'\ , ' 9 8, s.s.

T . \ \ ATK ! X ,

?tbslitutes.

G.

. \\ ! LSON, '98.

olby vs.

kowhe gan , \Vater ville,

"

Kent' s H i l l., K e nt's H il l ,

"

C. C.

"

Bowdo i n , B runsw ick,

l . , Wate rville,

. C . , Wate rville ,

M.

"

\Vaterville, \Vate rville,

"

Bates, Lewiston,

''

"

. H.

ol lege. \\'ate r v i l le,

C . , O rono. .

M . S.

"

Bates, \\'at er ille,

"

Rock land, Rock land,

·•

A l u m n i , \\'ate r v i l le,

H. A. H OYT, '99.

q-

7

9-

4

20- r 9 c o- 7

I-I2

3 - 19

.

"

D Esr-1 0 � 0 . '98, r . f.

2 1 -23

cadem y, H ebron , tate

W. B.

8- 1 8

Bowdoin , \Vaterville,

H ebron

' 9 6 , l . f.

I . F. B . R TO N , '96, c.f.

I I-l9

H ebron Acade my, \.Vater v i l l e ,

"

:--: , '9, ' p.

-17

2 5- 1 6

3- I I 7- 6

25- 9 I-

74

4


'96 . B. C o F F l

H.

T . \VAT K I :\

]. L.

T . C . TOO K E R , 3b.

, Captai n and 2b.

C . B . K nl B.\ L L, s . s .

c.

I

I. F.

T H O i\ l P O N , r b .

B L1 R TO:\, p.

H A L L , r r.

E. L.

H . \\'. D e x � . c . f.

. Fo

H. \

,

1 . f.

'97 . F.

A . R O B E R T , Captain a n d 3b.

r\.

G EO R GE K . B A SSETT, p . \

.

F.

P UT :\ A :l l , 1 b.

R. K E I T H , 2 b .

c . H . \ \ H l "DI A :\ , s . s .

c.

T I T CO M B ,

H. H.

R. M. B A R K E R , l . f.

H . B.

\

c.f.

AT O :\ ,

P. F. \\ I LL LULS,

r. f.

'98 . L.

p.

F. P.

H.

D ESMO N D , r b .

R. B.

Ac

T. PATT E R S O X ,

\V. B .

C. K. B R O O K

V. A. PCT:\

,

R.

J.

C.

;1 1 , Captain and

H. H

J. T . SCA.

:\ E L L ,

E. T. C u H MA K ,

p.

c.

R.

H.

H. A .

3b.

L.

D Y ER , 2b.

L. McFA o n E x , 1 . f.

G EO R G E A. \ . I L

·ox, c.f.

L .\ '.\t n, r.f.

R I C H A R D OX, 2b.

H. A.

Pl oYT, 3 b .

H . L. H A X o x , l . f.

c. E. G.

c.

o ON , C aptain a n d

'

J.

\V.

99. ib.

p.

S H ANNON,

,

T l N , Captain and s.s.

r\ . w. C L E A \"E

C.

A . C . R O B B i i\ ,

Pi K E r.f.

H A X XO X , S.S.

J.

0. E E L , c . f.

1 900. 3b.

J . B . GI B BO:\ ' , l b .

H . F.

TOD L A :\' , 2 b .

C A R L CorroN , s s.

75

C. E. FOG G , r.f. \

. G. H oo K ,

c.f.

E. H . TUPPER ,

l . f.


0. L. T H O M P 0 , Centre.

Left.

, '98, Captain V. A. PUT?\AM, '99 . ro T' '99 . R. c. S H A

Guards

C. K. B R O O K

F. \V. A LP E 1 •

Tackles

,

Ends W.

G. H O O K , 1 900, Quarter Back.

'9

Half Back E. E.

Right.

J. T. S C A � ::\ E L L, 1 900. H. H . C H A P}. f A '97 H. A . LAM B, '99 . J . B . G l B B O l\ , 1 900.

T P P E R , 1 900, Full Back. Substitutes.

J . 0 . E E L L , '99. C . E . G. H A N NO >: , '99.

Oct.

7, I O,

1 -1- , 2I,

Colby 2•s. "

" "

M . I.

T.,

� 1 . s. c .

N. H . College, Bowdoin ,

\V. L. M c FA D D E l\ , '98. A. E . DO

G H TY , 1 900.

�attreli

1 900. '98.

C A R L C OT T O \ F. P. H . P I K E,

�fa:y:elr. Oct. 3 1 , Colby vs. M. S. C . , at \\ aterville, " Bates, �ov. 4, " Bowdoin, I I, Colby, 62 ; Opponents, 1 Total,

at Boston 4 ---0 " O rono 1 2-0 " Waterville, 28-0 " B runswick, 0- 1 2 77

-1--0 -0 6-6


.511&-Qh1mnriffte.

H . B . \V AT

' , 97, Chairman.

P. E. G l L B E. RT, 1 900,

Secretary.

J. H . BATE · .

'

H . BU R L E l G H .

.!lfanager of Athletic Exhibition.

T . R . P I E RC E,

mtnnual lll t l!l dh: <!frxf!iltifi nn. <l!Lifu ij n l l , 1tli1a:rd1 5, 1897.

�rugtammr.

1.

Broadsword D ri l l

2.

1 5 Yard

i st H e at won by

PE.

E R , Time, 2 .g. seconds.

3 d H eat won by 3. �·

P1 KE, Leader.

Class o f '98

Dash, Trial H eats.

H o rizontal B a r

.

Pulling 1 6 Pound

hot

2 d H eat won by R

Fon:, 1 st ; CoTTO� . 2d ; 1.

BT�

O'.'\, Ti me, 2 � seconds.

'oB L E , Tim , 2� seconds.

78

Fo v F. , Leader.

N o m . E , 3d

C.\ � '.'< EL L , 3 2 ft.

7 in.;

2.

P 1 1rn ,

2 ft. 3 i n . ;. 3 .

SE

ERV,

25 ft. 7 }{ i n .


5.

6.

1 . H OKE, 3 1 � sec. ;

Potato Race, Trial H eats,

7.

R u n n i ng H igh J ump,

8.

Sparring,

9.

HANNO:\, Leader.

I ndian C l u b Drill, Class of ' 99,

I.

D u mb Bell Drill, Class of 1 900,

I I.

Pole Vault,

I 2.

15 Yards Dash , Final H eat,

lJ.

Special Tumbling,

2.

fo r r.

I. FOGG, 8ft. 9Yz i n . ;

I.

1 5.

;

� LA \\ R EKC E , 30

FL OO D .

2.

PI K E.

�.

2.

\

C o rra :-; , 4 sec. ;

2.

- ox.

R o s 1 x o:-; ; 3. SPE:\CER. H EDMAX, Leader.

ELUIA:\, 8 ft. 6Yz i n . ; 3· D l;GHTY r.

C arro :-; , 2 � sec. ;

2.

ft. 3 in.

;\OHL E ; 3. Ros1N o :-;. W 1 L o:-;,

\ lLSO:\'. r.

Potato Race, Fi nal H eat,

sec.

S H A X:\ x and C TTO:\ tied, 4 ft. 1 l Yz i n .

F o r r st place Tont A :\ and CLAR K E tied ; 3. ST E VE

20 Yards H u rdle,

J O.

1 4.

R o B i l\SO.N, 5 ft. }� in.

2.

� ! ER RIC K , 2 9! sec. ; 3 .

� [ ERR I C K , 29� sec. ; 2. H o o K E

;

Leader.

. LAWREK E.

P I K E, Leader.

Pyramids, Poiuts awarded.

For Class Drill,

Class of 1 900,

For Other \ ork,

'97, 4 points.

10 points. '98, 2 7 points.

'99, 14 points.

1 900, 44 points. 54 poin ts .

Class Cup won by 1 900, judges.

]. H . HoR xE, Bowdoi n .

Prof. C. B. STET OK.

79

Prof. J.

\

. B LACK.


!©f�c.er�. U B - C O M M IT T E E ON OUT- D O O R A T H L E T I CS.

lfanager,

C . H. DA co l B E .

U.Vinner.li i n ' 9 6 'QlL u umament.

Singles. C. E. G. SHA

N O N , '99, First ; 'vV. L. M c F A D D E N , '98,

Second.

Doubles. M c F ADDE:'."

and

S H A N :\ O l' .

iR.epr.e11.enfafitt.e 1i at lfrr Jlnl.erc.tt H .egiaf.e 'Ql u urnanumf.

Singles. c . E. G. S H A !'\NON.

W . L . McF ADD EK.

Doubles. M c FADDEN

and 80

S H A -NoN.


10 ffi.c.ers-5' :eastm u f 1897 . .5u(1-Q;un11niffrl!.

E. H . l\ll A L l t G, Clzairman. ] . H . BATES. F . P. H P I K E, Captain of Track Squad. W I L L I A M H A RT H O R

H . H U DSO , Secretary. E . T . W Y M A. ". ]. 0. \VE L LMA, , Manager of Track Squad. ].

E, Captain of Bicycle Squad.

®fftt:et11-$:ea�nrn

H. L. C O RS O N , llfanager.

l.lf

1896.

W.

L . H UB B A R D , Captain.

06tgqf££nfq mtnnual �tdb �au. ma� 27, 1896.

!0fft.c.et!� nf ff!ll � a u.

H . \V. DUNN, Referee.

PROF. C. B. STETS O N , Starter.

]. C . BASS ETT, '95, Clerk of Course .

F. M. PA D E L FO R D , judge of Walking.

judges of Finish.

] . W. SPARKS.

R. F. A V E R I L L .

judges of Fixed Events.

J . F. LARRABEE.

D . P. FOSTE R . Ti'mers.

C . H . W H EE L E R . 6

PROF. \

.

S. BAYLEY. 81

F . ] . GOO D R I D GE .

PROF. J . \ . B L AC K .


·--�

IOO

2. R O B I N SO ' · I . *C LE:li E:>;T,

H al f M i le R u n ,

1 20 Y ards H urdle,

2.

( I.

( !.

.l

Mile Run,

l

440 Yards Dash, Two M ile Bicycle,

2 20 Yards Dash, :v lile Walk Two Mile Run, Pole Vault, . Putting Shot, Running H igh J ump, Throwing H a m mer, R unning Broad J ump- Tied. •

College record broken.

2 min. 9%- sec.

ST E P H EXSOX.

H O L:ll ES,

2. R O B ! .

M ile H a ndicap Bicycl e,

2 20 Yards H urdle,

1 0� sec.

I . * \V H l T l\! A :-< ,

Yards D ash,

1 9l sec.

'98,

ox.

CHA E,

2 min.

2. R J C H A R D ON.

( J. *C u:�I ENT, 2. ::vl E R R I L L . ( I . * P EN C E R , .l 2. H O l .l\I ES, '9

2 3 * sec.

5 min. 20 sec.

29� sec. 56 sec .

( r . *ST E P H EN O X , ·l 2. H o ur ns, '97 .

J

I . PRATT, '96, 2 . H A R T H OR N E. 1 . *WH ITMA::\,

5 m i n . 3 4! sec.

·

{ { 2.1 . *ELY, { 2. f

.l

2. r.

O B LE.

8 min. 3 9! sec.

-vv E L L l\! A x ,

2. Wooo 1A:-;. . C L E M E 'T.

11

*Ct.:S H I 'G,

{I R . { 2r .. *CHAP IAN, { r.

m i n . 28� sec. 8 ft.

r .* T R E W O R GY, W E LLMAN.

l 2.

I'

Ii

24} sec.

6fo- in.

30 ft. S in .

M c FA DDEN.

5 ft. 2 in.

. * O BIN O X , 2 . STE\ E

79 ft. 2 i n,

PJ K E.

ETCH E L L , HA OK.

'9

I

1 7 ft.

I Il

in.

Class Cup won by '98. 82

I


'99 € eam. M r s Es STET. o � . BucK , LEllIO�T, B o ' '.\ I A � . FosT E R . Substitute, P

R I �GTO '.'\.

1900 �:eam. :\fIS E

H O L D E . · , H A R LOW, R L SSEL L , *

0 BO R N E ,

D IY E R .

Substitute, P r K E.t

::\-larch 4 , r 897, r 900 6,

vs.

' 99,

,,

I -0

Championship Pennant awarded to 1 900. *

Honorable mention for good playing.

t The

Co-ord.

6-2


.$ecnn(r annual �ic}ld£

Jmed.

Q!.o{(JlJ iRff!ldir !tsiiocfafion.

.. .. 10f1h:ers. ARTH

R CO

K. Waterville, Referee. judges.

A. F. DR MMO D.

A. A. PLAISTED.

E. G. CRO BY.

H.

H. DAVIDSO

.

Timers.

Clerk of Course. H. L. CORSO

I.

One Mile Amateur.

J1

E. H. MALI

I. \\. \

1

ALDRO

L. E. WALl1R

:\

r. C. B. Pr KE · 2. E. L. \\'ELL 1AN 84

G.

2 min. 52g sec.

}

2. \. . B. CH E 3. c. COTTO;-.; .

F. TITCOMB. Scorer.

K.

r. 0. E. Mo LT , 2. G. M EDWARD

" 2. c. COTTO:\', 3. R. RICHARD ON, "

{

R. H. CO

L. vVELLMAx

1. W. B. CHASE, Colby

One Mile.

(Open te Maine Colleges.) One Half lM1'le Amateur .

R. PIERCE.

c. B. PIKE .

2. E.

One Mile Professional.

\\. '

Umpire.

Starter. T.

.

One Half Mile. (Open to Colby.)

PRI CE.

f

2 min.

46 sec.

I min.

30! sec.

3 min.

6� sec.


Ceo llf,\SJ!f, ���co���rnco!Nl�


President.

C. � [ . \\'00 0 .\ I A . -

l "'ice- President.

E . C. H E R R I C K . . \

. G.

HOOKE

H. H. BISHOP

Secretary.

.

Treasurer.

� i ti r .e S>tu b u. A . H . P.\ G E.

A . \\, . C 1 . E.\ Y E

.

. E. Do ' G H T Y .

E.

!Jlhrdt fo r M.e\u �tu'lre1tf!:i .

H . H . P R .\TT.

H . L. H .\ X 0 :\ .

H . W. H .-\Y KES.

H . M . G E R R Y.

H. R .

H . \V .>. LD E '\ .

F.

D.

J . TOI.l\I A :'\ .

C.

D . McDo�ALD.

!mis. shmaru.

rR cligi lnni m eetin g . G. A . .\1.\ R T I ::\ .

A . C. R O B B I :\ .

m.emb-.e�T1ip.

. G. W.\ R � E R .

T. R. P I ER E.

H . .\ L\ L I :\ G.

J.

E\' E R \" .

6

PE:-; ER.

\ . B . CHA E.


!0fflr.er:s-. L E NO R A. B ES S E Y , M A U D LO

.

President.

ISE H O X IE,

:V I A R Y LOU I S A

Vice-President.

\\ I LBU R ,

Corresponding- Secreta 1:J'.

E L L I E W H I TT E N C R I E,

Recording Secretary.

S A R A H A T L A 1 T R O B E RTS,

Treasurer.

0£ u mmiffe�s. . !N.ecrption . •

-\ :-; :-: 1 E H l'TCI J l :\SO .

P F: l' P E R .

H E L E. . G E R T R ' D E

L . Ll \' A :'\ .

STEL L..\ Lo u E

Jo. · Es.

illl .e m b l?t.5f! i p . h A S L'S ..\ :\" T A Y L O R .

J E :\" :\ ! E

M .'\ R V G ..\ R D:\"ER P H I L B R

M A t: D E B l T K .

OK.

i9ib ( c_ 5tulry. A u E L E :-; A Co L . E .

A LI CE

\\'1-1 ! T E C 1 1 A

E.

G R A C I E E :I D I. .\

C H A :\" E\" .

�rayrr tale.efing. Eo_ · ..\ FLOR E:>:CE

DA -

:1 r n E .

MOLLI E

E\\' A L I . S:lt ..\ L L .

L I

A I . ETTA

\ I ES E R \"C: .


.l'inam:J.l.

SA R A H ATLANT R O B E R T-.

EDITH MOR R !

COO K .

:Vl V R A C A S E

if A R V E L L .

AG� E. c R I :'\NA STETSO:'\ .

H EL E :\ £ H O R TENSE BOWMAN.

C A R R I E MAY TOZI E R .

ia1i£J£Jhrnaru.

LA R A H ATTI E SMIT H .

R AC H EL j o , · Es Fo T E R . Ll ' LU MAE A M ES.

M v R A j os E P H I :'.'\ E PER R Y .

!thrntinaftng. :\1 A R Y H OP E 0 \\' .

] A .'\ ET C H R I T l ): E

E D ). A H A R R J ET

ETTA F R A :\CE P l ' R I :\'GTO :'\ .

TE\'E_'�.

T E \' E :\'S.

ELS I E GO R DO :\ R E I D . E '\ DJ A F R A i\ CE. H UT H ! NSO '.

A LI CE F R E E:\IA.'\ LOW E. H ATTI E ALlllA H A R LOW.

M A R G E E TELLE M A G R ATH.

M A R y G E R T R U D E LEM O;\'T.

FLO R E CE M A Y D I V E R .


QE�r J@radJ.1 B.1t.sndatiun. W. F . T I TC O M B , '97

President.

C . E. H ER R I C K , 19

Vice-President.

T. R. P I E R C E, ' 98

Secretary.

W. W . B RO W

Treasurer.

, '98

Publ ished A nnually by the Students .

G. K . B ASS ETT, '97

J.

E. N E LSON, '98.

Mr

A . E . LIN

M E R C Y A. B R A K :-.r, ' 97 .

Editor-in- Clzief.

C

OTT, 98.

Mr

E. GcR

H ELEK M . H A :\' cm1 ,

89

'

97 .

EY, '98.

H. S. ALLE � . ' 98.


!0ffn:.ers. \\'. A. H A R T H

E,

R

'9

President.

7

\V. \\ . B R O W N , ' 9

Vice- President.

C. E. G. S H A :-\ N O N , '99 .

L

N OW ,

' 97

Secretary .

.

Treasurer.

P u b l i s h e d B i - weekly, d u r i ng the College Year, by the Students .

• •

. H . \V H l T \ l A � . ' 9 7

(

� oa:.dr uf "frbifot·s. Editor-in- Chief.

1 1 s · E. B. H A

Assistant Clzief.

T . R . P I E R CE, '98.

r . F. h G R A H A ) I , ' 9 '.

A. H. P A G E , '9 .

M1

E.

. - E LSO :\ , '97.

}. L. D Y E R , ' 9 8. 90

.VI 1 N.

s

LE:\O R A

BE

K. F ' L L E R , '9 .

E \' ,

'9 .


_,


�@ � � �� �� �� �

l8ffb.:.et.5'. A. H .

PA G E ,

\V. 0.

TE

'9

,

H. R.

President.

PE

CER,

'

99 , Secretary.

L. E .

G

R :\ EY ,

' 99, Treasurer.

Cfx£i.:ufib.e q£ u m m iffJ?.e. E

S , '99 .

T . R . P I E R C E,

'98.

G.

'1.fres; �o nrnanumf fp?Ur at W itl.erhiHe, Rpqil 161 171 18, 1890.

B0\\'001 ;-.i .

'96 GAR O L "\ E R , '98 P R E B L E , '9 L Y FO R D,

Total

\ on. + Yz

3 Yz

IT

COLBY.

Lost. I

2

H A R T H R X E , '9 7 PAG E , ' 98 G ETC H E L L , ' 96

Yz

Yz

-1-

Total

91

,

. � I A RT l :\ ,

\\"on. 2 Yz I

z

Lo !.

2 }{

3 Yz

0

-1-

'99.

I I


ll�tl lttt !J flall e n's f!Repuulican Q!Uub uf Q!rulnu rutniin�r,uu:.

j . E. J . E.

President.

TEP H E SO , '9 EL 0 1\ , 198

A . B. wA R R E C. 0. '.\1

·DO

I

First Vice- President. econd V ice-President.

'99

LO, 1 900

Third V ice· President. Secretary.

D R U 1 1\ l O 10, '9 ' E. H. M LI :'\G, 99 .

C. M.

Treasurer.

(!!i x eruti\lc QC. u mmitfre. ] . E.

EL

·,

'9 .

H . M. GERRY, '9 '.

92

v. A. p T ;:\ A l\I , ' 99.


Ql!nlb)l A. R. K E I T H , '97 E. C. G

R

�tnup.c.

minllfrd .. ..

.

. General Jlfanager.

EY, '9

. Business Jlianager.

T. R. P I E RC E , '98 .

\ . H . H O L M ES , J R ., ' 97

. Stage Jlfanager.

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hztl'docutor.

End Jlfen.

G. K.

BA

0 . W. F O Y E , ' 98.

A. R . K EI T H , ' 97 .

SETT, ' 97 .

0 . A . L E A R l\ED, 1 900.

].

F. A. ROBER T

. \ . B R OWN.

B.

J.

G I B BO:\'S, r 900.

\\ . 0 . STEVE · . ]. H. H

H.

G . A . ELY.

J . R.

A . E . L I X COTT.

c. E . G. S HAl\l\Ol\.

H . R. S P E:\ ER.

o o

ELL, 1 900.

T. A. P I E R CE .

H . A . LA�!B.

R . H . COO K .

T. SCAN

\V. H A \' X E .

]. A . F LO O D . R . H . H ov

1 E L ON.

A. I . STL'A R T .

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C . H. W H I TM A N , ' 97

93

B.

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WAT o x .

Pianist.


H. A. LAi\r B, '99 .

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. Leader.

C. E. H E R R I C K , ' 9 8 .

. Manager. First Tenors.

J O H K TOW '.\' E.

H.

A. LAlll B, '99.

A. R . K EI T H , '97.

Second Teuors. c.

E. G.

1-I A J\ :\ O :\ , '99.

F.

A. R O BER T , ' 97 .

]. H. H c; o

o, , 1 900.

Baritones. c . H. WH1Tl\!AK, ' 97 .

I . F. l. G R A H AM , '98.

W. W. B R O W N , '98.

Bassos. H . \ \ ' . H A Y :-: E.

, r 900.

H.

S. B R O W N , '99.

c. E. H ER R I C K , '98.

Engagements.

Madison , March 8. H ebron Academy, March 1 7 . , 'orway, M arch

l

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Mechanic Falls, March 1 9.

Dover and Foxcroft, March 26.

L i vermore Falls, March 22.

Greenvi lle, March 25.

Farm i ngton , March 23.

Watervi lle, April 6.

94


jJ.0 rngra mm:c . .. .. PART I.

March , " Palitinus,"

Cornet SoLo, " H appy Days," . . . . .

R. B. Hall 0 R C H E TR.-\.

Vocal farch,

Smith

CL B. Solo, " Ise Gwine by de ' Lectric R oad, "

Solo, '' Don t Be Cros , " . . .

GLEE

.

H EK R y

Ballou

GLEE

Selected

C . ALBERT ROBBIC\'S. " Memories ,"

' Song of the Cornet," . J C Bartlett

PART

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'' Lo e's Old, Sweet Song,"

CLt:B.

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. Smiley

. . . . R. B. Halt

ll.

C. ALBERT ROBBI.l\ Solo, " I t's J ust an I dea of My O wn," PROF. FREDERICK K E :\1 I O ;\' . Me.dley, College Songs . . . . . . GLEE C L UB .

Kasnier

.

GLEE

.

.

Cu;s.

Reading,

Vatenberg

O R C H ESTRA.

\Valtz, " Gay H earts,"

Lanski

O R C H ESTRA .

J . G. TOWNE.

March , ' ' H owards, "

. . .

. l:.. A M B.

" M rs. \Vinslow's Soothing Syrup, '

ALBERT R. K E ITH .

Readi ng,

Banara

c. E. G. S H A.l\.l\ON.

Smitlt

GLEE CLUB.

95

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Selected Primrose

C l l 'll ilmall


musical. •• (!!Luffege U:kcf1esfra. C. H.

S.

BRO\ N,

'99,

H.

\ HITMA , '97,

A. R. KEITH, '97, J.

Pianist.

Cfariuel.

. P.

c.

H.

SHA:\:>;ON,

C. E. G.

\ HlTMAN, '97

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1900,

HEDMAN,

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H. Huo OK,

H.

ROBERTS,

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c. E. H. HUDSON,

HAYNE

,

1900,

Flute.

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Organi�t.

Bassos.

197. J.

Violins.

W.

Trombone.

Tenors.

F. A.

1900,

Cornet.

'99,

H.

HERRlCK,

'98. w. w.

1900. A. LAMB, ' 99.

BROW

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H.

96

'98. \V.

HAYNES,

1900.


QCulbJ1 @:qapter t1f trre i&ni11I1ts of Jrn.edta anh Ulassihtb.e.

fost Higll and Reverend Lord of Inactivity.

CHARLES MILLETT DRu�1r.10xo . CLAYTO. GEORGE

Most Obese and Bulky Lump of Sluggishness.

KINGMAN BROOK

AD.Bl

\VIL ox,

JR. .

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.

. The Laziest Bear in Oxford County.

The object of this Society is the promotion of indolence and extreme laziness, and the avoidance of all unnecessary motions of limb and body.

.Jitafte!l ht rutniintgtfafe. 1897. w. A.

L. E. \V ALDRON. 1898.

\

A. G Y-A\"ERILL.

1899. E.

K. G ILD.

1900. J.

H. HUDSON. t

*Re-tired.

t Honorable mention for" Standing for bis picture." t Chair-man.

97

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HARTHORXE.*

L. McFADDEN.

. A. p

"TNA�t. t

D.

RBU

H.

F

H.


H . H. C H A P M A

] . E.

TEPHE

-

. President. . Vice-President.

OK

1!.lle m b .er5.

H. H .

C H .\ P;\I

] . E.

i\ 1

C.

H. F.

Chief Knock-'em-Stiff.

STEP HE,

0"1, Lightning Fisticator.

L. C LE:l!ENT, Seven-foot Featherweight.

TontAN, Scientific Eye Distorter.

H.

W.

C LA R KE Hibernian Claret Tapper. c.

H.

vVH lTl\I A

] . H. F. E. TAYLOR , Harmless Puucher. PR F. M A R QUA R DT, " V ill"-ai11ous Cut-' em-out.

98

'

Jl:lathemalical Skull Cracker.

BATES, jaw Cracker.


QltnlbM J) draling Qlth1lr. E.

. President.

C. H E R R I C K , 198

H . R. S P ENCE R , '99

. Vice-President.

T . R. P I E R C E ,

. Trea.ntrer.

\ .

' 98 . .

. H A RT H O R

. Secretary.

E, '97

�fa nMng @:. tr m m iffcc. F. E. T A Y L O R ,

PR

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F.

' 97 .

E. c .

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E. N E L O N ,

\V r L LI A 1

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c. E.

1 H E R RICK, 9

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'98. E. C. H E R R I C K , '98.

99

F.

A. J .

RTH

G L' R :\ E Y , '9 .

ROBERT .

R

\\ . C L EA \' E

I

'9


IDtrffo :

H A RT H O R STEP H E

" :e rr is nof ©ol'b Ui11f

E

C:!Hiffere."

. President.

SO

Vice-President.

BROOKS

. Secretary.

C H APMA

. Treasurer.

GUILD.

PUTMAN, 99·

EELLS.

ADAMS.

�a:s)l 'i:ippfers.

\ I LS N .

COTTO

D R l! M M0:-\0.

TITCOM B .

LEA R

.

H A RT H O R ?\ E.

WALDRO .

BA R K E R .

AUSTIN.

A ERTLL.

D ESMON D .

100

ED.

W I R EN.


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H E fol lowing art icles u p o n Colby were cont ributed to t h e '97 O R AC L E for the p u rpose of giving t h e undergrad uat e a n d t h e graduate of recent years some id a of her past hi tory.

The art icle ent i­

t l ed " T h e O u t l oo k " i o n e of i nt e rest to e\ ery peron who is a n d h as been in any way con nected with th

Col l ege.

For the art icle en t it l ed " Colby in t he T h i rt ies " we

are i ndebted to D r. \1V i l l iam

Mathews of the class of

' 3 5 ; for ' 5 5'.

" C olby in the F i ft i es " t o D r. Lark i n D unton of the class of " The Outl ook " i

t h e cont r i but ion of

Pres ident Butler, who has

d e ply at h eart the wel fare of the College.

To D r. Pepper we are

i ndebted for the b iograph i cal sketch of Dr. Mathews. THE E D ITOR .

102


in 1 8 5 5 it was sold to Col. Sleeper, of the Boston ll!crcantile Journal, who u n ited it with h i s own paper, Tiu Portfo/£0. In 1 85 6 he removed to C h icago, I l l . , where h e remai ned u n t i l 1 880, nearly twenty-fi v years. T h e fi rst t h ree of these years h e w a con ­ nected with t h e Daily and eekly Press. of that city, as editor and writer ; the next t h ree ( 1 8 5 9-'62) ssociat i on ; t h e was l i brarian of the You ng Men's n ext thirteen ( 1 862-' 7 5 ) fi l led with d i ti nction t h e c h a i r o f Rhetoric a n d E n g l i h Literat u re i n t h e U n i­ versity of Chicago ; and for the remai n i ng year gave hi mself to the congenial work of author hip. \ hile in t h e Profe or's chair h e publi bed t wo books, t h e fi r t , " Getting o n i n t h e ·world," i n 1 872. I t sale , moderate at fi rst, soon i ncrea ed rapidly and has now reached about 70,000 copies. One Canad ian and t h ree London houses h ave issued editions of i t, while t here have been made three t ran slations i nto wed­ ish and one into the Magyar language. H i s second book was " Th e Great Con\'er ers of the \ oriel ( 1 874), revised and greatly enlarged i n 1 884 of which 24,000 copies have been sold. There followed in

O L B Y' children are her j ewel s. Of no one of them can she be more proud than of D r. Mathews. Born in 'vVater ille, Mai ne, J uly 28, 1 8 1 8, he entered the Col lege in 1 83 l at t h e age of thirteen, graduat i ng when a lad of only seven teen years. I m mediately on graduat ion he studied law, alter­ nately with T i mothy Boutelle of ·waterville and at t h e Harvard Law School, and was admi tted to t h e Kenn ebec b a r i n 1 838. G i v i n g t wo years to t ravel and to teaching in Vi rgin ia, he began the practice of law in Waterville in 1 840. But h e was predest inated for a literary career, and began to make sure thi h i s cal l i n g by establishing, i n 1 84 1 , a l i terary a n d family new paper, Tile Watervillonian, wh ich was enlarged t h e next year and the name changed to Tlte Yankee Blade. This soon engrossed all h is t i m e, and was r moved i n 1 843 to Gard in er, Me., and in 1 847 to Bo ton, . I ass. The paper grew rapidly in popularity u nder the management of editor Mathews, who a so­ ciated with h i mself many brilliant contributors, but

f!

"

l OJ


1 877 " Hours with M en and Books ; " i n the same year " Monday Chats," a translat ion from Sainte­ Beuve with an elaborate introductory essay on his l ife and writings ; and in 1 879, " Orators and Ora­ t ory," of which two reprints were issued in London. In 1 880 Dr. Mathews returned to Boston, Mass., and, as he says of him self, quoting a phrase of the A uto­ crat, " let his anchor fall where the pennons flew." H is publications since then have been " Literary Style and Other Essays " ( 1 88 1 ) ; " Men, Places and Things " ( 1 888) ; and " N ugce Litterarice " ( 1 896). H e has now ready for t h e press a volu me o f " Essays, B iographical and Crit ical," and has begun a work which he has long had in contem plat ion on a favorite theme-" The Choice and Use of Books. " During the last wi nter h e has been writing a series of critical and bibliographical introductions to the novels and romances of Bul wer, for an elegant new edition i n forty volumes which M es rs. Little & Brown are now publishing. H e has also del ivered many lectures on h i storical and l iterary ubj ects before literary socie­ tie , colleges, and other inst itutions. In this valuable service Colby Un iversity has richly shared . He has also been an abundant contributor to the foremost magazines and newspapers and to " Appl eton's Cyclo­ pedia of Biography. " Since 1 87 1 D r. Mathews has visited Europe five times, the longest visit being two year , 1 88 1-'83. Colby recogn ized the honor which he had be-

stowed on her by conferring upon him the degree of LL.D. in 1 868. She loves to welcome him home to her fi reside, whether at her anniversaries with the other children, or in term-t ime or vacation. He always has the freedom o f all her domain. H e loves to come home. He is full of enthusiasm for b is mother. No student in college is in feeling younger than he. We all love to hear him, with eloquent voice and more eloquent eye and face, tell of the good old t imes and eulogize the bet ter new t imes. Keen and clear of intellect, un iversal i n his sympathies, omniverous yet discriminating in his reading, of prodigious m emory (apparently unable to forget any­ thi ng), energetic, t irelessly industrious, wisely eco­ nomical of time, always pressing to achieve an end, easily identifying h imself with other men of all ages and races, appropriati ng whatever is purest and best in all literat ure and l ives, never fail ing to credit every man with that which he aLlopt s from him, affable, social, graciously helpful, he is still pouring out in authorship, as for three score years he has been pour­ ing out, those t reasures of wit and wisdom that have enriched hundreds of thousands of l ives and will con­ t inue to enrich the generations to come. Colby, the mother, with all her living children, assures him of her admiration and of her prayer that, as h eretofore, so for many coming years, he may grow, not old, but you ng, with unfailing powers of ach ievement and en­ joyment. 104


was also a small n umber of Partial Course students. Owing mainly to poverty, classes dwindled sadly dur­ ing the fours years' course. Of the 24 Freshmen i n my class only 1 4 became " grave and reverend Sen iors " and recei ed diplomas. Of the class of 1 83 7, at one time n u mbering 39 members, all but 3 left t h e coll ege before grad uat ion-day. M any w e n t t o Union , Dartmouth, and other coll eges. The reason of t h i s stampede was an i n tense h ost il ity to coll ege honors­ the distinction in rank for scholarship noted o n t h e Commencement programme. Strenuous petitions for the abol ition of t h e pract ice, bri�tling with argu­ · ments against it prepared by comm ittees of t h e ablest men i n t h e classes, and s igned by t h e latter unanimously, h ad been sent year afte r year to t h e Faculty of the College, w h o refused to make a change. Probably at no time i n the t h i rt ies was t here a deeper i nd ignat ion felt by the students against what t h ey deemed a grievance. The requi rements for ad mission t o t h e coll ege were exceedi n gly moderate. When, at the age of t hirteen, I was exami n ed for t h at purpose with four

N 1 83 1 , when I entered Waterville College, there were but two college buildings o n the cam pus - North College, now Chaplin Hall, and South College. Of the former t h e north d ivision w as unfi n ished, b u t w as completed s o o n afterward . The President' s house was some rods south of the South College. The college prayers and the declamat ions were held in rooms 1 and 3 i n t h e South College, n o w th e readi ng-room. T h e com­ mons was in the basement of the North College ; after a new building for i t h ad been e rected, t h e basement w a s u s e d as a chapel and f or exercises i n elocution. College educat io n was then cheap. Tuition and room-rent were low, and board could be had in com­ mons for $ 1 .00 a week, and i n private houses for $ 1 . 50. The n umber of u ndergraduates was small, probably averaging about 60 duri n g the four years of my col ­ lege l ife. In t h e General Catalogue only 1 20 gradu­ ates are recorded in the decade 1 830- 1 840. T here 105


others by Tutor Chapl in, we were required simply t o t ranslate e ight or t en l i nes i n each of t h e following works, viz., Vi rgil, C icero' s O rat ions, Sal lust and the Greek Reader ; after " upsett ing " which, as t h e Ger­ mans say, i nto bad English, we were told, to t h e aston ishment of two of u s , at l east, w h o had floun­ dered desperately all the way through, that our exam­ i n at ion was " sati sfactory. " Young as I was, I had been prepared for exam i nat ion for a year ; and J ere­ mia h Chapl in, the President's son ( 1 828) was actually grad uated at the age of fi fteen. The Faculty from 1 830 t o 1 840 comprised at no time more than seven members ; in my day but five. The consequence was t hat, l ike the chest in Goldsmith's village i nn,

over twelve years put his whole l ife into the college ? I n person he was tall, l ean, and angular, incli ned to stooping, and, except that he had a dark eye of more than usual brilliancy, not striking i n his physiognomy. College government was then more rigid than now. M anners were st iffer ; there was more of petty regu­ lat ion and surveillance ; and a j oke from the l i ps of the Doctor or one of his associates would have startled us l ike one on a gravestone or in a ledger. Dr. Chapl in, ki ndly t hough he was at heart, was, even for t hose days, a severe discipl inarian and a stout st ickler for etiquette, who wielded the sceptre of au­ thority with a fi rm, unwavering hand . _H e bel ieved i n the strictest enforcement of the rul es and regula­ t ions of the college, of which every student was fur­ n i shed with a printed copy, and which the boys, i n illusion t o t heir character and the blue cover in which t hey were enclosed, called " the Blue Laws." Shall I ever cease to venerate t he good Doctor's virtues, albeit when I , a shy, short-jacketed Fresh ­ man, followed h i m out of the chapel one Saturday eve n i ng to the South College doorsteps, and trem­ blingly told him t hat my parents wished me to be excused from attending prayers on Sun days, he main­ tained an icy silence, till, half-frightened out of my wits, and wondering what faux-pas I had com m itted, I stammered out the request a second and even a th ird t ime, when he abruptly pulled off his hat ? Too dull or verdan t to interpret t h i act, I stood shivering with m i sgivings, when at last he said to me in a

" Contrived a double debt to pay,

A bed by night, a chest of drawers by day, "

each professor had to do other work besides that of h i s own chair. When I t h i n k of the amount and qual ity of the work these seven men achieved , with t h e meagre equipment of books, cab inets, and appa­ ratu , I am fi l l ed with surprise, and feel like exclaim­ i n g, i n t h e spirit of the Roman' s epigram concern ing t h t h ree hundred Spartans at Thermopylce, zm­ q uam 7- idi plurem septem / The three Presidents during the t h i rt ies were J eremiah Chapl in, D . D. , I ufu Babcock, D . D., and Robert Everet t Pattison, hall I ever forget the fi rst and most venera­ D. . the e, the fi ne classi cal scholar, the stout Cal­ elf-sacrificing man, who for 106


magi sterial tone : " Take off your h at, sir, if you pl ease ! " I n the summer of 1 833, in consequence of a dis­ agreement in the Faculty about a matter of d isci­ pl ine, the President, his son, Professor Chapl in, and his son-i n-law, Professor Conant, i ndignantly resigned their chairs. On the Fourth of J uly the students had celebrated the decl aration of A merican independence by a d in n er and speeches in the college board ing­ hou e. T h e toast s were d ru n k in cold water, but th ere was n o lack of fi re in th e responses, which were greeted with such shouts as only college boys' t h roats can raise. After th e speeches we all marched with our " Ten Lots band " to the Presiden t's man­ sion, and serenaded h i m for some ten m in utes or m ore. Th is pat riotic and altogether cred itable out ­ burst of Americani s m greatly displeased th e h ead of t h e coll ege, and t h e n ext morning, after th e chapel exercises, the grave Doctor gave us all a sharp repri­ mand. Of all his caust i c criticisms of our celebra­ t i o n , I can rem ember only one classic sentence, viz . , t hat " a stranger, hearin g o u r shouts, would h ave fan­ cied that they were not the cries of civilized beings, but the howls of I ndians, or the bra;n.Jtgs of jack­ asses. As one half of the Faculty disapproved of this censure, and opposed any p u n ishmen t of the boys, the President, h i s son, and his son-in-law, sent their resignations to t he Trustees of th e college, which were accepted. The resignat ion of Thomas J. Conant, Professor of

Greek, and who also taught us German, was a da11l ­ num prope medull£s to our Alma Mater. Shall I ever forget that pale, n ervous, scholarly ermonter­ " Runken, " we called h i m , in reference to h i s favorite classical authori ty-afterward professor at Madison and Rochester Universities for over t wenty year , and who, confessedly one of the first H ebraists of h i s day, devoted t h e remainder of h i s l i fe of some n i n ety years to i mproved versions, with crit ical i nt rod uctions and notes, of t h e books of the Old Testament ? Of the kindly Professor Calvin Newton, can I ever cease to have a l ively remembrance-he who, com­ parat ively a giant in his own proper department, Mathematics, was i n R hetoric and Elocut ion, which h e h ad also to t each, a d warf ; who asked m e one day at declamation, after I had rung t h e changes o n the same piece for t wo years, whether I had not pretty nearly exhausted its elocutionary possibil ities, and had not better try another ? It was he who, in ex­ pounding Blair or Campbell , gravely told us one d ay t hat, i n t ranslating Horner, Pope would h ave greatly i mproved one of the l i n es o n t h e labors of Sisyph us i n which h e makes use of " apt alliteration's artful aid," if, i n stead of " Up the high h i l l h e heaves a huge

rouud stone,''

the poet had written' Up the h igh h ill he heaves a h u g e

hard stone

! "


Above all my other college t eachers looms up most vividly in m y memory the face and figure of the be­ l oved George Washington Keely, Professor of Math­ ematics and Natural Philosophy, with his encyclo­ pcedic culture and " h igh thoughts seated in a heart of courtesy," whose subtle, discursive mind was at home alike in science, metaphys ical speculation, h is­ tory and literature. Many and amusing were the anecdotes told i n the days of " lang syn e " illustrat i ng t h e professor's breadth and accuracy of culture, such as h i s correction of the careful Professor Loomis's classi fication of a shell which had greatly puzzled h i m , and, again , the suddenness with which Professor Keely once took the conceit out a young man pos­ sessed of a m usical devil, who unchained his demon i n the farmer' s parlor. After haranguing on M ozart, Beethoven, Mart i ni, Rossini, Cherubi n i and others that end in ini, and again , upon A lbrechtsberger and others whose names to pronounce were to disl ocate one's j aws, but to h ear whose music were to be rapt in Elysium, the amateur was quite confounded by fi nd­ ing the Professor, who had been a fi ne flutist i n his youth, perfectly at home o n the subj ect, going ! n reply far beyond his o w n d e p t h in m usical lore, abounding in anecdotes of the great composers, and showing an actually critical knowledge of their works. A n excellent scholar, but the shyest man I ever k new, was J oh n O ' Brien Chaplin, for two years Tutor in Lat i n, two years Professor of Lat i n and

Greek. " Puer Ascanius " the boys called him, but he was a very different Ascanius from the one of whom Virgil says, that in h unting h e t ires of small game, and " O ptat aprum au t fulvum descendere monte leonem. '

I n the class-room he rarely raised h i s eyes from the text-book, or looked a pupil i n the face ; and out-of-• doors he had the air and manner of a certain acquain_ tance of Robert H all 's, whom the great preacher characterized as " going about with an air of perpetual apology for the presumption of being in the world. " M y l im its i n space forbid m y speaking a t length, a s I would like, of Phinehas Barnes, Bowdoin's son, Pro­ fessor of Greek and Lat i n in the years 1 834- 1 839. He was a schoolmate of the " Autocrat " at Phill ips Academy, Andover, and in the latest biography of the latter there are many letters addressed by the wit and poet to his early friend. It was my privilege, while reading law with Hon. Timothy Boutelle, to be instru cted in Quintil ian by Professor Barnes at his house. There was but one college lecturer in my day, Ezekiel Hol mes, M . D., and he with a scanty equip­ ment, and as dry as the bones in the ancient Ezekiel's vision, or the remainder biscuit after a voya ge. H is subj ects were Chemistry, M i neralogy, Geology, and Botany. How I hated the fi rst of these sciences, so fascinating in itself, expounded as it was i n the 108


anticipated and h ad ready h i s answers to Ben ' s tough questions before they were put. I knew Ben well. H e was fond of debate, and i n t h e discussions of t he Literary Fraternity always espoused t h e u n popular side of a question. Gross in body as h e afterward became, he was t h e n a mere dagger-of-lath, and at graduation weighed but n i nety-eight pounds. I regret that m y l i m its pre ent me from doing j ustice to other able teachers i n t h e t hirties ; m y esteemed classmate, William Lamson, afterward t h e fervent preacher and polished writer ; Danford Thomas, Samuel F. Smith, the author of " Am erica," ] onathan E. Farnum, and J ustin R. Loomis, t h e mod­ est, solid, and clear-headed Professor of Chemistry and Natural H istory, who.se damn i n g testi mony at a capital t rial in 1 848 as an expert in the former science George Evans, Maine's great lawyer, vainly tried to shake. In my day the College Library h ad few books, and few of those were attractive i n l ooks or contents. In 1 83 1 it comprised probably not m ore than 1 , 300 or 1 ,400 volumes. A year or two later, t h e Rev. ] ohn 0. Choules, of New Bedford, fass., a n Engl ishman by birth, isited h i s n ative land, and obtained for t h e l ibrary b y solicitat ion a t housand o r m ore volumes ; but t h e books, given chiefl y by clergymen and pub­ l ishers of religious works, were largely dry, crabbed theological publications et cet., and added little to t h e m eagre s t o c k of h i storical, l iterary and scientific works o n the shel es. Who, in t h at day of small

most crabbed of te ·t-books, and by a prosaic lectu rer with hardly a spark of humor or even a retort I Dr. Chaplin was succeeded i n 1 833 as President by Rufus Babcock, D . D . , a pleasant, fi n e looking gentle­ man, and eloquent public speaker, but not a close t h i n ker nor an accomplished scholar. During h i s ad­ m in ist rat ion Champlin Hall was built. H e was suc­ ceeded by Robert Everett Pattison, D . D . , who bad been Professor of Mathematics i n 1 828-9,-a man of acut e and positive, i f not very broad, mind, who w a s an adept in the s ubtle speculat ions of m etaphysics, in the hair­ spl i t t ings of casuistry, and i n the facts and reason ings by which the divine aut hority of the Scriptures is maintained. As a preacher he was earnest, search­ i ng, and i m pressi e. When i n 1 838 h e was i n stru ct­ i n g the Seniors in the Evidences of Christianity, he was often s urprised and occasionally staggered by acute, subtle questions and obj ections propounded by Ben. Butler, a member of th e class. Suspecting that these skept i cal doubts and queries did not originate in his pupil' s brain , but were cribbed from some i n fidel work, t h e Presiden t sent for Ben's Ch ristian chum, and asked h im confident ially i f such was n ot th e fact. " Yes, sir, i t is," was the reply. " Th e book i s Tay­ lor's Diegesis of t/ze 1Vew Testame?tt." Thereupon D r. Pat t ison, as he h i m self told m e years afterward, inconti nently took the stage for Boston, bough t t h e work a t Burnham's " Antique Bok estore " i n Corn h ill, s t udied i t i n the crazy coach all the way back during his t h ree days' j ourney t o Waterville, and t henceforth 109


t h i ngs , cou1d have dreamed t hat sixty years fa.ter, m ainly th rough the i ndefat igable efforts of t hat born l ibrarian , Professor Edward W. Hall, the shelves would groan under the weight of more than 32,000 volumes, i ncluding costly encyclop�dias and i ll us­ trated works, besides r o,ooo pamphlets ? I remember t hat when, in the u nsophisticated i nnocence of my Freshman year, I plunged i nto " Pl utarch's Lives," and the " 'vVars of the French Revolut ion," the boys all laughed at me, and I i n continently exchanged the e i n structive works for I rving's " Tales of a Trav­ eler " and Scott's " Talisman . " There were no secret societies in those days, but there were two flourish ing l iterary societies, the Lit­ erary Fraternity and the Erosoph ian Adelphi. Both had small l ibraries, which many years ago were conol idated with that of the college. One of the m ost delightful parts of my coll ege l ife was the Wednesday even ing passed at the ses ion of the Fraternity. At these m eeti ngs original essays and dissertations were read in turn by the members, and discussions of grave que t ions were held-exercises which were of ignal service to the part icipants in training them for writing and publ ic speaking. Not only was the thinking faculty taxed and stimulated i n these intel­ l ect ual duel and bat tl , but a com mand of language was obtain d, a skill in thru t and parry, a quickness in detecting fallacie , a fertility of mental resource, and an ea e of mann r, a elf-posses ion and freedom from " stage-frio-ht," wh ich all together could hardly

have been acquired so well and so early in any other way. As our society l ibraries were built up by a tax on our own purses-purses nearly all " i mponderable, flaccid, and wh ich would not fling against the wind,"­ the books were fresher and more at tractive, and more eagerly sought for, than the m usty tomes of the col­ l ege. There was no gymnasium, no base or football, no rowing in those days. Walking, chopping or sawing one's own wood, and swimming in the Kennebec, were our only modes of exercise. Possibly a dumb­ bell or two m ight have been used , but we preferred the belles which could respond. We were not scared at the proposal of a twenty-mile wal k ; we were, as James T. Fields's colored neighbor termed him one day when he was taking h is " constitut ional," " m ighty predest i narians. " To avoid losing the fi rst reci tation of the year, after my admission to the college, I walked in August, 1 83 1 , from Augusta to Waterville, v£a Vassalboro ugh, on the afternoon of the day before the term opened, without very much weari ness. Bl iss­ fully ignorant of parallel oars, pulleys, and a' that, we enj oyed n evertheless an average health as good , I suspect, as that of to-day's " pitchers," " kickers," and even champion " sluggers." Perhaps a reason of this was, that we l ived plainly, rarely overworked, and were not distracted by a multiplicity of studies. Did my limits and the reader's patience allow, I might gi e an accont of the big workshop built on the campus in 1 832 or 1 833, and furn i shed with car110


penters' tools, in pur uan ce of a Quixotic scheme to enable students, by w rk ing a few hours a day under the d i rect ion of the superintendent, M r. Erastus Cof fi n-omin ous name !-t o earn money enough to pay their college bills and board . I m ight also com pare the aims, appl ication and moral tone of college boys

of " auld lang syne " with t hose of their favored succes­ sors to day ; and, again, contrast the august and impos­ ing Commencement of t h e Th irties with the bald an ni­ versary of these degenerate t i mes. But I have t axed the reader's atten t io n too long, and with a Paree pre­ cor I I will close.

·

I II


fjiijiiiiffi O LB Y i n the fi f ti e s was n ot Colby

modern methods o f t each ing.

There was a defi nite

at all ; it was Waterville College.

plan of procedure, however, runn ing through the

To the old graduates of Waterville

enti re i nstitution.

College it was a severe shock­

lessons to the students, day by day, and then see that

yes, a positive wrench-to lose the

they either had or had not performed the task as­ · signed ; and, in the mai n , woe betide the fellow

old name ; for \Vaterville occupied

This plan was to assign definite

a warm place in the hearts of the old graduates.

who had not learned his lesson.

The professors, as I

H owever, we preferred a second marriage for our

recall them, were an able set of men.

dear old mother rather than her death, and i t seemed

painstaking in their way and very exacting of their

to be a choice of these evils.

students.

So, i n the main, we

They were

When I entered college in 1 85 1 , Dr. Sheldon was

accepted the lesser of the two evils with as much complacency as we could summon.

president.

I remember distin ctly the impression H is clear

The Faculty in those days were few in n umber.

made upon me the fi rst time I saw him.

fi nd my el f unable to coun t up more than half a

complexion, i ntellectual features, and keen eye, indi­

dozen t eachers, all told, connected with the college ;

cated to me rare sharpness of i ntellect ; and, while I

I

knew him better and better for a great many years

and what few profes ors t here were, were not up i n II2


Dr. C hamplin.

up to the t i me of his death, this i mpression was never removed, but constantly deepened. remarkable logical power.

H e was a fi nancial giant.

Probably

h e did m ore t han any other man to save the college

He was a man of

from fi nancial rum.

H is ability to analyze a

He stood fi rmly by the in t itu­

subject into its elements and to perceive the signifi­

t io n in i t s po erty and was able to i n t erest m e n of

cance of those elements singly and combined, h as

m eans, so that the college was saved.

But to me h e

been exceeded by few, if any, men ever conn ected

stands out s t i l l stronger as a man o f i nt el lectual

with the i nstitution.

power.

Then, he i mpressed me as a

H e was an i ndefatigable worker and de­

t horoughly honest rnan ,-honest morally and honest

manded u nt i ri ng work from the students.

in t ellectually.

When h e had establ ished a set of

can set forth this trait of h i s charact er no better than

Perhaps I

premi ses i n h i s own m ind, which he knew to be true,

by mentioning my own personal experience with h i m .

and had reasoned from t hese to any conclusion, he

I recited Greek to D r. Champli n f o r t h ree years, and,

accepted the result, n o matter where i t landed h i m .

whatever else happened or did not h appen in the

The severing of h i s connection with t h e institu t ion,

recitat ion, I n ever once failed to h ear the word

partly o n account of views at ariance with his de­

" Dunton " before the end of the hour ; a n d ' h e n I

nomi nation, was a painful operation to him ; and yet

came to my feet I knew t hat I should either stand or

h e was so firm i n h i s moral convictions that h e pre­

fall, according t o m y own stre ngth or weak ness.

ferred to leave the i nstit ution and the denomination

Dr. C hamplin n ever carried students.

with which h e had worked for so long a t i me, rather

went t hemselves or went dow n .

than to temporize or trim in the slightest degree.

of stern exterior, and y e t a man o f real warm

I

have always regarded D r. Sheldon as a clear, strong,

and

beautiful character.

o n e morning to

The next man who presents h i m self to my m in d i s 8

t e nder feeli ngs

i ns ide.

com e t o

Th ey either

H e was a man

He sent h i s office.

for \ hen

me I

arri ed he went straight at h i s errand by saying, I IJ


" Dunton, your bills remai n unpaid now for the third year.

respect for him as a thinker.

Indeed , he did more to

The laws of the col lege require "-here he

establ ish i n my mind the habit of systemati c thought

hesitated and gained time by his peculiar method,

and systemat ic arrangement of matter, and to develop

and then added-" contemplate the suspen ion of a

power of m emory, in the broadest sense of the term,

student if his bills are not paid the second t erm. "

than any other man with whom I ever came i n con­

This hesitat ion let me o u t o f a severe difficulty ; for

tact.

I read for the fi rst time the Doctor's good heart

distinctly in my m emory.

beneath his h ard head .

like the following way.

So I said to myself, if the

The fi rst lesson in logical arrangement li ngers It was given in something He had assigned to my class

rules m erely contemplate the suspension of a student

the preparation of some synopses for future compo i­

under these circumstances, I will allow them to re­

t ions upon certain Shakesperian characters. We wrote

flect for a while longer.

I told him that at the com­

out our synopses on slips of paper, laid them on the

pletion of my course I hoped to be able to borrow

professor's desk, when we went to the recitation, and

the money and pay up, but I could not do it at that

sat down to hear them criti cised one after another,

time ; and t hus, through the Doctor' s good heart, I

without the wri ter's nam e.

was allowed to go on without being suspended.

until my turn came, and my i nterest did not cease

I

I listened attentively

H i s criticism ran i n about the following

feel deeply i ndebted to Dr. Champl in for my concep­

even then.

tion of the val ue and dignity of hard work.

He set

way : " The fi rst poi nt i s excellent, but being included

the example and led the way and demanded a close

i n n umber four, should not be placed in this general

following.

synopsis.

Dr. S m ith.

Number two is also a good point, but as i t

depends on number three, while it is properly num­

The n ext character that appears to my view i s that of I think be was elected professor the day

bered two, should be placed after nu mber three ; and

I soon came to have a profound

as number three i ntroduces the subject, it should be

I entered college.

I I4


So number one should be omitted,

distinctly to have heard h i m say one day, w i t h a

n u mber t h ree should be n umber one, n u m ber two

vehemence and fervor very u n u s ual, " I do like to see

should be placed after n um ber three, and n u mber

a man enthusiastic over somet hing ! " Professor H am­

n u mbered one.

four should be n u m ber three. "

l in ' s spirit was l ittle less than contagious.

When h is criticism

Almost

was ended, i t dawned on m e for th e fi rst t i me that _ t here was a logical arrangement of parts belonging

every student that came under his i n fl uence was

to every subj ect to be con sid ered.

only key to fut u re success ; and more than t h i s, that

made to feel that earnest, enthusiast ic work was the

The lessons of

that nature which I received from D r. Smith have

enthusiast i c work was a delightful occupat ion.

done more t h an the work of any other man in devel­

From t h e three men whom I have j us t named, I

oping in me what of logical and systematic power I po sess to-clay.

l earned t h e dignity of hard work, t h e power of sys­ tematic thought and the ' al u e of zealo u s effort .

I feel personal l y profoundly indebted

to D r. S m ith for the effect of his inst ru ct ion.

a m a n has d eveloped i n h im t h e ability t o perform

Professor Charl es E. H amli n cam e t o th e college while I was a student.

earnest, systemat ic work continuously and with pl eas ­

H is i ntellect was remarkably

u re to himself, it seems to me t hat h e h as acq u i red a

cl ear, and he wa one of the most i ndefat igable work­ ers that I have ever known .

If

power that i s aki n to genius.

In fact, I recall, among

There were other profes so rs connected with t h e

all my acquaintances, but a single superior, and t hat

coll ege who were men of ability, e n t h usiasm a n d

was h i s cousin, Delwin A. Hamlin, with whom it was

character.

my privilege to work for many years, later in l ife.

Keeley, and D r. Patterson.

A m o n g t hese I recall Prof. Loomis Prof. Professor Loomis was a

Professor H am l i n was an enth usiast in whatever h e

t eache r of power ; Prof. Keeley was a man of rare i n­

undertook to do, e en i n making st udents t h i n k and

t ellectual and social endowment to t hose ' ho were

work and be ent husiasti c th emselves.

brought into immediate contact with h im , and Dr.

I remem ber I IS


Patterson was a man of positive eloquence. For some

feet, we could get on ; but the students who did that

reason or otb er, I did not feel the power of these

without a thorough comprehension of the subject i n

t h ree men as I did the power of the three I fi rst men­

hand were very few.

t ioned.

velopment of power of i ndependent thinki ng.

The result of this was the de­ Of

As I recall the work of the old college from 1 8 5 1 to

course m odern m ethods of teaching are superior to

1 85 5 , while I was conn ected with it, my respect

t hose i n existence at that time ; and yet, as I recall.

for the work done for me and the other st udents

the persistent effort that was required of the students

grows stronger.

in those days, I see clearly the m eans for the develop­

Those were the days for earnest,

persistent, hard work.

We were not carried over or

m ent of exact scholarship, and that strength of char­

th rough the subj ects.

The teachers told u s what to

acter which is so essent ial to success in the world .

earn, gave us the books that discussed the matter,

While I am delighted with all the i mprovements that

If we chose

the college has made since i t becam e a university, I

to com m i t the texts to memory without comprehen d­

must say that as the years go on my respect and rev­

ing what they meant, and to do this work with suf­

erence for the old college cont inually broadens and

fi cient thoroughness so that we could be fluent on our

deepens.

and held us respon sible for the results.

1 16


�olhu tn f{Je ,Sebenties.

II

N article with the same t itle as this

old regime presen ted themselves. What was o n c e t h e

was to h ave been written by an alum­

old chapel became a t that t i m e a s i t i s a t t h e present,

nus, but for some reason or other the

R ecitation H all.

editor has failed to get it.

the breeding places of colds a n d d iseases, were among the t h i ngs of the pas t . The entire building under­ went a complete renovat ion. I t was d ivided i n t o t hree floors. The fi rs t a n d second floors were d ivided into four room s respectively. The t h i rd floor fur­

To avoi d

a break i n this succession of articles upon the Colby of d i fferent periods

the present editor h as culled a few th ings from the O RACLE

of '72, '74 and '75, and presents them to the

readers of the '97

ORACLE

nished apartments for t h e professor in mathemat ics and for class exercises i n elocu t ion. " Th ey won­ dered then how t hey had ever endured those under­ ground cells, which had been formerly called recita­

with t h e hope that they

m ay be of i nterest, though not from the pen of a Colby man of that time.

I t was i n the latter part of

the sixties and the fi rst part of the seventies that the

t io n rooms." The old bell, which had so often tolled forth its well-understood summons fro m the chapel, for the fi rst t im e greeted t he ear from South College.

working plant and resources of the C ollege were m aerially increased by the m u n i fi cence of Gardner Colby, Abner Coburn, and others.

The old recitation roo m s, so long

The College t hus

by all of Colby's friends in her welfare augured well

The building now k nown as Coburn H all was at t hat time in process of erection. Concerning coedu cati o n

for her future.

t he editors of t h e ' 72

received a new lease of l i fe, and the i nterest shown To the graduate returning to t h e

grounds i n 1 872 several marked changes from the

O RACLE

said :

" Th e grand problem which is now agitat i n g many II]


colleges, bas been sol ved, as far as Colby is concerned,

the com pet ition between the student , the young

without a struggle.

ladies obtain more than their fair share of honors, all

Shal l young ladies be adm itted

to our colleges on the same terms as young me n or

the comfort we can offer to the young gentlemen i s

shall they not ? has been the quest ion.

the o l d a n d somewhat hack neyed phrase, ' So m uch

The voice of

Colby at the last meeting of the Trustees was, ' They

the worse for you. '

shall.'

in the class of ' 7 5 and we hope to see m ore soon. " The prospects have grown better a n d better and

T his was an unexpected movement.

Long

agitation m ust generally precede any step of that kind, and such we naturally looked for in this case. Yet, speaking for the students, we th i n k that the maj ority looked upon the move with favor. h owever, were opposed to it.

should condit ions continue as they are, the time is not far off when it will be more nearly accurate to speak of al umna:! rather than alum n i of Colby. The

Some,

hand of change was also placed upon North College. The old dorm itories were entirely remodeled and steam took the place of stove and fi replace. The m arble stat ue of the " Lion of Lucerne " was pl aced

Should the writer speak

for h i m self he would look upon i t as a real advance i n the right d i rect ion. The opponents of it really present n o good reason why the young lad ies should

i n Memorial Hall at this t i me, as a tribute to Colby's

not compete w it h the young men in conj ugating G reek verbs and i nvesti gating the laws of motion and t h e properties of the Cycloid, i f they wish to. It

son s who fell i n battle. I n an editorial of the ¡ 75 ORACLE appeared these words, " There has been a change not only in the course of study but al so in the method of teach ing in some departments. The importance of committing ideas and not words is rapidly gaining ground. The mere ' Parrot ' will soon cease to stand at the h ead of the class, although be may obtai n the highest rank." The editor has often heard ol d graduates tell

m ay be, however, that bashful undergraduates are look ing forward to future Commencement dinners when they strenuously oppose this movement. " H owever we may regard the adm ission of young ladies to the privileges of the institution, i t still remains a fact t hat they are admitted, and all can do nothing better than accept the ' situation.' To the coming young lady students of Colby we would say with a literary man of note, ' we greet you .'

One young woman has entered

of the pages of Rhetori c or of dry Philosophy that students were expected lit rally to commit to memory,

If i n 1 18


" Elect ive s t udies had not been introduced.

and he wonders if th ese stud ies under t h e more mod­

Phys­

ern ways of i nstruct ion would be called " grinds,"

i cal training was not requ i red, and consequently prac­

i f Col by boys of to -day had to l earn them i n the old

t ice in the gym nasium was i rregular.

way . With the change in the course o f study came also a change i n the method of examinations. Up to

had organized a m il itary company called the Colby

t hat t i me most of the exam i n at ions had been oral .

company was flourishing i n 1 877, but from some cause

But written ones were substituted and this change

interest d i ed out afterward an d the guns were re­

has cont i nued to the presen t t ime.

turned to the State.

The students

R ifles, which drilled regularly and with benefi t .

This change was

This

The fi rst captain was A. W.

evidently not very acceptable, " for it seems to the

Small of '76, afterward President Small and now a

studen ts as t hough one day o ught to be of sufficient

professor in Chicago Un iversity ; and the seconrl wa W. H . Looney of '77, now a well-known Portland

lengt h i n which to exam i n e a class in one term's work ." In 1 873 D r. Champlin, wh o had so successfully

lawyer.

managed the affairs of the i nst itut ion, and so accept­

football, as it i s now played, was pract ically u n known.

There was m uc h interest i n baseball, but

ably acted as Pres ident for sixteen years, reti red from

An attempt had been made to arouse interest i n boat­

office.

D r. Robins, of Rochester, N. Y., became his H am l i n,

i ng. Clubs were formed, a boat house was built on the M essalonskee n ear the railroad bridge; and boat s

who wen t to Cam bridge ; Prof. H al l assumed the

were procured ; but the fever soon subsided, and what

d uties of l ibrarian

became of the property I n ever k new.

successor ; Prof. Elder

succeeded

Prof.

i n add ition to those of modern

The college

languages ; and Julian D . Taylor, formerly known as

yell had not been i n vented, or at least the fash ion had

" Tutor " Taylor, becam e Prof. Taylor.

In 1 877 the

not got around to us.

r oz .

I n a recent

" \, hen the class of '77 entered, there were two de­

n umber of the Ee/Lo appeared a n art icle by ] . H.

bat ing societies, the Literary F raternity and t h e

Files, '77, entitled " Remin iscences of ' 77." M r. Files

Erosophian Adelphi, each with a good h a l l i n South

faculty nu mbered 8 ; the students

ha

gi e n us such an excellent account of certain

College and a considerable l ibrary.

pha es of college l ife i n the seven tie that I y ield to

These, however,

gradually decli ned, the secret societ ies probably being

the temptation of borrowing from his arti cl e :

a factor of the decline. I I9

The E rosophian fi nally d i s-


banded and turned its books over to t h e college

the Freshmen triumphed from force of numbers. But eternal vigilan ce was the price of hats, and they were carried i n to the class-room and guarded day and n ight .

li brary, and the Fraternity has s i nce followed suit, I think. There were but two secret societies, the D ekes and Zeta Psis, while now there are more than twice as m any. The student of ' 77 lacked many of the

In the Sophomore year '77 introduced the cremat ion

of mathemat ics with elaborate ceremonies.

student of ' 97.

For water he depended upon a well

of a celebration for the same date. I n censed at the i nterferen ce, '78, which was numerically superior,

i n the rear of t he dormitory, whence h e would labori­ ously pump l iquid not of the h ighest quality. The

plotted revenge. They lay i n wai t with horns and drowned the music of the band, and when the funeral procession ret urned from a march through the town

electric l ight, as well as the trolley car and the tele­ phone, had not come into u se. Not even kerosene street lamps were provided by the town, and after

it foun d its pyre, which had been erected with much labor, prematurely bur.ned. This was the only time t hat a certain member of ' 77, since a foreign mis­ sionary, was heard to use a big, big D. But such was

dark one had to find his way about the town and campus by moonlight or starl ight or i n tu ition. The only bicycle in the place, I believe, was an old-fash­ ioned bone-shaker owned by an eccentric m ember of

the provocation that I believe the recording angel blotted out the word. Two of the class of '76, one of whom afterward became the president of the u niver­ sity, had been commissioned to guard the pyre, while the procession was down town that n ight, but it ap­ peared that they must have been negligent. " At one time the rope of the college bell ; at another

' 77, who was 'vvont to ride his velocipede at m idn ight down to the town hall and back. Commencements cam e the last of J uly, and the long vacat ion i n winter, when many students eked out their means by teach­ ing di trict schools. " There were pranks i n those days, of course, but very l ittle hazing wa practised. The class of '77 per­ sisted in wearing tall hats in t he 'F reshman year, de­ spite

ophomoric objection.

I t so

lzappened that the class of '78 had planned some sort

physi cal comforts and conveniences possessed by the

hymn books and chapel desk-same which recently took a swim down the river-were found by Sam in the cellar and returned before the morning exercises. Prankish student s had then, as now, to get u p very

The result was the loss

of a number of hat and a war of retaliation, in which 1 20


early i ndeed to get ahead of Sam.

improvements.

Once a sick bear

The OR CLE of 1 872 was a paper

t hat had been left beh ind by a t ravell ing menagerie

pamphlet of 32 pages, 12 of which were devoted to

t o recruit in the country several miles out, was foun d o n t h e campus on a morning w i t h i t s cage covered

literary matter, and the remain i ng pages to the d iffer­ ent college organizat ions. The 0RAq.E of 1 897 is a

with appropriate signs."

cloth-bound book of n early 200 pages.

Certainly, an

ominous fact as to the progress of the College.

I n closing, let me say that in the ORACLE, as along most other lines, t wenty-five years h lve seen great

1 21


H E author of Tlie American Com-

i n stitut ions within ten years, to . real ize the i m mense development that they have undergone, and one need only regard public events, and the affairs of great cit ies and organized act ivities of every sort, to per­ ceive that American life, to look no further, is at this moment dom inated by college-trained men.

No

swiftest progress, and to have the brightest promise

longer does the busy, work ing world sneer at the

for the future.

coll ege.

T hey are," he adds, " supplying ex­

Every department of activity demands its

actly th ose th ings which European critics have h ith­

best products.

erto found lack ing i n America, and they are con­

of a clearer general understand ing of the val ue of

tributing to her pol i t ical , as well as to her contempla­

what is termed " the higher educat ion," but even

tiv life, element of inesti mable worth."

more, perhaps, to the fact that in recent years the

\I

hat M r. J ames Bryce thus wrote i n his fi rst

d i tion i s more stri k i ngly evident to-clay.

This is due not only to the exi stence

curricula of the co1 1 eges have been greatly en riched ,

One has

and oth erwise, more perfectly than ev r before, ad­

only to con ider the millions, amounting to more than

j usted to meet the actual need of men and women i n

half a hu ndred, that have b en bestowed upon these

preparing for life. T h e term " a co1 1 ege man " is now 122


our libraries, our laboratories ; choose what you want,

regarded as synonymous with " a trained man," and n o one who u nderstands the demands of l ife and the

use them as you will, or let t hem alone.

world doubt that the ery best training of all a man's

your affair." The college deals, i ndeed, with men and

facult ies i s needed for conspicuous success, and what

women, but with men and women who are im mat ure,

is more i mportant, for conspicuous usefulness in the

who n eed and welcome counsel and direct ion. They are

world.

to be formed and confirmed accordi n g to what i s sound physically, socially, i ntellect ually, spiritually ; and so

New importan ce i s further added to the colleges by the de elopment of u niversities.

I t i s all

to form and confirm them i s the business of the col­

O n every hand the

demand i n creases for men with the specialized pro­

lege.

Moreover, the u niversities must stand in the

fessional training that the u niversity alon e can give.

great cities. The cities are, i n fact, great laboratories

The universities in turn demand as a prerequisite for

for the special student, with their courts, pul pits,

such professional trai ning the broad and deep fou nda­

hospitals, architecture, machi nery, music.

t io n which the college lays.

are not yet needed by the u n dergraduate.

The university seeks,

co1lege near home.

college. The u n i ersity, however, will never supersede the emphasis.

I f local colleges did not exist, it

would be the fi rst duty of the u niversities to establish

Rather, as already said, i t gives it new

t hem.

For the semi-paternal character of the

I ndeed, i n England this has been one great

ai m and result of " un iversity extension." The college

college makes it the natural and suitable home of the

must be at the door of the people.

The u niversity i s the least paternal

The local college, the " country " college, then, can

It does pract ically none of the student's

n o longer be regarded as an i ndependent and u n related

undergraduate. of schools.

And, for

economic reason s, the u ndergraduate must find his

for its raw material, the fi nished product of the

l ocal college.

But t h ese

plann i ng for him.

I t says : " H ere are our lectures,

u n it. l23

Each i s rather a member of a

ast s y st em,


each must be equipped as completely as possible for

i n Boston, New York, Chi cago, M ilwaukee, M i nne­

its work, and each will have its hall s filled with stu­

apolis, and throughout the land, Colby men and

dents in proport ion to the completeness with which i t

women are found i n the fi rst places i n every walk of

c a n care f o r them.

life.

These cond it ions may well be considered by those

College has nothing to regret.

who are re ponsible for th e work that Colby is set to do.

So far as past and present are concerned, the But we must look to

the future, and we m ust see to it that Colby shall be

If to them we add the s ignificance of condit ions

so completely equipped that in the mind of intending

pecul iar to her, we must conclude that the time h as

students there shall be no quest ion of seeking their

fully come when her material facilities should be

course elsewhere, save the geograph ical question, or

greatly enlarged. The campaign before us is disti nctly

that of family tradition.

one of material development.

T h i s i s all the College

The prospect for accompl ishing this i s most en­

lacks in order that she may mean to her own region

couragi ng.

as m uch as any of the few first American colleges

demanding it, are present. The location of the College

mean to theirs.

is not surpassed in New England for beauty, health­

With such add itions to her working

All the conditions, not only favoring, but

" plant " as it is easily wi thin th e power of her friends

ful ness, and accessi bility.

to provide, Colby will absol utely and always command

ing it combines the settled, cultured life of an old

her own field i n her at tractions for undergraduates as

col lege town with the stir of a growing, manufactur­

The community surround­

against the attractions of any other college. In many

ing city.

r spects she now holds that position.

] udged by her

century of honorabl e h istory. Her field is M ai ne, the

Behind the College are th ree-quarters of a

he may

Provinces, New Hampshire, a bit of Vermont and of

place her grad uates, man for man, in comparison with

Massach usetts. From this field she has always drawn,

In Maine,

and from this field there flows to her doors a stead ily-

output, Colby has no apologies to make. th ose of any other college, without fear.

1 24


i ncreasing current of students.

Our facilit ies for teaching chemistry are in­

ments.

To say that her

equipment should be enriched is, t herefore, n ot to

adequate.

The same is t rue of biology.

There is n eed

raise the question of grat ifying an ambitious imagina­

of more attention to oratory t han we can now give. A

t ion, not to propose creating an artificial boom for t h e

good course i n mechanical drawing ought to be pro­

College , it is simply a question of meeting actual

vided.

responsibility and opportunity.

the library will crowd us out of the chapel.

It i s not a question

A new lecture. hall should be built, and soon The in­

of revivin g a decayed and enfeebled i nstitution, but

creasing n u m bers of students already call for more i n­

one of providing for the i ncreasing demands of life

structors.

and expansion and growth.

and other colleges are m eet ing them.

Other colleges are feeling the same n eeds, Colby has only

to real ize her opportun ity, and she will take a leading

Twenty-five years ago, President Champlin, Gard­

place i n this advance.

ner Colby , Abner Coburn, J . Warren M errill, and

What , t hen , is to be done ?

some others, found them selves face to face with this

A large, but entirely

question. We know bow t h ey met it. They gave t h e

practicable th ing - practicable, because the whole

College a lease o f life f or a q uarter of a cent ury. The

embraces several defi n ite m easures, each easily wit h i n

time has come to renew that lease.

t h e ability of different groups of benefactors.

For twenty-five

First,

years Colby' s working facilities have not been materi­

the endowment of the College m ust be i n c reased until

ally enlarged, save by the timely and generou s gift of

t h e annual i n come amounts to $ 50,000.

Second, a

Colonel R. C . Shannon - th e Physical Laboratory.

chem ical laboratory should be erected at a maximum

That gift leaves n othing to be desired in that depart­

cost of $ 50,000.

A n equal amount i s required to

ment. The Laboratory is u nique, and it has been and

equip the department of biology.

will continue to be of i mmense value t o the College.

the women's college will requi re $50,000.

But it illust rates what is t o be done in oth er depart-

thousand dollars should be expended upon t h e build1 25

The building for Five or s i x


in gs now standing. All this demands between $400,000

ates.

and $500,000, but t hat amount will no more than meet

whole can be accomplished and no one feel his part as

the demands of the hour.

a burden.

I n a word , the present campaign has for its end to

With such a distribution of responsibility the

That it will be done, none can entertain any man n er

double the wealth, to double the mean ing of the Col足

of doubt.

l ege.

Of course, a great many people will have to

and move on steadily to full accomplishment within a

think and plan and do, in order to bring it to pass.

few years, depends, not upon the ability, but upon the prompt decision of all concerned.

Equally, of course, not all may be done at once. I t is a good work for four or five years.

Whether it will at once begin to be done,

Yet it is by n o

Th ere i s but one

obstacle, and that only a possible one-inertia. Move足

m e a n s i ncredible th a t it may be d o n e i n le s s time.

ment will mean success. For it will mean a college at

These several measures are so related, and are being

Waterville meet ing the larger demands of to-morrow

thought of with i nterest by so many people, that the

as completely as it met the si mpler demands of yester足

accomplishment of any one of them is sure to hasten

day ; an inst itution whose actual work shall be de足

all the rest.

I n fluential and wealthy friends have

scribed in the terms in which the president of a

given assurances, of which no more can be sa.id h erd The Baptist Education Society h as already offered

neighboring college stated his ambition : " To provide

co.operat ion.

Citizens of Waterville are taking part

for the best prepared undergraduates ; to turn out

i n the work.

The Alumni have set their hands to it.

boys from a four-years' course to be liberally educated

the best i nstruction, by the best qual ified professors,

American gentlemen.''

So, also, have Trustees and Faculty and undergradu-

126


@r q t @rale

nf fqe @ilet Olrlub.

! ST E N, m y children , a n d y o u shall hear Of the Colby Glee Cl ub, how far and near They t ravelled thro' Maine i n the early morn, '�9" Charming both man and beast with song : ...-i ....':.3l!�" inging their way i n the noontide sun, And giving a concert when day was done.

They picked t h e i r way over i ce and snow, And c racked their j okes, both old and n ew, 'Till Hebron came to their weary view. " The student-girls are fair and bright ; They are t ruly pleasing to greet one's s i ght. " Thus quoth Whitman, a Senior grave, And n ever a thought to poor Rachel he ga e, But fascinated by big brown eyes A nd cheeks the color of sunset skies, His head not only got strangely turned, But advice and entreat_ies alike he spurned, He left the orchestra in the l urch, And then for a girl tliey had to search. M iss Lamb took pity upon them then, And played 'till Whitman came back agai n !

F i rst to H ebron t hey went their way, Leaving t he trai n for a covered sleigh They followed the road up h il l and down, ' Till they came to the hamlet-t'wan't a town­ \ here the Academy reared i t s head, And the law was-at ten o'clock-abed ! Two sleighs t here were, which took t he boys With their dress-suit cases, and college noise. On one of t he seats there climbed that day, J udge Bonn ey, who weighs, I dare not say, But anyway i t was quite enough To prove that the cross-bar was not tough The leigh broke down i n fright and awe At the college boys, and the J udge of the Law Sadder and wiser with footsteps slow

Norway nestles among t h e hills A n d Oxford County rocks and rills, And there again t hey took thei r way In buffalo robes. an d a t wo-horse sleigh. H uge gray boulders lay scattered around 127


On th

hillsides

s if the

teep, and the farming-ground,

'Twa

iants in ag s pa t

in my

rip an hour a o ! "

He paus d a moment with flashing eye:

Had been playing marbles, and then at last

But they an wered him with a deep-drawn sigh,

They had gone away in the mid t of the game

"\i e a

And left their toys 'till they came again.

Of where that night- hirt indeed can be."

ure you no knowledge, in truth, have we

Far in the distance, in lofty pride,

Exeunt Whitman, with slamming door,

With shining head and glistening side,

And another room he tries once more.

The range of White Mountains lifted thems Ives In their garments woven by Jack Frost'

elves.

They were driving in Norway along the

treet

Thus the search goes on and on, And bid

fair to continue till break of dawn.

Now Hudson, rooming with Whit that night,

When a voice was heard from the sleigh's back seat,

Was much amused at his room-mate's plight.

" On the hotel piazza, I see, methinks,

sudden thought took possession of Whit;

Warren and Herrick, Sawyer and Squinks,"

"Do you think I'm slow? Well, I guess nit!"

And true enough, in their chosen places

He

They saw the grinning, familiar faces.

The long lo t night-shirt at last is found.

ru

hed for the bedclothes and turned them down:

The rooms were found and the grips unpacked,

For Hudson had swiped it from out Whit's pack,

And the dining-room sought for the things they lacked,

Slipped it onto his own broad back

And then it happened a little later,

And quickly tumbled into the bed.

That Robbins tipped the pretty waiter.

As to what was done, and what was said,

She took the tip, but that was all,

While punishment swift was being meted,

And Robbins' pride had a hard, hard fall.

'T would not be lawful to be repeated.

Night had come and the concert o'er,

Much of the time when not on the go

The boys were all in their rooms once more,

Was consumed by Herrick and his banjo.

When a hurried step was heard in the hall;

But the chord was lost and not to be found,

An angry knock, and angrier call,

Though Herrick pursued it round and round, He twisted his mouth and he twisted the pegs:

And Whit burst into the quiet room Effervescing, with fret and fume:-

He twanged the strings and he crossed his legs:

.

Till in time he got crazy as any loon,

"Whose seen my night-shirt I'd like t.o know? 128


Yet the banjo refused to get in tune.

\ ith eyes

But Herrick

That hi

aid, "'Tis good enough,"

o blue, and cheeks

o round,

piece of mind became quite

But on the listeners 'twas rather rough,

From the crown of his head to his

For Herrick played with might and main

Although he received a most sweet

ithout minding the discord in the strain.

Hi

happines

haken

oul'

foundrrtion.

mile,

lasted but little while,

The phantom chord is the phantom still,

For when he enquired about the "peach,"

Though Herrick pur ue

He found marriage had placed h

it o'er dale and hill.

r

beyond hi

reach.

The banjo is twisted and twanged in vain, Btlt the long lost chord ne'er comes again .

From morning to morning at Li\ ermore Falls, iew'

The Glee Club graced the "Grand From

Torway to Mechanic Falls they go,

' halls,

Except a few, who to private homes

\Vhere they find it slush in tead of snow.

Were sent that night to rest their bones.

Siu h around them on every side

They "did' the Pulp Mill, and what was more,

Six inches deep and eternally wide.

Six of them did a candy store.

But slush or no slush, the concert o'er,

Did it brown, as we say in our talk,

They make their way to Miss Walker's door,

For it took three hour , by the hotel clock.

Where her friends, the Mechanic Fall ' girl , They rolled into Farmington ju t at noon,

Watch the dimples and smiles and curl Of John Towne, tenor, at nearer view,

And welcomed with joy the dinner-bell's tune:

And are secretly thankful that John's not "two,.!

But after the jaws had all ceased their action,

'Twas indeed an occa ion for angels and men,

The

The ladies

And no wonder indeed, for faces fair

were

angels, the Glee Club

men.

Torma! School proved the greatest attraction.

They tore themselves from the pleasing sight,

Greeted them, smiling, from hall and stair.

And bade the ladies a hearty "good-night."

The most of the afternoon was

They voted Miss Walker was just "A

In the Normal building, on pleasure bent.

1,"

At last the

And deservino- of thanks for the hour's fun.

pent

ession was really done,

And night came on with the setting sun. It was al o here that a thing befell

\ irt grabbed his grip and went up stair

Lamb, their leader, in the hotel.

To attend to some of his own affair , Which were found in an envelope,

A girl in the corridor he found, 9

129

trange the tale,


That he got from home on the P. M . mail. Whether that was the cause of what befell, In t ruth, I am not able to tell : But before the morning light shone i n Alas a n d alack, the " grippe " grabbed him. Poor Wirt came home on a bed of pain, But I ' m glad to state that he's out again.

Loud were the cries, and deep the groans, Fierce the looks and fi ercer the tones, But poor Shannon was saved from the sad, sad end, Whither the ways of gluttons end.

To Dover and Foxcroft next they came, But the weather truly was m ighty lame. Slush beneath that soaked their feet, Rain and snow and a blinding sleet. As you might suppose the house was small, So they sang there Friday, by earnest call. This trip gave rise to considerable j est , When the " Robbins " t ried to build a nest. When the boys go i nto the Dover car, He saw down the aisle, not very far, A bright-faced girl, quite trim and neat, ¡ And facing her was an empty s eat. So he sailed down the car with a j aunty air, And took his place in the seat with care. Thus they sat for fi ve m inutes or so, When he thought of something he wanted to know, To get a paper from one of the m en, I ntending i ndeed to go back agai n. But n o sooner had Robbins left the seat Than this fair young damsel rose to her feet And calmly and quietly t urned the back ! Where were the nest i ng plans ? Alack ! They all had vanished and flown away, Though chaff was plenty aboard that day.

I n that hotel t hey had a way That differed from most, as I should say, Your separate order not being taken , " Beaf-steak, Lamb-ch ops, Eggs and Bacon," But the food brought in, i n a generous pile, By a buxom waitress, with beaming smile. A dish of oat-meal some eight inches across't And three i nches deep, was carelessly tossed In fron t of Shannon, as he sat at the table, Who believes in eating all he is able. He thought to himself it was all for him, So he sat him at work with m ight and vim. H e seized the pitcher and sugar-bowl, And he scattered the contents with liberal dole, S m iling away to himself the while, As he vi ewed with deligh t the luscious pile, And it n ever once seemed to occur to him, That the ample depth and the spacious brim For an oat-meal saucer were rather large, And was loaded i ndeed with a heavy charge. But the boy soon found where the dish had gone, And peace and quiet reigned not long. 1 30


From Dover, up the " B. & A." they go, Into the regions of i ce and snow : Wen d i ng their way ' m i d scenery grand, M ountai n s rising o n every hand, Lofty t restles, huge drifts of s now, H ouses like toys i n the valleys below. At G reenville the boys sang u nusually well, But otherwise th ere is naught to t ell, E xcept that H errick grinned a grin , A n d w a s therefore accused with a heinous s i n .

F o r he w a s charged with intoxication, But they cleared h i m from the accusat ion. And h e came home having within h i s pate Many a thing to contemplate. But the l igh t is fading, the pen runs hard : Be kind, I pray, toward t he luckless bard. The M use's presence I seem to m iss, B ut the t ri p is ended, and so i s t his. H . W. HA y

IJC

'ES.


(' ,1. · f\ ��/

� ·r-r��)

(I

I.

The ummer night wa pa ing warm, n I all the fellow ' hi rt were clean, o c!canli11css bei11g next to godliness \\ got t og ther in a warm ncl vowed uch neat nes mu t be s n. 2.

nd, " Forward, march ! " we ordered all, dim- en trail of purity Timi is, To tltc pure all t!tings are pure. But ' hen we came to Ladi ' H all, t hought tho e fair co-ord hould ee 3. \ ithout a bar ; and thu 'twa d ne,v t ok the b lt rin bl ind off quit , Vim lta<•c !tcarrl of tltc blz'ud leading tile blind. o t h y could v atch u e\·ery on ur can an <lane , a pr tt ight. r32

I


4.

ext, lined up 'gainst the chapel wall , The question searched us : \\ ho arc A nswer: Tlte Greatest Slww on Eart!t. 'o then we marked tho e sacred halls Boldly : " Colby' I enagerie ! "

5.

Then, though the thought may seem grote que, The De' il came his flock to keep, T/ure's a parable about us in t!te Bible. That's why we took the chapel desk And plunged down w ildly to the deep. 133

'

e?"


6. To send him to his chosen lair We made a chair-iot of fi re (Be/wld lww great a matter a little fi;e kindlet!t !) I t happened to be Prexy's chair Which n ext day roused the col lege i re. 7. And when these gentle games were o'er' Each fell ow laid his hollow head ( T!tey say, " Wh�1t t!te wine £s in, the wit is out. ") Upon his pillow, and a snore Perchance was all the prayer h e said.


.. .. " Su nset and evening star

there was a note of tender sad n ess in h i s voice, that

And one clear cal l for me,

seemed well su ited to the beaut iful words he sang :

A n d may there be no moaning of the bar, " Twilight and evening bell,

\ hen I put out t o sea. "

And after that the dark,

[fiiiiiiiii iii iiiiii�� H ES E words, sung i n the deep, mel -

11

..,

._

__

And may there be· n o sadness of farewell When I e mbark . "

low voice of a young man, floated out into the h ush of the well-filled church, m in gling with

A n d t h e people, sitting i n t h e cool dusk o f the

the soft

quiet room, forgot the h eat and weariness of the day,

music of t he organ, and falling like

forgot their own vexations and t roubles as they

a benediction on pastor and people.

l istened.

The day had been long and hot,

" For though from out our bourne of Time and Place

but here, i n s ide the old Baptist Church, i t was cool as cool could be.

A n d still he sang :

The flood may bear m e far,

Every one of the tall, narrow w i n­

I hope to see m y Pilot face to face

dows i n the d imly-lighted room was open, pushed far

\

down from the top, and the ghostly semblance of a

hen I have crossed the bar. "

b reeze stole through the room , softly, as if ashamed

The voice, and the music, and the words were all

of its own weakness. On, o n sang the tall, young college student, and

one, and the spell of it all rested upon the people and held them fast. 1 35


\\ h e n t h e la t notes had d ied away i n t o t h e s t i l l ­ ne

, a n d t h e t a l l young

young m a n i n th

i nger h ad t a k e n h i s

h a i red g i rl by h i

ide and

aid, " P h i l

better t ha n ever, does n ' t h e ? ha

i m pro ed i m m e n ely

Seem

ince

t h en it ough t t o i n t h a t t i me. him

i n g wa

t eams si ngs

t o me his voice

I h eard it last, but The l ast t i m e I h eard

Baccalaureate S u n day l ast year do you

rem e m ber ? " happy

mile a

he l ooked up i n t o h i s face w i t h a he an werecl, " \ es," ju t t h e o n e n d ] o h n \ i i n t er'

word , b u t i t a t i fi ed h i m.

d ark f a c e l i<Yhted u p, and t h e stern l i n e mouth did

\:

oft e n ed a n d

e r m o n a n d too k t h e i r

a i d t o Ph i l i p

\\' i n t e r clown t h er

about his

poke to h i m .

I ary

the

Dexter ?

t ion " \\.on ' t h

abru pt l y away. h e turn cl i n hi

hand ome m uth

Th

mil

campus.

J ust where t h e broad wal k from t h e door­

wal k h e passed a young coupl e wal k i n g slowly along and t al k i ng earn estly together.

book and a c i gar. the air

, " wa

t h e care­

n ext que -

tay for Commencemen t ? " a

once a and hi

trip I belie

did not h ear the o·irl'

t u rn ed

estry door

way of t h e Lad ies' Dorm it ory j o i n ed t h e wood n side­

ee ] o h n

on a bu ine But h

He h ur r ied out of the c h ur c h by t h e

and wal ked rap i d l y u p t h e st reet toward the coll ege

I didn't

H e'

h r

heads wh i l e t h e whi te-hai red old m i n ister pronoun ced t he ben edict ion, an d a t l en gth he was free to go.

They were vVi n ter

W h en h e reached the " B ricks , . and en tered h i s

" \ i n ter oh , h e cam e ye terday forenoon.

r ply.

The choir

sang o n ce mo re, and t h en t h e people bowed their

room h e f o u n d h i s room-mate on t h e lounge, w i t h a

k n ow ? "

h:

I t seemed t o h i m as i f t he ser­

vice wou l d n ever end, but it did at last.

hymn

v h en d i d he corn , do you

k n w h e w a s h ere.

he sat t h ere so q u ietly. a n d t h at was t h e effort t o keep from t h i n king.

e a t , t h e g i rl w h o

teams, " D i d you

' ith

He was conscious of only o n e t h i ng a

a n d M ary Dext er.

v hen t h e q uart " t t e fi n i h e el si nging

. ang alto

t ro n g ,

rnoothed away, a s t h ey al ways

h n Mary Dexter

before t he

eat , a

a u d i e n ce l ea n ed down to t h e fa i r­

m i n ed l i ne.

he

1 ft h i s face at

at to face t h e pr ach er,

ttl cl i n t o a h ard , d ter-

t i fi i ng.

to read , but

The room was hot a n d close and

Ph i l p i cked up a m agaz i n e and t ri ed

oon he reached f r hi

old ten n i

cap

and wen t out. He roamed about for a wh i l e on t h e campus and fi nal ly wand ered ai m l e river and As h i s eye place of

ly down to t h e brink of t h e

tood t h ere watch i n g t h e ru h i ng wat er. grew accu tomed to th

h adows -. here h e

chai n ed to the bank b

id

tood he him.

dark nes

of t h e

aw an old bateau

Pul l i n g it out fr m


the bank, he l eaped l ightly into it and sitting on one

coll ege life and m eanwh ile t h ey h ad shared their

of t h e rough board seats ga\'e h imself u p to the

secret with no one. But now all the old doubts came back to h i m , as

thoughts that t h ronged upon him.

he sat i n the old, leaky boat, look i n g down into t h e

Mary Dexter and he had known each other from their earl iest c hi ldhood, had been playmates i n the

dark, swift water a n d watching t h e moon 's reflection

l ittle vil lage t hat was their home.

as it broke and d issoh·ed and came again amid t h e

I n th ose old days

t h ey h ad been al ways together, but after they came

shadows cast b y the t ree-boughs overhead.

to college t hey had drifted grad ually apart .

had known all along, that Winter 10\·ed Mary " ith all

They

H e knew,

had alway been friends, to be sure, but no longer in

the strength of his strong nat ure.

t h e old wa) .

Winter could give her weal t h and ease at once, w h ile

Th ere had been some slight, indefi nable

He knew t hat

barrier between them t h rough the fi rst th ree years of

h e would have to wait and toil for years.

their course, a barrier -as to who e cause neither fel t

too, that i n many way \ i nter wa

someti m es

m ake her happy, that his stern sel f-repre s io n would

due to Mary's friendship with John

be to her a tower of strength , and t hat in his quiet

quite certain , but wh ich thought \ in ter.

\'\TaS

� tearn s

had

He knew,

j ust the man to

That friendship, begun early i n her Fresh­

power she would fi nd a peace t hat

\:

ould be m ore to

man year, had grown and i ncreased stead ily d uring all

h er t han anyth i ng beside.

t h e years until \' i nter had grad uated and gone a\vay.

have counted as n ot h ing to Philip Stearn s if he had

That summer when they went hom e Phil dropped

only been sure t hat

nat urally enough

He knew that she t hought she loved h i m , but he had

into his old position as

Iar '

But all t h ese t h i ng would

he loved him a

he h ad said .

chosen friend, and t hat place he had held ever ince.

felt all t h e time t hat perhaps after all

And now it was only t hree short weeks si nce t h e day

a m istake and some day she would fi nd i t out.

when he looked down i nto Mar) '

calm gray eyes

knew h e r too well t o t h i n k t hat h e could ever b e i n ­

and read t here her answer, the answer t hat made h er

duced to take back her prom ise to h i m, b u t as h e

hi

fore\ er.

" Forever," he repeated defiant! y, and

for a moment his face brightened.

h e had made He

t hought what i t m igh t m ean t o h e r t o keep t hat

The) had planned

promi e he set his teeth hard together and picking

t o announce their engagement the last week of t h e i r

up t h e paddle t hat la) in t h e boat pu h eel rapidl) 1 37


out i nto the m iddle of the river.

" If it hadn't been

for me, i t would have been all right by this t ime, if only I 'd kept out of it," he said half aloud. And then i t came to him like a flash of l igh t that there was a way to make it right even now. Wi nter would be happy, and so would Mary i n the end.

Two lives that made fair t o be spoiled now,

that he felt almost sure he h imself had spoiled, would reach perfecti o n after all, and his life would simply end. Mary would sorrow for him awhile, but she would soon be comforted, and there was no one else to care. His mother had died the year before, and his father so long ago that he could scarcely remem­ ber him. He was all alone in the world. He could think of n o other way to set things right, n o other way i n which he could repai r the wrong he had u n­ witti ngly done, and this was so simple. The deep, cool river-the boat would overturn so easi ly,-he l eaned far over to one side, but with a sudden start he d rew himself up again . " It's t o o easy, that's the nib," he muttered. H is perplexity had made him morbid, and he saw it now. Th ere must be some other remedy, some other way to straighten all this terrible tangle, some way that the consequences of his mistake might fall upon

h imself alone.

H e bowed his head i n his hands and

thought for a long, long t i me. Bu t all his thinki ng did not make it clear. H e m ust j ust take up his l i f e again a n d g o on a s if nothing had happened, and these two others must pay the penalty of his mistake. If only all the suffer­ ing came on h i m he would accept it wirn ngly, gladly ; but that site must suffer, that Winter must suffer­ He could do nothing to help them. He sat th ere motionless a long t ime. At last he said aloud, " God's will be done. I can only do my d uty so far as I can see it." Then, after a moment's pause, " Perhaps there'll be some way out for her yet . " Then the doubt a n d the struggle a n d t h e morbid­ ness left h im, and there came to him instead a feeling of strength and almost peace as he sat alone i n the hushed stillness of the n ight. H e thought of the quiet, d imly-lighted church he had left such a little while before, and for some mysterious reason the song he had sung that evening cam e back to him. H e hummed i t over quietly a moment, but soon he broke out i nto song. Softly he sang, and low : Twilight and evening bell, A n d after that the dark, And may there be n o sadness o f farewell When I embark .


For though from out our bourne of Time and Place

And may there be no m oaning of the bar,

The flood m ay bear me far, I

When I put out to sea.

hope to see m y Pilot face to face \

" But such a tide as m oving seems asleep,

hen I ha\ e crossed the bar.

Too full for sound or foam,

¡when he had ended , all was still for a moment.

When that w hich drew from out the boundless deep

Then suddenly he noticed that the rushing of the

Turns again home.

water was growing louder and louder in h i s ears. H e looked up.

" Twil ight and evening bell,

Not t wenty feet ahead the level floor of

And after that the dark,

the r iver was broken off and disappeared. It was the dam. H e grasped hastily for the paddle, but it

And may there be no sadness of fareweil When I embark.

snapped in two at the fi rst stroke. In another secon d it was too late for any struggles to avail. A m ight ier hand had smoothed the tangle out at last.

" For though from out our bourne of Time and Place The fl ood may bear m e far, I hope to see my Pilot face to face,

John \1V inter turned his chair away from his desk

\ hen I have crossed the bar."

and called " Mary, I want you to read this to m e ; I When she had

fi n i shed he said, " Thank you,

haven't read it for years. " H is wife came i n from t he n ext room and stood beh ind h i s chair. Lay ing her cheek caressi ngly against his dark hair where the

you remember how Phil Stearns usen to sing that,

white threads were showing now, she read in her

back in our college days, Mary ?"

dear, I had almost forgotten how beautiful i t was. Do

" Yes, I remember," she an swered with a smile

clear, low voice :

then sighed as she added, " Poor Phil !"

" Sunset and evening star,

H EL E

And one clea r call for me,

1 39

M A CGREGOR HA

COM, '97.


T H E second ann ual i n ter-col legiate chess tourna­ ment was held at Bru n w ick, pril I 5, 16 and 1 7, 1 897. C hess, although not dest i ned to become a very popu­ lar game, surprised its most enthusiasti c admirers by the interest wh ich it aroused among the students of both colleges. The fi rst i nter-col legiate tournament held at Water­ ille, a year ago, re ulted in a victory for Bowdoi n by a score of eleven to four. T h i s year the tables were turned, and after a closely fought contest, Colby won by a score of ten and a half games to seven and a half. The succes of these tournaments has made the ann ual m eet an as u red feature of in ter-collegiate rel at ions. The special interest in che s at Colby is of recent

origi n and we feel proud of our ach ievements thus far. The Chess Club was organized in '94, and has always received the hearty support of both students and facul ty, part icularly of Dr. Marquardt, of the Depart ment of Modern Languages, who, with a knowledge of the ga m e acqui red only by years of study and practice, bas freely given h i s services as instructor, th us affording except ional opportunities to any one wish i ng to learn the game. An attempt will be made to i nduce the other col­ leges of I aine to unite w it h Colby and Bowdoin i n form i ng a n in ter-collegiate chess association, under whose auspices the annual tournaments shall be held. The following is a detailed account of the '97 m eet at Brun swick :

t! fp.� .§.eru ntr fill n nual �ije.s.s t!u umament f! eUr at �tuns1u irk, !!lpd( 1 5 , 1 6 antr 1 7 , 189 7 .

Won.

Lo t.

G " R . EY, '9 H . H . PAGE, 9 L. E. Gt.: R :-\EY, '99

3 Yz 3 Yz 3 Yz

2 Yz 2 Yz 2 Yz

Total

r o Yz

7 Yz

COLll ) .

. E.

BOWDOIN.

J. E. O D I R '9 ' W. E. PREBLE, '98 E. K. WELC H , '98 Total 1 40

\Von.

Lost.

3 2 2 Yz

3 4

7 Yz

1 0 ;{

3 Yz


LT H O U G H my breath be chill, f y h eart is

a

heart of fi re.

I wa urged from my northern cave By a restle s, hot desire.

I touched the maple bough As I loitered through the wood, It paid for my caress With the tide of its heart 's red blood.

For love of the l eafy t ree, vVhere the sumac torches flame, For love of the slender fern And the shy, sweet fl m er, I came.

Alas, what a curse is m ine ! Let me not stay, but go On, on, fore\ er on. ords cannot speak the

I gently dropped a kiss On the aster's upturned face­ By the willow hedge she l ie , Lie slain by my embrace.

\:

oe

Of the soul that knows too well The sin of its one desire \ hose breath is i cy chill Though its heart be a heart of fi re. A L ICE L. COLE, ' 98.


!Jl)n

a

JSu1lf uf JmUtun.

The morn ing sun a fleeting glory throws Upon its chaste repose, To shame the sculptor, that he could not shed A halo ' round the head. Yet did he clothe the marble with a m ien Exalted and serene. Behold the lofty brow, the s ightless eyes That looked on Paradise. Does not some m ighty melody unsung, Still tremble on the tongue ? But all i n vai n the spirit yearns to hear­ It j ust eludes the ear. 0 j ealous Time ! Fixed far beyond the range Of all thy chance and change, Art, i nto this immortal shape, hath wrought The temple of high though t. ALICE L. COLE, '98.


d®f!£n ®iolds �lnnnt. The Summer Day has loosed her hair, Slipped on her t i nted robe, for rest,

W h e n violets bloom the thoughts turn back To golden days of long ago, When love and hope were still but young,

And in the distant, glowi ng West A smile throws to those watching there.

Song flowed unbidden from the tongue, And life, of zest , had yet no lack.

From out the groves the shadows creep :

So memories sweet, swift backward flow

They steal across the fi el d and stream,

And still the world seems all perfume,

While daisies bend their heads and dream :

When violets bloom .

They lull the Day's smile into sleep. When violets bloom the heart grows young, The rob i n in the apple-tree,

The cares of l ife have lesser hold ; Old Time t hrows by his load of years

Ful l-throated sings his evening prayer ;

And Sorrow e'en forgets her tears.

The black-birds in the m aple th ere, Respond in Nature's litany.

The flyi ng shut tle t h rows amon g Life's sombre threads, one strand of gold ;

The pagan night-hawk's whirring fl ight

How smoothly moves the magic loom,

Sweeps down the sky now streaked with rust ;

When violets bloom !

The Sout h-w i nd frets with fitful gust

R. E. X., '98.

The fringed mantle of the n ight . H . w. HAY ES. 1 43


• "

• •

a career of a fifth of a century, Tiu:

remained beh ind, and by its im provement has shown

Ec/w may be considered a firmly established i nstitu­

that the l i terary work of the College has reached a

FTER

tion of Colby.

May it con tinue to prosper, and may

h igher standard as well as the other l ines of college

it with undim inished shadow cel ebrate its fortieth

act ivity, and we are very glad to be able to com mend

ann iversary in 1 9 1 7, although some of us perchance

in the highest degree the work of the retiring board

will not be there to see." So writes ] . H . Files, of the

of editors, and more especially, Charles H unt i.ngton

class of ' 77, the fi rst ed itor-in-chief of T!te Echo, in

Whit man, the editor-in-chief, by whose efforts T!te

the recent ann iversary number which celebrated the

Ec/zo takes a position among the leading college

twentieth year of a college paper at Colby.

publi cations.

Great improvement has been made

It is now the custom for nearly every college to

along literary lines by i ntroducing new and pleasi ng

be represented by a period ical, the worth of which

feat ures, and by preservi ng throughout all the issues

depends on the size of the i nstitution, on the ability

a healthful and up-to-date tone.

The past year, T!te Ec/zo has more t ruly attained

of the st udents, and on many oth er things which at

to the real function of a college paper than ever

once suggest themselves to the mind. I n this present day of improvement and advance­ ment at Colby, Tlie Echo, our college paper, has not

before.

It has very faithfully presented al l phases

of college life, and by its strong editorials has done 144


that the editors w ill be elected purely on their merits,

m uch to create a healthy attitude on the part of the st udents toward questions dealing with college

augurs well for the fut ure succes of T!tc

l ife.

paper cannot fail to im pro e when its guid ing force

Echo.

The

If a college paper succeeds i n arousing a proper

is com posed of students chosen from tho e who pos­

college spirit, the ed itorial board may feel t h at their

sess real literary abi l ity rather than from those who

efforts have been to a very considerable degree suc­

represent college cliques.

cessful, and in this line The

Ee/to

In closing, THE ORACLE wishes to extend h eart i­

has been very

est congratulations, both for itself and the whole

strong d ur in g the past year.

student body, to those who have so earnestly striven

We are also glad to mention the recent move of

to make Tlte

Tlte Echo Associat ion in revising the con stitution, by

which the paper is put on a more stable basis both

m

a publi cation worthy of Colby.

editors, and trust that t hey will· not allow themselves

it s l iterary value and i n its value to the College.

to fall below the standard set by the retiring board,

The fact t hat hereafter in the select ion of the

in the t wentieth volume of T!te

editorial board, soc iety l ines will be thrown aside and

IO

Ee/to

'vVe also wish all success to the new board of

1 45

Ee/to.


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ll

H E two turned into t h e delightful shelter of the old wood-road from the clea ring upon which the sun was pouring its hot rays, where were the clinging blackberry bushes so loath to let go their hold-whose last hard fruit still green and red t h e sun was fast changing into large delicious blackberries, where swarms of flies were buzzing i ncessantly, dart­ i ng in and out among each other in their flight ; where was heard occasionally the glad note of some l ittle b i rd perched o n a bush n ear by, or the harsh cry of the crows as they took their way from the wood i n t h e north o f t h e clearing t o the tall bare fi rs opposite . The wood seemed to cut off every breath of the breeze that was st i rring t h e t ree-tops, and the motionless si lence, broken only by the ¡ buzzi ng flies, now and

then the sweet b ird-note, or the " cau, cau, cau " of the crows was only the m ore i n tense. They stopped beside a mossy stone n ear t h e opening, she to t a k e off her h a t and p u s h back the wandering hair that was falling over her face, he to pull off his cap and wipe the sweat from his forehead. The rough path whose course followed in part the bed of a spring-time brook was beautifully carpeted with rich green mosses and with ferns, large and smal l . Near the stone beside w h i c h these t w o halted was growing a bunch of the maiden-hair. She adm i red these sl ender plants, their delicate leaves and sh i ning brown stems, and ch ided h i m for having broken that waxen I ndian pipe that was growing by his feet. H e j ust n o w was i n d i fferent to the beauties of nature s o la\ isbly scattered about h i m . H e was hoping that the blackberries h e had h elped to pick, had earned


for h i m an inv itation to tea. Yet it was not the black­ berries t h at att racted h i m . T h e y had tarted ou t with n o i d e a whatever o f p i c k i n g berries, they did n o t even k n ow where any grew. They had set out i n the boat for a row up the l ake, but finding that the sun was warm in spite of the gentle breeze that was rippl ing the water t hey b ad landed at the opening of the old wood road whose entrance was arched by branches already tinted with the reds and yellows of autumn. They wandered up from the shore until the sunny pict ure of clearing framed by the trees at the head of the path att racted them. In the openi n g t hey had foun d so many berries, almost every branch of the tall young bushe wa bending low u nder i ts weight of h in i ng black fruit. He made som e baskets o f bark then, which they had very soon fi lled, and now they were returning to the boat.

A slight bend in the path, j ust where the slope to the water began, d isclosed to them another picture, and again the t rees formed the frame, this t i me at the lower end of the path. In the backgrou nd were the hills rising i n three ti ers from the opposite shore, a mile away. The breeze had died away, and the waters were perfectly calm and blue except where they reflected the fleecy wh iteness of a passing cloud, and j ust i n t h e centre, ploughing h e r way stead ily along was the steamer loaded with her freight of a h undred or more excursionists. Flags were flying, and a dark l i ne of smoke went curl i ng upward. Wh ile the two were watching her move so proudly and confidently along, a small launch came into sight, following so swiftly upon the larger boat that she was about upon her rival before t hey passed beyond the fram i ng bran ches, and were lost to sight, l eaving in the pictur e only the strokes of Nature's brush. Site had exclaimed over the beauty of sky and cloud, ligh t and shadow, and t he grace of the passing boats, but his calm repl ies had made her feel al most ashamed of her own en­ t husiast ic delight. It was not t hat he was i n capable of admiri ng the beauty i n such a scene, but he was admiring something else very much more as he buried the shining tip of his shoe in the heavy mo s. " Why would he mar the soft, rich tufts ! ' she thought. They sat down on a log by the shore and waited to h ear the swisb -swa h of the steamer's waves when they should beat upon the rocks. He began to cut


off t he bright h ead of the golden-rod with the quick blows of a l ittle stick. She did not like to see the yellow blossoms fall from their tall, straight stems. Why would h e do so ! Never before had h e shown h i m self so careless of the flowers. She ate a few ber­ ries from the heaped basket, but she d id not realize that she was doing it. The waves came, but they were quite unheeded . A squirrel, after watching them for some m inutes from the shadowing l i m b of the maple tree, began to chatter and scold at the i n­ t ruders, but they n oted him not. They sat t here a long t im e, th ese two. H e talked earnestly and gazed on her face wh ile her eyes, downt urned, were fi x ed on the basket of berries. A n d during all the time they sat th ere o n the old beech-log, she spoke only the word " yes. " The birds i n the trees overhead heard and under­ stood what it al l mean t , and t ried to express its meani ng in burst of ecstat ic song, the sunset becam e more glorious, and the little red squirrel was al most friendly. . The sun was h idden behi n d the hills when the boat was pushed off at last from the shore. H ow happy they were ! They had been friends since child­ hood, and h ad always loved each other as brother and

sister, and on this September afternoon, j ust before he was to start off for his last year in college, h e h ad told her all h is plans and had made h i s great confes­ sion. She had expected i t all summer, yet h owever much such things m ay be expected, their coming is always a surprise. And t hen, she b ad made her con­ fession too, n or was h ers unexpected to h i m . H e was going to h a v e t h a t pretty g i r l i n t h e city , the j udge's daughter, for a bride, as soon a he fi nished h i s courses of study. " Didn't she t h i n k h e was m ighty fortunate, and ought to be one of the h appiest fel lows alive ? " " Yes," h ad been her answer, and how full of m eaning that one word had been. " And, " con tin ued he, " now I want you to own up. I n't t hat young m inister coming for you soon ?" " Yes," again was her sole reply, but h e wa sat isfi ed, for he understood his shy little friend. T h e bi rds bad rej oiced to hear of f o u r people so happy. Silently, save for the regular dip of the oar , t h ey rowed home at the close of that beaut i fu l Sept e m ber day Whi ch was the happier will n ever be known. H e received and accepted her i nvitation to tea, and ate of the blackberries ripened under the warm sun i n the clearing. GRACE G ATC H EL L, '97.

149


�£at !5m££f£n£t

of O!tfr'g U!rummon

Dear sweetener of l i fe's common fare, my friend, To thee, when evening shuts the world away, A n d laughing sunset sobers into grey, My eager thoughts, like tired children, bend Tbeir steps, like tired childre n who do spend The early h ours in pyrami ds o f play, A n d fling themselves at rosy close of day

.. ..

�arr, mu

�rirnb.

Upon sweet beds o f rest ; so make a n end Of faring up and down . I pray thee, dear, Forbear to chide these fond unbidden guests O f thine, for they have wandered far and n ear, Through the great playhouse of this worl d ' s u n rests And, sick at last of chasing h ope and fear, They find in thee the end of all their quests. F LO R E.'.'<CE ELI ZABET H DUNN, '96.

Bestowed on one w�o wore the poet' s crown The added glory of i m mortal youth.

Thy fancies, like the skylark thou didst si ng, \ here Jost in azure depths of happy flight ; They skimmed above thy soul on dewy wing As o'er the sea o f glass, and k new no night.

Thy musi c l i ngered on our l ower air I n rapt, melodious, entrancing bars ; Thy captive soul had fled this cage of care To sing forever with the morn ing stars. FLO R E 'CE ELIZA B ETH D

The summer tides that weighed thy eyelids down And flung thee shoreward as i n hasty ruth,

U!rulb)l

·N, '96.

�pitif.

.. ..

\,\!h o can interpret the soul-soothing pleasure Old Colby's tree-tops will dreamily bring, \ hen, in the spring, Baby-leaves cling, Feathery promise of shade without measure­ He may unriddle that mystical treasure.

When, 'neath the willows, the violets reign Royally purple, oh, translate the thrill, Stealing your will, H ushing you still, Filling your bei ng with pleasure-like painThen may you better our secret explain .

He who can gather the m ists of the m orning, Which, o'er her river, oft shimmering l ie, Till, toward the sky, Sun- kissed they fly, Weigh them out cal mly, all Nature's laws scorning­ He knows the myst'ry our heart-lives adorning.

Tho' undefined in o u r song a n d o u r story­ Strong as the tree-trunks whence leaflets are born, Deep as the current 'neath the mist-veil at morn, Lasting as earth, tho' of violets shorn, I s our allegiance to ' ' Colby, our glory " ! ELLI E BAK EMAN D ON O V A , '92 .


ltn htrf JJruiuning. Some poets spu rn the earth as commonplace, Or touch i t as a th i ng unclean, unfit. They soar to vatic heights above th e clouds O n wi ngs of d reamy visions, d i mly lit.

The motive h idden from t h e sigh t of m e n H e sought, and t rusted n o t t h e purbl ind eye ; The breath of aspi rat ion, smothered deep, Would k i ndle hope and fan his courage h igh.

' ' Not man," they cry, " but a n gels be our theme ! Not l i fe, we'd know, but ecstasy d ivine ! " Their hea' 'n is not th e soul ' s l ast victory, But for surcease of strife they wait and pine.

A devotee of art, h e fi rst k new l ifeI t s l ights and shades of m i ng] ing pai n and j oy ; But n ever did its glory pass away : H e hailed i t with the freshness of a boy.

Of sterner soul was h e, our master bard, v\ ho l ived h i s days out i n the h ere and now, Yet held aloft a fait h in the unseen T hat earth's opposing problem s could not cow.

No prison-house be deemed t h i s flesh of ours To bar t h e spirit i n its l ively growth : H e pressed t hem into service m utual, And thanked t h e Deity who gave them both .

Defeat ! i t was a word h e never knew ; Mistakes to h i m were but a ground for h ope ; And, shining down, h e saw a better day For t hose who i n their darkness fall and grope.

L i k e H ebrew prophet i n t h e days of old, Who raised h i s head above th' obscuring cloud, From radiant heights, a message for his age He t h undered forth , in weighty accents loud.

Not h eroes crowned with praise for vantage won, Nor they who slip not in t he way of l ife, But souls submerged and t hose who beat the air Were s ubj ects for his penetrati n g knife.

What purity of h eart h i s vision cleared ! For everywhere-in sky, and sea and sod, In seemi n g chaos, even in d espairThat beati fi c vision saw but God ! ALICE SA \VTELLE RA 'DALL, ' 88. 151


fai r flo,. er bloomed be ide the du ty way ; potle ome me senger from H eaven it seemed, Borne down t o earth on snow) angel-w i ngs ; t meekly tood and dro oped it b auteou head A if in mute app al for h u man lov . Breathing the while an inccn e rare and weet A h eavenly odors, wh i ch are prayers of sai nt . lonely t ra eler a\ ,-and lo eel the flower, H knelt be icle it and was com forted. Then one ad oice wa h eard : ain-all, all vai n ! The flower mu t fade and die. Thy love i vain. ' ' A t i ny nowftak fell from out t h e ky. A h, softly d id it flutter, flutter clown , Mo t l i k e a fai r creature clothed in white ! It fell upon th gras . A little child topped, lapped h i hand in glee. " A tar ! A tar ! ' tar ! " Alas , alas, cl. hi littl hand gone. And then one m ore That dol ful voice did say : " \ ai n-all, all vai n ! no\ tar mu t melt a' ay. Thy jo i vai n . "

A s unset reddened a l l the west. The clouds, ¡wh ich through that summer's day had been a veil Before the sun' brigh t face, were lifted now To let the glory of his good-n ight s m il e hine full u p o n the world. Then many a one, Ti red with the labor of the day, l ooked up And caught the crlory sh in ing in the sky And blessed Goel for the sunset. Darkness fell. That mourn ful voice sobbed : " Vai n-all, all in vain ! So hall it ever be. Earth' l icrht is vai n . " Stay, mournful voice. A sound o f thunder rolls From hill to hill. A greater voice than thou Speaks m ightily, while livid light nings fla h In fi ery attestat ion of the word Heaven' th unders utter, " Thou, thou art a Lie, Mo t blind perversion of mo t glorious Truth ! Thou saye t flowers shall fad and snow-stars melt, And sunsets pa s away. But know thou this : The :flower, the snowflake, and the sunset, these Are but the gl i mpses weary mortal catch Of God' own mile, are but the writ ing d i m Of God' o w n thought . \ hat i f the writ ing fade ! Th th ught remains. ain it is not. For lo ! That th ught i Beauty. Beauty never di s !" HELEN R. BEEDE,

'

93 .


�rt �rram. ����:ii E S, sh e saw that light mysteriously slip­

tween t h e and irons, burst out with a light t hat ca t a

ping back and forth over the chamber

pal e glow upon t h e faces of the college girls

door ; not an ordinary light, you know,

' round upon the fl oor, al l of them stiff and erect , try­ ing to regulate the short, quick breaths t hat told of

but a sort of a dull lu m i nous glow that

palpitat ing h eart s. " Isn't that funny ? • · at l ength quoth she who al ways felt it her duty t o break a pause.

you can always recognize, for it will shine righ t t h rough everyth i ng.

T h e way to tell i t i s to put

" Funny ! It's ILOrrible, but it's elegant. Come again, girls, to-morrow n ight at ele\ en, after you get your studying clone, and we'll have anot h er ean ce of this k ind. H ow I wish we had a real skull to set right clown among us ! ·wouldn't i t be ideal ? " and t h e

your hand in front of your eye and if i t appears on your pal m it's something supernatural.

She tried

it ; it was the death-light.

Now, of course, m y aunt didn't bel ieve i n ghosts or anything of th e kind, but

she was all worn out tak i n g care of l ittle Elsie and

girl a l l bade Lena good-night, accepting her g h a t l y invitation.

she felt from that moment that she m ust gi e h er up. \ ell, the next night at t hat very same t i me, as she

Left alone, h e shuddered as she set the room to right s after her friends had gon e, but she would not for a moment have had any of the girl know how her

was sitting by the baby ' s cri b -the poor little t h ing was awfully s ick-she heard a hollow rap o n th e door and went t ip-toeing to open i t.

eated

No one was t here,

but when she came back to the crib the baby was

blood was creeping through her vein

in low, chill gushes, or how her flesh was all a-quiver. Skulls grinned around h er when she t ried to sleep.

d ead . " T h e embers 111 the fi replace, dropping down be1 53


" I ' m gett ing my wish, ' ' she said grimly to herself. She seemed to be looking into an old tomb with bursting

It

casket

where skeletons " ere peering through the cracks. Suddenly one of th e skulls gave forth a gu ty laugh t hat rattled its teeth i n thefr sockets. H or­ rors !

came again, the next n ight

and the n ext ;

always the hriek of the struggling skull that called her to another day of work. " What's the matter with Lena ? " every one asked. " She isn't j olly at all as she used to be, and

It was certainly strai ning toward her ! It bent,

she is growing thin and pale."

twi ted and turned, and at last with a h orrible wrench the perse\'ering cran ium wrested itself from the spi­

" 0 erwork," the

doctor said, " sh e mu t rest and sleep . " " You' re begi nn ing to look like the ghosts you th ink so much of," remarked a tactful friend, but waited in vain for Lena's usual ki nd laugh at a flat but expe ďż˝ tant j oke. " Oh ! " she screamed, " can' t you see i t ? Can't you hear it ? Listen ! H ear i t crunch , hear it grind, creak, wrmc!t I O h ! i t has snapped ! and it's rolling, rolling, rolling ! " She pressed both her hands to her head as i f to hold it. They soothed her and kept her in a still and

nal col umn and came slowly rolling toward her, bumping along over the u neven ground of the tomb. It had reached her feet when there issued from its empty case such a shriek that she sprang from her bed to fi nd that th e rising bell bad rung. The girl gathered again in the evening with an eerie fa c i nation for the h orrible things that were narrated by the fli ckering fi re-light. No one entered

darkened room till she was able to be carried home, and one m ore was added to the list of girl s broken down by the n ervous st rai n of college work.

i n t o the ghoul i h festivities with more zest than Lena t hough he felt that h er nerves were drawi ng ti ghter and tighter, and sicken ing thoughts of her dream m ade h r shiver.

1 54


1 55


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QJ!ulhu H �rr1n1 " mlllsudafiun . .. ..

This C l ub was formed for the purpose of waisting all spare moments in the i n terest of the " Press. " Ufr'truuria( .$faff. M R . A :\ D M R ' . B E R T R :Yl R .

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M C. R I C H A R D

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MR.

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M R. A N D M R S.

H A R R Y M. GE R R Y .


Q!r�£ da£hr i' nrmtfory from a Jl untor's �fanbp oinf. .. ..

when the alco". es are _not occupied. E\·ery corner should be � u rn_1shed w1th a large easy chai r. ome of the chairs m the Pal mer H ouse are as st i ff and uncomfortable as my new col lar. Now, Prexy, don't h ave t h e room too light . Many of us college fellows have t rouble with our eyes, and we ought to rest them one evenino- i n the week. " My lady friend " said she thought ; n umber of laro-e ] apanese screen � would look pretty in t h e room-sa , perhaps, about eight. Now, I don't l ike the looks of that fence as shown i n t h e plan. Of course, as Shakespeare-or Ben J on ­ s o n I forget which-said,

To tlte President aud Faat!tJ' of ColbJ' Universz'ty :I wish to express my feel in gs in regard to the new dorm itory wh i c h is in prospect for the co-ords. I am one of t hose " gents what makes dates wid their lady fr � encls," and I t h ink . this building should not go up w1t hout some suggestions from t he members of the men's college who expect to spend a large part of their t i m e t here. I utilize? . the greater part of Fast Day in care­ fully exam mmg the plan in Redi ngton 's w indow, and on the whole I call it pretty good, but I t h i nk a few suggestions m ight be val uable to you, and as I have been t h ree years in college and h ave passed much of the t i me d ur i n g those three years at the Palmer House, and h ave had ample opportu nity to learn what are t � e advantages and d isadvantage of a woman's dormitory, I feel that I am a. well fit ted to advise you as anybody could be. First, there i s the reception room . I th i n k t h i s room should be arranged fi rst i n pla n n i ng a woman's _ y. I u nders and that it has been suggested dorm1to � � . to have it arranged like a senes of confessionals or restaurant eati n g stalls, where each co-ord can receive her guest in comparative secl usion. i flatter myself that a great m in d l ike my own can devise a m uch bet­ � er scheme than t hat. The Prof . say my j udgment is pretty good, and when I was in Mechani c Falls last vacat ion, we tal ked i t all over and I will give you our plan free of charge. M y idea would be to have the room octagonal in shape, with an alcove o n each side t h us mak ing si xteen corners and alcoves for recept io1� purposes. Every alcove should have a tete-a-tete (they are m ighty comfortabl e, you know) and be h u n o­ w i t h portieres. T hese portieres c a n be d rawn ope�

y

" Stone walls do not a prison make ' or i ron bars a cage.··

15 7

But in spite of Shakespeare, I don't approve of that wall. Pers ? nally, I am �apable of stepping over uch an ? bstr uct 1on, an d so 1 s Fred, but my little m i n is­ _ t enal f nend has not been so blessed by nature as we have ; h e never gained any Laura-ls in vault i n o- con­ t � sts . . And i t i s hard ei:i ough to get away on �ecep­ t 1 on nights, anyway, without bein g walled i n and made to feel t hat you can' t get out even i f you h ould want to. I should also like to suggest t hat t h e warni n o­ bell be sounded at t e n o'clock, so a s to allow ten m i ; utes e,�tra for saying good-n ight, i nstead of taking t hat t im e out of our call ing hours. H ustle as best I can, I can' t seem to get around u n t i l quarter past si'x and f �om that t i m e u n t il ten i s alogether too short for a social call. Hoping these h i nt s will be acted upon, I am, Respectfully yours, j -R-Y \ -L L M-N.


WATERVI LLE, M E . , MAY I O, 1 897. i nt eresting i n n ova ti on was introduced here last n i gh t, the occas i o n being the debate between the members of the Col by faculty on the m uch-mooted quest ion of the classic lan guages and the sciences. It has t ranspired that w hen the new scientific course of Ph . B . was proposed m uch discussion was provoked at the regular meeti ngs of the faculty, and it was fi nally agreed that t he quest ion should be settled by a publi c debate. T h chapel was fi lled to overflowing, as both sides had created considerable i nterest by their spirited cam paign. The devotees of the old classic languages excelled Wel l m ight old Cicero have been in eloquence. proud to have uttered ·such encom i ums on his be­ loved Lat i n . The scientist s had rather the better o f t h e argu­ ment fro m a stand poi nt of logic. The art icles w re on the whole wel l presented and were well rece ived.

President Butler presided, and after a somewhat lengthy d iscourse stated the question as follows : Resolved, that t he sciences afford a better trai ning to the m i nd than the languages. President Butler t hen introduced Prof. Rogers as the fi rst speaker. Prof. Rogers spoke as follows : " M r. President, Ladies and Gentlemen .-In the dis. cussion of a quest ion so i m portant and so intricate­ a quest ion on wh ich scienti fi c m inds have long busied themselves since the day Gal ileo saw the apple drop ·-thereby discovering the law of gravitat ion,- until the present day, experience has shown that the honest m i nd freed from al l prej udice can alone grasp the truth. " I have always been enthusiast ic for the sciences. The sciences are the m ini sters of truth. I think it was Prof. Bowdoin, of H utchins, who said that ' Who­ soever worsh ips at the shrine of science thereby takes on the garments of accuracy and perspicuity.' " The supporters of the languages must feel embar­ rassed to read the names of the emi nent men who have achieved success and fame without any knowl-

AN

158


edge of the classic languages. I will read you a few such names " (considerable time was consumed h ere by Santa's futile attempts t o find his notes), " sis­ sis-sis-can't fi nd m y notes. Had 'em though. Laid t hem on the table. Sis-sis-sis-someone m ust have taken them . Can't get along. Let me see. What I I say. Forget w here I left off. Oh, yes, yes, yes. I said John Stuart M ill and H erbert Spencer d i d n ' t k now n anyth ing about Lat i n and· Greek. L o t of others, t oo, only they've slipped my mind at present. Therefore-h ence we'll assume I 've proved that point, namely t hat a great many famous men d id n ' t know Greek." (Teddy makes vociferous signals to Stet. Rob s n i ffs contemptuously. ) "Where am I ? 0 yes ! Therefore we know, there­ fore we deduce the following fact, namely that the sciences t ra i n a man to accuracy and perspicuit) . " For i nstance. If we take t h e M etronome pendulum and the Att wood m ach i n e, nam ely a machine for deter­ m i ning t h e velocity of a falling mass, we can fi n d the duration of time required for a given mass to pass over a given space. T hat is, we can find the time with­ in t h ree or four seconds, perhaps more, perhaps less." ( Laughter.) " Wonderful device that Attwood machine. N" ow ask you t o consider n ext the X-ray. ' (" Can't go on h ere unless we have it more q u iet," said Santa, as h e d odged a hymn book dexterously h urled �t him by Colonel Page. )

" Namely, the fact is self-confident, I mean self-e, i­ dent, sis-sis-sis-let me see. " 0 yes. I said the opposition would say science made a man guess. But it don't. Never made m e guess. I ' e made science guess, though, often. " (Ap­ plause.) " Statical electricity shows us every day. ( Five­ minute bell rings.) There is the bell. 0 d ear, 0 dear, what shal l I do ? What shall I do ? H aven't proved anythi ng yet. H aven ' t had t ime. 0 dear, 0 dear, s is-sis-sis. Got to stop, t hough. H ear the bell. 0 dear. H ave to take i t for grant ed . " Prof. H al l was introduced a s t he n e x t speaker. Prof. H all said : " Ladies and Gentlemen : I n all my experience w i t h men and books, i n a l l my experience with thi ngs l iving and t h ings dead, with th ings visible and i nvi ible, t h ings that creep and t h i ngs that fly, I have al ways observed that the classic languages stand u nrivaled in stateliness and splendor, absolutely alone i � grand­ eur and glory." (Hae applauds. ) " Dr. Rogers h as presented an argument based on the Attwood. Now, what i s this Attwood mac h in e ? It is composed of a few brass wheels, t wo t i n cans and a lot of stri ngs. Yes stri n gs, gentlemen, strings. " ( Santa attempts to rise. Stet scowls and Santa subsides.) " Now, gentlemen , I ask ou how can that machine, a mere combination of tin, brass and strings, discipl i n e a m a n ' s m i nd !" (Applause and groans.)

y

1 59


"Take chemistry," contin ued the Professor, warm i n g u p. " A m a n goes into the laboratory an d m i xes up a few acids, or l iquids, or gases. Does it all under the guidance of an i n st ructor. That k i n d of work makes man a mere m achine." (Stet and Rob look cheerful . ) " Same of geology. Breaking up stones, gentlemen. Breaking up stones. H ow can a man break stones and get an ed ucat ion ? As i f every stone was a m i ne of i n format i on . Absurd, gentlemen, absurd. " ( H ar applauds violently.) " Now let us consider the other side of this question. T h e associat ion, the familiarity with the language of C icero and Cresar, of H om er and JEschylus make a man to think. Thi n k ing is what the classics trai n a man to do. " But I shall not weary you with details. (Applause. ) I shall t rust my colleagues to present you the remain­ i ng arguments i n support of our s ide. (Haugh t ily.) I have captured the cit­ I have met the opposition. adel ." (Applause. Dutchy groans.) President Butl er, i n a very appropriate speech about thirty minutes long, i n troduced ]. William Black, Auger Professor of Poli ti cal Economy. Dr. Black advanced to the front part of the plat­ form with a small l ibrary u nder his arm. H e depos­ i ted the l ibrary upon the table and spoke as follows : " Ladi e and Gentlemen : I, myself, never had much experience with the· exact scien ces, as Pol i t ical Economy can not in the strictest sense be called exact. ] ohn Stuart M i l l and other famous men have fre-

quently stated this and from the fact that it is subj ect to-well, to changes both in form, facts and various other things, this quest ion may be regarded as settled. " Now, I remember, down in Baltimore, various ques­ tions which have arisen concerning municipal revenue and grants which have changed i n the course of a few y ears. Now, down in Baltimore (laughs) some years ago (sm iles) t h ere was no natural gas and we had to wait until I grew old enough (laughter and applause ; Professor smiles, grins . and laughs) to rem ember that two gas, that is art ifi cial gas, companies started, and so on. Now, i n this age we try, at least I make it a point to try in my cl asses, to kill or anni­ h ilate time ; we do it, too. " (General laughter.) " Now I remember down i n Baltimore that there was som e trouble about the water-works. What did t hey do ? Did they buy their works ? Exactly. That i s they d i d n o t exactly b u y t h e m , b u t they rented them, which i s quite the same thing. " But to retu rn to our subj ect from which we have slightly digressed. Science means knowledge, sys­ tematized thought. Therefore, if a man thinks he must be trained for the dut i es of l ife, (and of course he is, in a sense). In one sense he i s, in another Yes, exactly, quite right, sense he is not . Why ! yes. (Time l imit bell rings and Black grins). Exactly, exactly, and again I say exactly. Yes, exactly. " (Takes his seat amid cheers and hisses, blushi ng l i ke a girl, and feeling foolish, funny and flunked .) 1 60


not know anyth ing abo ut Greek and Lat in. Listen, and I'll read you someth i ng from t he ' Encyclopcedi a Britan n i ca. ' " (Reads, and proves Santa was wrong. ) [At this j u ncture Santa arises and asks perm i ssion to correct an error. " I s there obj ection ? " sternly asks Prex. No obj ection bei ng made, Santa stoutly denies ever having said that ] ohn Stuart M ill or H erbert Spencer knew noth ing about Greek or Lat i n . Dutchy backs u p Santa. Suppressed m erriment .] " It i s i m m aterial, anyway, " continued PROFE SOR Roberts. " I am convinced that t h i s aud ience don't want any more arguments. What you need i s my opi nion, m y authority. Will you vote ' No ? You see I k now all about this subj ect, and you, 0 rabble, only deceive yourselves i n t o thinking you k now. " This modest observat i o n called forth thunderous applause. A period of silence fol lowed, and then Stet attempted to renew the applause and i nadvert­ ently brought his foot down on Dutchy's toe. Dutchy l oses h i s wonted self-control, and becomes excited. Santa, Dut chy and Prex all try to talk at once. The Colonel throws a hy m n boo k at the l ight. Excite­ m ent i ntense. M ingled cries of " Donnerwetter ! 0 dear, 0 dear ! Zru, Zru Tl<; ayopn)Eiv {3ov'A.£Ta Deu ex­ machina Deusmeansgod. ! ! ! ? ? ? x + ( ) [ J + + ! ! ! + ? () ? ? ? --[J O ! ! ! ! ! ! ! - ? ? Reubei:i, Confusion and Chaos !

" Th ere is no m an m ore qualified to discu ss, fun­ damentally and thor ughly, the subj ect under con_ sideration than Professor Roberts," said President Butler i n presen t i ng the next speaker. PRO F ESSOR Robert s , a m edium-sized man of about thirty years of age, advanced with a swagger that seemed to suggest contempt for the rest of the race. PROFESSOR Roberts speaks with a confident air. Follo w i ng is the full text of PRO FES. OR Roberts's speech : " M r. President, Lad ies and Gentlemen : -Now I'll tell you r ight h ere what I know about tl1 i s science busi ness. I think that a man m ight study science for one h undred years and then not know anyth i ng about it. What is the use of knowing when you can bluff j ust as well ? Shakespeare says, somewhere, that a l ittle k nowledge is a dangerous thing, and you can ' t learn muc!t science i n a few years, so i f you st udy it at all, you must be content to learn a !£ttle. But I ' ll tell you, I don 't t h i n k it's really necessary. I n ever knew any science. I don't know a great deal now, but then I know enough to ' phase ' m ost people. Say, I ' ll give you a good rule. Make positive statements ! Jlfake positi11e statements ! N i ne t imes out of ten nobody'll quest ion them. I f they do-0, well, I suppose you'll have t o back water. But t h ey won't m ore t han once a year. " No w, Professor Rogers was m i st aken when he said that J oh n Stuart M ill and H erbert Spencer did II

1 6r


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WH Y does the D utch m an , pale with fear, Grab his hat and bolt for the door ? Why do the Sophomores hold their breath And gaze i n dread from ceiling to floor ? H ear the Professor charge round the hall, O n Sam and other divinities call . O nly listen a n d hear h i m yell, " Oh , there was that awful smell ! " are you going, my pretty maid ? ' " Goi ng to a n e ight- o'clock, sir," he said.

' ' WHERE

\

'Trs there that the Dutch man holds his sway, And pounds the desk in the good old way. H e' l l wave his arms and tear h is hair, And h url D utch verbs through the l urid air, For most of the maids were out last n ight, And have n ' t studied their lessons a m ite. And we'd all of us l ike to get u p and shout " \Ve don't k now what you are raving about."

1LL 1AM B. JACK .

Jo A TH AN

L. D Y E R.

" MA y I go with you, my pretty maid ? "

FRANK J. SE ER Y .

H ENRY H .

' ' Sure, if you'll coach me, sir," she said.

PUT - A l\1 , JR.

H E stood o n the steps in the morn i ng, As the bell was stri king the hour. \ hen the heavens opened abo e him , A n d dropped a copious shower. Little he thought that a t\vo-pound bag Could hold so much of wet. He started for home across l ots, And is probably run ning yet.

\VILLTAM H. H o urns, JR. \VILLARD

L . McFA D D E N .

H UBERT

J . MERRI CK.

A RTHUR I. ST ART. H ENRY D . ERNEST

FURB

L.

H.

HERR I C K ,

163


• •

To wait for " Woggins " to grow. To wait for " Pa " Allen to answer a question. To wait for " Billy " Holmes's head to settle to its normal size. To wait for co-ords to grow better looking. To wait for " Old Put " to make up h is m ind. To wait for contribut ions to the ORACLE. To l isten to Carson's stories . To wait for " Dutchy " to get onto American ways.

To wait for Prof. " Rob " to act naturally. To see " Pip " walk " faster than four m i les an hour. ' To wait for J oh nny Stephenson to buy his own tobacco. To wait for Herrick to learn to s ing. To hear " Young Put " tell the truth. To have " Chap " learn how to place his money. To have Brooks give up his profession as a peri­ patetic.


IJaiu�sttn ns

for

Jlfa:e11f!men.

The following are some of the many quest ions which every F reshman is su pposed to answer at the beginn ing of h i s course.

The an swers are carefully preserved i n the arc h i\ es of the Un iversity :

1 . Gi e you r name i n full.

(Take special pains as

to the correct use of capitals.) 2. G ive your age. (Co-ords over th irty are exempt.) 3 . vVhat was your great-grandfather's m iddle i n i­ tial ? 4.

Where was he born, and when ? Do you t h i n k there is any possibil ity of your

becoming engaged to a co-ord ?

If so, why ?

5. H ave you had the measles ?

6. Do you wear fal se teeth ? ( \'J'e)cely as possible.)

7. Do you prefer Mel l i n ' s food, conden ed milk, or Roberts's sarse-parilla ?

vVh en ? (Answer t h i s as

8. Do you belong to t h e Y. M. C. A. ? c . A. ?

Y. W.

9. Are you a regular church attendant ? 1 0.

Ha e ) ou always been a Ch ristian ?

1 r . Do you intend to assist foreign m issions ? 1 2 . How often do you attend prayer-meet ing ?


ll

�olby U n i versity th e

T the last meet ing of the Trustees of

The requ i rements necessary for obtain i ng these

questi o n of add­ mg the degrees of B. I . C., "' M . S. S.

degrees are as follows :

C. '

granted to those students who have done special work

·

The degrees of B. I. C., M. S. S. C., and M. D. are

and M. D.t to those degrees al­

ready conferred by the Universi ty, was seriously con­

in the various college departments, and have passed

sidered.

a successful examination in the same.

There had been subm itted a pet i t ion from the

No student is

el igible to M. S. S. C. until he has received B. I. C.,

Faculty headed by the name of the Dean of the

nor to M . D. unt he has received M . S. S . C .

Women 's College, praying for the granting of such

W e give below specimen test quest ions contained

degrees o n the ground that the growt h and reputat ion

in each of t h e three exami nat ion papers for the college

of the Uni\ ersity made this step i mperat ive.

year '96-'97, together with the names of those can­

After a J ong and heated d i scussion it was decided

didates who ha\'e obtained their respective degrees.

by a mall maj ority that the above-ment ioned degrees

Pi. 1r. Q!L.

hould be instituted. r.

* Bachelor of Ice Cut ling. t '.\laster of the

cience of

t Doctor of '.\latrirno11y.

ucces�ful CourL<;h i p .

1 66

Translat e i nto Engli sh

<f>tlLVOVTaL.

:

Kwopoui ov�K r.f.cnv o"n


2. T ranslate i nto Lati n :

A wise man l i nes up

Virgi n's Bower.

(i) Um brella Plant.

(j) Love-in-a­

mist.

qu ickly after conference. G i en freshman , co-ord, athletic exhibition, front

4. Find the rat i o at which the molecules E G R ,

seat i n gallery, and box of chocolates ; how many

M L W and F L D combine respecti ely with t h e

chocolates contained i n a pink box, can freshman and

molecule (R H H ) 3 , and write out the reaction.

3.

Degree conferred upon the following :

co-ord consume from 8 to 1 2 P. M. ?

W. H .

4. Read at sight from " La Plaine."

H ol mes, ] . 0 . \ ellman, F. G. Getchell, ] . E . Nel on,

Degree conferred upon the following : F. E. Taylor,

H.

L Gerry, R . B. Austin, W. W. Brown, 0. \ .

A. H. Page, A. C. Robbins, C. F. Towne, S. P. H ed­

· Foye, R. H. H o use, I . F. I ngraham, A. 'vV. Cleaves,

man, H. W. H aynes, C. L. Clement, F. P. H. Pike,

H . S. Brown.

C. H . Dascombe, W. B. Jack, A. E. Doughty.

m. 1.

rm . JP .

!5. 5' . <IE.

I.

Write an art icle on " The Transcendent Beauties

of t h e M essal onskee by M oonlight " from your own

of Del irious Infatuation Considered Psychologically, Eth ically, and ·Economically. "

per anal observatf o ns. 2.

2. Determ ine the path of Venus' Satellites * t ra el­

Sight translat ion from " D ie R egel n von Gesell­

schaftliche i m Palmer-hause " by A . Marquardt. 3.

Describe the fl ora i n the vicinity of the Woman'

College as fol lows :

(c) Venus' Fly t rap. Plant.

v rite a t hesis on " Th e Ulti m at e Con ummation

(a) H eart ' s Ease.

(b) Gas Plan t .

(d) Bleed i n g H eart.

(/) Ten-o'clock.

ing i n a d i rect line from campus south ward, i n tercept­

ing the (e) rect-angular co-ord inates at d i stances and b from the origin ( L. H .).

(IL)

Write out form ula for

the path described .

(e) I c e

(g) Ladies' Tresses.

a

3. *

It i s most conducive of paramount blessing to

Discovered b y Prof. Rogers last spring.


this hab itat ion of hu man ity that man should not

abide i n agynical (from tile Greek : a + yv�tKos) soli­ tude.

G ive argument for validity of this theory with

detailed account of your i nvestigation. 4 . Give the difference of the forces W* and M t i n

i ng i nversely as the square of the distance, and a repellent force represented by (M) act upon this body contin ually, the distance bei ng 900 feet. Degree conferred upon the following : B. C. R ich­ ardson.

A si x-foot J un ior arrives a t the

For further part iculars regarding these courses

Pal mer House i n 250 seconds, traveling with a mean

apply to H. M. Browne, Professor of Applied Social

velocity of 3 feet per second, provid i ng that an at­

Sc i ence, Col by University. _

the following :

tractive fore � * Co-ord.

(\I

) be acting in conj unction and vary-

t :\latron.


Through the dusky m urky n ight, (Long the sun had sunk from sight) I n t h e pink o f p r i m e condition, See him stride along i n m ight ! See his grand and lordly air ; Fat and j ocund, without care, \Vh ile the rarest rich suspicion O f tobacco scents the air.

Meets a maid with pretty eyes, \Vhat a rai nbow- beauty l ies I n t hose eyes of pretty margins And her looks of glad surprise (?) ! Surely those lush, carmine l ips \ ill meet h is in glad eclipseB ut !-t1e pale, gold moon afar grins On the high h orizon's h i ps.

And the swirl-topped lofty trees, Bending in the gentle breeze, Laughed as he ran palpitating, O fttimes falling o n h is knees. them al l, ' ' Oh !" cried he, " ! \ ith their curves i m possible, And their way so agitating To�a captain of football." --

For the maid with brunette skin A n d an all determined ch i n , Sent a look that froze h is heart' s blood, Drew a pistol straight on him ! Gre w no grass beneath his feet, But with m otions swift and fleet, Scared and trembling, splashing through mud, Beat h e straight a safe retreat.

ow he always stays at home, And h e never strays alone, For h e fears that some French maiden \ ill demand that he atone. And will shoot him o n the spot ; Send him straight to regions h ot ; So his heart is sorrow lade n , And his virtue can't be bought ! 169


�onk fmnfic.es. \V H A T S H A K ESPEA R E R EA LLY M E NT. By Prof. A. ] . R oberts. \Ne c a n conscieotiou::.ly recommend t h i book t o c ollege professors, to (iterators, and to a n y o n e desiring a n i nsight i nto t h e obscurity of Shakespeare. T h e author with a rare knowledge o f his subject deals with the most disp uted questions o f Wil liam Shakespeare and settles tf1em for now and all time. This work i by the same author as " B rown­ ing Boiled Down on Mind vs. M ist. " Published in paper, cloth and kid, $3.oo to . 4 . 00.

l n his book of elocution occurs M r. Robbi ns's favorite selection where he says : " I was an over-grown cal f, Seventeen years of age. Green ! Yes, slightly I guess, Tho' never so green as Page." M r. Robbins is the author of several poems, all of which appear i n this book. They are : " The Crown of H ay," " A n Ode to Green Stuff Growing.' ' Bound in calf only. Price $J.OO.

TH E ANGLE A'.';0 A M.\ LI E F A PPEA R A E By G. A . Martin . It was i n 1 860 that Diana, the great French beauty, published her celebrated work, " H ow to be Beau ti­ ful," and this is a fitting, even though tardy successor to that famous work. M r. r-. 'lartin is too well known to need any but a passi ng n otice. He has taken two fi rst prizes, at the l ew England H orse Show, and was first introduced to the public by Prof. Garner. Bound i n paper and cloth . Price, 2 . 50 and 3.00. -

.

The O RA C L E acknowledges the receipt of the fol lowing books : H ow TO R ED cE S U P E R F L o s FAT. By C. L. Clem­ ent, M . D . This treatise will prove an i nvaluable help to all persons suffering from excessive corpulence. Dr. Clem­ e nt not only gives us the results of the life-long study which he has devoted to the subject, but also adds the facts of his own personal experience. The reliability of the work is .unquestioned. Price r o cents.

ELOCUTIO . ELUCIDATED A D EXE I PL I F J ED. By c . A. Robbi ns. The author of this work , C. Albert Robbin , of \Vinthrop, r-.laine, began life a few years ago. The rural rawness o f the farm is still observable in Mr. Robbins' pleas­ ing manner . Entering Colby in the Fall of 195, M r . Robbi ns began his career. Hi winn ing modesty and unharsh bas voice made him an early favorite among the kine of the meadows . He was wont to wander and recite " with nature as my only auditor." In the Fresh man reading he temporarily won second prize o n a fluke. H e woul d have been appointed to the oph omore declam ation , if merit had been trumps.

C H I · C H J , or the Story without an End. By C. E. Gurney. The author's versatile power of ex pression i admirable, but often leads him to indulge in unpardonable i nconsistencies. O ne traces the narrative with inte nse cu riosity, unable to form any definite conception o f what will come next. The story concludes i n a vague manner that leaves the reader to interpret the author's meaning for himself. A great many solutions have been offered by i nventive minds, but the plot of the originator still remains an enigma. Agents for the college : G. A. Ely and H. H. Pratt. Through the benevolence of the author this book is distributed free.

1 70


1 71


J!ln rutn�ntsf!dr �nem.

ta ta " Deadwood D ick " Shannon very kindly offered his services for the composition of a poem , and we are glad to present his efforts in that direction to the readers of the O RACLE.

H ere o n the h illside, Quite silent the wind, The twigs hung down, nder sat Grace. Grace sat 'midst the " Dead \�ood," She sat i n the pure fragrance, The grasshoppers h u m med And splashed through the air. There stood the forest so silent, She gazed so wisely therein, And through Dick 's locks (t) Streamed the su nshine, A n d the cuckoo laughed from the distance.

J!lbou �anfa ill o grr,n.

ta ta Old Santa R ogers. may his kind decrease, A woke one night, being ill at ease, And saw within the shadows of his hall, A Colby student w riting on the wall. ow anta was a man advanced i n years, H avi ng o f ghosts n o crude and childish fears ; T h us to the being spake : " \\Tho art thou, then ? That thou shoul clst thus di sturb thy fellow-men ? \Vhat writest thou ? "

The be i ng answered with a smile obtuse , " The names of those wl 1 0 are some earthly use . "

" A nd i s m i ne on e ? " said an ta. ' ' Tay, not so, " The student answered. Santa spoke more low, But hurriedly s till. ' ' Write, write, yes , write me then , W h a t 'cl I say ? Yes, yes , a s one w h o balls nine o u t of ten. And if I find one whom I cannot bal l For i nstance, one whom I can 't ball at al l.­ �ay, cross that out and write it o'er again, And say, ' I m uddle ten men out of ten ,' A nd then you 'll have i t right.'' The being wrote and vanished, but next day H e came again with pomp and great display, And read aloud with m i ngled laughs and scoffs, The names of superannuated Profs. O f those who nailed the truth, but got their data wrong. vVho . led their classes through a mental mire, And in the maze of doubt did never tire. Who above all things earthly loved the X - ray best, And lo ! poor San ta's name led all the rest.

�hro !@lb maUhl.

ta • She sai d , with a smile, " H e re's a riddle for you : \V hen ' s a man an old mai d ? l ow, answer me, do." But I didn ' t :

I searched throuj!h my brain, But no answer was there ; I guessed to no purpose, Then gave up in despair, \Vhen she said : "

ow, if Cole doesn't cause The Colonel to " 1 op,'' Who'l l be the ' old maid ? ' " And she ca me to a stop, nd looked up.


H mt

1')urb fu fq£

�hw."

.. ..

The boys of Colby' s classic h alls A re i n a dreadful way ; They gather in the Palmer H ouse At all hours of the day. And there with l aughter, sport, and j est Is a merry contest waged, For nearly every Colby lad To a Co-ord is engaged.

nd there is J erry \Vellman, too, A loose and lathy l ad ; As a wal ker he is unsurpassed, But his gait, they say, is bad. Yet still to cap the climax, And to cap it gives me pain, But I must add, though i t be sad , H e s got " Co-ord on the brain."

There's Bertram Carver R ichardson , A man who's in the swi m , And s o , for h i m to get engaged \ ould seem n o foolish whim. H e dotes upon that maiden, who Did his affections gain ; For he's a lad who's got it �ad­ That's " Co-ord on the brain."

T he re' s Colonel Page, a fine young man, \Vho always seems so nice ; A n d si nce he chanced to fall in love H e ' s cut cart loads of ice. H e visits her twice i n the week In starlight or in rai n ; For you m ust k now that Colonel's woe Is " Co-ord on the brain . "

And there is Freddie Getchell, in \Vhom atu re went astray, A lllarve/ of ungainli ness In each and every way. His actions are so very queer, You'd think he was insane ; H e's got, you see, that malady O f · • Co-ord on the b rain."

:\ow, Fres h men, p lease take notice, And don't get caught so soon, But wait u n ti l you r senior year Ere you begin to s poon. Now, i f you won't this warning heed, B e s ure you don't complain, I f you're roasted i n the ORACLE, \,\ hen summer comes again. P. D . Q .

1.

2.

There was a precocious young swain Who said, " ow to m e 'tis quite plain, If I want to get k nowledge, I m ust go to coll ege, And where should i t be but i n Maine ? "

3.

-1- ·

H e though t all the col leges o'er Inqu iries he made by the score. " Th e best I m ust choose ; There my influence use, For ·I surely can't honor the four." . 5.

So then to old Colby he came, And pompously gave i n his name ; The Faculty grim Were not awe-struck by him ; He was sorry for them j ust the same. Behold, at the end o f a year, This Freshman, who once was so queer, Is now mild and meek, A n d hardly dares speak, If a Sophomore chance to be near.

The moral I ' m trying to teach I s certainly now within reach. The Sophomores bright Can bring Freshmen u p right, \Vhatever all others may p reach. 1 73


A wise son rnaketh a glad father ; but a man with three deficiencies bringeth woe to a household.

A holiday [ i s w m e to the spirit of man, but an " exam " is bitter to the belly.

He who carrieth the most water, usetb not always t h e most towels.

Who hath woe ? who hath sorrow ? who hath red­ ness of eyes ? They that cut six times, yea seven, wi thout cause, and receive a notice from Teddy.

Crib while i t is called to-day, for the time cometh

A wh i p for a horse, a halter for an ass, and water for the back of the Freshman.

when the honor " exam " will be a th ing of the past. Answer not Sam according to his fol ly, lest thou also be like unto h im .

There be two things which are too wonderful for me, yea, three that I know not : The way of an eagle in the air, the way of a serpent upon a rock, and the way of " Santa " i n the midst of the street.

There is a way which eemeth right unto the Sopho­ more · but the Fre hman faileth to see the fun thereof.

1 74


S H E. -\ ho was that k i nd l ittle boy standing back i n the corner all the evening ? H E.-That frai l , deli­ cate, s ick -looki ng lad ? Sr-r n.-Yes. H E.-Oh, that was B rooks.

J UST she and I, 'neath the moonlit sk)

Shall I tell her that she is dearer to me Than all my earthly pelf ? Ah, no ! :Twould be vai n, and the reason is plain, She's the boat that I made myself.

Are floating with the stream. The stars of lo\ e shine forth above With a soft and tender gleam.

1.

2. A M A I DEN, it is said, H ad a little tul i p bed, Brigh t and fai r. She had covered it up warm From the winter's chilling storm, With all care.

� � ���

But now she was perplexed 3. " When should t ulips be uncovered, " And her h eart was sorely vexed Was h er question a she hovered In t h e spring ; Near a friend. For all she'd gai n ed at College Said the friend , with blushing cheek, Didn't gi e sufficient knowledge " If 'ti for myself I speak, For this thing. ' T\i ould depend." 175


&ir f!£ Ult fft�On .

@:fie

• •

The trees o n the bank A nd the osiers dank ighed with a plain itive sound, o·n a sweet J un e n ight \\ hen the moon m ade l igh t f the darkness that hovered rou nd. The trees on the bank And the osiers dank Looked o'er t he silver stream , But never a boat, \\, ent gayly afloat ; Silent all as a dream. Lonely the bank Where the osiers dank, tirred i n the soft night breeze ; ever a pair \Valked pensive there nder the whispering trees. But the stream is deep. In its onward sweep. It answered the plaintive " why " Of the trees on the ban k , ad t h e osiers dank : " No colors th is J u ly."

' ' Now, how do you play at basket-bal l ? " I asked of a ophomore maid, Who, with feelings ore, nd cars galore, Fl ome from the " Gym " slow strayed.

�nor

'� aff1rn �p eahs. • •

The Gospel Bells are ringin' over land from sea ter sea ; The gates ajar are narreri n ' up the crack ; I n the H 'ark the' a in 't no standi n ' room from pit ter gallery, And J oe, our J oe, has given us the sack. ' Es tak in' ' is girl ter Beulah ! horus of the lost) . Then it's gropi n' in ignorance we may be, But we're not such a holy show as he. They've got a season ticket, And you'd think they oughter lick it ; But they take the longest way ter Beulah. The fields are white with 'arvest ; the corn is p roper shocked Ter hear of Joe a gal -ivantin ' round. \Vhen will 'e canvass 'ere 'is bloomin' 'arps of which 'e talked, Since hat on nose, and eyes upon the ground ' E tak i n ' 'i girl ter Beulah ? (Chorus)

Then its gropi n ' in i gnorance we may be, But let the ' eathen rage and faller me. We'll be t here ter see the fun ; nai l go by 'em on the run , nails may h ump themselves, b u t J o e , n i t , ter Beulah.

But weari ly then she looked at me, With a meaning shake of che head. ( There wa patience there That had made Job stare.) • · There are Diver's ways, ' she said.


A. L . ( B.1if i - $ fl\ n p , u r }lrmen i :l n S>nffenr,; . J

.. ..

� o r u res ieo-nae

AGNES B R Al\N . G R ACE G ATC H E L L .

E D I T H M A t; D LA R R AB E E .

M ERCY

O C T A \'I A

H E LEN M A G R EG O R H AL SCO'.\L

\ H lT l .\'G �1 ATH EW . A u E Lo 1 E · \' E. :\ l. .\ RT H A D u :-<LAP TRA v. l .\' A G E R T R L' DE •

EDrTH B R A GG H A K OK. H A R R I ET F L R ENCE H O L i\1 E, . :-< X I E L E E K r G HT. $ol'O't mm $ ll 1tfl. A.'\ '.'\ I E H t:TCH l

O'.'\ PEPPER.

Soro-t.':2� .J'nhtrne. GIRL

A. L .

OF

'98.

.$onn.

( fil1111e- lhllz11 :B r o 1 u 1 1 ' G B u b !!, . )

Oh, the poor dear Armen ians 1 They have friends i n such as we-un , ad we'll s i ng to the m our pcean Anti -Slang goes marching on.

Oh, how awful 'tis to use slang ! Those who use it ought to go h ang, O r be murdered with a gu n , bang, Anti-Slang goes march ing on. CHOR

12

Glory, glory, Anti- Jang-Slang, Glory, glory, Anti -Slang-Slang, Glory, glory, Anti-Slang- Jang. Anti-Slang goes marching on. Repeated ad infinitum. 1 77

E


mln �pie. O v ER t h e balmy a i r , last night as I sat a t my win­ dow, Floated, I fi rst though t, my name, my angular name from the text-book, Cheerfully hymned in loud notes ; but I must have been off i n a tangent. ' \Vay down below, ' were th e words that followed with startling d i sti nctness. Syllables then most confused, till I caught th e faint words, ' swell with yearning.' Li ngering accents of ' H ades ' fell soft on my tym­ pan ic membran e Rousing ain thoughts in my heart of the m ighty in t hat gloomy ki ngdom, I ntercourse with whose souls would be pleasant to us and of profit To tlteir m inds," modestly quoth the good man in whose cran ium dwell math ematics. ' Well," said the doughty young ch ieftain who hold up the big de k i n chapel, " Wi hes are surely of no u e save transferred by the will into act ion. H ere is occasion, I think, for the heartiest co­ operation ;

Who can inform this assembly of mean s for th is great undertaking ? Easy enough if we simply choose the right way to come at it." Slowly the heads of the wise men turned on their vertebral pivots. None had provided for th is, though Santa made the confession : " Th i s is a subj ect," he said, " I discussed in a j our­ nal of science ; H ow. I ' ve forgotten j u t now ; but wait and I think we can do it." " Virgil's account of JEneas in hjs search for h is father, A nchises, Gives us suggest ion," said one. " We must fi nd the gold leaf by Avernus." " That is the way, I remem ber. Yes , yes ; precisely the method, Easy as " with the X-rays, turn them full force on the forest The metal stands out so plai n from the rest you have only to pluck i t . " " Doves would b e better, " said J udy ; " JEneas had them to guide h im . "


" Not scient i fi c at all ! Will have noth i ng to do with the matter ! Doves ! I s hould say ! " but the President here inter­ rupted the quarrel, Seeking adj ustment of matters, amicable and con­ sistent. " Science i n our clay," said he, " confron ts us with startling d iscoveries ; Things that the ancients had welcomed had t hey but been able to know t hem. M atches are cheaper t han steali ng if Prometheus only h ad tried them. Brimstone and sticks i n this world had saved bri m­ stone and Styx in the other. ' Rough upon Rats ' or ' Dead-stuck ' i n destroying Stymphalian mon sters H ercules h ad best used or a hydrant for Augean stables. Therefore I t hink since X-rays will fi nd us the gold leaf most quickly This is the method to use. Bring on your machinery, Doctor. " Bright through the leaves of the forest shone the strange light from the Crookes' .tube, Pierced through the vegetable growth l ike sun through the clear air of morning. Quivering stood t h e gold leaf ' neath fl uoroscope's s harp revelation . " Gods have decreed we shall go," quoth the Prof, with locks l ike the sunlight, " Makin g our own providences, that's the way to get on, I assure you. Solid, I t hi nk, from my testing ; not found in this shape very often. Sold, would bring several dollars t o go toward a h alf­ back n ext season."

" Aid for the Coll ege, hurrah ! " · ' Books ! " " Fund for the new dormitory ! " Cries were of vari ous import at thought of the dollars ' t would bring them. " Thought we had started t or Hades," growled Rob ; " then what's the use talking ? T hough , to be s ure, much the sense to pay when you might go for nothing. " Toward the ca\ e of the Sibyl they wended, giving ear to one who convi n ced them Chlorophyl was attacked by the gas from ill-smell ing Avernus · Then, too, the old from the sunshine sifted down and dropped on the green leaf. Chloride of gold was produced, then the heat from i t s torrid surround i ngs F reed all the chlorine, and gold leaf was left to be twirled by the breezes. Sounds greeted t heir ears most d istressing of clank­ ing and moan i ng and groaning. " Don't .be alarmed, friends," said Rob, " we're safe when we get to old Pluto. I nt imate friend of mine. I' e done h i m many a favor. Offered to take me once as a partner in ruling h i s kingdom. " " What is the nature of t h is infernal organiza­ t ion ? " Queried our friend from the South of Johns H opki n s and Oberli n College. " Judged from the fact of the leaf, I should say a Pluto-cracy, surely. " Darkness grew t hicker around them, dread forms loomed up in the dim l ight, Vengeance and Fear and Disease and Want and t h e snaky-locked Furies.

g

1 79


" O h , t h ey will take m e ! t h ey ' l l take m e ! Why d i d I ever l eave D e u tschland ? What w i l l . beco m e of t h e k i nder ? and M am ma, I know he will m i ss ·m e . " B ravely h e k i cked at t h e n eares t , but t h ru st t h rough the vapory fi g u re, Startled t o see his foot on the other side of t h e s h adow.

Lost he h i s balance at fi nd i ng nothing to strike or to h i t at ? No, my i nnocent reader, k i c k i n g at a i r was not novel, Rather his usual past i me, his favorite sport and diversion ; Even to strike t h rough a shade was more satisfact ion t h an o ften. Santa t hey lost in t h e darkness. Last seen he was · busily trying

Shadows to cat ch with the X -rays, but never a shadow­ graph got h e ; Found a material lack, I fear, in t h e subj ects be­ fore h i m . Charon w a s m il d a n d po l i t e w h e n they boarded h i s Stygian ferry, Showed h i m the gold t h ey had pl ucked fro m t he l eafy grove by Avern us. " Gold i s the bas is down here, ' remarked one who was versed i n t h e subj ect. " Wonder what Bryan will do, guess he sti'cks when h e gets t o this river. " Now, when t hey stepped from t h e boat, the leaky and grimy old rowboat, " That i s n ' t worth any fare ; " t hey conferred 'm ongst t hem sel ves and decided, S l i pped t h e gold leaf out of sigh t to be used in t h e fu t u re when needed. Cerberu s n ex t m ust be passed , " ' Tis a cake t hat we need , " quoted J udy, " ' M elle soporatam et medicat i s frugibus offa m . ' ' ' " Let me add ress t h e good beast," said Prexy, with courage u ndau nted, " H e i s a reasoning creat ure and n eeds but a word to explain t h i ngs. Then I am sure h e will gladly assist and agree with us ful ly. " There he was l eft by h i s com rades to talk to t h e th ree-headed monst er, F i l l his six ears with such strong words, such argu­ ments, so overwh elm ing, Danger from h i m woul d be routed while t h ey went on with t he i r j ou rney. " H ercules was as naught bes ide t h i s one, or brpheus, or all of t h e others, "


Pondered t h e clog in h i s m i nd, t ri ply revol v i n g t h e matter. • Meanwhile t h e o t h ers h ad met adven t u res to s u i t e ' e n t h e boldest. Wra i t h s from a corner of H ades had ·wrat h fu l l y risen toget h er, G hosts of puns of past years resolved t o p u n i s h t h e i r s l ayer, C hased Dr. Pepper w i t h speed far out t oward t h e sl uggi sh Cocyt u s. " Wh o is afra i d " shouted he, " of your p u n y s t rength ? " but h e sprinted S t ra i g h t toward a small rocky poin t , " obl igat ion's ul t i­ mate ground," termed, Where h e felt s u re none would care t o i nfest h i s refuge a n d safety. Bayley tapped rou n d at the rocks, rej oicing t o fi n d w i t h h i s hammer S u l p h u ro u s com pou n d s u n k nown in M a i n e or o n M i ch igan borders. Stetson h ad m et Arist ides, who claimed t o be " j us t " from A t h e n s ; Fal ely, of course, for he k n e w naught uf C ret e o r t h e Concert of Po wer. , Asked what t h e Persi ans were d o i n g. D id wal l s s t i l l reach t o P i rreus ? Pl a i n ly from h i m t h ere was n o t h i n g of pro fi t to l earn , and so Gorgias T u rn ed his a t t e n t ion abo e, t o a root t hat seemed i n t eres t i ng. Y es, ' t was a verb h e h a d sough t for i n vain in regi o n s l ess buried, Rooted, h e foun l , clown i n H ades. A h ! would t h ey were all in t h e same place ! Teddy sat cl own w i t h o l d Pl i n y to a k w h e re h i s l ost book h ad gone to ;

E u c l i d soon cornered Co i n e , i n an angle t h ey chat t ed t ogeth e r. Seated on top of a fog ban k t h at rose from P h l ege­ t h o n s waters, Fear i n g n o cold o n his l u n o-s h i s shadowy l un gs, was L u c re t ius, L i s t ' n i n g to Billy, w h o told him of m o l e c u l es, bon d s , and of atoms, \ hi l e from t h e shades and t h ei r torments J udy \ as gai n i ng s uggest ions, H i n t s for t h e conference bo ard, a d m i red R h adaman­ thus' proceed i n gs, Thought suspen s i o n popular h ere from the dangl i n g form s a l l aro u n d h im . R o b w a s t h e h appiest , t h o ugh, r i g h t i n h i s element s u rely, Nursing his Plutonic fri en d s h i p at the feet of t h e k i n g of t h e regio n ,

I I


Sadly t h ey brought to an end t h e i r talks full of pl eas­ ure and profit. Black was t h e most loath to leave, to break off the t h read of h i s discourse. He'd gone to work with a system, to start with t h e fi rst man created, Follow t h em down in their course and notice in all l i nes their progress ; Now he had reached only Ada m , had learned who h i s mother-i n law was. H ow should h e now ascertain Adam 's subsequent l i fe and the oth ers' ? Out t h rough t h e i vory gat e fou nd t h ey their way as d irected. " Th i s is, I t h i nk, w hat I heard i n the word s of t h e s o n g that I men t ioned , " Si ghed Dr. Warren , as slowly t h ey climbed to reg ions t errestrial, " Somet h i ng I t hought t h en t hey sang about l eaving those real m s by compulsion . "

Tal k i n g of what t h ey ' d accom plished, d i scussi ng new means and methods. Suddenly, a l l t h rough t h e ki ngdom rose shouts and cries of vexat ion, " Bored are we with t h ese callers, t h ey ' l l waste u s to shades of ou r shadows Tal king so m uch an d so d ryly;" but loudest of al l was I x ion, C l ai m i n g h is t ort u re enough without this new i m po­ s i tion. A l l i nt erested i n wheel ing, they'd told h i m, but t!tey a l l rode safeties. Angri l y rose the grim monarch to cal m his i rasc ible subjects. ' ' Out of this place, all ye strangers, I ' ve m ercy enough on my people, Pity en ough for t h eir woes not t o burden their souls with n w torment . Go, and n e'er darken our portals, gol d leaf or not, t i l l you ' re sen t for. "

l

2


JJ.auutations. T H E C o - o R D :-

O R A CLE E D I TORS :-

" Seen too oft, fami l i ar w i t h her face,

" We sing of h eroes and of k i ngs, I n m ighty n u mbers mighty t h i ngs. " E D I TOR-I -C H I EF :-" Vengeance is m i ne,

I

We fi rs t endure, then pity, then em brace." will re­

PEPPER :-" He had a face l i k e a benedi c t i o n . "

PROF. ROBERTS :-" A sweet a n d l ovely gentleman . "

pay," saith the Lord . T H O S E WE D I D N OT

DR.

SLUG :-" Thousands were t h e're

and darker fame t hat dwell, whose deeds som e n obler poem shall ado r n . "

WIRE

r

:-" H ow green you are and fresh i n t h i s new

worl d . " B ROWN, ' 9 8 :-" Taught or untaught, t h e d u nce i s s t i l l

W I LSON :-" A s idle as a pai n t ed s h i p upon a pai nt e d

ocean. ' '

t h e same. " HuD o

C HA PMAN :-" H e knew t h e t averns well i n every town . "

:-" A babe

m

t h e house is a yell spring of

pleas u re. " W H I T M A N :-" H e wou l d not i n a peremptory t o n e,

LA WREN C E :-" T h e maternal m ilk scarce d ry upon h i s lips. "

Assert t h e nose u pon his face his own . " PJ ERCE :-1 do n o t want t h e presidency ; whom shall

GLEE C LUB :-" M usic hath power to charm a t o i l er, O u rs hath power t o b u rst

a

boiler. ' '

we put i n ? ' ' BARKER :-" For t h at t i red feel i n g t ake H 2 0 . "


ROBERT :-" Bu y a M c FA D D E

a bee."

PA .E :-" Th rough

:-" H e start , he m o ,·e , H e seems to know, T hat he'

: -"

Ju

t h e Devil d rives."

h ad e. "

Mr

s

R EED

H E D � f A X , 1 900 :-" I f d i rt were t rumps what hands

you would hold . " TE

A

E

P I K E :­

: - " My l i fe i

o n e damned horrid gri n d . "

T I K : - " But i n t h e m i d n ight's solemn h ush H e hol d s a hancl t hat i

not t h i ne,

He s i t teth close beside the wine, And dal l i e

he

E n t u n ed i n h i r

fter t h

next we meet.

!"

EE L L :-

GURNEY,

'

99 :-" The t imes h ave been,

That when the b rains were out, t he man would die. "

EELL :-" Stand not upon t h e order of your goi ng,

an()' t h e .

A n d Frenche

ripen ing b reath, M ay prove a beaut eous flower when

" 0 flesh, flesh, h o w art thou fi s h i fi ed

ELY : -

with a bobtail flush . "

AWTELLE :" F ul wel

� :- J

I " Their bud of love, by S u m m er'

P I K E :-

I ENT :-" Thou shadow of a

C LASS :-" He must n eeds go th at

lOR G E R MA

T l1 e empty vessel makes t h e greate t

so und . "

CLE

t h i n , bot h over bank

In hope her to attain by hook or crook . "

t h e laziest h ere below. "

T I TCOMB :-" There was a laugh i ng devil in h i s snare . " HoL rn

t hick and

and bush,

no e ful swetely ; he

pake ful fayr

scho I of

For F renche of Pari

But go at o nc e ."

ervice clevi ne, Mr

t rat ford upon Bowe, wa

to h i re unknowe. "

R

ELL, 1 900 :-" Be somewhat scanter of your

maiden presen ce. "

and cl everly, MI

DA COMBE : - " Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my

ins remem bered."


PROF. BAYLEY :-" The man that blushes is not quite

SPENCER :-" He was not merely a chip oi the old

a brute. "

block, b ut the old block itself. "

J EN K INS :-" Puffed up in h i s own conceit. "

PROF. 1IARQ ARDT :-" That fellow seem

F ITZGERALD : -" The face of a babe and the heart of a fiend . "

AVER I L L :-" E'en Sunday shi nes, no sabbath day to

TAYLOR :-" I m ight call h i m a t h i ng d ivine ; for no­

me. ' '

thing nat ural, I ever saw so noble."

GETCHELL :-' Often the cockloft is empty i n tho e

LEARNED :-" A fallen angel." H ooKE :-" A horse ! horse ! ' ' RICHARD M i ss

o

'98:,

SuLLlVA :

-

l

I

r I

j

A

horse !

whom Nat ure hath built many storie h igh. " 'I y kingdom for a

CLARK :-" H e givet h hi

" But love is blind, and lovers

Which only poets know."

can not see

FoL 'Oi\I :-" The lad ies call him sweet. "

The pretty follies that them_ _ selves commit."

H ARDY : -" T h e woman hater. " G I BBON S :-" H appy as the day i long. " " PA " A L LEN :-" Oh cruel master of ladies' heart "

trifles . " '99

THE M 1 SES STEPHEN :-"Two loYely berries moulded : -" Company, villainous company, hath

been the spoil of me .. M iss

� eloved sleep."

HAYNE :-" There is a plea ure i n poetic pai n ,

PROF. STET ON :-" A s napper up of u nconsidered PuT A M,

to me to

possess b ut one idea, and that i a wrong one. "

on one stem."

,

H ERRICK,

'98 : - '

\tVrapped in conceit' i m penetrable

fog."

COLE :-

STHE� o :-" : Iuch may be m ade of an I rish man if

" She is beautiful and t herefore to be woo'd ;

he be caught young."

She is a woman, t herefore to be won . " 1

5


ADA t

G U I L D :- " Nature made h i m , t hen broke t h e mould . "

t i m es a great deal worse. "

E E L L :-" H i s equal l i ves n o t , t h a n k G o d for t h at . " P U T N A ::-f, '99 : - ' T h e d e v i l hath power t o ass u m e a

VosE :-" As t h i n as picn i c lemonade. "

pl eas i n g sh ape. "

M r s Fo TER

HA

C O M :-

I love. "

LA M B :-" Thou who hast the fatal gift of beauty."

They al ways tal k , who never t h i n k . "

DRU I

lOND : -

" An idler i s a wat c h that wan ts both hands,

O.K

As useless i f i t goes as i f i t stands. "

" H e looked l i k e a l ion with a gloomy st are, And o'er his eyebrows h u n g

" I am in love, but a t eam of horses

CoNFORTH :-" The accident of an accident."

" Th ey n ever taste, w h o n ever d r i n k ;

BR

:-

shall not pluck t hat from m e nor who ' t i s

CoR O N :-" A gross, fat man, as fat as butter. " M1

:-" Every one is as God made h i m and oft­

]1 i s matted

hair."

1 86


T!ll m nuhllÂŁbgmÂŁnf!l. We are proud t o state t h at all t h e art i st i c work for the '97 O RA C L E has been d o n e right h e re at Col by.

'vVe h ave not gon e beyond t h e l i m i t s of t h e cam pus for t h e work in t h i s depart men t .

I n previous years considerable art i s t i c work h as b e e n done by professionals i n Boston, New York a n d elsewhere, and by art ists i n town.

For the fi rst time in the history of the O RA C L E

every draw i n g h as been made by C ol by st udents.

To Fran k W. Alden, '98,

. 0 . Stevens, '99,

and H ascall S. H al l , '96, all praise is due for t h e i r excellent and helpful work. We t h a n k M r. S . L. Preble for h i s excel lent group pict u res. We also t h a n k Ed ward Stern & Co. , o u r publ i shers. for their t imely suggest i o n s, a s i t a n ce and i n t erest i n t h i s publication.

[ 7

/


'Y'/. O . S�

1 88


1 89


INDEX Alden Bros. . . . . . . Arnold, \\'. B. & Co. , . Bessey, Drs., . . . . . Boothby, L. T. · on, . . . . Boston University Law chool, Bowden, Lewis F. , . . . . B ridge Teachers' Agency, Brown & l\Ierrick, . . . Chadwick's Music Store, Colby Echo, The . Carleton, T. F. , . Cotrell & Leonard, . Darrah's Bazaar . . . Dolloff G. S. & Co. , Dunham , H . R. , . Elmwood Hotel, . . Emerson Shoe Co. , Emery, E. H . , . . . Estes, S. A . , . . . Flood, G. S. Co., Foster, D. P. , . . . Foster, E. \V . , . . . Fryatt, F. A. & Co. , Garcelon, G. P. , . . Getchell, Colby, . . Gilpatrick, Evander, . Globe Steam Laundry, Goodridge, F. J. , . . . Gould, H. C. , . . . . . Gove, E. L. , . . . . Green, S. A. & A. B . , . Gurney, Frank L . , . . Hanson, L. B. , . . . . . . . Hanson, Webber & Dunham , Harriman, F. A. , . Heald, P. S. , . . . Hendrickson, C. A. . Herbst, P . P. . . . . Hill, C. A. , . . . . . Hinds • oble, . . Hutchins, Dr. G. \ . , Johnson, Dr. M. D. , Johnson, r. & Co. , Learned & Brown, . .

TO

ADVERTISEME NTS. Page.

29 27 16 29 17 28 16 35 8

16 29 21 26 6 1

2 8 15 34 14 29 33 IO

33 27 8 22 25 2 13 33 2 19 17 32 33 28 20 20 23 25 34 11 22

Loud & Sons, Lovejoy, F. A. & Co., Mail Pub. Co. , . . . Mathews. C. K. , Ierrill, P. I. , . M i ller, C. R. , . Mitchell , H. R. & Son, M itchell, Sam & Co., . Noel, J. 0. E. , Otten, A . , . . . . . Peavy, J. & Bros. , . Pierce, E. A. , . . . . Pollard & l\I itchell, Pomerleau, . Preble, S. L. , . Redmgton & Co., . . . Richmond Straight Cut, . . Robinson, James A. & Son, . Rollins, L. W . , . . Sentinel, . . . Shem pp, Dr. H. E. , imons, Bro. & Co. , Smith, C. A., Photo. Co. , . Soule, Dr. E. M. , . Spaulding & Kennison, Spaulding, W. D., . . . . . Stern, Edward & Co. , Inc. , Thompson & West, Thayer & Hill, . . . Towne, I. J. & H. C. , . . . . . nion Mutual Life Insurance Co. , University Book Store, . . . University Steam Laundry, Vigue, J. A. , . . . . . . Ward, Samuel, Company, Wardwell Bros., Wheeler, C. H. , Wheeler Bros. , . Wilshire, W. M., . . . . . Winship Teachers' Agency, . Witham, C. , . Wright, E. A. , . . . York, A. H. & Co. ,

Page.

12 27 3 29 7

34

13 31 5 20 28 4 4 31 9 JO

5 32 26 l

27 24 16 12 4 12 30 28 16 19 25 20 31 35 19 29 13 13 26 21 35 34 10


May 8. Arbor Day. Cut in the afternoon. l\fay 9. 111 . S C. Colby 1 , on the campus. Co-ords hold mock Republican convention and nominate McKinley on the first ballot. 1 2,

Publishers of

Have Your College and

THE WATERVILLE EVENING MAIL

School Printing done by

THE WATERVILLE MAIL �Weelcly) �

Cb c man publisbins Co. folders, programmes, Catalogues, pamphlets, etc., at short notice

First-Class Work at Low Prices

MAIL PUBLISHING CO. WATERVILLE, MAINE

III


May 13. Bowdoin 18, Colby 81 on the campus. Minstrel sbotv at city Barn. Roasts galore. Alden stars as an animal designer. " Father and mother both dead ? "

E.

J\.

P I E RCE

Ph otogra ph er to th e Peopl e \Ve warra n t o u r Photographs, i n M a terial, W o rkmanship a n d F i nish, to be Superior

93 Main Street, Waterville, Me.

POLLARD & M ITCH ELL

G.

V. SPAU LDING

Livery, Boarding

W. F. K E N N I SON

S PAU LDI NG & K E N N ISON . . . PR ACT I C A L. . .

and Baiting Stable

Painters and •

GOOD TEA�1 S AT R EASONA B LE PRICES Hacks and Barges Furnished to Order for any occasion

Paper- H angers

WALL PAPERS

Pasi:: • mgers taken to any Desired Point Day or Night

7 6 w. TEMPLE STREET, WATERVILLE, ME.

ELMWOOD A N D S I LV E R ST. STABLES IV


May 14. Prex lectu _res in Chapel on Aims and Melhods in the Study of Literature. l\Ia y 15. Colby Junior League contests. Coburn Reception to vi ilor in Memorial Hall. 24, Higgins 1 . Hebron 19, Ricker 1.

RICHMOND

nrw ronSOITifiL ffiITLOITS J. 0. E. NOEL, Proprietor

S T R}\ I G H T C U T N o .

CIGA R E T T ES

CIGARETTE SMOK ERS who are willing to pay a little more than the price charged for the ordinary trade cigarettes will find THIS BRAND superior to all others. These Cigarettes are made from the brio-htest, most deli­ cately flavored and highest cost Oold Leaf grown i n irginia. This is the Old and Original Brand of Straight Cut Cigarette!', and was brought out bv us in the year 1 8 7 5 . B E W A R E OF I MITATION S , and observe t h a t t h e firm name as below is on every package.

EVERYTHING IN LATEST STYLE A ND NEW THROUGHOUT

SPECIAL NOTICE GIVEN T O

A LLEN

COLLEGE PATRONAGE FIVE CHAIRS

&

GINTER

T H E AM E R I C A N T O B A C C O C O M PA N Y

GIV E US A CALL

Successor, Manufacturer

36 Main Street, Corner of Silver

R I C H JV\ O N D , V I R G I v

IA


fay 16.

fay 1

.�.

-

ri

Coburn defeats Hebron, to 8, aud wins Jack ::\lcCone defeats the Colby' 23 to 21. Jack as isledthebychampionship. local team. Bat�s i s, �f. .s . C. at Lewiston. Students alla go to City Barn aud vote for a City Bu1ldmg. ,

to,

--

� -�

. G. S . DO L LO F F & CO.

U p-·to .... Date Clothierrs . . f arrnisherrs }-tatte rrs .

.

and

t t t t

Specialties : Fine Dress Su its, Bicycle and Golf S uits, and Hose. N egl ige Shirts, Sweaters. N ec k wear in all the l atest novelties.

S p ecial attention given to students' trade.

G . S. D O L LO F F &. C O . S U C C E SSO�S TO

D O L LO F F & D U N H � M 46

fll A i l'f S T � E E T

VI


May 19. l\lay 20. l\lay 2 r .

Foss and Padel ford roast an ta in an X-ray lecture at City Barn. Bates 191 Colby 31 at Lewiston. Hebron i 7, Colby 8, at Hebron.

T H E B E A CO N T E A C H E R S ' A G E N CY

7 3 1 and 7 3 2 Tre m o n t Te m p l e

P. I . M E R R I L L , M anager C o l by , ' 8 3

W H AT COLBY GRADUAT ES SAY

J . E . Burke, S u p e • i n tencl e n t o f Schools, Lawrence, Mass.:--" Ju all m y dealings with P. I. 'lerril l , o f the Beacon Teachers' Agency. I have found h i m courteous. genllemanly, traightforward and altogether reli­ aule. It is safe to follow his advice and put coufidence in his j udgment. H e recommend candidates with caution anci serves his clients faithfully. I would have no hesitancy in engaging a teacher upon :Mr. Merrill's endorsement." \V. K . \ V h i t t l n , uper i nt e n d P n t o f Schools, \Vesterly, I. :-" I can heartily recommend the Beacon Teachers' Agency to school officials and teachers. Havinir h:i.d dealiu?;s with Mr. i\lernll, the manager, I can say that he is very considerate in the n umber of candidates recommended and j ud icious i n their election. Superintendents applyinir to him for teach­ ers can be sure that they will not be flooded with applications." Cha'!. B . Wilson, Profe-sor of Biology, Stale 'ormal School, West­ field, lass.-" I consider that the Beacon Teachers' Agency is, without excep­ tion, the best managed agency with which I am acquainted. The reasons for this opinion are as follows : I have been connected with several agen­ cies and know from actual experience that the manager o f the Beacon Agency takes more p ains to become thoroughly acquainted with those who have registered in his agency than any of the other managers with whom I have had dealings. H e endeavors to ascertain, i f possible. just what a teacher desires for a position, and whether they are capable of fi l ling such a place or not " I considl'r this to be the true work of an agency manager, but most of them fall far short of it, and, with the excepti01 .. of Mr. Merrill, none that I have met have shown any real effort or desire to attain unto it. ' ' Mr Merrill then endeavors to find the right place for bis teacher, and in this he has been eminently successful . I consider his method of notify0 b n t ac r e q e , a )� � o r u t t em ployed in other agencies, and I am confident that school boards and superintendents appreciate such a rational method far better than we who are teachers." Albert Robinson, SuperintendPnt o f School�, Warren, Mass.-" In my dealings with the Beacon Teachers' Agency I have found that the man­ agem<'nt recommends to positions only such candidates as are qualified for the sam e .and are likely of election This is a source of confidence and satisfaction, both to teachers and em ployers of teachers. " I heartily com 'tlend the business mtegrity of lllr. Merrill and his de­ sire to serve faithfully his patrons." C . F. Leadbetter, Principal Berlin H igh School, Perlin, N . H . :­ " I have bad relations with Mr. P. I. Merrill, of the Beacon Teachers' Agency, extending over some yea i:s and have u n iformly found him courte· ons and helpful, a man of sound JUrlgment and common sen e. on whose advice it is always safe to rely. I believe he labors conscientiously for the best interests of teachers and schools." Cha•. P. Barnf's, A.1'1., Principal of H igh School, Attleboro, Mass.:-" After much unsatisfactory experience with teachers' agencies,

BOSTON

it was my good fortune lo register with P . I. )lerrill, o f The Beacon Teach­ ers' Agency, in November, 1 896. On January 4th following, 1 began work in m y present position as a direct result of his effort i n my behalf. " Why is his agency the best ? Becau e he look a man up thoroug h ly� bas practical knowledge of the requirements of the field, recomm end­ only one or two candidates for any vacancy, a n d inspires a feel ing of con­ fidence in teachers and school authorities alike . ., C . L. J u d d k i n �, P r i n c i pa l o f I D gh chool, Oxford, Mass. :-· • I t gives m e pleasure to b e a b l e to recommend the Beacon Teacher ' Agency as one which is square and straightforward iu all 11 dealin gs, and 11 h c tf t " 0 ? , e s . fi e • � re and limited to a few good candidates, those who best fill the requirement o f the place, and i n the long run this plan o f procedure must neces arily succeed." E . L . Getchell, P r i n c i pal o f H i e h c h o o l , Lubec, l\Ie :-" In my I have estimation, the Beacon leads all other 'ew England agencies. found )[r. Merrill, its manager, courteous and gentlemanly in all hi dealings, prompt a n d energetic in bis management, and devoted Lo the in terests of all who enter the Beacon Agency. The value of hi· work i shown by the fact that, to my own knowledge. he ecured more and better positions for the Class o f '!16 at Colby than did all the other agencies com­ bined. I can honestly a n d heartily endorse the Beacon Teachers' Agency and its genial manager." Harry W . Dunn, P r i nc i pal of A c a d e m y , Mon o n , l\Ie.:-" I take genuine pleasure in expressing my a pi;> reciation of the character o f the Beacon Teachers' Agency. )ly e.xpenence has satisfied m e that your agency can be relied upon for prompt and valuable i n formation, timely suggestions, and active personal intere t i n each individual case. I n all these qualities I have found it superior to any other that I have tried, and 1 can recommend i t especially to all graduates of Colby who are de irous of ecuring teaching positions." Wellington Hodgkins, P r i n c i pal H i gh chool, outh Dennis:, Mass :-" Teachers wishing the services of a Bureau will fi n d i t to their advantage to employ l\lr. :\Ierrill, of the Beacon Teachers' Agency. M r . Merrill deals mainly with chool officials direct, a n d h i s notifications are reliable. I cordially recommend him." w. L . J o n e s . P r i n cipal o f the H i g h chool, Milbridge, :\le. :-" r have always found Mr. P. I. )ferrill, of the Beacon Teachers• Agency, cour­ teous, straightforward and active in advancing- the interest of his patron . The positfon I now bold was secured through bis recom mendation . ' ' W . C . Burnham, Commercial Depart m e n t , H igh Srhool, Brain­ tree. Mass.:-" I cannot speak too highly of the Beacon Teachers' Agency, so ably conducted by M r. Merrill. For prompt and efficient -ervice, cour­ teous treatment, ability and tact to frnd the right man for the right place. this agency i u n exce!led and offers superior advantages to teachers seek­ ing positions."

R.

��: � ��

�icf ����� �� {j1fi � �1 � � �1e��:;\io�r5t �! fa : ;�rl�� ����J;; ��d�

VII

�fa�;� ��� ����1 �F��: �f t ?i� ��i\'���

�����l�


May 22. May

23.

Sophomore debate at Baptist Church. Nelson says " Sculptuary." Colby 2s, N . H. C. 16. Bates 16, Bowdoin 15, 11 inn ings. Everybody goes up tream in the e\â&#x20AC;¢ening. Corsi! gets Hutch on his ear.

Chadwick's Music Store

PIANOS ORGANS SEWING M ACHINES

MUSICAL MERCHANDISE Shoes are not copies, they are " originals." In design, stock and workmanship t hey are as perfect as shoes can be. They have

VIOLINS BANJOS GUIT ARS, ETC.

Picture Frames Made to Order

Chadwick's Music Store

Pratt Fasteners

f 54 MAIN STREET, WATER VILLE, MAINE

EVANDER GI LPATRICK ontractor and Builder

(No knots, no bother.) FAST COLOR EYELETS AND HOOKS (never get brassy). They are ANTI-SQUEAK ( patent filling between soles). They are UP-TO-DATE. Calf, Russia Calf, Vici Kid (new) in Black or Tans. Patent and Enamel, Cordovan, Kangaroo, Elastic Web Shoe (new), for outing and sports. $3, $3.50, $4, $4.50, $5, $6

C

Job Work and General Repairing by Competent Help

{

SHOP ON FRONT STREET

PORTLA N D STORE Under Prebl e House

OP POSI TE

Factory, Brockto n , nass.

-SEND FOR CATAl.OGUE--

DEA L E R IN

Lum ber and Aroostook Shingles

Sold only to consumer at ONE fair profit. Our Mr. 03good will visit Waterville, Spring and Fall, with samples to take orders. N. B.-.M.ail orders receive prompt attention.

R. B. G RO V E R & CO . ,

Best quality o f Germ an, Italian and Russian Strings for al l kinds of Stringed Instruments. Every S t ring Warrante d .

CITY

HALL

Residence, 5 BELMONT ST., WATERVILLE, ME. III


May 26. May 27. May 28.

College Sociable at the Bapti t Church. College field day. Five College and three Intercollegiate records broken. '98 win Shannon Cup. Santa lectures in the Chapel on the Higher Criticism.

� �������- � We m a k e a s p e c i a lty

of

C l ass W o r k

Having been engaged this year to do more Classes than any other firm in the State. Every ltfember of the Classes of •93, ' 9 4 , ' 95 . ' 1J 6 and '97 voted t o elect us as Class Photographer

S . L. P R E B I-1 E

C o l l ege Ph ot o g ra p h e r 66

lVf A I N ST. , WAT E RV I L L E , lVf A I N E

To obtain work equal to ours, one must visit the leading studios in a few of our largest cities. Our method of making photographs is unsuccessfully imitated by other photographers throughout the State. """" """"

N. B . - Th e p u b lic is cordially invited to call at o u r S t u di o and inspect o u r work


May 29. May 30.

Freshman Reading'. '98 War Cry appears, likewise bell in the organ. N o Ca n e Rush. Guild and B i l l y Holmes the o n l y Freshmen on earth. Prex lectures i n the morning i n C hapel on Emerson. Memorial Day. Prex sanctions War Cry in Chapei. Pratt finishes sixth out of one hun dred starters i n Revere Road R acr-.

R E D I N GTO N & c o . DEA L E R S

IN

F u r n i t u re , C a r p ets , C roc ke ry , M i r ro r s ,

M a tt res s e s , Etc.

S I LV E R ST. , w ATE RV I L L E, H A V E Y O U T R I Eb O N E O F T H OS E

T O J't\ A L E S

MISS

F. f\ . F RY ATT

& CO.

� �.,u,��.,u,.,u,.,u,.,u,.,u,

Fash i o n a ble M i l l i n e rs

J U ST O V E R F R O/\'\ P A R I S? S T E P I N A N D G ET O N E A T T f-\ E N E W L U N C f-\

3 C O JV\ JV\ O N ST. �· H . Y O R K , P R O P .

1V1 E .

WAT E R V I L L E , M E . �

Tri m med Work a Spec i a l ty


June r. June 2.

Tennis Team

goes to Portland. 'if> Oracle out. Santa on the slrin�. Sha.nnon wins and McFadden loses at Portland. Reception at Ladies' H a U , given by the of ' 9 8 to t h e of '99.

girls

girls

t

Boat Rowers J�h nso n 's Bicycle Riders 1 Anod yne t • t Baseball Players L 1n1men .

!

For I NT ERNAL as m uch as E XT E RNAL use

IS

US E D

AN D

For Colds, Coughs, Sore-Throal, Cramps Pains Our boys a l l l i ke Johnson·s Anodyne Liniment. For bruises, strain or muscular lameness i t most certainly i s a l l ) ou c la i m for i t. W i shini:- you cont i n ued success H. S . CORN I S H , Athletic fanager Boston Athletic Assn. J n practice. as in professional rowing, strains and overworked m u scles are not uncommon, which vour Johnson·s Anodyne Liniment i s well calculated io relieve promptly. I gladly add my indorsement of i t to the many you could no doubt obtain if you wish J . J . CASEY from professional oarsmen. I have used vour Johnson's Anodvne Liniment with much satisfaction. Ba eball players should all u e it. I n fact, among professional athlete a good rub down with the old Anodyne after a lively spurt of any kind wi l l prevent many a sore m u sc le and stiff joint I sincerely believe. WM. EWING Manager and C:tplain New York Ball Club I have used your Anodyne Liniment during the past few years for removing s t i ffness of t he muscles after long rides and have never found anything to do the work so q u i c k ly and effectively. have also used i t very successfully for m u scular rheumatism. J . J . FECITT, President of the Roxbury Bicycle Club. W el l - k nown Bicycle Rider

I

U n l i ke any Other

E N DO RS E D

BY

ON E

!

Price,

AN D

ALL

I have k n o w n of y o u r Johnson · s Anodyne L i n i ­ m e n t b e i n g u s e d with m u c h satisfaction f o r so •ne time. Probably among athletes no severer test could be applied than i n the numerous departments of the gymnasium. J . H . C LAU E ·, Champion Jumper Boston Athletic Association

! !

For SHff Joinls, lameness and Soreness of any kind

Having used Johnson's Anodyne Liniment on a friend who was suffering with Lumbago with good re­ sults, I recommend 11 to any one in need of a good liniment. W �I. CORCORAN, Cycle Trainer, Boston Working certain muscle more than others causes muscular oreness which should be attended to at once. cheerfully endorse John on's Anodyne L i n i ­ ment, a n d have found i t invaluable f o r removing sore­ ness caused by being i n various athletic games. and our members use it extensively for the same purpose. WM. J . CASEY, ice Pres. Trimount Athletic Club

I

Honest Competition we w i l l meet half way.

IF YOU C A N 'T GET IT Send to u s .

I

Your Johnson's Anodyne Liniment I find to be the most valuable of any I ever u sed. I had a strained cord that bothered me for four years. I did n o t fi n d a n y relief u n t i l I u s e d y o u r valuable Liniment. WM. M I LLS Champion Sprinter of New England.

Superior to a ny Other

B u t against Dishonest Imitation, we declare ETERNAL WAR.

35 cts . , six, S2.oo.

I . S . JOHNSON & CO . ,

2 2 Custom H ouse St. , Boston , Mass.


June 3· M. S. C. Colby 3, at Orono. Bates 14, Bowdoin 1 1 . June 5· Interco!legiate J'.ield . Day. Bowdoin rn8, Bates 13, Colby 1 0 , M. S. C. 4 . �f;������w�:;1�\� Bicycle Race. Main's Circus plays in Waterville, not . n.

� �������

LOUD & SONS � ��/if

In Burleigh Block, Cor. Main and Temple Sts. R.ooms 1 and ::z

Teeth extracted without pain, . . . . . . . jo.25 Best Teeth on Rubber, . . . . . . . , . . 8 oo A Good Set, • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.oo Elegant Gold Crowns, . . . . . . . . . . 5. 00 Bridge work o r teeth without plates a t lowest possible prices. Gold Fillings . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ c . oo up Silver Fillings, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 cents Cement Fillings, . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 cents

Artisti c Footwear

No charge for extracting where artificial teeth are made. Cleaning, 50 cents, or free when $2.00 worth of work is done

D r. E . M . S O U LE, M a n a g e r

For Gentlewomen and

For Fine Stationery, School Sup­

Gentlemen

plies, Tennis and Base Ball Goods, Spaulding's Book Store is H eadquarters.

A

specialty

is made of Engraving Cards, Invitations, Etc.

1 37 MAIN STREET

SPAUhDING'S BOO� sronE

W . D � S PAU � D I N G , P roprietor

WATERVILLE, MAINE, �I


June 6. M. S. C. 15, Bates 7 : the beginning of the end for Bates. June . Santa fires the '98 Physics Class.

Obi

19·�39999������ ������ �

Say !

� � �

:� And Fine Floral Work for all occasions, can be obtained at the

Do you know get the

. . . City 0rttnhousw .

where to

H. R. M I T C H E L L & S O N ,

best C hocolates,

al l kinds of

Down-Town Stands at

C andy, Ice

i �

i

C. H. WHEELER'S, f f 3 Main St.

C rea m , Sod a, Fruit, N uts,

WHEELER BROS., 44 Main St.

Cut Flowers for Gradu at­ ing Exercises, Etc . ?

..

Pro p rietors

� �

We No. 2 HALL COURT

are sole agents for Baker's

No. 6 MAPLE ST.

and M orton' s Chocolates and Bon-Bon s.

We also

Meat s , Fish, G roceries and Provisions , Fruits a n d Confectionery Green Stuff of all kinds in t heir seasons Special Prices t o Clubs All Goods Delivere d Prom ptly

. do Catering at reasonable prices in the best of sty le.

A t C . H . W H E E L E R ' S , 1 1 3 M ai n St .

OPEN EVENINGS

E.

W H E E L E R B R O S . , 44 M ai n St .

XIII

L

GOVE, Proprietor


June 9.

J une 10.

Dr. and Mrs. Butler receive the Seniors. Grand Junior Spread a t No. 5, Ladies' Hall, by the girls of '97. Last Cllapel for 'g6. Colby 7, Bates 6, on the campus. Bates sees her fin ish . Collins aud M iss Moffatt set up on t h eir engagement.

G. S. F L008 & CO. S H I !'> P E R S A N D D E A L E R S I N

All Ki �ds �£ Anthracite and B1tummous .

\:._, . . . r.

\JOOD, L I M E

A LSO

,

0 AL

G E M E N T, H AV, SIR A \J A N D DRA I N P I P E O rders P ro m p t l y F i l l ed and Ca refu l l y Attended to

G0A L Y A R S S A N S 0 F F I GE :

MAIN A N B f'LEASA NT STS. XIV


J une 1 1 . June 12. June 13.

Dr. Hill banquet the ball team at the Elmwood. C. Oliver Jselin in town. Freshmen or J u n ior try to postpone Sophomore Dec., but are foiled. Soph. Dec. at the C h u rc h . " I pass." M . I. S. A . A . field day. Portland 1st, Bangor 2d, Coburn 3d. Reception to viJ<itors i n Memorial Hall. Bowdoin 14, Bales 1 1 . Bate ' fi n ish. Bowdoin wins '96 p e n n a n t .

��������-��-

__ � �

E . H . E M E RY 12

HlLOR

M A I N S T R E ET

W AT E RV I L L E , M E . A FULL L I N E O F

F oreign

,p

Domestic W ool e n s . . . I T

S U I T I N GS, TROUS E R I N GS Parti cula r Attention Given to College Trade

AND

O V E RC O AT I N G S

Prices as Low as the Lowest

SATI S FACTI O N

GU ARANTEED

F. A. RO B E RTS, Agent N o. 3 C . H . xv


June q, June 1 7,

Ball team dine on Landlord Judkins at the Elmwood. Bachelor 8, Benedicts Old maids set up a t L�dies' Hall. Rochland 9.

7.

Colby 25,

-----

� in

OFFICES :

2 A Beacon Street B OSTO N

S e n d for

1 69 Wabash Ave n u e

� B O S TO N

C H I CAGO

A.

E. B ES EY, H O URS 1 0 TO 1 2 A . M. 1 TO 3 P. M . 7 T O 8 P. M . S U NDAYS 3 TO 4 P.M.

M . D.

M.W.

WATERVILLE,

B ESSEY,

H O URS 8 TO 1 0 A . M. 3 TO 5 P. M . EVENI NGS S UNDA YS II TO 10 A . M .

Tt{AYE� & H l llll Physiei&ns and S u tTg eons

M.D.

MAINE

Residence, 7 2 Elm Street Office, I 16 Main Street , over Ticonic Bank

F.

Telephone Connection

@abinet �hotos $ 1 . 00

to

$s.oo

AG E N CY M A N U A L

119

m a in

S t tT e e t

C. THAYER, M . D.

Home, u 4 M a i n St.

].

F.

H I LL, M . D .

Hom e, 225 Main St.

�be '-!olbr JEcbo BI-W E E K LY

P ER DOZ E N

PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS

T H E C . A . S M I T H P H OT O C O . 17 M A I N STR E ET

To keep in touch with the activities of the College,

W AT E RV I L L E, M E.

subscribe for the ' ' Echo. ' '

Uerms, $1.50

We h ave the Largest a n d Best I n stru ments th i s s i d e of Boston .

a }?ear, i n at>"ance

S E N D TO THE B SINESS M A N A G E R FOR A S A M PLE C O P Y

XVI


J

�; \���� �� �!1� 1 �d �::�dd �;���:° : nx:;

e ies fo s a i i i:;f:;kfif���e;� b:����ta m . ��C�ha�pe�l.� ��� � une

18•

�Go TO ! o� SEND TO�

BHJSOJ, WEBBEl & DUJBllW * F O R ._

Base Ball, Foot Ball

Boston

AND

Tennis Goods

£aw

Gymnasium Supplies

Uniu¢rsitp

Scboot

Jlsbburton Plact, Boston

Athletic Games and

For circular giving full information , apply to the Dean

Everything in Uniforms

E�mun� 1' . l3ennett, 11. JD.

from Caps to Shoes They are A gents for W r ight & D itso n ' s a n d

A . G. S palding & B ro . ' s G oods and C rawford B icycles

S EN D F O R CATALOGUE . . . . . XVII


J une Waterville 10, Colby 6. Five innings. The Missei; G allert receh•e. June 23. Exams begin. June 24. Zeta Psi receives at Soper's Hall. Event of the season. 20.

Colby Alumni all over Maine are sending us their School and other Printing.

Are You one of them ?

Fine Job ... . . . Printing Embossing

College and School Work a Specialty

and

Lithographing

Every Fadlity for Catalogue and Neat Printing of Every Description

Samples and Estimates Cheerfully Furrilihed

.-

THE WATERVILLE SENTINEL

PLEASF.S OLD AND YOUNG TELEPHONE

83 .MAIN STREET, WATERVILLE, .MAINE" ,

34-2 XVIII


J u n e 25. J u n e 26. J u n e 27.

M i n eralogy Exam. Six g i r l a nd one boy. No one of the seven gets any rank for t h e s pr i n g term . '99 exits a l kowhegan. Exams e n d . '99 Co·ord exit a t t h e F.lmwood. 'Q girls exit on the " St r e a m . " H a :.c a l l H a l l e n terta i n s

'g6.

WE

f it1 s b-� C l a s s

ARE

H E A DQ U A RT E RS

For Everyth ing that can be found in a

f u t1 n i s h i n g

G e n ts '

tfou s-e

The Finest Assortment of DRESS SHIRTS, NECKWEAR, GLOVES, ETC. To be found in this city

T h e o n l y A gents for t h e " LA M SO N & H U B BA R D " H ATS i n the C i ty

We a l s o carry t h e Best L i n e of F i n e T r u n k s a n d V a l i se s

L. B . H A N S O N , BOSTON LINEN for fashionable correspondence.

for

every-day

Ask your Stationer for these goods

Paper Merchants and Manufacturing Stationers

College Invitations a Specialty

J. &

H . C. T O \iV N E

L A TEST STYLE

IN

C A I:,L A N D S E E O t " R

SAMUEL WARD COMPANY 49 and 51

I.

jfasbionable milliner� anb jfanc� (Doobs

BOSTON BOND for foreign letters. BUNKER HILL use.

N o . 4 2 l\!I a i n S t re e t Watervi lle, M a i ne

FRANKLIN ST. , BOSTON XIX

CONNENCENENT Hats 6ND BONNETS C l a s s a n d S o c i ety C o l o rs A l w a y s H ad at Low est P ri c e s

84 M a i n S t . , \7V a t e r ' i l l e


une 2

June 29.

Corumencement begins. Baccalaureate Sermon by Ex-President Robins. Vesper;; i!J the Chapel at four. addressed by Prof. . hailer Mathews. Board­ man M1ss10nary ermon, by Rev. F. ir. Preble, 'St. Presentation Day. Junior Exhibition. Phi Beta Ka ppa Banquet

I U n i versity Book Store ST n BIJ E g I I ! � I P. P. HERBST �IO a od fancQ 'l)ake rQ g

C . A . H I L L' S uvERv AND B0 A R 8 I N G

r\

T EM P LE

STR E ET

o

Stationery and Other College Supplies

0

PATRONS RECE I V E T H E PERSONAL ATT E

TIO

C.O LLEQE TEXT B O O K S

Second-Hand Books Bought and Sold

Tennis and Sporting Goods a Specialty

5ERT1'AM

O F T H E P R O P R I ET O R

C.

RICHARD.S ON

No. r n SOUTH COLLEGE

S AT I S F A CT I O N G U A R A N T E E D

<>-O-O-O<X> <> OO<>O<>OOO<>O<>O<>O-O<><>O-O <> O-O<><>O-O <> OO<>O<>O

<><><><><><> <><><><><><> OO<>O<>O <><><><><><> <><><><><><> <><><><><><> <><><><>

. A . O TT E N

Whoiesale and Retatl

R EAL O R I G I N A L

����� : ��: � �

j t s a e impl ies, and Otten's O. K. you will find all his other Bakery Products O. K. also. H O T R O L L S E v e ry M o r n i n g a n d E v e n i n g

R e m e m b e r t h e N u m b e rs, 39 a n d !41 Te m p l e St.

� § g

i

g

xx

Toba ccon i st

Manufacturer of the Celebrated K. P. lO CENT CIGAR

89 MAI N ST R EET W aterv ilte, Me.


June 30. '<)6 Class Day. President Butler inaugurated. July 1. Commencement Day Alumni Dinner. Alumni Game ; Alumni 4, Colby I . Band Concert. President's Reception . July 2 . General Exodus. � ------

r·..... . .. . ..... .....

.

..... . . .. .. ....... ....... .....

. ......

W I NS H I P TEAC H ERS'

AGENCY:-i

(N. E. Bureau of Education-The Oldest Teachers' Agency in New England)

P RO M PT A T T E N T I O N

COURTEOUS TREATMENT

3 SO M E R S E T ST R E ET, B O ST O N

L

We

F A I R D E A L I NG

B E S T EQ U I PM E

T

W e st e r n O ff i c e , TO P E K A , K A N S .

W . F . J A R V I S , M a n a ge r

are daily in receipt of calls for efficient teachers of all grades to fill positions in the best schools in every part of the country. �:e9d�::n: is often greater than the supply. Send for Circulars and Regist�a:i:n B9la9n�:· ..,...... . • ....

9

I N T E R C O L L E G I AT E B U R Ef\ U

COTR E L L

&

LEO NARD

4 7 2 - 4 7 4 B ro a d w ay , A l b a n y , N . Y .

MAKERS OF

C aps, Go w n s an d H o od s

To the American Colleges and Universities, including Colby, Bates, Bowdoin, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Columbia, Williams , Amherst, Dartmouth, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, Mount Holyoke, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, University of Illinois, Etc. I llustrated monograph, samples, prices, etc . , upon request. Class Contracts a Specialty. Gowns for the Pulpit and Bench.

XXI


September 23. Term begins. September 24. Fir t Chapel. Co-ords take up two more Freshman seats. Mary Anna Sawtelle joins the Faculty. Prof. Wm. Mathews, '35, speaks. September 25. Y. ?11. C. A and Y. W. C . A . Reception at Memorial Hall. �

-

-

@@@@@@@@@@@@@ Learned & Brown

T. ]. FROTHINGHAM Proprietor

PLUMBERS AND STEAM. AND HOT WATER FITTERS

6lobc ... . . STEA M . .

Laundry /P

DEALERS I N ALL KI N DS O F

26, 28, 30 and 32 TEMPLE STREET

flumbing and Steam Fitters' Supplies

PORTLAND, ME.

A ge n t s f o r E l e ctr i c H e at R e g u l at o r

27 M A I N S T R E ET , W aterv i l l e , M e .

W. B. Chase, Agent for Colby University

XXII


W

O Ul n ro ��

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'The undergraduate or the new-fledged alumnus who reads this was i n

the p r imary schoo l w h e n we fi rst concei ved the idea, years ago, t hat t h e sclzoolbooks l ying d iscarded a n d d usty o n everybody's shelves, or unfor­ gotten in closets and garrets, ough t to be rescued from premature obl iv ion, and made to con t i n ue their useful ness i n this al ready too expensive world - prolonging their own l ife, and at the same time saving di mes and dollars t o many a needy student. To-day every student and every teacher k no ws, and we want every parent to learn, that no school book should be t h rown a'rny u n til we have been given a chance to appraise it. E veryone knows, too, that we can suppl y pro mptly, and at N e w York prices, a ny school book of any publ isher - probably second-hand if desired ; surely new if we happen to be out of second-hand. M o re than that, we stand the postage or else we prepay the expressage. Swiftness, courtesy, and fair prices make u p our golden rul�, and we bestow the same careful considera­ tion u pon the boy or girl in the remote hamlet who wants one book i n a · :.-1 h ur ry, that we give to the bookseller who has his whole town to suppl y. A n y school board, any school official , any teacher will fi nd it not only to h is conven ience, but to his profi t, to treat with us because we are not o n l y a t t he school book center (N c w York ), but are ou rselves the school book head­ q1ta rters, thus ensuring the t wo great desiderata, discounts and despatch, not to mention the crecli t-a1 lowance on old books consigi1ed to us for exchang..... .

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T h e n , aga i n , we o u rsel ves p u b l i s h o n e h u n d red a n cl t we n t y-fi ve T r a n s l a l i o n s ( t h e L at i n , t h e G reek, G e r m a n , a n d F r e n c h c l ass i c w r i t e rs ) , a n d a d ozen-and-a- h a l f D i c t i on ar ies o f t h e a n c i e n t and modern l a n g u ages, so t h at we h a ve come lo be c o n s i d e red t h e. one s u re c l e a r i n g - h ouse

for a n y t ran s l a t i o n or d ict i o n a ry.

We a lso publ i s h q ue s t i o n - a n d-answer

books, c i v i l-se r v i ce gu i des, speakers, c l ass records, a n d ot h e r spec i a l t ies for teac h e rs, besides t h e t h ree- h u n d red-odd v o l u m es of the U n i ve r s i t y Tutorial Series w h i c h com p r i ses t ex t-books ( w i t h t h e 1mir;11e Tea c h e r s ' Ed i t i ons, separate ) cover i ng t h orough l y G reek, L a t i n, F re n c h , T h ese t h e s c i e n ces, m a t he m a t i cs, m ec h a n i cs, h i story, et h i cs, l og i c, e t c . , e t c. T u L o r i al tex t-books· are designed for s i n cere and t h orough work, and a re t h e prod u c t i o n of English,

s i n ce re men w h ose exd11si11c blfsi11ess h as been and is t o fi t s t u d e n ts fo r t h e severe lests of t h e L o n d o n U n i ve r s i ty. The in ten l i on of t h e pu b l i sh e rs is lo fill the bill, not to r i va l o t h e r Yet m a n y com peten t i n st ru c t o rs t e l l u s t h a t l h e T u t o r i a l books d o s u r pass a l l s e r i es. Complete listjn:e 011 applicatio11. t h e rs, b o t h ed i l o r i a l l y a n d t y pogra p h i ca l l y .

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To a n y o n e m e n t i on i n g t h is ad v e r t i sem e n t we w i l l send fret o u r new and om p l e te nlfhnlh'licrrlly Th i s C a t a l og u e q u otes o u 1 m a i l i ng prices fo r arranged Catal o g u e of t h e school boo k s of all lhi· pu/ilis/1t'rs. l Jo t h n e w a n d J t'u111d-/ta 111/ boo k s , a n d is freq u e n t l y descri bed by e n t h usias t i c custo m e rs as a t r asu re in i tself C o r respon de n ts w h o des i re to sdl schoo l boo k s t o u s , s h o u l d also l le..:ause so com pac t wh i l e so c o m p l ete. N o 1.. h a rge fo r c a t a l ogues f o r y o u rself o r fo r a n y as k for " Hooks \\'an t ed " w h i c h i s our /111yi11A' Catalogue. of y o u r f r i e n d s u pon w h o m y o u m a y wish to confer t h e favor. S e n d us t h e address - - we w i l l do t h e res t.

HINDS & NOBLE

4 Cooper Institute

NEW YORK CITY

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September 23. Term begins. September 24. Fir t Chapel. Co-ords take up two more Freshman seats. Mary Anna Sawtelle joins the Faculty. Prof. Wm. Mathews, '35, speaks. September 25. Y. �I. C. A and '\"_ W. C. A . Reception at Memorial Hall.

@/§J/�),@,@,@/§),@,@,@,@/#J,@,

l@@@@@@@@@@@@@ Lea rned & Brown

T. J. FROTHINGHAM. Proprietor

PLUMBERS AND STEAM AND HOT WATER FITTERS

6lobc ... •

.

STEAM

Laundry �

D E A L E R S I N A L L Kl N O S 0 F

26, 28, 30 and 32 TEMPLE STREET

flumbing and Steam Fitters' Supplies

PORTLAND, ME.

A g e n t s f o r E l e c t r i c H eat R eg u l at o r

27

M A I N S T R E ET , W aterv i l l e , M e .

W. B. Chase, Agent for Colby University

XXII

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'1he unclergracluate or the new-fleclgecl alumnus who reads this w as i n

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t h e primary school when w e fi rst conceived the idea, years ago, that the sclzoolbooks l y i ng discarded and d usty o n everybod y's shelves, or unfor­ gotten in closets and garrets, ough t to be rescued from premature obl ivion, .a n d made to continue their usefulness i n this already too expensive world - prolonging their own l ife, and at the same time saving dimes and dollars t o many a needy student. To-day every student and every teacher knows, and we want every parent to learn, tha� no schoolbook should be t h rown away u ntil we h ave been given a chance to appraise it. E veryone knows, too, that we can suppl y promptly, and at N e w York prices, any school book of any" publ isher - probabl y second-hand if desired ; surely new if we happen to be out of second-hand. M ore than that, we stand the postage or el se we prepay the expressage. S w iftness, courtesy, and fair prices make up our golden rul�, and we bestow the same careful considera­ tion upon the boy or girl in the remote hamlet who wants one book i n a h ur ry, that we give to the bookseller who has his whole town to supply. Any school board, any school official, any teacher w i l l fi nd it not only to h is con venience, but to his profit, to t reat with us because we are not o n l y a t the schoolbook center ( Ne w York ), but are ou rselves the schoolbook head­ qua rters, thus ensuring the t wo great desiderata, discoun ts and despatch, not to mention the credit-allowance o n old books consigned to us for exchange. T h e n , agai n , w e o u rsel ves p u b l i s h o n e h u n d red a n d t wen t y - fi v e Tra n s l a t i o n s ( t h e Lat i n , t b e G reek, G e r m a n, a n d F r e n c h cl assi c w r i ters ) , a n d a d ozen-and-a- h a l f D i ct i o n a r i es of t h e a n c i e n t a n d modem l a n gu ages, so t h at we h a ve come to be cons i dered t h e. o n e sure We a lso publ i s h q uest i on -and-answer c l ea r i n g- h ouse for any t r a n sl a t i o n or d i ct io n ary. books, c i v i l-se r v i ce gu i des, speakers, cl ass records, a n d o t h e r spe c i a l t ies for teachers, besides t he t h ree- h u n d red-odd v o l u m e s of the U n i ve r s i t y Tutorial Series w h i c h com p r i ses text-books ( w i t h t h e 1tuiq11e Teachers' Ed i t i ons, separat e ) cove r i n g t h orough ly G reek, Lat i n , F re n c h , Engl i s h , t h e s c i e n ces, m a t h e m a t i cs, m e c h an i cs, h istory, e t h i cs, l og i c, e t c . , e t c. T h ese T u t o r i a l t e x t-books are designed for s i n cere and t h orough work, and are t h e prod u c t i o n of s i n ce re men w h ose exc/11sin b1ts£11ess has been and is to fit stude n ts for t h e severe tests of t h e L o n d o n U n i ve rs i t y . T h e i n ten t i on of t h e publ i s h e rs is to Jill tlze bill, n o t to r i va l o t h e r

Y e t m a n y com pete n t i n st ructors tell u s t h at the T u t o r i a l books d o surpass a l l se r ies. Complete list free 011 aj>plicatioll. o t hers, b o t h ed i t o r i a l l y a n d t ypograph i ca l l y .

To a n y o n e m e n t i o n i n g t h is advertisement we w i l l send fra o u r new and c o m p lete nlflta/lt'licafly T h is Catalogue q u otes o u t m a i l i n g p rices fo r arranged C a talog u e of t h e schoo l boo k s (If all the p11blishas. both n e w and seco11d-h1111d boo k s , a n d is freq u e n t l y described by enth u s i a s t i c c us t o m e rs as a treasu re in i tself Correspo n de n ts who desi re lo sdl sch oolbooks t o u s , s h o u l d also because so compact w h i l e so c o m p l ete. l'\ o chargt: for catalog ues for y o u rse l f o r for any ask for " Hooks \\' an ted " wh ich is our !111yi11,I( Catalog ue . of your f r iends upon whom y o u m a y w is h to confer t h e fa vor. Send us t h e acldrnss - - we will do t h e rest.

HINDS & NOBLE

4 Cooper Institute

NEW YORK CITY

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Oct. 3. M �ss Vi gue entertains a number of '97 people. Oct. 6. ::\llss Sullivan celebrates her b irthday and enterta i ns the girls of '98. Oct. 7. g���� �i: ��i;fi�id�· at Boston. Great rejoicing. Adjourn to ncle Tom's

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S I MO N S B RO . & GO . 6 1 6 C H E S T N U T S T R E ET F H I LA D E L F H IA, FA .

. . . Manufacturing Jewelers and Silversmiths

frat¢rnitp J¢W¢lrp

=

=

College and Class Pins, Prizes, Badges, Medals, Etc.

A FEW SUGGESTIONS,---� Fraternity Fraternity Fraternity Fraternity Fraternity Fraternity

Badges Scarf Pins Rings Lockets ouvenir Spoons ouvenir Mu tache Combs

Fraternity Souvenir Garters Fraternity Souvenir Stamp Boxes Fraternity Souvenir Bookmarks Fraternity Lapel Buttons Fraternity Sleeve Buttons Fraternity Charms

Fraternity Fob Chains Fraternity Souvenir Court Plaster Cases Fraternity Souvenir Belts Fraternity Souvenir Match Boxes Fraternity Souvenir Scent Boxes Fraternity Souvenir Watches

$ A lVC P � E S S E f'i T FOR I N, S PE CTIOf'l TO ANY C f{ A PT E � � x ry


Oct. 8. Oct. 10. Oct. 1 2. �c t. 14.

Day of Prayer for Young Women, observed by class prayer meetings in the Women's College.

���b��fj�-n� · C. o, at Orono. Fireworks and a big reception for the boys at

Delta Upsilon initiates. Doc Adams goes to Brown. Colby 28, N. H. C on the cam;>Us. o,

T0 BE RICH

----�

is the a mbition of most you n g m e n . Sol id, substantial assista n ce i n that di rection is rendered by a

. . . 2o�V E A R E N DO W M E N T PO L I CY . . .

The an n ual paym e n t o f 5 per c e n t. of the pri ncipal for 20 years pu rchases moo, d u e at the ex p i rati o n of that t im e, with d ividends, and gives i n su ra nce p rotection all the while i n a reliabl e M a i n e i nstit u tion, managed by well- k n o w n Maine me n . n A I N E I N V EST M ENTS

U n i o n Mutual Life I n su ra nce C o m p a n y

H AVE P R E F E R. E N C E . . .

PO RT LAN D , rtAI N E

I ncorporated 1 84 8

Ask for free bi-monthly paper A l o, booklet, " What Maine Says."

DI\. G.

W.

FRED. E. RICHA RDS,

I-{UTCiiINS

F.

WATERVI LLE, M AINE

·

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O FF I C E H OU RS ,

·

·

·

.

J. GOO DR I DGE

�oofactoring �Jeweler

D E N TA L O F F I C E �� ·

Presiden t

AND DEALER IN

.

Watches, C locks, Jewe l ry and S i lve rware

M AIN STREET

104 M A I N S T R E ET WATE R

9 to 1 2 and 1 to 5 xxv

I LL E , l\I E.


October 15. :\li s Sawtelle peaks iu the Chapel ou "A Winter Abroad." October 16. Zeta P i initiate . :\!rs. Taylor lectures at Ladies' Hall on " Matthew Critic aud Poet." October 17. Arnold, Bates 4, l\L . C. 4 . Reception given by the La<lies of the Faculty lo Miss awtelle and the members of the Women's College. Prexy suffers from an ocdpital contusion induced by violent aud uupremed1tated contact with an overhanging staircase. r;::: � � �� � �����������������������---+� H'te:r-::;;,..; -

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B o a rd i n g

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B e s t I ce C re a m

Sta b l e

i n t h e C i ty

2 9 F ro n t S treet W�TE

VILLE,

C I TY

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MAINE

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COO L S O D A

GO TO

DA R RA H 'S

B A N Q U ETS

G re at B a z a a r

GOTTEN U P AT SHORT NOTIC E A N D SATIS­ F A CTION G U A R A N T E E D

'TO B U Y

(!rocl\ery a11d �lassware

M e a l s a t A l l H o u rs

C H EH P

ALSO

W . M . W I LS H I R E

C A RTS, D O LL C A R R I AGES, B I R D CAGES, BASKETS, D O L L S, DRUJ'.11 :3 AND FA. CY GOODS PRE

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T

GI

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AWAY

W I T H T E A A N O C O FF E E

Proprietor

WATERVI LLE, ME.

1 6 4 M a i n S treet, W A T E RVI L L E, M E . XXVI


October 20 . October 21. October 22.

Miss Bessey receives. Bowdoin 1 2, Colby o, at Brunswick. Coach Marsha 1 1 loses his reputation !\Iarshall leaves town. Bates and Brooks to coach the tea m .

� ---

----

W. B. A R NOLD

W.

-

B. ARNOLD

--�

CO.

0 . G . SPRINGFIELD

&

MARDWARE ......

Manufacturer of

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N A I L S,

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A N D S TEE L, C A R R I A G E WO ODWO R K ,

TICON IC

O I LS, M I LL S U P P L I ES, B L ACK POW D ER A :-.l D H IGH E X P L O S I V ES

Doors, Sash and G lazed W i nd o w s

F I T GUARANT E E D

S T E A M A N I) W A T E R F I TT E R S

I

WATE R V I LLE, M A I N E

F.

A. LOVEJOY Dealers i n

Wate hes,

&

CO.

W ATER ILLE, M A I N E

D E N TA L O FF I C E...

Jewelrry, S i h te rrw a tre O p t i e a l Goods

1 70 Main Street, WATE R V I LLE, M A I N E

3 r Main Street

S H I RTS

DR. H. E. SHEMPP

C loe ks

a nd

----­

CUSTO M

STO V E S A N D FURNACES, G L A.SS, PA I NTS A N D

T I N .S M I T H S,

COLBY GETC HELL

No. 84 Main Street X XVII

WATERVILLE , MAINE


October 23. A K E, <I> A 0, and A T n initiate . Miss Meserve entertain5 r1 �� �f ���ri :�!��r�����:1���; · F Ayer. . October 24. a r e:: e g���g�� �: ����� 1:ie i�fji� <;���I " Vote to secure Hopkins of Brown as coach. . October 31. Colbyc 4, III. S . C. so, on tbe f campus. Hallow E'en. A Junior Reception at 1,adies' Hall, with a witch o prehi toric date. �

FINE

R OW B O AT S

� L EW I S B� . B O W D E N

SPECIAL

S P E C I A L RATES G I VEN TO PARTI ES

A TT E N T I O N COLBY

'r H O JV\ P S O N & W E ST

C. A. H EN DRI CKSON

J. P E A V Y c£ B ROS.

DEALER I N

3 1 MAIN STREET, WATE RV I LLE, M A I N E

M ISCELLANEO s , SCHOOL A N D COLLEGE TEXT

Hooks

� ONE-PRICE

(l0tqiers and ftatters

PAPER HANGI NGS, W I N D O W S H AD ES

ON E-PRICE

A N D CORNICE PO LES H E AVY AND LIGHT DRAPERIES

P I CT

R E FRA 1ES A

TO

4 H A L L ' S COU R T

W A T E RVI L L E , M E.

CORNICE

GIVEN

BOYS

D FANCY ARTIC LES XXVIII

(10tqie�s and purnisqefs


r.

Nov. Nov. 2. Nov. 3. Nov. 4. Nov. 6. �

Day of Prayer for Student Volunteer Movement. Election Debate in the Chapel. Mayor Webb presides. Bryan wins. kins arri\•es on crutches. Election Day. Cut all day. President and Mrs. Butler receive. Colby 8, Bates ou the campus. Iconoclast absent. Sigma Kappa initiates.

Hop-

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Wardwell Brothers

Cl\ITLLT0n

T. r.

W I L L S A V E Y OU M O N E Y O N

DRESS GOODS BILLIARD AND POOL ROOM

JACKETS

CONNECTED

GLOVES U N D E RWEAR, ETC. D.

P.

FOST E R

J:t L D E N

F i re , L i fe a n d A cc i d e n t I n s u ra n ce A ge n cy LP.a d i o g Howe and F o r e i g n C o m p a n i e s Represented

94 M A I N

S T R E ET

B R0S.

Wa tches, Clocks, Je welry, Silverware, Optical Goods, Etc.

WAT E R V I L L E , M E .

98

L. T. B O O THB Y & SON

Special Attention Given to Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing and Engraving

M A I N ST R E E T,

W AT E R V I L L E

C . K. M AT H E W S

I n s u ra n ce Age n t

R E S I D E N T A G E N TS

LEA D I N G AMERICAN A N D F OREIGN

Fire Ins uran ce Companies RAI LROAD TICKETS

LI FE, F I R E AND ACC I D ENT

T O A L L P O I NTS W E ST A N D S O U T H

74 M A I N ST.

Jlogers' Block, Main S treet, W aterville, Maine

xp.rx

WAT E R V I L L E , M E .


Nov. 7. Nov. 9. Nov NOY. Jr. Nov. 13.

Freshman cider on the campus. Excelleut stuff. Kappa Alpha initiates. Santa gives his X-Ray Lecture at the Baptist Church. Colby 6. Bowdoin 6. on the campus. Measles! Everybody goes to the Congo Sociable.

10.

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W

G lobe Printing House

E

treat Printing a s a � Art.

O u r e n d eavo r is t o p ro d uce novel an d str i k i n g

effects hy combi n i n g t h e fi n est ty pe speci m e n s ,

or artists'

designs, w i t h t h e

latest materials fur n i s h e d b y t h e l e ad i n g paper man u factu rers of t h e world. BOO K S \\

E

P E C I A L TY

IAKE

A

C O LL E G E

F

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COM T ER C I A L P R I N T I N G IN R E FI N E D A N D A RT I S T I C F O R M S

all

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Eow A R D STERN & Co. L CO R PO R ATED

ORTH TWELFTH STREET

xxx


Nov. 14. Nov. 20. Nov. 21. Nov. 25. Nov. 26.

22, de Chava1t 1us.

Bowdoin Bates o. Charles H. Pepper lectures at Ladies' Hall on Puvis Freshman Reception at Miss Gallert's. Big Scrap. Several black eyes. Coburn 6, Hebron 4, on the campus. Thanksgiving recess begins. Thanksgiving Day. Those members of the Men's College who stay in town, dine at Ladies' Hall. �-

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W E W I L L M A KE

Peffi E R l1 EAf f s

Full Custom Suits

H A I R==B R ESSI N G �A R l1 0 R S

T H IS SEASON FOR

8 5 M A I N ST. Special attention given t o Colby Boys If you are troubled with Dan­ druff, don ' t fail to try Pomer­ leau' s Dandruff Cure, which

G R A D U AT I O N S U I T S

never fails.

A S P E C I A LTY

N ot a has-been , nor a

G ive U s a C all Before B u y i n g

SAM .

would-be-but al ways

M ITCH E LL & co.

u p -to-date

A.

U N IVERSAL STEAM

C U STOM TAI L O RS

LA U N DRY

COR. CONGRESS AND PEARL STS.

1 3 1 M A I N ST REET

PORTLAND

O ver M rs. S. E . Percivall's XXXI


2 • Nov. 30. NO\·. 31.

Nov.

The " remnant " of 198 spends the evening at Ladies' Hall. Recess ends. Concert by the Unity Concert Co. at the Baptist Church. Miss Effie K. Price, General International Secretary of the Y. W. C. A.., ,;sits Ladies' Hall, speaks there in the afternoon, and 111 tbe evening at the Chapel.

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F. A. H A R R I MA N

J"NIES

Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry Clocks, Silverware

·

�OBl�SO�

M a n u facturers ,

snucr Roucltics

J obbers

Retail ers of F i n e Clothing.

Colby Banner Pins and Link Cuff Buttons

Leaders

F i n e Furnishi n gs .

so� and

Ready M ade on

M en ' s

Age n ts fo r

t h e celebrated S terl ing Goods, i n ­ cl uding S W EAT E R S and un­

fin� R�pairing a Sp�cial tp

derw ear of all kinds . Also age n ts for Ypsilanti and J aros Un der ­

You will find the Largest Stock. of

wear a n d

Optical Goods AT

"

C u sto m Ta i l o rs

DEALE R I i

N EW H AV E N B I CYC L E S

F . A. H A R RIM A N 'S

Students will be allowed a Special Discount All Goods Guaranteed as Represented, or Money Refunded

Glasses Fitted by a Graduate Optician

CHAS. H. PULSIFER, Manager

5 2 M ai n St . , W aterville, M e .

38 MAIN STREET

XXXIl

3 SILVER STREET

}

Waterville, Me.


Dec. 1. Dec. 4. Dec. 5.

�·

Preside at·s monthly reception. Chap and Lotta star at the Unitarian. Peck's Bad Boy a t City Baro. '99 Reception at Dr. Spencer·s. Alden nominated for President o f the Athletic A ociatiou.

��

� � � � � � � � �

���

� �

� ��

��

G U TS i

With your other cuts don't forget to have your Suits �"""" """"�"" """02!? """" ""�""""' ""' .Ill/!! ��:zti� -�� '03=-8� ;-z?'O;f!i�� cut over by

" Ta i l o r E d . "

Orders taken fo r

Ladies' Jackets cut over and re-fitted by

Edmund W. Foster P.

BOOTS

S. A.

GARCELON

Banjo? Mandolin and Guitar Permanent Address

WILL BE AT

SHOES . . . . .

. . . . . FOR MEN

ND

BOY S

WATE RV I L L E 1 MA I N E

Expert Professional Teacher o f the

57 D R€::1 M M O N D

AND

Custom Clothing

f' E R H A M S . H E A L B I 0 8 M A I N SIREEI

5 SIL VER STREET

GEORGE

Ready-Made Clothin g Hats, Caps and - - Gents' Furnishin gs

SIREEI

&

A . B . GI\EEN DEAL ERS

ANT BRACITE AND B ITUMINOUS . . . .

A.LSO

Al:f B l:f R N 1 MA I N E

I

G 0 A ll

Hard and Soft Wood and Kindlings

• • • •

T h e celebrated Philadelphia an d Reading Hard White Ash

Elmwood Hotel, Waterville, Fridays and Saturdays I n struments, I n struction Books, Strings, Latest M usic, E tc . , For Sale

Coal a specialty. O FFI C E AND YARD

PRESS NOTICE.-At the recital last evening Prof. Garcelon's pupi ls showed proficiency and i n telligent mastery o f their instruments, and the uew Eldorado C lub, u u de r his direction, made their successful debut.­

2 5 1 M ai n St.

Lewis/011 Evening Journal.

X X XIII

.

DOWN-TOWN O F FI C E

COR N E R MARKET

W H E E LE R B R O S . ' F R U I T STO R E

v' A T E RV I L L E ,

ME.


Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec.

7. Lecture by Fra n k W. Smith at the Church. 8. Broc_>ks r i;-elected captain of the footba l l team for the third year. 9. Cosme gt\·es an A rt Lecture in the Chapel. 11. Co-ords receive Zeta Psi at Ladies' H a l l . 1 2. Colby Debating Club formed. Herrick President.

- -�

Boot�, �hoe� and �ubber� A T LO W EST P R I C E S

.s.W\<?_��ll�i'Al�� �

A New Line of S P R I N G G O O DS just in

rcocoIL �ocon

R E PAI R I NG Neatly and Promptly Done

S. A. ESTES PLAISTED BLOCK

52 Main Street

�o [Q)o

Waterville, Maine

J(Q)lHlJM§\Q)JNI o o o o

© f f ll � �

lllNI

ID ICINJll�� 1

@ � !Mi � l l

� l © � OC

� � M� �!Nl �u���u I

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Philadelphia

1

We have our own Photo-

graph Gallery for H a l f Tone and Photo Engravings.

FASHIONABLE ENO RAVINO AND Sr ATIONERJ

VJ!! �ll�Jl WillL!L�p M�.

OFFICE HOORS : FROM 8 T O 1 2, FROM

� Chest��:'street LEA D I N G H O U S E F O R

C O LLEGE, S C H O O L A N D W E D D I N G I N V ITA T I O N S , D A N C E PROG ll A M S

TO 6

M E N U S A N D F I N E t: N G R A V I N G O F A LL K I N D S

Pure Nitrou Oxide and Ether constantly on band. Particular attention given t o all forms of Operative Dentistry. Go�d Fillings a pecialty-inserted in a most artistic mann.,r, and as free from pain as is consistent with thoroughness and durability.

X X X IV

BEFORE ORDERING ELSEWHERE CoMPARE SAMPLES AND PR1cer


Dec. 18. Dec. 19. Dec. 2 1 . Dec. 22.

Exams begiu. Senior Exhibition with Junior Parts. Julia May, the " Poetess of Maine," gives readings at Ladies' Hall. Jessie Conthoni Concert at the Church. Term ends. Colby Glee Club, Jr., goes to Getchell's Corner.

C.

BROWN & MERRICK

L ive ry S t a b l e

Electrical Engineers and Contractors •

ALSO

.

Saddle H o rses To Let

Bicycle Work a Specialty

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO COLBY STUDENTS

LIGHT MACHIN E WORK A N D JOBBING ELECTRICAL SUP P L I ES O F ALL K I NDS

In

Rear

of

S t e a m Dye

Hou

e

WATE R V I L L E , M E .

1 88 MAIN STREET

DAV I ES

THE BEST PLACE FOR CLUBS TO GET THEIR SU? PLIES I S AT . . . .

W I T H A 1V1

PAINTS CARRIAG ES AN D SLEI G H S ALSO MAKES SIGNS ( THO' H L 1 5 NOT DLAi AN D DUi'"I B ) •..•

MT....

1 4 �N D 1 6 1\\ECH:lThl IC

B E SURE A N D GET HIS P R ICES xx xv

SQU�RE:


�;:

Jan �,ary

1897

BALANCE

�: �;rGlr���ir�s�ntertained by Miss Vose at ber home.

Spread given by Miss Tracy at M artha's Vineyard. 12. President Gates, of Amherst, lectures in the Y. M. C. A. Course. i3. President Gates speaks in Chapel. Corse elected Manager of '97 Football Team. Richardson, '98, and Miss Sullivan set upon their engagement. Miss Nye and Miss Holmes give a unique Entertainment to the girls of '97. 1:;. Special Initiation of A T. il. 16. Miss Sawtelle entertains the '97 Girls. . Black Crook in town. First Debate of the Debating Club. Misses Smith, J\!arvell and Walker entertain at the Palmer House. i9. Everybody goes to Congo Sociable. Baseball Practice begins in the Gym. 20. Le ercle Fran�ais founded. Members : Louise M. Benson, Ethelyn M. Brackett, Susie A. Hall, Grace B. Holden, ella M. Merrick. 22. Miss Louise H. Coburn lectures at Ladies' Hall on Egypt. f t i 23 M is e · �vi�h 1o��n�� !�1tJ 'B�;�: Fc:;1�h� f���r :/��ea;'�e�t��"'se���� e s B 2<;. 2\1is;vE�� :i�� ����!��Ya���- �_ c;:�r��t the Church. 28. Day of Prayer for Colleges. Feb�u �ry ;: ��s�!� '1���s M°:s���·t\s:���::i�!!�s Macbeth in the Chapel. t 1, 2 and 3. Deputation Meeting of the Y. \'V. C. A. at Bates. Thir­ teen Colby girls attend. 8. Last lecture in the Y. M. C. A. Course by Rev. Charles E. Luck, of Fall River. 9. Arbitration Debate. Woodman and Gurney win over Wellman and Harthorne. 10. Beta Phi initiates. Pierce gives Bachelor Supper to the Zetes at Wilshire's. 1 2. Eli Perkins lectures for tbe benefit <?) of the Echo. Board of Trustees adopt a course without Greek, leading to the degree of Ph.B. 13. Kappa Alpha holds a special initiation. Valentine Party gh·en by the women of 1900 to the men of their class. Geology Class goes to Dr. Bayley's to tea. 1 5. Kappa Alpha gives a Valentine Party in honor of her new members. 18. '98 sets up for at Wilshire's. Freshmen play horse with Eels. 19. Art Exhibit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Ayer for the benefit of the '97 girls. Ruth Ashmore receives at J\liss Benson's. 22. \Vashington's Birthday. Cut. Celebrated by Senior Girls in o n 23. A fa�;::� fe,�1f..?t�1 7�fr1���panions go to China with Corson as pilot and bring up at North Vassalboro'. 9.

'97

I

100

ANNA LES

OF

�;:

February 24. Miss Sawtelle lectures before the Current Events Club of Augusta. Afternoon Tea given at Ladies' Hall for the ben­ efit oftbe Armenians. This 1s the day of the "Blessed Eight." 25. The Principal of Higgins' Classical Institute spends the even­ ing at Ladies' Hall. 26. Musical in the parlors at Ladies' Hall. Later, another in Eldia. 27. Grand Concert in Eldia, given by Jessie Contboni Concert Company, Jr. 28. Mrs �· · G. Clark, of Portland, gives Bible Readings at Ladies' H iE Temperance Republicans turn down Goodridge and elect DemMarch ocratic Mayor. Gre::at exciteme11t. 4. Inauguration Day. 5. Athletic Exhibition and Indoor Meet, i900, 54 ; '98, 27 ; '99, 14 ; '97, 4. e in �: ����r�;!k 36'c �bi� ����e B���i�i°ciiu:��·g����b�· the Colby Y. W. C. A. Catalogue for '<1'>·'97 appears. 12. Exams begin. 1 5. Exams end. 1 7. Term ends (in the catalog). Spring Term begins. Mass Meeting at City Barn in interest of April Women·s Dormitory. 2. Girls of '99 give girls of '97 a " sugaring-off." " Sweets to the Sweet." 6. Glee Club gives concert at City Barn. 9. Glee Club sing at Portland Alumni Dinner. Miss Brann and Miss Mathews entertain the '97 girls in honor of Miss Minnie Corson, a former member of the class. The girls of '99 spend the evening at Miss Alice Purinton's. i5. Chess Tournament begins at Brunswick. Colb,· 4, Bowdoin 2. Mis� Sawtelle speaks in the Chapel on " Paris and the Student." The girls in the Senior 16. Colby 6, Bowdoin 4, unfinished. the Coburn classes of the \Vaterville High School and Classical Institute are received by the members of the Women's College at Ladies' Hall. 1 7 . Colby wins Tournament. Colby 10� . Bowdoin 7�. 2 r . Ladies' :\1andotin, Guitar and Banjo Club formed. Mandolins, Alice M. Purinton, Lois A. Meserve. Guitars, Josephine T. Ward, Edna F. Dascombe. Banjo, Maud L. Hoxie. Banjeaurine, Annie H. Pepper. \Vomen of tbe college vote to have two boats for training crews. One of Senior girls goes to Bangor to spend Fast Day. 22. Fast Day. Cut. Colby23, M. C. I., 2. 24. Play begins on the tennis courts. 27. Rev. W. H. Clark, of Charleston, gives illustrated lecture in the Chapel on 1he Tabernacle. Desmond wild as a hawk. 28. C. C. I. 17, Colbv 29. Sousa at City Barn. Cut in the afternoon. " And the band played on:"

XXXVI

r.

r.

IO.

2

I I.


The Colby Oracle 1897  

Colby College’s yearbook for the Class of 1897. (Alternate titles: The Oracle; Colby Oracle; Colby Yearbook.)